Aug 08, 2022  
2017-2018 
    
2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Chemical Process Industries

  
  •  

    CPI 270 - Advanced Process Operations Lab

    Credits: 2
    Provides practical application of the skills required of an entry level chemical operator, including following Standard Operating Procedures, new process commissioning, equipment troubleshooting, preventative maintenance, Lock Out / Tag Out and Environmental, Health and Safety Compliance.

    Prerequisite(s): CPI 230 , CPI 240W , CPI 250W   with a minimum grade of "C" or better.
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment with CPI 260W  is recommended
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Commission a new chemical process for start up.
      1. Participate in project planning
      2. Develop and produce basic engineering diagrams, including PFD, P&ID and other process documentation.
      3. Perform risk analysis.
      4. Perform site audits, including those for safety and process performance.
      5. Write and produce standard operating procedures, supported by visual aids and training materials.
    2. Operate chemical process equipment.
      1. Operate a simulated pilot plant in the process simulator.
      2. Maintain operating variables during simulated runs.
      3. Make, test and implement continuous improvement suggestions under guidance of faculty and student assistants.
    3. Perform quality assurance of chemical process.
      1. Write quality control plan for proposed process.
      2. Take samples and run sample analytical tests on process and service fluids.
      3. Initiate and participate in a team-based problem solving exercise.
    4. Conduct troubleshooting/maintenance of chemical process.
      1. Troubleshoot basic process equipment, including valves, pumps, heat exchangers and filters.
      2. Perform both single block and double bock Lock Out / Tag Outs, including the purging and preparation of equipment for maintenance.
      3. Write a preventive maintenance plan for one piece of equipment utilized in the student's pilot process.
  
  •  

    CPI 290-299 - Special Projects in Chemical Process Industries Courses

    Credits: 1-4
    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Chemical Technology

  
  •  

    CT 290-299 - Special Projects in Chemical Technology


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Chemistry

  
  •  

    CHM 100W - World of Chemistry

    Credits: 4


    Develops student understanding of fundamental concepts and methods used in chemistry. Includes topics of the composition, reactivity, arrangement and classification of matter, bonding, nomenclature, rates of reaction, and intermolecular forces. Investigates the context of food, environment, materials, energy, sustainability, and social implications of chemistry. This course is applicable as a lecture and laboratory credit for non-majors to satisfy a science requirement in certain curricula. Not appropriate for chemistry majors.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2, WRITING LEVEL 2, MATH LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science Lab
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1:     Demonstrate and understanding of fundamental chemical vocabulary and classify matter into categories based on an understanding of
            chemical and 
    physical properties.

         A.          Classify matter by physical state

         B.          State the shape and volume characteristics of the three physical states

                      1.    Classify common samples of matter according to physical state

                      2.    Identify the processes by which matter changes physical state

                      3.    Classify materials by physical state at a given temperature through use of reference data

         C.         Recognize the application of the scientific method

         D.         Based on experimental data, differentiate between elements and compounds

         E.         Classify common substances as a mixture or a pure substance

                      1.    For a pure substance classify as an element or compound

                      2.    For a mixture classify as homogeneous or heterogeneous

         F.          Distinguish between physical and chemical properties and classify examples

         G.         Differentiate between metals and nonmetals

                      1.    Recognize the placement of metals and nonmetals on the Periodic Table

                      2.    Give typical physical properties of each

                      3.    Use properties to classify materials as metal or nonmetal

         H.         Differentiate between the symbol for an element and a compound

         I.           Use Avogadro’s Number to convert between number of molecules, formula units, ions,  atomic mass

         J.          Perform calculations using scientific notation

         K.          Use a reference source on properties of substances to classify a sample substance

    2.    Explain the importance of units in measurements and perform relevant calculations

         A.          Learn metric base units: gram, liter, meter

         B.          Recognize the difference between mass and weight

         C.          Learn metric prefixes: kilo, centi, milli, micro

         D.          Convert between metric units

         E.          Convert temperatures between Fahrenheit and Celsius

         F.           Interpret data from graphs, charts, and tables

         G.          Distinguish between measured numbers and exact numbers

         H.          Convert measurements between English and metric units

         I.            Calculate density from mass and volume

         J.           Experimentally determine the volume of a solid both by direct and indirect methods

         K.          Given the parts of one component in a given amount of the total, calculate the per cent of that component

         L.          Express and convert between per cent  and decimal values

         M.         Learn rules for rounding

      Outcome 3:    Demonstrate the relationship between energy changes and changes of state as well as perform appropriate calculations.

         A.          Apply the Law of Conservation of Energy

         B.          Discuss energy transformation between chemical, mechanical, electrical

         C.          Convert between units of energy: calorie, Calorie, and Joule

         D.          Use specific heat, temperature and mass in calculations

         E.           Differentiate between endothermic and exothermic reactions.

     4.   Describe the structure of the atom and formation of ions.

         A.          Distinguish between elements, compounds, and mixtures in terms of their atomic makeup

         B.          State the names, symbols, charges and relative mass for the three subatomic particles

         C.          Given the atomic number, state the number of protons and electrons in an atom and use the Periodic Table to identify the element

         D.          Describe how anions and cations are formed

         E.          Given the number of protons, neutrons and electrons in an ion, write the correct symbol for the ion, including the mass number, atomic
                       number and charge

         F.          Using the Periodic Table, identify the following: group, period, metalloid, alkali metal, alkaline  earth metal, halogen, noble gas, inert gas

         G.         Describe the trend of nonmetallic or metallic character among elements

         H.         List the elements that exist as diatomic molecules

         I.           Observe physical properties of some elements and compounds

         J.          Use reference data to report physical properties of some elements and compounds.

     5.     Describe the configuration of electrons within an atom and the resultant availability for chemical reaction.

         A.          Recognize significance of electrons in chemical reactions

         B.          Recognize the relationship between minimum energy and maximum stability

         C.          Describe the nature of attraction and repulsion between subatomic particles

         D.          Deribe the relationship between the ground state, excited state, and energy being absorbed and released.

         E.          Recognize that the light spectrum emitted from an excited atom is unique for a given element

         F.           Use the Periodic Table to identify the number of valence electrons for any main group element

         G.          Write the Lewis dot structure for any element given the number of valence electrons.

         H.          Use trends from the Periodic table to make predictions about properties.

         I.            Observe flame tests on several metallic ions and relate to excited state vs. ground state.

         J.           Recognize the transition metals on the Periodic Table

     6.    Describe the role of electrons in chemical bonds and general properties of ionic and molecular compounds.

         A.           Differentiate between ionic and molecular compounds

         B.           Observe and categorize physical properties of ionic and molecular compounds.

         C.           Describe the octet rule and how both ionic or covalent bonding can follow this rule

         D.           Recognize the duet rule that applies only to hydrogen

         E.           Determine the number of electrons a metal atom will lose to become a cation

         F.            Determine the number of electrons a nonmetal atom will gain to become an anion

         G.           Using the Periodic Table, predict the charge on an ion

         H.           Write formulas for ionic compounds given the charges on the ions

         I.             Distinguish between a monatomic ion and polyatomic ion

         J.            Recognize the formulas for common polyatomic ions.

         K.           Distinguish between single, double and triple covalent bonds and bond strength

         L.           Write the Lewis electron dot structures for molecular compounds

         M.          Write the Lewis electron dot structures for polyatomic ions

         N.           Describe the trends in electronegativity across a period and down a group

         O.           Differentiate between ionic, polar and nonpolar bonds based on electronegativity.

         P.            Use symbolism to indicate the dipole in a polar covalent bond.

         Q.           Recognize the shape of a compound based on its Lewis structure and 3-dimensional arrangement.

         R.            Determine the relative polarity of a compound based the polarity of its bonds, its Lewis structure and its shape

         S.            Determine if a compound will be water soluble or not based on its polarity

         T.            Predict the physical property differences between polar and non-polar compounds in terms of attractive forces between molecules

         U.           Compare the properties of ionic and molecular compounds

         V.            Predict the weight ratio of elements in a compound from the combining ratio of atoms or ions in the compound.

     7.    Constrict a formula from the name of a compound, and generate a name from a chemical formula.

         A.          Name metal ions using both the Stock and Latin root method

         B.          Name monatomic anions

         C.           Recognize acids

         D.           Associate name and formula for binary molecular compounds

         E.           Recognize the chemical names for a number of household compounds

         F.            Calculate the formula mass for a compound

         G.           Calculate percent composition for elements of a compound

    8:    Represent chemical reactions using balanced equations

         A.            Represent reactants and products with appropriate chemical formula

         B.            Write and balance equations so that there are equal numbers of atoms of each element on

                         each side of the equation

         C.            Develop an activity series and understand its use to predict reactivity

         D.            Use double replacement reactions and recognize the significance of the insolubility of some

                         products as a driving force for the reaction

         E.             Distinguish between physical change and chemical change and classify examples

    9.    Perform calculations relating the quantities of chemical reactants and products.  

         A.                Interpret a balanced equation to represent the ratio of reactants and products

         B.                Use chemical equations and mass balance to predict

                      1.                Quantities of products from a known quantity of reactant

                      2.                Quantities of reactants needed to produce a given quantity of product

                      3.                Given quantities of two reactants, determine the limiting reactant and the excess  reactant

    10. Describe the effects of temperature and pressure on the volume of a gas and the relationship for moles of any gas at standard
          temperature and
        

         A.          Recognize units of pressure.

         B.          Recognize and be able to use the relationship between gas volume, temperature, and pressure

         C.           Recognize and use Avogadro’s Law to explain the relationship between the number of particles and gas volume

         D.           Recognize the relationship of the Kinetic Molecular Theory to gas behavior

     11. Express concentration of solution by various methods and use units of concentration to calculate quantities of solute.

         A.            Define solute and solvent

         B.            Express and be able to convert concentration of a solution as a % (m/m), parts per million,

                         parts per billion and other appropriate units

         C.            Given a %(m/m) concentration, calculate the mass of solute in a given volume or total mass of a solution

         D.            Calculate the mass or volume of solute from concentration values

    12. Develop laboratory skills, including proper technique for recording measurements with quantity and units consistent with the device.   
         Students 
    will practice safety procedures in a chemical laboratory.

         A.          Recognize measuring devices and the significance of a standard reference

         B.          Utilize safe laboratory procedures

         C.          Recognize common laboratory hazards

         D.          Recognize the significance of a Material Safety Data Sheet

         E.          Demonstrate the proper use of basic laboratory equipment

         F.           Demonstrate the ability to make measurements accurately

         G.          Practice basic laboratory techniques such as filtration, distillation, dilution, and others

    13. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.

    14. Apply chemical principles to everyday/real world examples

    15. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.

  
  •  

    CHM 101W - General Chemistry I

    Credits: 5


    Provides fundamental principles, including atomic theory, periodic properties, states of matter, laws of chemistry combination, nomenclature, and chemical phenomena of interest to daily living. Designed as a preparation to CHM 111  for those students with no previous work in chemistry and to satisfy a science requirement in certain curricula.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 4
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 75 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science Lab
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives   Outcome 1.   Learn fundamental chemical vocabulary and to classify matter into categories based on an understanding of chemical and
                             physical properties. 
    Students will be introduced to safety requirements in a chemical laboratory.

         A.          Classify matter by physical state

         B.          State the shape and volume characteristics of the three physical states

                      1.    Classify common samples of matter according to physical state

                      2.    Identify the processes by which matter changes physical state

                      3.    Classify materials by physical state at a given temperature through use of reference data

         C.          Understand the application of the scientific method

         D.          Based on experimental data, differentiate between elements and compounds

         E.          Classify common substances as mixture or pure substance

                      1.    For a pure substance, element or compound

                      2.    For a mixture, homogeneous or heterogeneous

         F.          Distinguish between physical change and chemical change and classify examples

         G.         Distinguish between physical and chemical properties and classify examples

         H.         Differentiate between metals and nonmetals

                      1.    Recognize the placement of metals and nonmetals on the Periodic Table

                      2.    Give typical physical properties of each

                      3.    Use properties to classify materials as metal or nonmetal

         I.          Differentiate between the symbol for an element and a compound

         J.         Use a reference source on properties of substances to classify a sample substance

         K.         Define and be able to use the following terms: chemistry, matter, solid, liquid, gas, melting, freezing, fusing, evaporation, vaporization,
                     condensation, boiling point, sublimation, pure substance, mixture, physical change, chemical change, chemical reaction, precipitate,
                     physical properties, chemical properties, element, compound, metal, nonmetal, law of definite composition, atomic symbols, chemical
                     formula, chemical equation, atom, molecule, reactant, product, diatomic

         L.          Understand and begin to utilize safe laboratory procedures

         M.         Recognize common laboratory hazards

                      1.    Understand terms used on a Material Safety Data Sheet

                      2.    Recognize and understand the proper use of basic laboratory equipment

                      3.    Practice reading laboratory measuring devices as accurately as possible and record data correctly indicating the accuracy of the
                             measurement.

    2.    Understand accuracy and precision of measurement expressed using scientific notation, English and SI units of measure.

         A.          Recognize measuring devices and the significance of a standard reference

         B.          Convert numbers between fractions and decimals

         C.          Convert numbers between fixed decimal form and scientific notation

         D.          Add, subtract, multiply and divide using scientific notation

         E.          Understand the rationale for the use of significant figures

         F.           Learn metric base units: gram, liter, meter

         G.          Recognize the difference between mass and weight

         H.          Learn metric prefixes: Giga, mega, kilo, deca, deci, centi, milli, micro, pico

         I.           Convert between metric units using unit cancellation method

         J.          Convert temperatures between Fahrenheit and Celsius

         K.          Graph data on an x and y axis and use the graph to predict unknown data

         L.          Distinguish between measured numbers and exact numbers

         M.         Given a measured number, state the number of significant figures

         N.          Use significant figures properly in addition, subtraction, multiplication, division

         O.          Learn rules for rounding

    3.    Use the unit conversion method to perform dimensional analysis calculations involving matter and energy.

         A.          Convert measurements between English and metric units using unit cancellation method

         B.          Perform multi-step conversions

         C.          In the laboratory, calculate density from mass and volume

         D.          Experimentally determine the volume of a solid both by direct and indirect methods

         E.          Recognize density as a conversion factor

         F.           In the laboratory, prepare solutions of known concentration, measure the series of densities and graph density as a function of
                       concentration. Use the graph to predict the concentration of an unknown solution of measured density.

         G.         Calculate mass from density and volume

         H.         Calculate volume from density and mass

         I.          Given the parts of one component in a given amount of the total, calculate the per cent of that component

         J.         Express per cent when given a decimal number

         K.        Convert a per cent to a decimal number

         L.         Differentiate between kinetic and potential energy

         M.        Understand Law of Conservation of Energy

         N.        Discuss energy transformation between chemical, mechanical, electrical

         O.        Convert between units of energy: calorie, Calorie, and Joule

         P.         Use specific heat, temperature and mass to calculate heat

         Q.        Given appropriate experimental data, calculate the specific heat of a substance

    4.    Understand the structure of the atom and formation of ions.

         A.          Distinguish between elements, compounds, and mixtures in terms of their atomic make-up

         B.          State the names, symbols, charges and relative mass for the three subatomic particles

         C.          Given the atomic number, state the number of protons and electrons in an atom and use the Periodic Table to identify the element

         D.         Given the number of protons and neutrons in two atoms, indicate whether the atoms are isotopes

         E.          Given the atomic number and mass number, determine the number of protons, electrons, and neutrons in the atom

         F.          Given the atomic number and mass number of two atoms, determine if the atoms are isotopes

         G.         Indicate how anions and cations are formed

         H.         Given the number of protons and electrons in an ion, determine the charge on the ion

         I.           Given the symbol for an ion, including the mass number, charge and atomic number, calculate the number of protons, neutrons and
                      electrons in the ion

         J.          Given the number of protons, neutrons and electrons in an ion, write the correct symbol for the ion, including the mass number, atomic
                      number and charge

         K.          Calculate the average atomic mass of an element given the percentage abundances for the isotopes of that element

         L.          Using the Periodic Table, identify the following: group, period, metalloid, alkali metal, alkaline

                      earth metal, halogen, noble gas, inert gas

         M.         Describe the trend of nonmetallic or metallic character among elements within a group

         N.         List the elements that exist as diatomic molecules

         O.         Observe physical properties of some elements

         P.          Use reference data to report physical properties of some elements.

         Q.         In the laboratory, observe trends in reactivity of alkali metals. Compare reactivity of alkali metals to alkaline earth metals in the same
                      period. Observe similarities and differences in reactivity of halogen compounds.

    5.    Understand the configuration of electrons within an atom and the resultant availability for chemical reaction. 

         A.          Recognize significance of electrons as the vehicle for chemical reactions

         B.          Recognize the relationship between minimum energy and maximum stability

         C.          Describe the nature of attraction and repulsion between subatomic particles

         D.         State the relationship between orbitals, sublevels and main energy levels

         E.          State the spin relationship between electrons in the same orbital

         F.          List the order in which atomic orbitals are filled (suggest reference to Periodic Table)

         G.         Write the electron configuration for any A group element

                      1.    Using box and arrow

                      2.    Using 1s2 2s2 2px2 2 py2 2 pz1

                      3.    Using 1s2 2s2 2p5

         H.         State and apply Hund’s Rule for writing electron configurations and determining the number of unpaired electrons in an atom

         I.           Describe the relationship between the ground state, excited state and energy being absorbed and released.

         J.          Explain the unique light spectrum emitted from an excited atom is unique for a given element

         K.         Explain the relationship between electron arrangement and the Periodic Table

         L.          Use the Periodic Table to identify the number of valence electrons for any A group element

         M.         Write the Lewis dot structure for any element given the number of valence electrons

         N.         Evaluate data and develop trends across periods and down rows for ionization energy, atomic size and electron affinity.

         O.         Observe flame tests on several metallic ions and relate to excited state vs. ground state.

         P.          Recognize the transition metals on the Periodic Table and indicate the distinguishing electronic characteristic

         Q.         Define and be able to use the following terms: ground state, quantization, orbital, energy level, electron spin, Pauli exclusion principle,
                      electron configuration, Aufbau principle, Hund’s rule, spectroscope, valence electrons, Lewis electron dot structures, ionization energy

    6.    Understand role of electrons in ionic and covalent bonds and general properties of ionic and molecular compounds.    

         A.          Differentiate between ionic and molecular compounds

         B.          Observe and categorize physical properties of ionic and molecular compounds.

         C.          Describe the octet rule and how both ionic or covalent bonding can follow this rule

         D.          Recognize the duet rule that applied only to hydrogen

         E.          Determine the number of electrons a metal atom will loose to become a cation

         F.          Determine the number of electrons a nonmetal atom will gain to become an anion

         G.         Using the Periodic Table, predict the charge on an ion

         H.         Recognize that the number of electrons lost be metal atoms must equal the number of electrons gained by nonmetal atoms in the formation
                     of an ionic compound

         I.          Write formulas for ionic compounds given the charges on the ions

         J.          Distinguish between monatomic ion and polyatomic ion

         K.          Learn the formulas for the following polyatomic ions: ammonium, acetate, chlorate, cyanide, dihydrogen phosphate, hydrogen carbonate,
                      hydrogen sulfate, hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, perchorate, permanganate, carbonate, chromate, dichromate, hydrogen phosphate,
                      sulfate, sulfite, phosphate

         L.          Distinguish between single, double and triple covalent bonds and relationship to bond length and bond strength

         M.         Write the Lewis electron dot structures for molecular compounds

         N.         Write the Lewis electron dot structures for polyatomic ions

         O.         Describe the trends in electronegativity across a period and down a group

         P.          Differentiate between ionic, polar and nonpolar bonds based on electronegativity

         Q.         Predict whether a bond will be ionic, polar or nonpolar based on the elements placement on the Periodic Table

         R.          Use the crossed arrow to label the dipole in a polar covalent bond

         S.          Use partial charge symbolism to label the dipole in a polar covalent bond

         T.          Recognize the formation of a coordinate covalent bond

         U.         Compare the properties of ionic and molecular compounds

         V.          Predict the weight ratio of elements in a compound from the combining ratio of atoms or ions in the compound.

         W.         Define and be able to use the following terms: bond, octet, duet, cation, anion, ionization energy, electron affinity, ionic compound,
                      molecular compound, ionic bond, covalent bond, bonding pair of electrons, nonbonding electrons, lone pair, double bond, triple bond,
                      bond length, bond-dissociation energy, coordinate covalent bond, electronegativity, polarity, dipole

     7.    Construct a formula given a compound’s name, and also assign a standardized name to a given formula.

         A.          Classify compounds as binary and ternary

         B.          Name metal ions using both the Stock and latin root method

         C.          Name monatomic anions

         D.         Associate name, formula and charge for the following polyatomic ions: ammonium, sulfate, nitrate, chlorate, bromate, iodate, carbonate,
                     manganate, chromate, dichromate, acetate, oxalate

         E.          Recognize oxyacids and learn system for naming oxyacids and salts of oxyacids

         F.          Associate name and formula for binary molecular compounds

         G.         Differentiate naming conventions between a hydrogen halide gas and acid (aqueous) form of the hydrogen halide compound

         H.         Given the chemical formula of a hydrate, name the compound

         I.          Calculate the molecular mass of a molecular compound; calculate the formula mass for an ionic compound

         J.          Recognize molecular mass and formula mass as equivalent to molar masses

         K.          Calculate per cent composition for elements of a compound

         L.          In the laboratory, determine the quantity of an element that is lost during a decomposition reaction and express as a per cent.

         M.         Using experimental data, calculate per cent error from a theoretical result.

    8.    Represent chemical reactions using balanced equations

         A.          Represent reactants and products with appropriate chemical formula

         B.          Balance equations so that there are equal numbers of atoms of each element on each side of the equation

         C.          In the laboratory, develop an activity series and understand its use to predict single replacement reactions

         D.         In the laboratory, perform multiple double replacement reactions and recognize the significance of the insolubility of some products as a
                      driving force for the reaction

         E.          Write molecular equations, ionic equations and net ionic equations

         F.           Identify spectator ions

         G.         Define and be able to use the following terms: reactant, product, law of conservation of matter, aqueous, precipitate, catalyst, combination
                      reaction, decomposition reaction, single replacement reaction, double replacement reaction, oxidation-reduction reaction

     9.    Understand the relationship between mass, molar mass, and units (including molecules, ions, formula units, atoms)   

         A.          Be able to determine the mass of one mole of a several elements and compounds

         B.          Use an understanding of molar mass to convert grams to moles and reverse

         C.          Recognize that equal numbers of atoms are present in any two samples of elements if the

                      they contain an equal number of moles of the element.

         D.         Use Avogadro’s Number to convert between moles and number of molecules, formula units, ions, atoms

         E.          Construct conversion factors for grams/mole using the Periodic Table

         F.          Construct conversion factors for units/mole using Avogadro’s Number

         G.         Given a molecular formula, determine the empirical formula

         H.         Given the per cent composition of a compound, calculate the empirical formula

         I.          Given the empirical formula and the molar mass, calculate the molecular formula of a compound

         J.          Define and be able to use the following terms: ion, formula unit, gram atomic weight, gram molecular weight, molar mass, empirical
                      formula, empirical weight

         K.          Experimentally determine the empirical formula for a compound made by a combination reaction with known quantities of reactants.

      Outcome 10: Perform calculations relating the quantities of chemical reactants and products and indicate excess reactants.

         A.          Interpret a balanced equation to represent the mole ratio of reactants and products

         B.          Construct conversion factors based on the mole ratio from a balanced chemical equation

         C.          Use mole ratio conversion factors to predict

                      1.    Quantities of products from a known quantity of reactant

                      2.    Quantities of reactants needed to produce a given quantity of product

         D.         Given quantities of two reactants, determine the limiting reagent and the reactant in excess

         E.          Use the limiting reagent to predict the quantity of product

         F.          In the laboratory, react two soluble ionic compounds which are known to react to produce a precipitate; choose quantities of reactants so
                      that one is in excess. Predict the mass of a precipitate formed during the reaction. Isolate the precipitate by filtration and dry the precipitate.
                      Determine the mass of the precipitate formed and calculate the % yield compared to the theoretical yield.

         G.         Differentiate between endothermic and exothermic reactions

         H.         Construct conversion factors for heat/mole of a given reactant or product

         I.          Use heat/mole conversion factors to calculate quantity of heat as a function of mass of material reacting

         J.          Define and be able to use the following terms: mole ratio, limiting reactant (limiting reagent), theoretical yield, actual yield, percentage yield,
                      endothermic reaction, exothermic reaction

      Outcome 11: Understand the effects of temperature and pressure on the volume of a gas and the relationship for moles of any gas at
                             standard temperature and 
    pressure.    

         A.          Convert between temperatures expressed in Celsius and Kelvin

         B.          Convert between pressure expressed in atmospheres, torr, mm Hg

         C.          Observe the relationship between volume and pressure for a gas

         D.         State Boyle’s Law and express mathematically

         E.          Given a change of pressure, calculate the change of volume and the reverse

         F.          Recognize the significance of the partial pressure of water vapor in measuring the pressure of a gas collected by displacement of water

         G.         Observe the relationship between temperature and volume for a gas

         H.         State Charle’s Law and express mathematically

         I.          Given a change of temperature, calculate the change of volume and the reverse

         J.          Combine application of Boyle’s Law and Charle’s Law; use Combined Gas Law

         K.          Use the Ideal Gas Law to solve for pressure, volume, number of moles, or temperature

         L.          Recognize Avogadro’s Law and understand that at any given temperature and pressure,  there are an equal number of moles of any gas in
                      an equal volume

         M.         Recognize that at standard temperature and pressure (273 kelvin, 760 mm Hg), 1 mole of a  gas has a volume of 22.4 L

         N.         Use the density relationship to calculate molar mass (g/mole) using the Ideal Gas Law

         O.         Use molar mass and the Ideal Gas Law to calculate density of a gas at a given temperature and pressure

         P.          Given a balanced chemical equation, the mass of one reactant or product, and the T and P of a gaseous reactant or product, calculate the

                      volume of the gaseous reactant or product.

         Q.         Given a balanced chemical equation, the volume of a gaseous reactant or product and a given T and P, calculate the mass of another
                      reactant or product

         R.         Understand the applications of Kinetic Molecular Theory to gases

         S.         Recognize the relationship of the Kinetic Molecular Theory to Boyle’s Law, Charle’s Law, and Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressures

         T.          Define and be able to use the following terms: atmosphere, torr, partial pressure, standard temperature, standard pressure, molar gas
                      volume, universal gas constant, ideal gases

         U.         Recognize the difference between an Ideal Gas and a real gas.

    12. Understand the relationship between energy changes and changes of state as well as perform appropriate calculations.   

         A.          Given the heat of fusion, calculate the heat required/liberated for a given mass of material to melt or freeze

         B.          Given the heat of vaporization, calculate the heat required/liberated for a given mass of material to evaporate/condense

         C.          Given appropriate specific heats and the heats of fusion and vaporization, calculate the heat required for a specified mass of a substance
                       to undergo a particular temperature change

    13. Express concentration of solution by various methods and use units of concentration to calculate quantities of solute.

         A.          Define solute and solvent

         B.          Define and be able to use the following terms: soluble, insoluble, solubility, saturated, unsaturated, dilute, concentrated, miscible,
                       immiscible, concentration, molarity

         C.          Express concentration of a solution as a % (m/m)

         D.         Given a %(m/m) concentration, calculate the mass of solute in a given volume

         E.          Calculate the mass of solute and solvent to prepare a given % (m/m) solution.

         F.          Calculate the mass of solute and volume of solvent to prepare a given % (m/v) solution

         G.         Calculate the volume of solute and solvent to prepare a given % (v/v) solution

         H.         Convert between % and ppm

         I.          For a given molarity solution, calculate the mass of solute required / L

         J.          For a given molarity and volume, calculate the number of moles of solute

         K.          Calculate the volume of a solution with a specified molarity to deliver a given amount of solute

         L.          Given the molarity and volume of a concentrated solution, calculate the volume required to prepare a dilute solution of a specified molarity

         M.         For a given molality solution, calculate the mass of solute required/ 1000 g of solvent

    14.   Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
    15.   Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
    16.   Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.

  
  •  

    CHM 105W - Technical Chemistry I

    Credits: 5


    Provides basic principles of general chemistry with an emphasis on resource-based and hands-on learning. Includes chemical and physical properties of matter, measurement and chemical calculations, chemical terminology, reactions and processes, and use of industrial and field testing equipment. Integrates computer skills into the course including word processing, spreadsheet, email, and web use.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 60
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science Lab
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.   Identify the scope of chemical study and implications of industrial and environmental studies    

         A.          Identify the major groups of chemicals manufactured in the US.

         B.          Classify matter by physical state and identify the processes by which matter changes physical state.

         C.          Use a reference source on properties of substances to classify sample substances as to state at a given temperature.

         D.         Discuss typical processes for separation of mixtures: sieves, filtration, distillation.

         E.          Demonstrate knowledge of chemical language:

                      1.    use a chemical symbol to determine an element’s name.

                      2.    understand use of brackets in chemical formula and be able to count atoms.

                      3.    classify common materials based on formula as element or compound

         F.          Distinguish between physical change and chemical properties and changes and classify examples.

         G.         Define the following physical properties: density, viscosity, specific gravity, solubility.

         H.         Classify top 50 chemicals produced as elements or compounds, inorganic or organic.

         I.           Demonstrate safe laboratory procedures; recognize common laboratory hazards.

         J.          Explain terms used on a Material Safety Data Sheet including oxidizer, corrosive, reactivity, hygroscopic, sensitizer.

         K.          Define and use the terms: atom, atomic (elemental) symbol, boiling point, chemical equation, chemical formula, chemical properties,
                      chemistry, compound, condensation, crystalline solid, element, endothermic reaction, evaporation, exothermic reaction, freezing, fusing,
                      gas, kinetic energy, melting, Law of Conservation of Energy, Law of Conservation of Mass, liquid, matter, mixture, particulate, phase,
                      physical properties, potential energy, precipitate, product, pure substance, reactant, solid, sublimation, vaporization.

         L.          Develop computer skills necessary to open files, read Word files, and cut and paste between files.

    2.    Demonstrate knowledge of measuring techniques and conversion of units in and between SI and English systems of measurement.

         A.          Use a calculator for addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, including use of exponents.

         B.          Differentiate between accuracy and precision and read measuring devices with linear or dial analog scale (ruler, refractometer), volume
                       (graduate, burette), and digital scale.

         C.          Discuss the usefulness of scientific notation and demonstrate the correct use of scientific notation.

         D.          Discuss the need for significant figures.

         E.          Apply rounding conventions to measured numbers.

         F.          Read temperatures on Fahrenheit and Celsius scales and convert between °F and °C.

         G.         Use unit conversion method (dimensional analysis) to convert between measurement units.

         H.         Use metric base units and prefixes.

         I.          Locate sources of conversion information.

         J.          Use density to convert between mass and volume.

         K.          Calculate specific gravities for liquids and gases.

         L.          Calculate volumes of solids with regular dimensions.a. rectangular solid (storage bin, tote); cylindrical solid (tank, pipe, drum);b. sphere
                      (tank)

         M.         Discuss the use of tare weights; describe the difference between contained and delivered mass.

         N.         Calculate volumes of pipes and tanks from dimensions and convert to gallons, liters.

         O.         Manually graph linear data on x and y axis and read data from the graph.

         P.          Enter linear data on an Excel spreadsheet, graph data and read data from graph.

         Q.         Define and use the terms: base unit, conversion factor, density, dimensional analysis, exact number, exponent, mass, scientific notation,
                      significant figure (digit), uncertainty, weight.

    3.    Demonstrate knowledge of the basic concepts of atomic structure, and relate them to the Periodic Table, electron configuration,
           formation of ions, 
    and use and relevance of radioactive isotopes.

         A.          Discuss the historical development of subatomic particles.

         B.          Distinguish between and determine atomic number, atomic mass, mass number.

         C.          Calculate average atomic mass of an element from the isotope distribution.

         D.          For the following categories of elements: alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, oxygen group, halogens, noble gases, transition metals,
                       metalloids, rare earth metals:

                      1.    Recognize their placement on the Periodic Table

                      2.    Discuss general properties of the category

         E.          Identify types of radioactive decay (alpha, beta, gamma) and write equations to express alpha and beta decay.

         F.          Discuss the difference between fission and fusion.

         G.         Describe the relationship between the electromagnetic spectrum and electron energy level changes.

         H.         Write electron configurations and discuss their relevance to periodic table.

         I.           Determine valence electrons and write appropriate Lewis Dot structures for elements.

         J.          Predict trends in properties from the periodic table.

         K.          Define and apply the terms: anion, cation, chemical family, electron configuration, excited state, ground state, ion, ionization energy,
                       isoelectronic, Lewis dot symbols, metal, nonmetal, octet rule, orbital, Pauli exclusion principle, photon, principal energy level, quantized 
                       energy levels, semimetal, spectrum, sublevels s, p, d, f, valence electrons

    4.    Demonstrate an understanding of the similarities and differences between ionic and covalent bonds as well as polarity within bonds
           and molecules.

         A.          Predict ionic charge for monatomic ions.

         B.          Write formulas for ionic compounds.

         C.          Describe the transfer of electrons to form ions when a metal and a nonmetal react.

         D.         Describe the concept of sharing of electrons to form a covalent bond when two nonmetals react.

         E.          Use electronegativities to distinguish between polar and nonpolar covalent bonds.

         F.          Describe ionic attraction and lattice structure characteristics.

         G.         Describe the difference between polar bonds and polar molecules, and show how polarity of bonds affects solubility.

         H.         Use Periodic Table to predict bond character: ionic, polar covalent, nonpolar.

         I.          Describe the difference between single, double and triple bonds (multiple bonds).

         J.          Identify exceptions to the octet rule.

         K.          Describe metallic bonds.

         L.          Recognize common alloys.

         M.         Define and use the terms: alloy, anion, bond, bond dissociation energy, bonding pair of electrons, cation, chemical bond, covalent bond,
                      covalent compound, dipole, double bond, electronegativity, ionic bond, lattice structure, lone pair of electrons, molecular compound,
                      molecule, monatomic ion, multiple bond, nonbonding pair of electrons, nonpolar covalent bond, octet rule, polar covalent bond, polar bond,
                      polyatomic ion, single bond, triple bond.

    5.    Cross-reference chemicals by name, formula, common name, trade name and CAS number.

         A.          Discuss the need for learning chemical nomenclature.

         B.          Use appropriate molecular formula for elements that occur as diatomic molecules.

        C.          Correctly name and write formulas for compounds made from two nonmetals.

         D.         Correctly name and write symbols for monatomic ions with single or multiple charges including use of Stock naming convention to indicate
                      charge on transition metal ions.

         E.          Correctly name and write symbols for acid compounds including: nitric acid, chloric acid, bromic acid, iodic acid, manganic acid, carbonic
                      acid, sulfuric acid, chromic acid, and phosphoric acid.

         F.          Write formulas for compounds containing the ions: ammonium ion, hydroxide ion, cyanide ion, acetate ion, oxalate ion, chromate ion,
                      dichromate ion

         G.         Correctly name and write symbols for ternary salts and hydrates.

         H.         Discuss use of common names.

         I.          Use a hard-copy reference as well as the Internet to cross-reference compounds by:

                      1.    chemical name

                      2.    CAS number

                      3.    chemical formula

                      4.    common name

                      5.    trade-name

         J.          Define and use the terms: acid, anhydrous compound, anion, binary ionic compound, binary molecular compound, cation, diatomic
                      molecule, hydrate, hydrated, ion, ionize, monatomic ion, oxyacid, oxyanion.

    6.    Recognize the types of chemical reactions, and write and interpretchemical equations.

         A.          Write and balance simple chemical equations.

         B.          Given a balanced chemical equation, describe its meaning on the particular, molar, and macroscopic level.

         C.          Classify chemical reactions as one or more of the following: combination or synthesis, combustion, decomposition, single or double
                       replacement, neutralization.

         D.          Predict solubility of compounds in a reaction from a table.

         E.          Define and use the terms: aqueous solution, balanced equation, combination reaction, combustion reaction, decomposition reaction,
                      double replacement reaction, neutralization reaction, precipitation reaction, single replacement reaction, synthesis reaction.

    7.    Distinguish between the types of chemical processes, using material balancing, a factors affecting a reaction.

         A.          Determine the number of atoms of each element in a formula.

         B.          Calculate the molecular mass and formula mass in atomic mass units (amu).

         C.          Describe the concept of the mole and calculate molar mass in grams.

         D.          Convert between mass, moles, and number of particles.

         E.          Calculate percent composition for the elements in a compound.

         F.          Use molar mass and the coefficients of balanced equations to predict quantities of reactants and products.

         G.         Use molecular weights and stoichiometric relationships to perform calculations to predict quantities of chemicals to be reacted/produced.

         H.         Given the expected (calculated, theoretical) yield, calculate the percent yield for a reaction.

         I.          Identify limiting reactant situations and predict the theoretical amount of product, and amount of remaining excess reactant.

         J.          Convert between the following units of energy: calorie, joule, kilocalorie, kilojoules.

         K.          Calculate heat energy as a reactant or product.

         L.          Discuss factors that may limit the reactions (mass of reactant, product, vessel size, time, mixing capability).

         M.         Discuss factors that may influence and how they influence the reaction rate: temperature, pressure, concentration, surface area.

         N.         Discuss the role of catalysts in affecting the rate of reaction.

         O.         Discuss the characteristics of a chemical system in an equilibrium state.

         P.          Identify conditions that affect the rate of a chemical reaction: temperature, catalyst, concentration.

         Q.         Apply Le Chatelier’s Principle: concentration, volume, and temperature effects.

         R.          Identify examples of catalysts used in industrial processes, and describe the implications of poisoning the catalyst.

         S.          Describe the role of equilibrium in controlling a chemical process.

         T.          Discuss shifting equilibrium by removing product from the reaction mix

         U.         Discuss water treatment reactions: ion-exchange resins / demineralizers.

         V.          Define and use the terms: adsorption, balanced equation, catalyst, chemical equation, chemical reaction, distillation, endothermic reaction,
                      equilibrium, equilibrium point, equilibrium reaction, exothermic reaction, limiting factor, material balancing, poisoned catalyst, process,
                      process variable, product, raw material, reactants, reaction rate, reactor.

    8.    Explain the expressions for concentration of solutions and the physical and chemical properties of common acids and bases.

         A.          Define the properties of a solution.

         B.          Use the terminology associated with solutions.

         C.          Discuss factors that affect solubility.

         D.         Calculate and use percent by mass concentration as a conversion factor.

         E.          Calculate and use parts per million (and billion) as a conversion factor.

         F.          Express solution concentration in molarity and use molarity as a conversion factor.

         G.         Calculate the desired quantity of a concentrated solution to use to make known quantity of a dilute solution.

         H.         Perform the calculations associated with a titration.

         I.          Review structure of acids, bases, salts.

         J.          Discuss the concept of a pH scale and interpret a pH as being acidic or basic.

         K.          Calculate pH or pOH from molarity of an acid or base and molarity of an acid or base from pH of pOH.

         L.          Identify physical properties, uses and hazards of common acids and bases.

         M.         Describe the formations of acids from nonmetal oxides and the formation of bases from metal oxides.

         N.         Describe the industrial purification of salts by crystallization.

         O.         Use an acid/base indicator to indicate pH.

         P.          Use pH meter to measure common substances.

         Q.         Perform an acid/base neutralization reaction using an indicator.

         R.          Perform the same neutralization reaction using a pH meter and graph the pH vs. milliliters of titrant.

         S.          Define and use the terms: concentrated, dilute, immiscible, indicator, miscible, pH, pOH, saturated, solute, solubility, solvent,
                      supersaturated, titrant, titration, unsaturated.

    9.    Describe implications of intermolecular forces on physical properties as well as the utilization of physical methods for process
           optimization.
       

         A.          Explain the meaning of: calorie, Calorie (large calorie), BTU, bar, mm Hg, atm

         B.          Describe the separation concepts for the following purification techniques:

                      1.    Distillation

                      2.    Liquid/ liquid extraction

                      3.    Filtration

         C.         Identify states of matter.

         D.         Discuss properties of solids.

         E.          Define crystalline vs. amorphous.

         F.          Distinguish between metals and nonmetals

         G.         Discuss properties of liquids.

                      1.    Solubility

                      2.    Define terms: concentration, saturated, supersaturated, solute, solvent

                      3.    Discuss effects of polarity, temperature, mixing, solubility, filtration, and distillation

         H.         Define and use the terms: latent heat, sensible heat, absorption, adsorption, leaching, extracting solvent, carrier solvent, vapor pressure,
                      upper cut point, lower cut point, refluxing,reboiling.

    10. Practice general education abilities within the context of course.

         A.          Write accurate lab reports reflecting data collected

         B.          Analyze data and draw appropriate conclusions

         C.          Report results of work to class orally

         D.          Evaluate validity of internet source materials

         E.          Demonstrate teamwork skills both in small class groups and while working in lab groups.

         F.          Use computers effectively to retrieve information from files, create word-processed documents, create basic spreadsheets including
                      graphs, retrieve information from the Internet, and utilize email including attachments.

    11.  Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
    12.  Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
    13.  Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.

  
  •  

    CHM 106W - Technical Chemistry II

    Credits: 5


    Provides inorganic and organic chemistry knowledge and technical skills’ foundation essential for employment as a technician in a variety of chemistry-based professions. Includes analytical instrumentation use.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 3; CHM 101W  or CHM 105W  with a minimum grade of C (2.0).
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 60
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science Lab
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.      Regain familiarity with general chemistry concepts needed for understanding of introductory organic chemistry.

         A.         Understand atomic structure including subatomic particles and electron configuration

         B.         Use electronegativity to predict the nature of bonds as either covalent or ionic and be able to represent with appropriate Lewis Dot
                     structures

         C.         Recognize the common notations for isotopes

         D.         Understand atomic mass and the relationship to molar mass

         E.         Recognize the relationship between empirical and molecular formulas

         F.          Differentiate between acids and bases in accordance with the Arrhenius, Bronsted-Lowry and Lewis theories

         G.         Understand oxidation, reduction, oxidizing agent, reducing agent

         H.         Understand occurrence and significance of hydrogen bonding

    2.    Understand the structure, nomenclature and some reactions of saturated hydrocarbons.  

         A.          Describe the tetrahedral nature of the carbon atom

         B.          Explain the role of hybridization in formation of single bonds around the carbon atom

         C.          Express alkanes and halogenated alkanes as Lewis structures

         D.          Know the IUPAC names and formulas for the C1-C10 alkanes

         E.          Become familiar with both natural sources and commercial uses of alkanes

         F.          Understand isomerization

         G.         Recognize the utility of structural formulas, condensed formulas, Lewis structures, ball and stick models and space-filling models

         H.         Write structural formulas and IUPAC names for the isomers of an alkane or halogenated alkane

         I.           Learn common names for short chain branched alkanes

         J.          Give the IUPAC name of a hydrocarbon or a halogenated hydrocarbon when given the structural formula

         K.          Give the structural formula of a hydrocarbon or a halogenated hydrocarbon when given the IUPAC name

         L.          Write equation for the halogenation of an alkane including all possible mono-substituted  product isomers

         M.         Write structure formulas and names for cycloalkanes C3-C6.

         N.         Understand the two conformations for cyclohexane.

         O.         Understand the derivation and utility of the octane number system

         P.          Understand and be able to use the following terms: acyclic, alkane, alkyl group, axial position, CFCs, catalytic cracking, conformational
                      isomer, cycloalkane, equatorial, functional group, halide, halogenated, homologous series, hydrocarbon, isomer, isomerism,
                      monosubstitution, paraffin, petrochemical, saturated, sigma bond, unsaturated

      Outcome 3:    Understand the structure, nomenclature and some reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbons.    

         A.          Explain the sp2 and sp hybridization of carbon atoms and the formation of a pi bond, double and triple bonds

         B.          Distinguish, by formulas, the difference between saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons

         C.          Name and write structural formulas of alkenes, alkynes, cycloalkenes, and aromatic compounds

         D.         Determine from structural formulas whether a compound can exist as geometric isomers

         E.          Correctly use the terms “cis” and “trans” to describe isomers

         F.          Write equations representing addition reactions of alkenes and alkynes

         G.         Explain the formation of carbocations and their role in chemical reactions

         H.         Understand Markovnikov’s rule for addition of HCl, HBr, HI, and H+/H2O to alkenes and alkynes

         I.           Recognize the results of the Baeyer test for unsaturation

         J.          Explain simple chemical tests that can be used to differentiate between alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes

         K.          Compare benzene structure and properties to cyclohexane

         L.          Relate IUPAC names for substituted benzene compounds to structural formulas

         M.         Write equations for the following reactions of benzene compounds

         N.         Halogenation with chlorine or bromine

         O.         Nitration

         P.          Friedel-Crafts Alkylation

         Q.         Oxidation of side chains

         R.          Understand and be able to use the following terms: alkene, alkyne, aromatic compound, geometric isomer, cycloalkene, cracking,
                       pyrolysis, dehydration, addition reaction, carbocation, Markovnikov’s rule

    4.    Have an understanding of the structure, nomenclature and some reactions of alcohols, ethers, phenols and thiols.

         A.          Name alcohols, ethers, phenols and thiols by common and IUPAC methods

         B.          Write the structural formula for the above when given the name

         C.          Recognize and identify primary, secondary and tertiary alcohols.

         D.         Understand the common sources, means of preparation, uses and hazards for common alcohols, ethers, phenols and thiols

    5.    Have an understanding of the structure, nomenclature and some reactions of aldehydes and ketones.   

         A.          Recognize the aldehyde and ketone functional groups within a molecule

         B.          Name aldehydes and ketones by common and IUPAC methods

         C.          Write formulas of aldehydes and ketones when given their names

         D.          Write equations showing the oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes and ketones

    6.    Understand the structure, nomenclature and some reactions of carboxylic acids and esters

         A.          Give the common and IUPAC names of selected carboxylic acids

         B.          Write the structural formulas for saturated, unsaturated, aromatic and dicarboxylic carboxylic acids

         C.          Understand correlation between molecular mass and the properties of solubility in water and boiling point

         D.          Write equations for the preparation of carboxylic acids by:

         E.          Oxidation of alcohols and aldehydes

         F.          Hydrolysis of esters

         G.         Saponification of fats

         H.         Oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons

         I.           Write equations for the reactions of carboxylic acids to form salts and esters

         J.          Write common names, IUPAC names and formulas of esters

         K.          Identify the portion of an ester that is derived from a carboxylic acid and the portion derived from an alcohol

         L.          Compare and contrast the cleansing action of a soap and synthetic detergent

         M.         Recognize differences in the composition of natural fats and oils and the effect on the properties of the triacylglycerols (triglycerides, fats).

         N.         Differentiate between: fat and oil; salt of a carboxylic acid and a soap; hydrogenation, hydrogenolysis, hydrolysis and saponification;
                      cationic, anionic and nonionic surfactants,

    7.    Have an appreciation for the utility of polymers and an understanding of the relationship between structure and function.

         A.          Recognize naturally occurring polymers including fibers

         B.          Be able to represent polymers in terms of their repeating units

         C.          Write formulas for condensation polymers, given the monomer

         D.          Identify polymers from their tradenames using standard reference materials

         E.          Recognize characteristics of common polymeric materials and thereby classify the polymer into major categories such as polyethylene,
                       polystyrene, polyurethane, silicone polymer, PET, etc.

         F.          Demonstrate understanding of the functional characteristics of common polymers

         G.         Understand the difference between addition and condensation polymers

         H.         Understand thermoset vs. thermoplastic resins

         I.           Differentiate between a polymeric fiber, resin and film.

         J.          Understand the role of polymer additives

         K.          Recognize the role of polymer properties in determining recycling capability

      Outcome 8:    Understand of the relationship between structure and function of amide and amine compounds.

         A.          Recognize the amide functional group

         B.          Use IUPAC nomenclature system for amides

         C.          Predict hydrolysis products of amides in acid and base solutions

         D.          Recognize the amine functional group

         E.          Recognize heterocyclic compounds and be able to name using reference information

         F.          Appreciate the uses of urea and the alkaloid group of pharmaceuticals.

     9.    Understand of the relationship between structure and function of carbohydrates and lipids.  

         A.          Recognize optical isomers

         B.          Classify carbohydrates as monosaccharide, disaccharide, oligosaccharide and polysaccharide

         C.          Differentiate between glucose and fructose

         D.          Describe hydrolysis of disaccharides

         E.          Recognize the significance of sugars and sugar substitutes

         F.          Discuss the utility of polysaccharides (polymers) starch and cellulose

         G.         Recognize the classification of lipids as being simple lipids, compound lipids, steroids or fat-soluble vitamins

    10. Understanding of the relationship between structure and function of amino acids, polypeptides and proteins.

         A.          Recognize foods that are major sources of protein

         B.          List the elements usually contained in protein molecules

         C.          Recognize the names of the amino acids and be able to use a reference to determine their structure; identify the functional groups present

         D.         Predict the structure of a peptide linkage between two amino acids

         E.          Differentiate between primary and secondary structure of a protein

         F.          Discuss the role of enzymes in biodegradation

      Outcome 11:  Work independently to locate chemical information and analyze data effectively.    

         A.          Use reference books to locate physical and chemical properties as well as safety information.

         B.          Use internet search engines to locate chemical information above and also vendor information, career opportunities, and opinions on social
                      issues regarding chemicals.

         C.          Evaluate the credibility of information retrieved from the internet

         D.         Understand the implementation of risk assessment

         E.          Determine the information required to make a chemical decision

         F.          Make decisions based on data and observations

         G.         Pay close attention to detail and observe trends

         H.         Have a general understanding of the considerations in choosing a chemical container  (sampling size or industrial)

         I.          Utilize appropriate sampling techniques

         J.          Understand the concept of calibrating an instrument against a standard

         K.          Use chemical principles to explain observed phenomena

         L.          Follow a standard operating procedure

      12.  Perform writing tasks to promote learning.

      13.  Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.

      14.  Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.

  
  •  

    CHM 107 - Chemistry For Engineering Technology

    Credits: 4


    Develops a foundation in chemistry for engineering technicians and designers so they can make better informed decisions. Builds connections of understanding between engineering material selection, design, and manufacturing processes. Uses fundamental principles including atomic theory, structure of metals and polymers, periodic properties, states of matter, gas laws, nomenclature, and common chemical reactions to make connections.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 6
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science Lab
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Relate the effects of temperature and pressure on the volume of a gas and the moles of any gas
           at standard temperature and pressure.
        

         A.         Convert between temperatures expressed in Celsius and Kelvin

         B.         Convert between pressure expressed in atmospheres, torr, mm Hg

         C.         Observe the relationship between volume and pressure for a gas

         D.         State Boyle’s Law and express mathematically

         E.         Given a change of pressure, calculate the change of volume and the reverse

         F.          Recognize the significance of the partial pressure of water vapor in measuring the pressure of a
                      gas collected by displacement of water

         G.         Observe the relationship between temperature and volume for a gas

         H.         State Charles’ Law and express mathematically

         I.           Given a change of temperature, calculate the change of volume and the reverse

         J.          Combine application of Boyle’s Law and Charles’ Law; use Combined Gas Law

         K.          Use the Ideal Gas Law to solve for pressure, volume, number of moles, or temperature

         L.          Recognize Avogadro’s Law and understand that at any given temperature and pressure,

                      there are an equal number of moles of any gas in an equal volume

         M.         Recognize that at standard temperature and pressure (273 Kelvin, 760 mm Hg), 1 mole of a

                      gas has a volume of 22.4 L

         N.         Use the density relationship to calculate molar mass (g/mole) using the Ideal Gas Law

         O.         Use molar mass and the Ideal Gas Law to calculate density of a gas at a given temperature and
                      pressure

         P.          Given a balanced chemical equation, the mass of one reactant or product, and the T and P of a
                      gaseous reactant or product, calculate the volume of the gaseous reactant or product.

         Q.         Given a balanced chemical equation, the volume of a gaseous reactant or product and a given T
                      and P, calculate the mass of another reactant or product

         R.          Understand the applications of Kinetic Molecular Theory to gases

         S.          Recognize the relationship of the Kinetic Molecular Theory to Boyle’s Law, Charles’ Law, and
                      Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressures

         T.          Define and be able to use the following terms: atmosphere, torr, partial pressure, standard
                      temperature, standard pressure, molar gas volume, universal gas constant, ideal gases

         U.         Recognize the difference between an Ideal Gas and a real gas.

    2.    Express concentration of solution by various methods and use units of concentration to calculate
           quantities of solute.

         A.          Define solute and solvent

         B.          Define and be able to use the following terms: soluble, insoluble, solubility, saturated, unsaturated, dilute, concentrated, miscible, immiscible, concentration, molarity

         C.          Express concentration of a solution as a % (m/m)

         D.          Given a %(m/m) concentration, calculate the mass of solute in a given volume

         E.          Calculate the mass of solute and solvent to prepare a given % (m/m) solution.

         F.          Calculate the mass of solute and volume of solvent to prepare a given % (m/v) solution

         G.         Calculate the volume of solute and solvent to prepare a given % (v/v) solution

         H.         Convert between % and ppm

         I.           For a given molarity solution, calculate the mass of solute required / L

         J.          For a given molarity and volume, calculate the number of moles of solute

         K.          Calculate the volume of a solution with a specified molarity to deliver a given amount of solute

         L.          Given the molarity and volume of a concentrated solution, calculate the volume required to
                      prepare a dilute solution of a specified molarity

         M.         For a given molality solution, calculate the mass of solute required/ 1000 g of solvent

    3.    Explain the structure, nomenclature and some reactions of carboxylic acids and esters.

         A.          Give the common and IUPAC names of selected carboxylic acids

         B.          Write the structural formulas for saturated, unsaturated, aromatic and dicarboxylic carboxylic
                       acids

         C.          Understand correlation between molecular mass and the properties of solubility in water and
                       boiling point

         D.         Write equations for the preparation of carboxylic acids by:

                      1.    Oxidation of alcohols and aldehydes

                      2.    Hydrolysis of esters

                      3.    Saponification of fats

                      4.    Oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons

         E.          Write equations for the reactions of carboxylic acids to form salts and esters

         F.          Write common names, IUPAC names and formulas of esters

         G.         Identify the portion of an ester that is derived from a carboxylic acid and the portion derived

                      from an alcohol

         H.         Compare and contrast the cleansing action of a soap and synthetic detergent

         I.           Recognize differences in the composition of natural fats and oils and the effect on the

                      properties of the triacylglycerols (triglycerides, fats).

         J.          Differentiate between: fat and oil; salt of a carboxylic acid and a soap; hydrogenation,

                      hydrogenolysis, hydrolysis and saponification; cationic, anionic and nonionic surfactants,

    4.    Differentiate characteristics of the atomic structure and molecular arrangement of common
           engineering materials.

         A.          Identify characteristics of the following lattice structures of metals and why they form from a

                      molten state:

                      1.    Face-center-cubic (FCC)

                      2.    Body-center-cubic (BCC)

                      3.    Hexagonal close packed (HCP)

         B.          List at least 3 common metals within each group (FCC, BCC, HCP).

         C.         Compare the formation of a pure metal from a molten state with that of an alloy.

         D.         Identify characteristics of the amorphous structure of glass and ceramics.

    5.    Explain the utility of polymers and of the relationship between structure and function.

         A.          Recognize naturally occurring polymers including fibers

         B.          Represent polymers in terms of their repeating units

         C.          Write formulas for condensation polymers, given the monomer

         D.         Identify polymers from their tradenames using standard reference materials

         E.          Recognize characteristics of common polymeric materials and thereby classify the polymer

                      into major categories such as polyethylene, polystyrene, polyurethane, silicone polymer, PET,

                      etc.

         F.          Demonstrate understanding of the functional characteristics of common polymers

         G.         Understand the difference between addition and condensation polymers

         H.         Understand thermoset vs. thermoplastic resins

         I.          Differentiate between a polymeric fiber, resin and film.

         J.          Understand the role of polymer additives

         K.         Recognize the role of polymer properties in determining recycling capability

    6.    Identify the relative importance of chemical bonding in engineering materials.

         A.          Differentiate between the 4 types of bonds-Covalent, Ionic, Metallic, Vanderwaal.

         B.          Identify how each of the 4 bonds can be most easily broken.

         C.          Explain how slip planes and lattice structure defects in metals can be used to break bonds and
                       reshape metals.
    7.    Explain how engineering materials degrade over time.

         A.          Explain what happens when you place 2 dissimilar metals in contact with each other.

         B.          Explain the process involved in the rusting of ferrous metals.

         C.          Explain the process of oxidation of aluminum.

         D.          Explain the process of degradation of plastics due to chemicals and heat.

    8.    Explain the relationship between structure and function of carbohydrates and lipids.

         A.          Recognize optical isomers

         B.          Classify carbohydrates as monosaccharide, disaccharide, oligosaccharide and polysaccharide

         C.          Differentiate between glucose and fructose

         D.          Describe hydrolysis of disaccharides

         E.          Recognize the significance of sugars and sugar substitutes

         F.          Discuss the utility of polysaccharides (polymers) starch and cellulose

         G.         Recognize the classification of lipids as being simple lipids, compound lipids, steroids or fat-

                      soluble vitamins

    9.    Explain the operation of commonly-used batteries.

         A.          Identify the role of the anode, cathode, and electrolyte.

         B.          Explain how a common flashlight battery works.

         C.          Compare lead-acid storage battery operation with more recently-developed battery types.

    10. Explain the process of chemical etching in manufacture.

         A.          Explain how chemical etching is done on flat surfaces.

         B.          Explain how chemical etching is used in building printed circuit boards for microchips in the

                      semiconductor industry.

    11. Identify the characteristics of liquid engineering materials.    

         A.          Compare the chemical formulations of the following hydraulic fluids:

                      1.    petroleum oils
                      2.    phosphate esters
                      3.    chlorinated hydrocarbons
                      4.    alcohol

         B.          Identify whether the fluids in (1) above are chemically compatible with the following seal materials:

                      1.    rubber
                      2.    thermoplastic
                      3.    thermoset
                      4.    cork
                      5.    wood
                      6.    cast iron

  
  •  

    CHM 111 - General and Inorganic Chemistry I

    Credits: 5
    Emphasizes an in- depth study of the theories and principles of atomic structure bonding, stoichiometry, states of matters, and properties of solutions. Required for students who intend to enroll for more than one year of chemistry. Meets the needs of chemistry majors. Credit may be earned in CHM 111 or CHM 111H  but not both. 

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 5 and either high school chemistry or CHM 101W  with a minimum grade of C (2.0)
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science Lab
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Manipulate fundamental principles and terminology in the study of matter and its changes.
      1. Define physical properties of matter and give examples.
      2. Identify the states of matter and give examples.
      3. Explain the changes between states using Kinetic Molecular Theory.
      4. Comprehend the relationship and convert between density, volume, mass, and specific gravity.
      5. Describe the terms atom, element, molecule, compound, mixture and their interrelationships.
      6. Describe and differentiate between physical and chemical properties. Match elemental symbols to properly spelled names of the elements.
    2. Understand and apply proper measurement techniques and manipulations of measured numbers.
      1. Manipulate units of English, Metric, and SI systems, and interconvert them.
      2. Use dimensional analysis to carry out unit conversions and other calculations.
      3. Explain the difference between precision and accuracy and demonstrate proper use of significant digits in calculations.
      4. Demonstrate use of the F, C, and K scales and convert temperatures from one scale to another.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the organization and information contained in the periodic table.
      1. Summarize trends and predict elemental behavior based on the element’s position in the periodic table.
      2. Identify the difference between the atomic number and atomic mass from information contained in the periodic table.
      3. Identify the location of groups, periods, and series.
      4. Use the periodic table to predict properties of elements and the formation of ions.
    4. Describe and explain the accepted theory of atomic structure.
      1. Describe electrons, protons, neutrons, and the general structure of the atom.
      2. Define isotope and give the mass number, number of neutrons, and number of electrons for a specific isotope.
      3. Calculate the atomic mass of an element from isotopic abundances and calculate the abundance if given the isotopic masses and average mass.
    5. Understand the basic characteristics of compounds and their formation.
      1. Describe the difference between cations and anions and how they are formed.
      2. Comprehend the difference between structural and molecular formulas.
      3. Categorize ionic, covalent, and coordinate covalent bonds.
      4. Explain the differences in the properties of ionic and molecular compounds.
    6. Converse and read fluently in the language of chemistry.
      1. Name and write correct formulas for ionic and molecular compounds, including acids and bases.
      2. Associate the names of common polyatomic ions with their formulas.
    7. Apply the basic concepts of molar calculations.
      1. Calculate the molar mass of a compound.
      2. Calculate the number of moles of an element or a compound from a given mass and the converse.
      3. Determine the % composition of elements compounds.
      4. Determine empirical and molecular formulas of a compound.
    8. Explain the principles of chemical reactions.
      1. Complete and balance single replacement, double replacement, and oxidation-reduction equations using proper subscripts.
      2. Identify the oxidizing and reducing agents in an oxidation-reduction reaction.
      3. Predict the solubility of ionic and non-ionic compounds in water.
      4. Explain the difference between an electrolyte and non-electrolyte.
      5. Predict what species will form when a compound dissolves in water.
      6. Write and balance molecular, ionic, and net-ionic equations for an indicated reaction.
      7. Determine the oxidation numbers for all elements or for each atom in a compound.
      8. List the 7 strong acids and identify strong bases by formula.
    9. Use the principles of stoichiometry.
      1. Calculate the mass or moles of a reactant or product from the mass or moles of another reactant or product using a balanced chemical equation.
      2. Determine which of two reactants is the limiting reactant.
      3. Calculate and explain the differences between actual yield, theoretical yield, and percent yield.
      4. Explain and calculate molarity.
      5. Prepare solutions of
  
  •  

    CHM 111H - General and Inorganic Chemistry I - Honors

    Credits: 5


    Emphasizes an in-depth study of the theories and principles of atomic structure bonding, stoichiometry, states of matters, and properties of solutions. Required for students who intend to enroll for more than one year of chemistry. Meets the needs of chemistry majors. Practices intellectual curiosity and applies it in independent ways to deepen understanding of course material. Provides opportunities to engage in independent intellectual inquiry to foster deeper learning. Credit may be earned in either CHM 111  or CHM 111H, but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4, WRITING LEVEL 4, MATH LEVEL 5 and CHM 101W  with a minimum grade of C or high school chemistry or permission of the Honors Office
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science Lab
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Manipulate fundamental principles and terminology in the study of matter and its changes.

         A.          Define physical properties of matter and give examples.

         B.          Recognize the states of matter and give examples.

         C.          Explain the changes between states using Kinetic Molecular Theory.

         D.          Understand and manipulate the relationship between density, volume, mass, and specific gravity.

         E.          Explain the terms atom, element, molecule, compound, mixture and their interrelationships.

         F.          Differentiate between and give examples of physical and chemical properties and changes.

         G.         Identify elemental symbols.

    2.    Understand and apply proper measurement techniques and manipulations of measured numbers.

         A.          Manipulate units of English, Metric, and SI systems, and interconvert them.

         B.          Use dimensional analysis to carry out unit conversions and other calculations.

         C.          Explain the difference between precision and accuracy and demonstrate proper use of                
                       significant digits in calculations.

         D.          Explain, convert between and measure temperature using the F, C, and K scales.

    3.    Demonstrate an understanding of the organization and information contained in the periodic table.

         A.          Recognize trends and predict elemental behavior based on the element’s position in the periodic table.

         B.          Explain the difference between the atomic number and atomic mass from information contained in the periodic table.

         C.          Identify the location of groups, periods, and series.

         D.          Utilize the periodic table to predict the properties of elements and the formation.

    4.    Describe and explain the accepted theory of atomic structure.

         A.          Describe electrons, protons, neutrons, and the general structure of the atom.

         B.          Define isotope and give the mass number, number of neutrons, and number of electrons for a specific isotope.

         C.          Calculate the atomic mass of an element from isotopic abundances.

    5.    Understand the basic characteristics of compounds and their formation.

         A.          Differentiate between cations and anions and how they are formed.

         B.          Understand the difference between structural and molecular formulas.

         C.          Categorize ionic, covalent, and coordinate covalent bonds.

         D.          Understand the describe the properties of ionic and molecular compounds.

    6.    Converse and read fluently in the language of chemistry.

         A.          Name and write correct formulas for ionic and molecular compounds, including acids and bases.

         B.          Associate the names of common polyatomic ions with their formulas.

    7.    Apply the basic concepts of molar calculations.

         A.          Understand and calculate the molar mass of a compound.

         B.          Calculate the number of moles of an element or a compound from a given mass and the converse.

         C.          Determine the % composition of elements compounds.

         D.          Determine empirical and molecular formulas of a compound.

    8.    Explain the principles of chemical reactions.

         A.          Complete, balance, and interpret the three types of chemical equations (single replacement, double replacement,
                       oxidation-reduction).

         B.          Identify the oxidizing and reducing agents in an oxidation-reduction reaction.

         C.          Predict the solubility of ionic and non-ionic compounds in water.

         D.          Explain the difference between an electrolyte and non-electrolyte.

         E.          Predict what species will form when a compound dissolves in water.

         F.          Write and balance molecular, ionic, and net-ionic equations for an indicated reaction.

         G.         Determine the oxidation numbers for all elements or for each atom in a compound.

      Outcome 9:    Use the principles of stoichiometry.

          A.         Calculate the mass or moles of a reactant or product from the mass or moles of another reactant or product using a
                       balanced chemical equation.

         B.          Determine which of two reactants is the limiting reactant.

         C.          Calculate and explain the differences between actual yield, theoretical yield, and percent yield.

         D.          Explain and calculate molarity.

         E.          Prepare solutions of a known concentration through serial dilution.

         F.          Solve the stoichiometric problems using solution concentrations.

         G.         Explain how to carry out a titration and the preparation of a standard solution.

    10. Understand basic concepts of energy in chemical reactions.

         A.          Describe the difference between potential and kinetic energy, and between heat energy and temperature.

         B.          Describe how to perform and calculate information from calorimetry experiments.

         C.          Recognize the terminology exothermic, endothermic, system, surroundings, and enthalpy.

         D.          Interconvert the units of calories and joules.

         E.          Understand the basis of the first law of thermodynamics.

    11. Understand atomic structure.

         A.          Recognize and manipulate the symbols and equations for wavelength, frequency, wave

                      amplitude, and node.

         B.          Recognize and apply the Rydberg equation, Planck’s equation.

         C.          Understand the deBroglie equation, and the Bohr equation in the appropriate calculations.

         D.          Describe the probability of finding an electron in the region described by a wave equation as an orbital.

         E.          Discuss the implications of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle.

         F.           Describe the allowed energy states of an electron in an atom using the quantum numbers n, l, ml, and ms.

    12. Understand electronic structure of elements and its relationship to chemical periodicity.

         A.          Classify substances as either paramagnetic or diamagnetic.

         B.          Understand that no orbital can be assigned more than 2 electrons and that the two electrons in an orbital must have
                       opposite spins.

         C.          Indicate the proper placement of electrons in an atom using electron configuration and orbital diagrams.

         D.          Predict the trends in atomic size, electronegativity, ionization energy, and electron affinity down a group or across a period
                       of the periodic table.

    13. Understand fundamental concepts of bonding and molecular structure.

         A.          Determine the number of valence electrons for a given element from the periodic table.

         B.          Define the difference between ionic and covalent bonding.

         C.          Predict whether two elements will form an ionic or covalent bond based on their positions on the periodic table or the
                      difference in their electronegativity.

         D.          Describe the importance of lattice energy in the formation of ionic bonds.

         E.          Draw Lewis Electron Dot Structures for compounds, including compounds that do not obey the octet role.

         F.          Understand the difference between oxidation numbers and formal charges.

         G.         Assign a formal charge to each atom in a Lewis Electron Dot Structure and use the charges to determine the best structure
                      from several possibilities.

         H.         Draw and explain resonance structures and resonance hybrids for Lewis Electron Dot Structures.

         I.          Define and predict trends in bond order, bond length, and bond dissociation energy.

         J.          Predict the formation of polar bonds and polar molecules based on electronegativity.

         K.          Describe the 5 basic molecular shapes and predict the shape or geometry of a molecule or ion using the Valence Shell
                      Electron Pair Repulsion Theory.

         L.          Understand the main components of valence bond theory and molecular orbital theory.

         M.         Describe and identify and bonds in a molecule.

         N.         Use the concept of orbital hybridization to describe bonding in a molecule.

    14. Demonstrate an understanding of the behavior of gases.

         A.          Understand the variables P, V, n, and T and their relationships in the behavior of gases.

         B.          Understand the concept of and know the conditions of standard temperature and pressure.

         C.          Understand the Kinetic Molecular Theory and how it explains the gas laws.

         D.          Understand the individual and combined gas laws and how to apply them.

         E.          Understand and use Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressure in calculations.

         F.          Understand the ideal gas law and how to apply it.

         G.         Understand the phenomena of effusion and diffusion and how to use Graham’s Law.

         H.         Understand that gases do not usually behave as ideal gases and know when to apply the Van der Waal Equation of State
                      for Real Gases.

    15. Demonstrate an understanding of the behavior of liquids and solids.

         A.          Use the kinetic molecular theory to distinguish between liquids, solids, and gases.

         B.          Describe the different intermolecular interactions in liquids and solids and predict which will occur based on molecular
                       structure.

         C.          Explain the processes of evaporation and condensation of a liquid or its vapor and use the enthalpy of vaporization in
                       calculations.

         D.          Explain the process of melting and freezing of a solid or its liquid and use the enthalpy of fusion in calculations.

         E.          Define and use the concept of equilibrium vapor pressure and dynamic equilibrium.

         F.          Understand the concept of normal boiling point, normal freezing point, critical temperature,

                      critical pressure, and the triple point and identify all of these areas on a phase diagram.

         G.         Understand and describe how the intermolecular forces affect the physical properties of a

                      substance.

         H.         Understand and describe the different types of solids and their properties.

         I.           Understand the concept of crystal lattices and be aware that different types of crystal

                      lattices exist.

    16. Practice intellectual curiosity and apply it in independent ways to deepen their understanding of course material.

         A.         Complete at least one significant project, either individually or as a group depending on the instructor’s discretion, and work
                      with the instructor to assure that the project demonstrates intellectual curiosity and academic rigor.

         B.          Actively engage with their peers in conversations, seminars, or in other formats at the instructor’s discretion to enhance
                      the depth of knowledge of the relevant material

  
  •  

    CHM 112 - General and Inorganic Chemistry II

    Credits: 5


    Studies chemical equilibria in water, including ionization solubility, complexion, acid-base phenomena, and oxidation reducing equilibria. Discusses the principles of electrochemistry, chemical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics and special topics such as the descriptive study of metals and non-metals. Meets the needs of chemistry majors. Credit may earned in CHM 112 or CHM 112H  but not in both. 

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 6, and CHM 111  with a minimum grade of C (2.0)
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science Lab
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Demonstrate an understand of the behavior of liquids and solids.

         A.          Describe the different types of solids and their properties.

         B.          Describe the concept of crystal lattices and be aware that different types of crystal lattices

                      exist.

    2.    Apply information about solution preparation and concentration.

         A.          Explain the terms solution, solvent, solute, colligative property, saturated, unsaturated, and supersaturated as they apply to
                       the formation of solutions

         B.          Perform and apply calculations using molarity, molality, mole fraction, mole percent, weight percent, and parts per million

         C.          Explain the difference between a miscible and immiscible solution

         D.          Explain the relationship between lattice energy and enthalpy of hydration to enthalpy of solution

         E.          Perform calculations for the solubility of a gas in a solvent using Henry’s Law

         F.           Apply Le Chatelier’s Principle to the change in solute solubility with temperature changes

         G.         Use Raoult’s law to calculate the mole fraction of a solute or solvent or the effect of a solute on solvent vapor pressure

         H.         Define the concept of freezing point depression and boiling point elevation and perform calculations of change in freezing
                      or boiling point, the molal freezing and boiling point elevation constants, and molecular mass using this information

          I.          Explain the effect of ionic compounds on colligative properties and use the van’t Hoff factor in the appropriate calculations

         J.          Define osmotic pressure and use it in calculations of pressure, concentration, and temperature

    3.    Perform calculations about chemical kinetics.

         A.          Explain the concept of reaction rate

         B.          Use experimental information to determine the average and instantaneous reaction rate

         C.         Write a rate equation for a reaction when given the appropriate experimental information

         D.         Describe and use the relationships between reactant concentration and time for zero-order, first-order, and second-order
                      reactions

         E.         Explain the concept of half-life and perform calculations for first and second order reactions

         F.          Explain the collision theory of reaction rates

         G.         Explain the relationship between activation energy to the rate and thermodynamics of a

                      reaction

         H.         Describe the effect of molecular orientation, temperature, and concentration on reaction rate

         I.           Apply the Arrhenius equation to calculations

         J.          Describe the elementary steps of a mechanism, give their molecularity, and define the rate- determining step

         K.          Define homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts and describe their effects on the activation energy and mechanism of a
                       reaction

    4.    Perform calculations involving equilibrium.

         A.          Describe the nature and characteristics of the state of equilibrium

         B.          Write an equilibrium constant expression for any chemical reaction, realizing that the concentrations of solids and solvents
                       are not included

         C.          Explain the difference and relationship between Kc and Kp and calculate each one if the other is known.

         D.         Determine the K value for an equation when coefficients are changed or the reaction is reversed

         E.          Describe the relationship between the magnitude of K and the position of the equilibrium

         F.          Calculate the equilibrium constant when the equilibrium concentrations of the reactants and products are given

         G.         Calculate the concentration of a reactant or product at equilibrium when the equilibrium constant is provided

         H.         Apply Le Chatelier’s principle to predict the effect of a disturbance on a chemical equilibrium

         I.          Explain the effect on a reaction mechanism and the kinetics of a reaction if one step in the mechanism involves an
                     equilibrium

    5.    Apply concepts concerning acids and bases.

          A.          Define and apply the Lewis, Bronsted, and Arrhenius acid-base theories

         B.           Recognize and write balanced equations for the ionization of mono and polyprotic acids in water

         C.           Define and apply the concept of an amphoteric substance

         D.           Describe the autoionization of water and its role in acid-base chemistry

         E.           Recognize the Bronsted acids and bases in a reaction and identify the conjugate partner of each

         F.            Identify and list common strong and weak acids and bases

         G.           Calculate the pH of a solution using the hydroxide ion or hydronium ion concentration

         H.           Calculate the pH of a solution from experimental information about ka values and concentrations

         I.             Describe the acid-base properties of salts and calculate the pH of a salt solution

         J.            Calculate the pH of a polyprotic acid

    6.    Predict reactions between acids and bases.

         A.          Calculate the pH at the equivalence point in the reaction of a strong acid with a strong or weak base or the reaction
                       between a strong base with a weak acid

         B.          Predict the effect of the addition of a common ion on the pH of a weak acid or base solution

         C.          Describe the function of a buffer solution and write instructions for preparation of a buffer solution with a designated pH

         D.          Use the Henderson-Hasselbach equation to calculate the pH of a buffer with a given composition or predict the change in
                       pH if the composition of the buffer changes

         E.          Calculate the pH during an acid-base titration

         F.          Explain how an indicator functions in an acid-base titration

         G.         Describe the difference between a titration curve for a strong acid/strong base and a titration curve where one of the
                      titrants is weak

      Outcome 7:    Apply principles of solubility and precipitation equilibria.

         A.          Write the equilibrium reaction and equilibrium constant expression for any slightly soluble salt

         B.          Calculate Ksp, solubility, and the formation of a precipitate from the appropriate experimental information

         C.          Calculate the solubility of a salt in the presence of a common ion

         D.          Devise a method for separating ions in solution from one another using Ksp values

         E.          Calculate the equilibrium constant for the net reaction for a situation in which two or more equilibrium processes are
                      occurring in solution

         F.          Understand that hydrolysis increases the solubility of a salt when the anion is the conjugate base of a weak acid

         G.         Understand that the solubility of slightly soluble salts may be affected by pH or the formation of a complex ion

    8.    Apply principles of thermodynamics.

         A.          Describe the difference between the information provided by kinetics and thermodynamics

         B.          Define entropy as a measure of disorder in a system, predict the sign and calculate the entropy change for a reaction or
                      change of state

         C.          Predict whether a reaction is spontaneous (product-favored) using entropy and enthalpy changes

         D.          Use the relationship between Gibbs Free Energy and entropy and enthalpy and perform the appropriate calculations

         E.          Describe and apply the relationship between the free energy change and the equilibrium constant for a reaction

         F.          Explain how a reactant-favored reaction can become product-favored by coupling with another strongly product-favored
                      reaction

    9.    Apply principles of electron transfer reactions.

         A.          Define and use the terms electrochemical cell, electrolysis, electrode, electrolyte, salt bridge, anode, and cathode

         B.          Balance equations for oxidation-reduction reactions in acidic or basic solutions using the half-reaction approach

         C.          Predict what will occur in an electrochemical cell if both half reactions are given as reductions

         D.          Calculate the standard electrode potential for a cell reaction and predict whether the reaction will be spontaneous as
                       written

         E.          Understand and apply the Nernst equation to calculate the cell potential under nonstandard conditions

         F.          Calculate the equilibrium constant for a reaction from the standard electrode potential

  
  •  

    CHM 112H - General and Inorganic Chemistry II - Honors

    Credits: 5


    Continuation of CHM 111 . Studies chemical equilibria in water, including ionization solubility, complexion, acid-base phenomena, and oxidation reducing equilibria. Discusses the principles of electrochemistry, chemical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics and special topics such as the descriptive study of metals and non-metals. Meets the needs of chemistry majors. Provides opportunities to engage in independent intellectual inquiry to foster deeper learning. Credit may be earned in CHM 112  or CHM 112H but not both. 

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4, WRITING LEVEL 4, MATH LEVEL 6, and completion of CHM 111  with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or permission of the Honors Office
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science Lab
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Understand behavior of liquids and solids.

         A.          Use the kinetic molecular theory to distinguish between liquids, solids, and gases.

         B.          Describe the different intermolecular interactions in liquids and solids and predict which will occur based on molecular structure.

         C.          Explain the processes of evaporation and condensation of a liquid or its vapor and use the enthalpy of vaporization in calculations.

         D.          Explain the processes of melting and freezing of a solid or its liquid and use the enthalpy of fusion in calculations.

         E.          Define and use the concept of equilibrium vapor pressure and dynamic equilibrium.

         F.          Understand the concept of normal boiling point, normal freezing point, critical temperature, critical pressure, and the triple point and identify
                      all of these areas on a phase diagram.

         G.         Understand and describe how the intermolecular forces affect the physical properties of a substance.

         H.         Understand and describe the different types of solids and their properties.

         I.          Understand the concept of crystal lattices and be aware that different types of crystal lattices exist.

    2.    Understand and can apply information about solution preparation and concentration.

         A.          Explain the terms solution, solvent, solute, colligative property, saturated, unsaturated, and

                      supersaturated as they apply to the formation of solutions.

         B.          Perform and apply calculations using molarity, molality, mole fraction, mole percent, weight

                      percent, and parts per million.

         C.          Explain the difference between a miscible and immiscible solution.

         D.          Explain the relationship between lattice energy and enthalpy of hydration to enthalpy of solution.

         E.          Perform calculations for the solubility of a gas in a solvent using Henry’s Law.

         F.          Apply Le Chatelier’s Principle to the change in solute solubility with temperature changes.

         G.         Use Raoult’s law to calculate the mole fraction of a solute or solvent or the effect of a solute on solvent vapor pressure.

         H.         Define the concept of freezing point depression and boiling point elevation and perform calculations of change in freezing or boiling point,
                      the molal freezing and boiling point elevation constants, and molecular mass using this information.

         I.          Explain the effect of ionic compounds on colligative properties and use the van’t Hoff factor in the appropriate calculations

         J.          Define osmotic pressure and use it in calculations of pressure, concentration, and temperature.

    3.    Understand and can perform calculations about chemical kinetics.

         A.          Explain the concept of reaction rate.

         B.          Use experimental information to determine the average and instantaneous reaction rate.

         C.          Write a rate equation for a reaction when given the appropriate experimental information.

         D.          Describe and use the relationships between reactant concentration and time for zero-order, first-order, and second-order reactions.

         E.          Understand the concept of half-life and perform calculations for first and second order reactions.

         F.          Explain the collision theory of reaction rates.

         G.         Explain the relationship between activation energy to the rate and thermodynamics of a reaction.

         H.         Describe the effect of molecular orientation, temperature, and concentration on reaction rate.

         I.           Apply the Arrhenius equation to calculations.

         J.          Describe the elementary steps of a mechanism, give their molecularity, and define the rate- determining step.

         K.          Define homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts and describe their effects on the activation energy and mechanism of a reaction.

    4.    Understand and can perform calculations involving equilibrium.    

         A.          Understand the nature and characteristics of the state of equilibrium.

         B.          Write an equilibrium constant expression for any chemical reaction, realizing that the concentrations of solids and solvents are not
                       included.

         C.          Understand the difference and relationship between Kc and Kp.

         D.          Determine the K value for an equation when coefficients are changed or the reaction is reversed.

         E.          Understand the relationship of the magnitude of K and the position of the equilibrium.

         F.          Calculate the equilibrium constant when the equilibrium concentrations of the reactants and products are .

         G.         Use the equilibrium constant to calculate the concentration of a reactant or product at equilibrium.

         H.         Apply Le Chatelier’s principle to predict the effect of a disturbance on a chemical equilibrium.

         I.          Explain the effect on a reaction mechanism and the kinetics of a reaction if one step in the mechanism involves an equilibrium.

    5.     Understand and can apply concepts concerning acids and bases.

         A.          Define and apply the Lewis, Bronsted, and Arrhenius acid-base theories.

         B.          Recognize and write balanced equations for the ionization of mono and polyprotic acids in water.

         C.          Define and apply the concept of an amphoteric substance.

         D.          Describe the autoionization of water and its role in acid-base chemistry.

         E.          Recognize the Bronsted acids and bases in a reaction and identify the conjugate partner of each.

         F.          Identify and list common strong and weak acids and bases.

         G.         Calculate the pH of a solution using the hydroxide ion or hydronium ion concentration.

         H.         Calculate the pH of a solution from experimental information about ka values and concentrations.

         I.          Describe the acid-base properties of salts and calculate the pH of a salt solution.

         J.          Calculate the pH of a polyprotic acid.

    6.    Understand and can predict reactions between acids and bases.

         A.          Calculate the pH at the equivalence point in the reaction of a strong acid with a strong or weak base or the reaction between a strong base
                      with a weak acid.

         B.          Predict the effect of the addition of a common ion on the pH of a weak acid or base solution.

         C.          Describe the function of a buffer solution and write instructions for preparation of a buffer solution with a designated pH.

         D.          Use the Henderson-Hasselbach equation to calculate the pH of a buffer with a given composition or predict the change in pH if the
                       composition of the buffer changes.

         E.          Calculate the pH during an acid-base titration.

         F.          Explain how an indicator functions in an acid-base titration.

         G.         Describe the difference between a titration curve for a strong acid/strong base and a titration curve where one of the titrants is weak.

    7.    Understand and apply principles of solubility and precipitation equilibria.    

         A.          Write the equilibrium reaction and equilibrium constant expression for any slightly soluble salt.

         B.          Calculate Ksp, solubility, and the formation of a precipitate from the appropriate experimental  information.

         C.          Calculate the solubility of a salt in the presence of a common ion.

         D.          Devise a method for separating ions in solution from one another using Ksp values.

         E.          Calculate the equilibrium constant for the net reaction for a situation in which two or more equilibrium processes are occurring in solution.

         F.          Understand that hydrolysis increases the solubility of a salt when the anion is the conjugate base of a weak acid.

         G.         Understand that the solubility of slightly soluble salts may be affected by pH or the formation of a complex ion.

    8.    Understand and apply principles of thermodynamics.

         A.          Describe the difference between the information provided by kinetics and thermodynamics.

         B.          Understand that entropy is a measure of disorder in a system, predict the sign and calculate the entropy change for a reaction or change of
                       state.

         C.          Predict whether a reaction is spontaneous (product-favored) using entropy and enthalpy changes.

         D.         Understand and apply the relationship between Gibbs Free Energy and entropy and enthalpy and perform the appropriate calculations.

         E.          Describe and apply the relationship between the free energy change and the equilibrium constant for a reaction.

         F.          Explain how a reactant-favored reaction can become product-favored by coupling with another strongly product-favored reaction.

    9.    Understand and apply principles of electron transfer reactions.

         A.          Define and use the terms electrochemical cell, electrolysis, electrode, electrolyte, salt bridge, anode, and cathode.

         B.          Balance equations for oxidation-reduction reactions in acidic or basic solutions using the half-reaction approach.

         C.          Predict what will occur in an electrochemical cell if both half reactions are given as reductions.

         D.         Calculate the standard electrode potential for a cell reaction and predict whether the reaction will be spontaneous as written.

         E.          Understand and apply the Nernst equation to calculate the cell potential under nonstandard conditions.

         F.           Calculate the equilibrium constant for a reaction from the standard electrode potential.

    10. Practice intellectual curiosity and apply it in independent ways to deepen their understanding of course material.

         A.          Complete at least one significant project, either individually or as a group depending on the instructor’s discretion, and work with the
                       instructor to assure that the project demonstrates intellectual curiosity and academic rigor.

         B.          Actively engage with their peers in conversations, seminars, or in other formats at the instructor’s discretion to enhance the depth of
                      knowledge of the relevant material.

  
  •  

    CHM 210 - Organic Chemistry I

    Credits: 4
    Provides the basic principles of organic chemistry, including functional groups, nomenclature, mechanisms, reaction types and various reagents. Meets the needs of students in the medical and health fields, engineering fields, and science majors.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2, WRITING LEVEL 2, MATH LEVEL 5; CHM 111  or CHM 112  with a grade of “C” or better.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Communicate effectively.
      1. Demonstrate understanding by reading, speaking, and writing.
      2. Employ critical writing and active listening to obtain or convey information.
      3. Collect and analyze data.
      4. Identify trends, solve problems, and conclude logically by integrating concepts.lusions.
    2. Demonstrate understanding of fundamental concepts of bonding and molecular structure
      1. Describe atoms in terms of atomic structure, orbital electrons configurations and chemical bonding theory.
      2. Explain the basic principles of ionic and covalent bonding.
      3. Describe the relationship of acids, bases, electrophiles and nucleophiles to the reactivity of organic molecules.
      4. Draw and explain resonance structures and formal changeof organic molecules and dipole moments of covalent bonds.
      5. Predict the formation of polar bonds and polar molecules based on electronegativity.
      6. Use the concept of orbital hybridization to describe bonding in organic molecules.
    3. Demonstrate the understanding of basic structures and properties of organic molecules.
      1. Recognize and identify the common organic functional groups and their elemental components.
      2. Use line bonds diagrams to explain chemical structures.
      3. Determine the degrees of unsaturation of a molecule.
      4. Describe the stability, bonding structure and physical properties of alkane, alkene, alkyne, alkyl halides and organometallic compounds.
      5. Explain the stability of aromatic systems using resonance, the importance of aromaticity, and anti-aromatic and non-aromatic compounds
    4. Apply the fundamental rules of nomenclature.
      1. Name and draw the homologous series of alkanes and alkyl groups for the first twelve carbons in the series (C1 through to C12).
      2. Use the rules to name and draw cycloalkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, substituted benzenes, aromatic and organometallic compounds.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of alkane and cycloalkane conformers.
      1. Draw staggered and eclipsed conformers of various alkanes to illustrate their stability
      2. Explain steric and torsional strain of different alkane and cycloalkane conformations.
      3. Draw and identify the axial and equatorial bonds in various cycloalkanes.
      4. Explain the conformational mobility of cyclohexane and its substituted derivatives that produces chair conformers from ring flipping
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of the important concepts of stereochemistry.
      1. Explain chiral and achiral molecules, enantiomers and racemates.
      2. Explain optical activity dextrorotatory, levorotatory, specific rotation and plane polarized light.
      3. Draw and name isomers from a given chemical formula.
      4. Classify and draw E and Z stereoisomers of alkenes.
      5. Classify and draw cis and trans stereoisomers of cycloalkanes.
      6. Classify and draw the configuration of enantiomers either in line-bond structures or Fischer projections.
      7. Explain diastereomers, constitutional isomers, stereoisomers and meso-compounds.
    7. Demonstrate and understanding of the major organic reactions and recognize their characteristics.
      1. Describe and identify the major reactions: rearrangement, addition, substitution and elimination reactions.
      2. Describe a chemical reaction in terms of energy diagrams, transition states, bond dissociation energies, rates and equilibria, homogenic and heterogenic reactions, bond breaking and bond making processes.
      3. Use mechanisms to explain the electrophilic addition reactions and syntheses of alkenes and identify the reagents used in these transformations. Explain Markovnikov’s rule and the stability of carbocation intermediates in these reactions.
      4. Use mechanisms to explain the major reactions and syntheses of alkynes and identify the reagents used in these transformations.
      5. Use the SN1, SN2, E1 and E2 mechanisms to explain the major reactions and syntheses of alkyl halides. Identify the nucleophiles and bases reagents used in these reactions.
  
  •  

    CHM 210LW - Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

    Credits: 1
    Provides the basic principles of organic laboratory techniques. Includes note keeping, filtrations, recrystallizations, extractions, distillation methods, spectroscopic methods, chromatographic methods, chemical searches, and report writing.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2, WRITING LEVEL 2, MATH LEVEL 5 and completion of or concurrent enrollment in CHM 210 .
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 60
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science Lab
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate understanding of the importance of laboratory safety and maintenance.
      1. Complete the agreement provided after reading the safety protocols and regulations of the science laboratory.
      2. Conduct safe lab procedures and recognize common laboratory hazards.
      3. Identify and locate all safety features within the laboratory (eye wash fountains, fire extinguishers, fire alarms fire blankets, etc.).
      4. Complete the agreement provided after reading the procedures of safe and ethical use of equipment and instrumentation used in the laboratory.
      5. Dispose of all waste materials properly (chemicals, sharps, broken glassware), if necessary review Safety Data Sheets.
      6. Use personal protection (e.g. goggles, gloves, lab coat) properly.
      7. Clean up all work areas and return all equipment to designated areas before leaving the laboratory.
      8. Report any accidents, incidents or breakages immediately.
    2. Record experimental work to promote learning of good laboratory practices.
      1. Locate Safety Data Sheets, as needed.
      2. Use a laboratory notebook to communicate experimental concepts and results.
      3. Record and analyze the data and results of an experiment.
      4. Produce reports to inform others of your progress in the laboratory.
    3. Demonstrate understanding of how to perform fundamental organic chemistry experiments.
      1. Recognize and name all the glassware items used in the laboratory.
      2. Use standard laboratory equipment and classical techniques to carry out macroscale and microscale experiments.
      3. Describe the objectives of performing organic experiments.
      4. Conduct a broad range of organic transformations which illustrate topics drawn from the organic chemistry lecture sequence.
      5. Follow directions as presented, but troubleshoot and explain deviations from expected procedures and results.
      6. Design experiments with proper safety features.
    4. Demonstrate understanding of core lab concepts and effectively complete experiments and analysis in organic chemistry.
      1. Perform stoichiometric calculations for reactions (limiting reagent, theoretical yield).
      2. Perform fundamental methods of laboratory separations and purifications: thin layer chromatography, recrystallization, simple and fractional distillation.
      3. Perform basic methods of preparative chemistry: refluxing reaction mixtures, extractions and controlled chemical transformations.
      4. Identify and assess the purity of organic compounds using melting point, thin layer chromatography, and gas chromatography.
      5. Characterize and identify organic compounds by physical and spectroscopic methods including but not limited to: Infra-Red (IR), proton NMR spectrophotometry (and other methods as presented).
  
  •  

    CHM 220 - Organic Chemistry II

    Credits: 4


    Provides a continuation of CHM 210 with reactions, mechanisms and nomenclature of carbonyl groups, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleotides. Includes special topics with applications in the medical, pharmaceutical and industrial fields. Meets the needs of students in medical and health fields, engineering fields, and science majors.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2, WRITING LEVEL 2, MATH LEVEL 5 and completion of CHM 210  with a minimum grade of C (2.0).
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Communicate effectively.

         A.          Demonstrate understanding by reading, speaking, and writing.

         B.          Employ critical writing and active listeneing to obtain or convey information.

         C.          Collect and analyze data.

         D.          Identify trends, solve problems, and conclude logically by integrating concepts.

    2.    Recognize the importance of the pre-requisite organic chemistry material.

         A.          Explain fundamental concepts of bonding and molecular structure.

         B.          Describe alkane and cycoalkane conformers.

         C.          Explain the important concepts of stereochemistry.

         D.          Recognize the major organic reactions of alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides and aromatic compounds.

    3.    Demonstrate an understanding of the basic structures and properties of organic molecules.  

         A.          Use line bonds diagrams to explain chemical structures.

         B.          Describe the stability, bonding, structure and physical properties of amines, alcohols, thiols, sulfides, disulfides, ethers and major carbonyl
                       functional groups.

         C.          Discuss the acidity and basicity of these functional groups and the effects of substituents.
     

         D.          Identify these functional groups through analysis of spectroscopic data (NMR, IR and mass spectrometry).

    4.    Apply the fundamental rules of nomenclature.

         A.                Name and draw the homologous series of carbonyl functional groups and sulfur derivatives for the first twelve carbons in the series (C1
                            through to C12).

         B.                Use the rules to name and draw amines, alcohols, thiols, sulfides, disulfides, sulfoxides, sulfones, ethers and major carbonyl functional
                             groups.

    5.    Demonstrate an understanding of the important  organic reactions.

         A.                Explain the important reactions of amines, alcohols, thiols, ethers, sulfides, sulfoxides, and sulfones.

         B.                Use mechanisms to explain the major reactions and synthesis of amines, alcohols, thiols, ethers, sulfides, sulfoxides, and sulfones.

         C.                Explain the important nucleophilic addition reactions of aldehydes and ketones.

         D.                Use mechanisms to explain the major reactions and synthesis of aldehydes and ketones.

         E.                Describe the nucleophilic acyl substitution reactions of carboxylic acid and their derivatives.

         F.                Use mechanisms to explain the major reactions and  synthesis of carboxylic acid and their derivatives.

    6.    Demonstrate an understanding of the major α-substitution and carbonyl condensation reactions.   

         A.          Discuss enolate ions and the keto-enol tautomerization of carbonyl compounds to undergo chemical reactions.

         B.          Describe the mechanisms of α-substitution and carbonyl condensation reactions.

         C.          Explain the importance of enolate ions in malonic ester synthesis and acetoacetic ester synthesis.

         D.          Explain how aldol and enone products are produced through simple and mixed condensation reactions.

         E.           Describe Claisen, mixed Claisen and Dieckmann condensation reactions.

    7.   Apply organic chemistry principles to biochemical macromolecules.

         A.          Carbohydrates:

                      1.    Draw and identify the major monosaccharides and disaccharides and polysaccharides.

                      2.    Explain the different epimeric, anomeric centers and mutarotations in reference to Howarth and Fischer projections.

                      3.    Describe the major reactions of monosaccharides and disaccharides.

         B.          Lipids:

                      1.    Explain the difference between fats and oils, saponifiable and non-saponifiable lipids.

                      2.    Draw and recognize the  structures of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, glycerol, phospholipids, sphingolipids, steroids,
                             prostaglandins, leukotrienes and thromboxanes.

                      3.    Explain the major reactions of fatty acids, lipids and steroids.

         C.          Amino Acids, Proteins, Enzymes and Nucleic Acids:

                      1.    Recognize and draw the amino acid and zwitterionic forms and predict the structure of  peptide linkages between  amino acid.

                      2.     Identify the primary, secondary and tertiary structures of proteins and the types of bonding involved.

                      3.    Discuss the simple classification of enzymes by their function and reaction and recognize the terms of selectivity active site, inhibition,
                             denaturation and cofactors.

                      4.    Discuss and identify the common aromatic heterocycles and nucleic acids found in biological systems.

    8.    Apply organic principles to polymers.

         A.          Recognize naturally occurring polymers including fibers.

         B.          Draw and recognize polymers from their monomeric units.

         C.          Describe the step-growth synthesis of polyamides and polyesters.

         D.          Recognize characteristics of common polymeric materials and classify them, their properties  and recycling uses.

         E.          Demonstrate understanding of the functional characteristics of common polymers.

         F.           Explain the difference between addition and condensation polymers.

         G.          Explain the differences between thermoset and thermoplastic resins, polymeric fiber, films and additives.

  
  •  

    CHM 220LW - Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

    Credits: 1
    Provides a continuation of CHM 210LW , applying the basic principles of synthesis and analysis to various challenging reactions, using established techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2, WRITING LEVEL 2, MATH LEVEL 5 and completion of CHM 210LW  with a minimum grade of C (2.0). 
    Corequisite(s): Recommended to be taken concurrently with CHM 220  
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 60
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science Lab
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of laboratory safety and maintenance.
      1. Complete the agreement provided after reading the safety protocols and regulations of the science laboratory.
      2. Conduct safe lab procedures and recognize common laboratory hazards.
      3. Identify and locate all safety features within the laboratory (eye wash fountains, fire extinguishers, fire alarms fire blankets, etc.).
      4. Complete the agreement provided after reading the procedures of safe and ethical use of equipment and instrumentation used in the laboratory.
      5. Dispose of all waste materials properly (chemicals, sharps, broken glassware), if necessary review Safety Data Sheets.
      6. Use personal protection (e.g. goggles, gloves, lab coat) properly.
      7. Clean up all work areas and return all equipment to designated areas before leaving the laboratory.
      8. Report any accidents, incidents or breakages immediately.
    2. Record experimental work to promote learning of good laboratory practices.
      1. Locate Safety Data Sheets as needed.
      2. Use a laboratory notebook to communicate experimental concepts and results.
      3. Record and analyze the data and results of an experiment.
      4. Produce reports to inform others of your progress in the laboratory.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of core lab concepts and effectively complete experiments and analysis in organic chemistry.
      1. Perform stoichiometric calculations for reactions (limiting reagent, theoretical yield).
      2. Perform laboratory methods of separations, purifications, recrystallizations, steam distillations, refluxing reactions, extraction and controlled chemical transformations.
      3. Identify and assess the purity of organic compounds using melting point, thin layer chromatography, and gas chromatography.
      4. Characterize and identify organic compounds by physical and spectroscopic methods including but not limited to: Infra-Red (IR), proton NMR spectrophotometry (and other methods as presented).
    4. Demonstrate understanding of how to perform advanced syntheses reactions.
      1. Use standard and non-standard laboratory equipment and classical techniques to carry out macroscale and microscale experiments.
      2. Describe the objectives of performing organic experiments.
      3. Use established techniques for handling air sensitive reagents.
      4. Conduct a broad range of organic transformations of alcohol and carbonyl derivatives drawn from the organic chemistry lecture sequence.
      5. Perform basic qualitative analysis experiments to identify specific unknown samples and reagents.
    5. Demonstrate understanding of how to combine the fundamental laboratory techniques to solve a chemical problem.
      1. Design experiments to answer specific chemical questions, outline important strategies using proper safety features.
      2. Troubleshoot through directions from expected procedures and results.
      3. Perform basic qualitative analysis methods to identify samples and reagents.
      4. Analyze and interpret data acquired from experiments and analysis.
      5. Produce a report to explain the results of the experiments, the data obtained and clear rationale for the conclusions derived.
  
  •  

    CHM 221 - Organic Biochemistry

    Credits: 3
    Addresses the major human metabolic pathways from an enzymatic perspective. Relies heavily on the major classes of organic compounds and the interrelationships of biologically active compounds. Designed for students interested in careers in health related fields, biochemistry, medicine or pharmacy.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2, WRITING LEVEL 2, MATH LEVEL 5 and BIO 171  or CHM 210 
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Communicate effectively
      1. Demonstrate understanding by reading, speaking, and writing.
      2. Employ critical writing and active listening to obtain or convey information.
      3. Collect and analyze data.
      4. Identify trends, solve problems, and conclude logically by integrating concepts.
    2. Apply chemical principles to biochemical systems
      1. Explain the basic principles of ionic and covalent bonding.
      2. Describe the importance of pH and its relationship to the reactivity and stability of molecules.
      3. Explain the significance of hydrogen bonding to biochemical molecules.
      4. Explain the first and second laws of thermodynamics, coupling of reactions, catabolic, anabolic, exergonic and endergonic reactions.
    3. Apply organic chemistry principles to biochemical systems
      1. Draw and name functional groups and use their chemical properties to predict the reactivity and physical characteristics of molecules.
      2. Recognize how functional groups in biochemically relevant macromolecules are inter-converted.
      3. Explain the molecular structures of functional groups in terms of enantiomers, chiral and achiral centers, stereoisomers, isomers and conformers.
    4. Apply principles of enzyme kinetics to biochemical systems
      1. Explain how enzymes are specific and selective catalysts with reference to the chemical properties of amino acids and prosthetic groups.
      2. Define activation energy and describe how it is related to reaction rates, free energy and bonding energy.
      3. Describe the Michaelis-Menton and allosteric model for enzyme kinetics to calculate Km and Vmax.
      4. Recognize the importance of pH, temperature, salt concentration, enzyme concentration, substrate concentration and inhibitors in regulating enzymatic activity.
      5. Explain the differences between competitive, non-competitive and uncompetitive inhibitors and how these can be identified using enzyme kinetics and Lineweaver-Burke plots.
      6. Describe the simple classification of enzymes by their function.
    5. Describe cellular process in a biochemical system
      1. Carbohydrate metabolism:
        1. Describe the major points of regulation and interconnections between glycolysis, the pentose pathway, anaerobic degradation and the Krebs cycle.
        2. Identify and explain the importance of ATP, NADH, and FADH2 in glycolysis, the Kreb cycle, the pentose pathway and the electron transport chain.
        3. Explain the physiological relevance of these pathways and strategies for driving endothermic reactions.
        4. Explain the significance of the pentose pathway and anaerobic respiration and their regulation points.
      2. Fat metabolism:
        1. Explain the major molecules involved in fatty acid metabolism and ?-oxidation.
        2. Describe the methods of regulation, the interconnections of these metabolic pathways and recycling of the metabolites.
        3. Compare the overall energy efficiency of the aerobic respiration, anaerobic degradation of glucose and lipid metabolism.
      3. Nitrogen metabolism:
        1. Explain the major molecules involved in deamination and the carbon chain breakdown from the available amino acid pool.
        2. Describe the methods of regulation and interconnections of protein metabolism.
        3. Describe the methods of regulation and interconnections of nucleic acid metabolism.
      4. Cell signaling / communication:
        1. Identify the major molecules and the reactions involved in cell signaling.
        2. Describe how cell signaling regulates the various metabolic processes within a cell.
  
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    CHM 222LW - Organic Biochemistry Laboratory

    Credits: 1
    Provides a variety of perspectives using laboratory experiments to supplement and enhance the student’s background in organic and biochemistry. Includes extractions, syntheses, dilutions, analyses, and enzyme kinetics. Designed for students interested in careers in health related fields, biochemistry, medicine or pharmacy.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2, WRITING LEVEL 2, MATH LEVEL 5 and BIO 171  or CHM 210  and completion of or concurrent enrollment in CHM 221 
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science Lab
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Communicate effectively.
      1. Demonstrate understanding by reading, speaking, and writing.
      2. Employ critical writing and active listening to obtain or convey information.
      3. Collect and analyze data.
      4. Identify trends, solve problems, and conclude logically by integrating concepts.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of laboratory safety and maintenance.
      1. Complete the agreement provided after reading the safety protocols and regulations of the science laboratory.
      2. Conduct safe lab procedures and recognize common laboratory hazards.
      3. Identify and locate all safety features within the laboratory (eye wash fountains, fire extinguishers, fire alarms fire blankets, etc.).
      4. Complete the agreement provided after reading the procedures of safe and ethical use of equipment and instrumentation used in the laboratory.
      5. Dispose of all waste materials properly (chemicals, sharps, broken glassware), if necessary review Safety Data Sheets.
      6. Use personal protection (e.g. goggles, gloves, lab coat) properly.
      7. Clean up all work areas and return all equipment to designated areas before leaving the laboratory.
      8. Report any accidents, incidents or breakages immediately.
    3. Record experimental work to promote learning of good laboratory practices
      1. Locate Safety Data Sheets as needed.
      2. Use a laboratory notebook to communicate experimental concepts and results.
      3. Record and analyze the results and data of an experiment.
      4. Produce reports to inform others of your progress in the laboratory.
    4. Apply chemical methods to biochemical systems
      1. Use basic chemistry skills to make reagents in a laboratory setting including the concept of moles and molar solutions, percent solutions, normality, and dilutions.
      2. Perform and demonstrate an understanding of the principles of extraction, chromatography, serial dilutions, buffers and pH.
      3. Use chemical methods to explain colorimetric assays, enzyme catalysis and protein concentrations.
      4. Use chemical tests and indicators to determine the presence of specific organic functional groups found in biological macromolecules.
      5. Use various tests and reactivity’s to compare and identify specific functional groups found in biochemical systems.
    5. Demonstrate the competent use of laboratory instrumentation and equipment
      1. Accurately use critical pieces of equipment like micropipetors, balances, spectrophotometers, hot plates and water baths etc.
      2. Exhibit proper handling of enzymes, solutions, solids and glassware used in biochemical experiments and analysis.
      3. Design and conduct experiments with proper safety features.
      4. Conduct controlled experiments without wasting reagents and time.
      5. Explain the use of UV-visible spectrometers, IR spectrometers for quantitative and qualitative analysis.
      6. Use structural drawing programs to draw major macromolecules.
    6. Demonstrate use of equipment to study enzyme kinetics
      1. Explain how enzymes are specific and selective catalysts with reference to the chemical properties of amino acids and prosthetic groups.
      2. Define activation energy and describe how it is related to reaction rates, free energy and bonding energy.
      3. Conduct enzyme kinetics to calculate Km and Vmax.
      4. Conduct enzyme kinetics to identify competitive, non-competitive and uncompetitive inhibitors using Lineweaver-Burke plots.
      5. Explain the reactivity of enzymes with variables such as pH, substrate concentration, temperature and enzyme concentration.
  
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    CHM 230 - Chemical Analysis/Instrumentation

    Credits: 4
    Presents the theory and practice of basic chemical preparation and analysis as performed in research and/or industrial settings. Emphasizes safety, detailed and accurate record keeping, data handling, and report writing. Benefits all science majors in Biology, Chemistry, Engineering, and other Applied Science Curricula.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 6 and either completion of CHM 106W  or completion of CHM 112  and CHM 210  all with a grade of “C” or better. CHM 210  and CHM 230 may be taken concurrently with permission of the instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science Lab
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand proper techniques and considerations for sampling and sample preparation.
      1. Take, package, store, and transport liquid, solid, gaseous, or mixed-phase samples so as to maintain the integrity of the sample prior to analysis
    2. Understand and are able to perform calculations associated with analytical methods.
      1. Describe and perform statistical calculations including determination of average, deviation, and standard deviation
      2. Apply statistical tests to data to determine whether a value can be discarded as an outlier
      3. Prepare a calibration curve or table for internal standard, external standard, and standard addition methods and apply the appropriate calculations to their data
    3. Perform calculations for and prepare solutions using various concentration units.
      1. Calculate the amount of compound required to prepare a given volume or mass of solution using percent by weight, percent by volume, percent weight per volume, molarity, molality, and parts per million
      2. Prepare a given volume or mass of solution using percent by weight, percent by volume, percent weight per volume, molarity, molality, and parts per million by choosing the appropriate glassware and measurement techniques
    4. Understand and apply concepts of pH.
      1. Identify a sample as acidic or basic using the pH
      2. Calculate the pH of a solution when given concentration information
      3. Perform calculations for and prepare a solution with a pre-determined pH
      4. Perform calculations for and prepare a buffer with a pre-determined pH
    5. Understand and apply concepts of chemical equilibrium.
      1. Discuss and perform calculations pertaining to systems at equilibrium
    6. Understand and are capable of performing wet chemical analysis procedures.
      1. Choose equipment for, prepare equipment and perform mass and volume determinations using the appropriate accuracy and precision for the piece of equipment
      2. Prepare apparatus for, perform, and complete appropriate calculations for preparation and standardization of solutions, titrations and gravimetric analysis
    7. Be versed in theory and practice of chromatographic methods.
      1. Describe the basis for different types of chromatography including partition, size exclusion, and adsorption
      2. Design a separation using a chromatographic technique that is appropriate for the analyte and sample matrix
      3. Prepare samples and perform injections on gas and liquid chromatographs
    8. Be versed in theory and practice of spectroscopic techniques.
      1. Explain the theory behind and operation of instruments which use nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, ultraviolet, visible, atomic asorption, and mass spectrometry techniques
      2. Demonstrate the appropriate uses of instruments which include nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, ultraviolet, visible, atomic asorbtion, and mass spectrometry techniques
    9. Be versed in theory and practice of good laboratory practices.
      1. Maintain a laboratory notebook following good laboratory practices
    10. Be versed in theory and practice of safe laboratory techniques.
      1. Work safely in the laboratory
    11. Troubleshoot laboratory instrumentation.
      1. Check instruments to isolate each component and determine area for a malfunction.
  
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    CHM 231 - Troubleshooting for Analytical Instrumentation

    Credits: 1
    Provides an overview of techniques and documentation required for trouble shooting analytical instrumentation in an industrial setting. Includes systematic approach to diagnosis of instrument failures as well as hands-on maintenance and repair operations. Beneficial to all science and technology majors.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 5 and completion of or concurrent enrollment in CHM 210 , CHM 221 , or CHM 230 .
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Determine that instrument has no output.
      1. Systematically evaluate instrument and determine that it is properly connected, set up or is not functioning at all.
    2. Determine that instrument output is not typical and instrument is not working properly.
      1. Observe instrument’s output and determine that it does not meet operation standards.
      2. Systematically isolate instrument electronics, plumbing, and sample compartments to determine which area has been affected.
    3. Document problems in instrument performance and interact with appropriate service personnel.
      1. Maintain use and maintenance logs for instrument.
      2. Document evaluation of instrument problems
      3. Contact appropriate service personnel.
      4. Work with service personnel to identify and repair instrument problem.
    4. Perform routine maintenance operations on small instruments.
      1. Determine time for and schedule maintenance on instruments.
      2. Perform maintenance operations including, but not limited to, replacement of lamps, seals, liners, o-rings, and circuit boards.
    5. Perform simple repair procedures on small instruments.
      1. Perform repair operations including, but not limited to, replacement of lamps, seals, liners, o-rings, and circuit boards.
  
  •  

    CHM 290-299 - Special Projects in Chemistry


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Child Development

  
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    CD 109W - Introduction to the Educational Paraprofessional

    Credits: 2
    Introduces the role of the educational paraprofessional in a classroom setting. Prepares for work with a diverse population while assisting in implementing curriculum, facilitating classroom activities, and working with special needs students. Identifies the skills necessary to work well with a team of teachers, administrators, and other professionals. Requires a service learning project.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 or WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Provide assistance to educational personnel as directed.
      1. Identify ways to support and work with children to complete classroom tasks.
      2. Implement developmentally appropriate practice.
      3. Take initiative in responding to classroom needs commensurate with level of preparation.
    2. Examine different approaches to working with typical and atypical children in a classroom setting.
      1. Understand and implement a range of strategies to motivate children and enhance their learning.
      2. Critically examine and implement a variety of positive discipline strategies relevant to the child and situation.
    3. Function as an effective team member.
      1. Utilize a service learning project in a classroom setting to enhance relationships and function as a cooperative member of a classroom team.
      2. Utilize effective verbal and non-verbal communication skills in team-building.
      3. Identify and avoid obstacles to effective communication and team-building.
      4. Demonstrate respect to all children and team members.
    4. Complete reading and writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Comprehend, analyze, and evaluate assigned readings.
      2. Reflect upon subject matter and communicate in a coherent writing style.
  
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    CD 110W - Infant/Toddler Development

    Credits: 4
    Introduces the skills needed to interact with infants and toddlers as a teacher in a professional capacity and includes observing and participating with these specialized populations and their teachers. Identifies curriculum methods used to enhance growth in all developmental areas, and skills required to work with parents to foster basic early learning enhancement. Requires volunteering 3 hours per week for a total of 30 contact hours in an approved, public, child development program during the main portion of the day.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 or WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Define the stages of growth and development of children under 2 1/2 years old.
      1. Differentiate the needs of newborns, young infant, mobile infant and the toddler.
      2. Define the physical, social, emotional, cognitive skills to be learned at each stage of growth.
    2. Identify use of routines as opportunities for growth and learning.
      1. Describe the importance of building trusting relationships for optimal growth and development.
      2. Explain the proper timing of self-help skills in all areas of development.
    3. Define the stages of language development and non-verbal communication.
      1. Understand the critical role of non-verbal communication.
      2. Define the progression of stages in acquiring language.
    4. Plan, prepare and present appropriate learning activities.
      1. Identify activities that enhance and foster development.
      2. Extend activities to appeal to a mixed age group.
    5. Make connections between the center, the home, and the family.
      1. Identify the importance of communicating with parents.
      2. Role model learning methods for the parent to use at home.
    6. Promote writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Understand and analyze information in written form.
      2. Explain the subject matter in a coherent writing style.
      3. Evaluate the information.
    7. Function as a teacher’s assistant in a developmentally appropriate program, while acquiring technical teaching skills from professional teachers.
      1. Complete 3 hours a week for 10 weeks of instructor approved fieldwork during the main portion of the teaching curriculum in an infant/toddler classroom.
      2. Perform as a cooperating member of a teaching team.
      3. Record classroom activities and observations in a daily journal.
    8. Relate theory to practice while participating in an early childhood program.
      1. Identify developmentally appropriate practices in early childhood classrooms serving infant/toddlers (2 weeks-2.5 years old).
      2. Apply goals, objectives and strategies for both age groups.
      3. Organize curriculum experiences around developmental themes.
      4. Evaluate the quality of programs for both age groups.
      5. Share impressions and experiences in the classroom seminar.
  
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    CD 111W - Introduction to Early Childhood Education

    Credits: 3
    Introduces the field of early childhood education for ages birth-8. Provides an overall view of classroom goals, types of programs, teaching techniques and professionalism. Defines Michigan licensing laws for programs.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 or WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Examine basic information about the field of early childhood education.
      1. Identify and discuss some of the current issues in early childhood education.
      2. Define some of the common terminology used in early childhood education.
      3. Define play and how it is important in the child’s overall development and academic learning.
      4. Write goals, objectives and strategies for early childhood programs.
      5. List the names and locations of several early childhood programs in the tri-county area.
      6. Describe some strategies for managing the classroom learning areas.
    2. Explain the basic developmentally appropriate theory that underlies teaching decisions in early childhood programs.
      1. Identify the contemporary constructivist leaders in early childhood education.
      2. Identify some of the leaders who have influenced early childhood education.
      3. Compare and contrast the three models based on the goals and philosophy of the behaviorists, the interactionists and Montessori.
      4. Describe how different theories explain children’s growth and development.
    3. Interpret the State of Michigan licensing laws for early childhood programs.
      1. Identify the Licensing Rules for Child Care Centers as established by the State of Michigan, Consumer and Industry Services division.
      2. Interpret the specific rules for children ages birth-2 1/2.
      3. Interpret the specific rules for children ages 2 1/2-5.
      4. Interpret the specific rules for children ages 5-12.
      5. List the inspections that need to be routinely conducted.
    4. Promote writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Understand and analyze information in written form.
      2. Explain the subject matter in a coherent writing style.
      3. Evaluate the information.
  
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    CD 112W - Learning Center Activities

    Credits: 3
    Provides the basic curriculum and organizational skills needed to work in an early childhood program. Identifies, develops and presents developmentally appropriate activities for the early childhood classroom.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 or WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify, develop and present developmentally appropriate activities in the art, table toys/floor toys, group time/music, science/snack and pretend learning centers.
      1. Identify developmentally appropriate activities for each learning center.
      2. Develop lesson plans that are developmentally appropriate activities for each learning center.
      3. Demonstrate a developmentally appropriate activity for each learning center to their peers.
    2. Compile an organized portfolio of developmentally appropriate learning center activities of the student’s own work, as well as gathered materials from peers and workshops.
    3. Promote writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Understand and analyze information in written form.
      2. Explain the subject matter in a coherent writing style.
      3. Evaluate the information.
  
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    CD 113W - Child Guidance Strategies

    Credits: 4
    Introduces basic skills needed to interact with young children in a positive manner. Identifies instances of growth-producing and/or growth-restricting child behavior and the capability to recognize, interpret and apply a variety of positive guidance techniques. Introduces the preschool and primary classroom, observing and participating with these specialized populations and their teachers. Requires 3 hours a week for a total of 30 hours volunteering in an approved, public, child development program during the main portion of the day.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 or WRITING LEVEL 2.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Define the term discipline.
      1. Provide examples of positive and negative discipline
      2. Differentiate between traditional “time-out” and “think space”.
    2. Differentiate between a constructivist and a behaviorist approach to discipline.
      1. Explain when each is most appropriately used.
      2. Identify the theorists aligned with each approach
    3. Identify examples of authoritarian, authoritative, and permissive care giving styles.
      1. Describe the characteristics of children exposed to these three styles.
      2. Discuss the cultural bias of this perspective on parenting.
    4. Discuss how developmentally appropriate practices prevent behavior problems in children.
      1. Design a child care center that reduces the likelihood of misbehavior, including large and small group centers and a private space.
      2. Describe at least 18 positive discipline strategies.
    5. Demonstrate competence in implementing a variety of positive discipline strategies.
      1. Complete a self-study of your strengths and weaknesses.
      2. Lead a class discussion on recommended strategies to address a particular behavioral concern.
      3. Design a handout on a child care issues ready for inclusion in a parent newsletter.
      4. Problem-solve solutions to case studies.
    6. Demonstrate competence in interacting productively with others.
      1. Engage in cooperative group work.
      2. Provide constructive criticism regarding other students’ presentations and handouts.
    7. Demonstrate the ability to access information about a particular discipline topic.
      1. Produce citations from the computerized index systems in the Delta library.
      2. Write a paper reviewing the literature on a childhood behavior disorder.
    8. Promote writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Understand and analyze information in written form.
      2. Explain the subject matter in a coherent writing style.
      3. Evaluate the information.
    9. Function as a teacher’s assistant in a developmentally appropriate program, while acquiring technical teaching skills from professional teachers.
      1. Complete 3 hours a week for 10 weeks of instructor-approved fieldwork during the main portion of the teaching curriculum in an appropriate program.
      2. Perform as a cooperating member of a teaching team.
      3. Record classroom activities and observations in a daily journal.
    10. Relate theory to practice while participating in an early childhood program.
      1. Identify developmentally appropriate practices in early childhood classrooms.
      2. Apply goals, objectives and strategies for both age groups.
      3. Organize curriculum experiences around themes.
      4. Evaluate the quality of programs for both age groups.
      5. Share impressions and experiences in the classroom seminar.
  
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    CD 115W - Introductory Preschool Practicum

    Credits: 3
    Introduces the early childhood classroom, observing and participating with young children and their teachers. Requires approximately nine hours a week volunteering in an approved early childhood program during the main teaching portion of the day, for a total of 90 hours.

    Prerequisite(s):  CD 111W , CD 112W , CD 113W .
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 27 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Function as a teacher’s assistant in a developmentally appropriate program, while acquiring technical teaching skills from professional teachers.
      1. Complete nine hours a week of instructor approved fieldwork during the main portion of the teaching curriculum in an early childhood classroom.
      2. Perform as a cooperating member of an early childhood team.
      3. Record classroom activities and observations in a daily journal.
    2. Relate theory to practice while participating in an early childhood program.
      1. Identify developmentally appropriate practices in early childhood classrooms serving preschool or kindergarten-aged children (2 1/2-5 years old).
      2. Apply goals, objectives and strategies for early childhood programs.
      3. Organize curriculum experiences around themes.
      4. Evaluate the quality of programs for young children.
      5. Share impressions and experiences in the classroom seminar.
    3. Evaluate future career possibilities, and select a student teaching site.
      1. Use the introductory practicum to prepare to student teach in a publicly funded program, such as Head Start, Michigan School Readiness, or a parochial or public school kindergarten or pre-kindergarten. (Not as part of a day care center program.)
    4. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      1. Employ conventions of written, edited, standard English (WESE), or the language of instruction.
      2. Articulate important ideas.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to move between generalization and details.
      4. Quote, paraphrase and summarize accurately.
    5. Use writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Understand and analyze information in written form.
      2. Explain the subject matter in a coherent writing style.
      3. Evaluate the information.
  
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    CD 116W - Diversity and Families in Early Childhood Education

    Credits: 3
    Introduces the background needed to work with parents of children in early childhood programs. Explores diversity in social class, economic resources, cultural customs, and traditions.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 or WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and evaluate how cultural factors impact human perceptions and interactions, and how these factors influence the development of the child.
      1. Describe how socio-cultural factors such as ethnicity, race, language, values, religion, and gender interact to form a person’s perceptions of the world.
      2. Describe the concept of pluralism, its social implications, and apply this concept to activities and interactions in early childhood educational settings.
      3. Critically analyze and report how one’s own cultural background has influenced one’s values and views on child-rearing in formal written assignments.
      4. Compare/contrast the childcare practices, and the values that underlie them, of various cultural/ethnic groups other than his/her own.
      5. Enter into and interact with individuals from cultural backgrounds different from one’s own, and reflect and report upon experiences and findings in informal discussions and formal written assignments.
    2. Describe and evaluate how family structure and dynamics influence the development of a child.
      1. Define the concept of family.
      2. Evaluate the effects that different family types (extended, nuclear, single-parent, gay/lesbian, bi-racial) have upon child-rearing practices and child development.
      3. Evaluate the role of stressors (economic hardship, divorce, death, individuals with disabilities) on the functioning of the family and the development of the child.
      4. Describe responsibilities and pressures that affect parents, and apply this knowledge in developing ways to interact positively with and provide support for parents.
      5. Visit a family with a young child, gather data about the family’s child-rearing methods and their goals for their child, and report your findings in discussion and written assignments.
    3. Describe and evaluate how the family, school, and other social institutions mutually interact to socialize children.
      1. Understand and apply the ecological theory of development.
      2. Identify and assess the various ways in which society & culture influence the functioning of the family, and communicate personal perspectives through discussion and written assignments.
      3. Identify and apply culturally sensitive, professional mannerisms that facilitate productive parent-teacher interactions during home visits, conferences, etc.
      4. Describe legislation that shapes policy affecting families with young children.
      5. Identify and describe how to access community resources for families of various types.
    4. Promote writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Understand and analyze information in written form.
      2. Explain the subject matter in a coherent writing style.
      3. Evaluate the information.
  
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    CD 117W - Student Teaching Practicum

    Credits: 6
    Focuses on teaching developmentally appropriate activities while volunteering in an approved preschool or kindergarten classroom. Application of developmentally appropriate practice and theory during 12 hours per week in an approved student teaching classroom, for a total of 150 contact hours.

    Prerequisite(s): CD 110W , 115P and either CD 114 or ED 201W .
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 37.5 Lab Hours: 150
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Apply experience and knowledge gained through practice of theory to perform as a lead teacher in a preschool program, or as an assistant in a public school kindergarten.
      1. Complete twelve hours per week of instructor approved student teaching during the main portion of the teaching curriculum in an approved early childhood classroom.
      2. Perform as a cooperating member of an early childhood team.
      3. Record classroom activities and observations in a daily journal.
      4. Implement developmentally appropriate lesson plans to meet the educational needs of young children.
    2. Identify specific techniques in child guidance related to learning age appropriate concepts.
      1. Appreciate and support positive behavior.
      2. Understand and redirect negative behavior.
      3. Schedule activities to meet children’s needs.
      4. Guide children’s self-help skills.
      5. Guide children’s art activities.
      6. Guide children’s math activities.
      7. Guide children’s science activities.
      8. Guide children’s dramatic play.
      9. Guide children’s literature, language and music activities.
      10. Guide children’s motor skills.
      11. Guide children’s dramatic play communicating with parents of young children.
    3. Identify specific techniques necessary to effectively communicate with parents of young children.
      1. Participate in a parent-teacher conference, a home visit, or a parent’s program.
      2. Role-play confrontational situations dealing with upset parents regarding curriculum and/or program policies.
      3. Record observations using forms required at the student teaching practicum.
    4.   Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      1. Employ conventions of written, edited, standard English (WESE), or the language of instruction.
      2. Articulate important ideas.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to move between generalization and details.
      4. Quote, paraphrase and summarize accurately.
    5. Utilize writing to promote learning in any or all of the above.
  
  •  

    CD 210W - Child Care Program Management

    Credits: 3
    Provides the student with the capstone course for obtaining an Associate of Applied Arts Degree in Child Development. Details all facets of program management in a licensed facility. Introduces the student to developing techniques used in writing a parent program handbook, as well as a staff manual of policies and procedures. Instructor permission required to enroll in this course.

    Prerequisite(s): CD 117W , LWT 165  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. The student will be able to meet at least the minimal requirements for opening and operating a child development facility according to the State of Michigan licensing rules and regulations.
      1. Organize a program management file using resources from previous courses and practicum teaching assignments.
      2. Write a personal philosophy and program developmental goals.
      3. Develop written policies as required by licensing regulations for:
        1. programming,
        2. discipline,
        3. nutrition, and
        4. admission.
    2. The student will develop a parent information handbook with detailed program policies.
      1. Write detailed policies for parent information, including: .
        1. tuition,
        2. contract,
        3. schedules,
        4. health policy,
        5. emergencies,
        6. accidents,
        7. weather concerns,
        8. a newsletter.
    3. The student will develop a staff information manual of procedures.
      1. Write detailed policies for staff information, including:
        1. job descriptions,
        2. salary scale and benefits,
        3. absences and vacation days,
        4. promotion and job retention,
        5. hiring and dismissal procedures.
    4. The student will prepare a resume for the Delta College Placement Office.
    5. The student will write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      1. Employ conventions of written, edited, standard English (WESE), or the language of instruction.
      2. Articulate important ideas.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to move between generalization and details.
      4. Use appropriate vocabulary for the audience and purpose.
    6. Promote writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Understand and analyze information in written form.
      2. Explain the subject matter in a coherent writing style.
      3. Evaluate the information.
  
  •  

    CD 290-299 - Special Projects in Child Development


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Civic Engagement

  
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    CEP 101 - Civic Engagement Practicum

    Credits: 1
    Develops skills as active citizens in a democratic society through exploration of personal values, analyzing community problems, participation in a civic engagement community project and reflection on the civic engagement experience.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of and engagement in a democratic society.
      1. Complete a civic engagement project (at least 15 non-classroom hours of public activity).
        1. Assess a public problem or issue.
        2. Represent the public problem in course context.
        3. Identify one’s own civic and cultural values.
        4. Formulate and implement a plan to address the public problem or issue.
        5. Reflect on issues encountered and insights gained from engagement in the public activity.

Communication

  
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    COM 112CW - Fundamentals of Oral Communication

    Credits: 3
    Offers training in the fundamental processes of oral expression, with an emphasis on speaking and listening as the coordination of perception and expression. Practices the basic principles, components, and skills for the development and delivery of presentations in specific communication situations. Intended to only be taken in a learning community combination.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): Specified sections of PSY 211W , ABS 090A, and ENG 098.
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the communication process.
      1. Distinguish the elements in the communication process.
      2. Develop an understanding of diversity and its impact on communication.
      3. Develop an awareness of various speech presentations.
        1. Informative
        2. Persuasive
        3. Manuscript
        4. Impromptu
        5. Extemporaneous
      4. Differentiate the lines of communication
        1. Intrapersonal
        2. Interpersonal
        3. Group
        4. Public
        5. 5. Mass communication
    2. Develop research principles.
      1. Assess knowledge of the topic and the suitability of the topic for speaking occasion.
      2. Analyze audience demographics; interests; attitudes; and knowledge of topic.
      3. Develop research strategy.
      4. Access research information from a variety of credible sources.
      5. Evaluate research information.
      6. Organize information.
    3. Develop outlining techniques.
      1. Organize the introduction.
      2. Organize the body.
      3. Organize the conclusion.
      4. Arrange outline using proper outline stage.
    4. Employ effective presentation delivery techniques.
      1. Demonstrate effective use of language.
      2. Demonstrate effective use of voice.
      3. Demonstrate effective use of eye contact.
      4. Demonstrate appropriate facial expressions and gestures.
      5. Demonstrate effective use of posture.
      6. Demonstrate effective use of visual aids to illustrate and reinforce message.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the listening process.
      1. Differentiate listening from hearing.
      2. Describe the listening process.
      3. Examine listening obstacles from both speaker and listener perspective.
      4. Employ listening skills and speaker strategies to promote listening.
      5. Demonstrate ability to listen to and respond to audience feedback following presentations.
    6. Interact productively with others to promote learning of all of the above Outcomes and Objectives.
    7. Utilize writing to promote learning of all of the above Outcomes and Objectives.
  
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    COM 112HW - Fundamentals of Oral Communication - Honors

    Credits: 3
    Offers skill development in the fundamental processes of public speaking. Practices the basic principles, components, and skills for the development and delivery of presentations in specific communication situations.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4 and WRITING LEVEL 4 or permission from the Honors Office
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the communication process. D
      1. Distinguish the elements in the communication process.
      2. Describe diversity and the need to adapt to diverse communication styles.
      3. Distinguish the differences between various speech presentations. 1. Informative 2. Persuasive 3. Manuscript 4. Impromptu 5. Extemporaneous
      4. Differentiate the lines of communication. 1. Intrapersonal 2. Interpersonal 3. Group 4. Public 5. Mass communication
    2. Apply research principles to informative and persuasive speeches.
      1. Assess knowledge of the topic and the suitability of the topic for the speaking occasion.
      2. Analyze audience demographics, interests, attitudes, and knowledge of topic.
      3. Develop research strategy.
      4. Access research information from a variety of credible sources.
      5. Evaluate research information.
      6. Organize information.
    3. Demonstrate outlining techniques in speeches, including informative and persuasive research speeches.
      1. Arrange the outline using appropriate format.
      2. Organize the introduction.
      3. Organize the body.
      4. Cite research sources within the outline.
      5. Organize the conclusion.
      6. Arrange the bibliography using appropriate format.
      7. Demonstrate outlining in multiple speeches, including informative and persuasive research speeches.
    4. Employ presentation delivery techniques in multiple speeches, including informative and persuasive.
      1. Demonstrate use of language.
      2. Demonstrate use of verbal source citations.
      3. Demonstrate use of voice.
      4. Demonstrate use of eye contact.
      5. Demonstrate facial expressions and gestures.
      6. Demonstrate use of posture.
      7. Demonstrate use of visual aids to illustrate and reinforce message.
      8. Demonstrate delivery techniques in multiple speeches, including informative and persuasive speeches.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the listening process.
      1. Describe the listening process.
      2. Examine listening obstacles from both speaker and listener perspective.
      3. Employ listening skills and speaker strategies to promote listening.
      4. Demonstrate ability to listen to and respond to audience feedback.
    6. Use writing to promote learning of all of the above Outcomes and Objectives.
    7. Practice intellectual curiosity and apply it in independent ways to deepen their understanding of course material.
      1. Complete at least one significant project, either individually or as a group depending on the instructor’s discretion, and work with the instructor to assure that the project demonstrates intellectual curiosity and academic rigor.
      2. Actively engage with their peers in conversations, seminars, or in other formats at the instructor’s discretion to enhance the depth of knowledge of the relevant material.
  
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    COM 112W - Fundamentals of Oral Communication

    Credits: 3
    Offers skill development in the fundamental processes of public speaking. Practices the basic principles, components, and skills for the development and delivery of presentations in specific communication situations.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the communication process.
      1. Distinguish the elements in the communication process.
      2. Describe diversity and the need to adapt to diverse communication styles.
      3. Distinguish the differences between various speech presentations. 1. Informative 2. Persuasive 3. Manuscript 4. Impromptu 5. Extemporaneous
      4. Differentiate the lines of communication. 1. Intrapersonal 2. Interpersonal 3. Group 4. Public 5. Mass communication
    2. Apply research principles to informative and persuasive speeches.
      1. Assess knowledge of the topic and the suitability of the topic for the speaking occasion.
      2. Analyze audience demographics, interests, attitudes, and knowledge of topic.
      3. Develop research strategy.
      4. Access research information from a variety of credible sources.
      5. Evaluate research information.
      6. Organize information
    3. Demonstrate outlining techniques in speeches, including informative and persuasive research speeches.
      1. Arrange the outline using appropriate format.
      2. Organize the introduction. 
      3. Organize the body.
      4. Cite research sources within the outline.
      5. Organize the conclusion.
      6. Arrange the bibliography using appropriate format.
      7. Demonstrate outlining in multiple speeches, including informative and persuasive research speeches.
    4. Employ presentation delivery techniques in multiple speeches, including informative and persuasive.
      1. Demonstrate use of language.
      2. Demonstrate use of verbal source citations.
      3. Demonstrate use of voice.
      4. Demonstrate use of eye contact.
      5. Demonstrate facial expressions and gestures.
      6. Demonstrate use of posture.
      7. Demonstrate use of visual aids to illustrate and reinforce message.
      8. Demonstrate delivery techniques in multiple speeches, including informative and persuasive speeches.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the listening process.
      1. Describe the listening process.
      2. Examine listening obstacles from both speaker and listener perspective.
      3. Employ listening skills and speaker strategies to promote listening.
      4. Demonstrate ability to listen to and respond to audience feedback.
    6. Use writing to promote learning of all of the above Outcomes and Objectives.
  
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    COM 114HW - Interpersonal Communication - Honors

    Credits: 3
    Introduces communication theories. Applies communication principles involved in initiating, developing, and maintaining a relationship. Increases competency as communicators in social settings. Applies various concepts of communication behavior.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4 and WRITING LEVEL 4 or permission from the Honors Office
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Apply basic principles of communication to life experience.
      1. Explain the models of communication.
      2. Identify basic needs in communication.
      3. Distinguish between positive and negative communication behaviors.
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of diversity and its impact on communication.
      5. Practice skills to interact productively with others.
    2. Explain the role that self-concept plays in communication.
      1. Identify the important forces that have shape self-concept.
      2. Identify the ways in which one impacts the self-concept of others.
    3. Explain the role that perception plays in communication.
      1. Distinguish how differences (e.g., gender, culture, age, health, etc.) impact perceptions.
      2. Describe how perceptions influence communication.
    4. Analyze ways in which emotion affects communication.
      1. Describe the difference between facilitative and debilitative emotion.
      2. Assess the impact of facilitative and debilitative emotion on communication.
    5. Examine ways in which communication is shaped by language.
      1. Identify the symbolic nature of language.
      2. Choose appropriate language based on context and source in a communication event.
    6. Determine the role that nonverbal communication plays in communication.
      1. Identify basic characteristics of nonverbal communication.
      2. Categorize types of nonverbal communication.
      3. Choose appropriate nonverbal communication based on context and source in a communication event.
    7. Examine relationships and ways in which they are affected by communication.
      1. Identify the types of relationships.
      2. Identify the stages of relationships.
      3. Evaluate strategies to manage loss of relationship.
      4. Evaluate strategies to improve relationships.
      5. Identify the role of computer-mediated communication on relationships.
    8. Evaluate the importance of listening and its impact on communication.
      1. Identify basic aspects of the listening process.
      2. Assess listening behaviors for impact on relationships.
      3. Select appropriate listening responses.
    9. Determine ways in which conflict can be effectively managed.
      1. Identify conflict strategies.
      2. Practice effective strategies in managing conflict within interpersonal relationships.
    10. Use group interaction to promote learning of all of the above Outcomes and Objectives.
    11. Use writing to promote learning of the above Outcomes and Objectives.
    12. Practice intellectual curiosity and apply it in independent ways to deepen their understanding of course material.
      1. Complete at least one significant project, either individually or as a group depending on the instructor’s discretion, and work with the instructor to assure that the project demonstrates intellectual curiosity and academic rigor.
      2. Actively engage with his/her peers in conversations, seminars, or in other formats at the instructor’s discretion to enhance the depth of knowledge of the relevant material.
  
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    COM 114W - Interpersonal Communication

    Credits: 3
    Introduces communication theories. Applies communication principles involved in initiating, developing, and maintaining a relationship. Increases competency as communicators in social settings. Applies various concepts of communication behavior.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Apply basic principles of communication to life experience.
      1. Explain the models of communication.
      2. Identify basic needs in communication.
      3. Distinguish between positive and negative communication behaviors.
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of diversity and its impact on communication.
      5. Practice skills to interact productively with others.
    2. Explain the role that self-concept plays in communication.
      1. Identify the important forces that have shape self-concept.
      2. Identify the ways in which one impacts the self-concept of others.
    3. Explain the role that perception plays in communication.
      1. Distinguish how differences (e.g., gender, culture, age, health, etc.) impact perceptions.
      2. Describe how perceptions influence communication.
    4. Analyze ways in which emotion affects communication.
      1. Describe the difference between facilitative and debilitative emotion.
      2. Assess the impact of facilitative and debilitative emotion on communication.
    5. Examine ways in which communication is shaped by language.
      1. Identify the symbolic nature of language.
      2. Choose appropriate language based on context and source in a communication event.
    6. Determine the role that nonverbal communication plays in communication.
      1. Identify basic characteristics of nonverbal communication.
      2. Categorize types of nonverbal communication.
      3. Choose appropriate nonverbal communication based on context and source in a communication event.
    7. Examine relationships and ways in which they are affected by communication.
      1. Identify the types of relationships.
      2. Identify the stages of relationships.
      3. Evaluate strategies to manage loss of relationship.
      4. Evaluate strategies to improve relationships.
      5. Identify the role of computer-mediated communication on relationships.
    8. Evaluate the importance of listening and its impact on communication.
      1. Identify basic aspects of the listening process.
      2. Assess listening behaviors for impact on relationships.
      3. Select appropriate listening responses.
    9. Determine ways in which conflict can be effectively managed.
      1. Identify conflict strategies.
      2. Practice effective strategies in managing conflict within interpersonal relationships.
    10. Use group interaction to promote learning of all of the above Outcomes and Objectives.
    11. Use writing to promote learning of the above Outcomes and Objectives.
  
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    COM 202W - Oral Communication for Managers

    Credits: 3
    Provides theoretical and practical understanding of organizational communication. Develops skill in interpersonal and small group communication. Examines multiple aspects of the career search process including interviewing. Offers training in oral presentations. Emphasizes practical skills within an organization.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Apply the basic elements of the communication process to an organizational setting.
      1. Define the elements of the communication process.
      2. Describe specific organizational elements of the communication process.
      3. Discuss ethical issues related to the communication process in organizations.
    2. Identify basic tenets of organizational models.
      1. Describe organizational models.
      2. Describe how communication occurs in each model.
      3. Discuss the advantages of each model.
      4. Discuss the disadvantages of each model.
      5. Demonstrate how to adapt as a communicator within specific organizational models.
    3. Describe the importance of interpersonal relationships in organizations.
      1. Describe communication styles.
      2. Discuss the advantages of each style within different contexts.
      3. Discuss the disadvantages of each style within different contexts.
      4. Demonstrate skill in adapting communication style appropriately.
    4. Demonstrate listening skills.
      1. Describe the importance of listening skills in organizational and personal settings.
      2. Describe effective listening behaviors.
      3. Describe poor listening behaviors.
      4. Model effective listening skills.
    5. Demonstrate verbal and nonverbal communication skills.
      1. Cite examples of each type of nonverbal communication in organizational settings.
      2. Describe how nonverbal messages differ from verbal messages in organizations.
      3. Analyze organizational situations involving nonverbal communication.
      4. Analyze language and clarity in developing instructions.
      5. Analyze verbal behaviors in communicating with others in organizational settings.
      6. Define sexual harassment and its impact on an organization.
    6. Demonstrate skills in various types of interviews.
      1. Describe career research process.
      2. Prepare a resume.
      3. Describe types of professional interviews.
      4. Model the phases of the interviews.
      5. Practice interview scenarios.
      6. Assess interview skills.
    7. Apply small group communication skills.
      1. Describe small group development.
      2. Describe maintenance roles in small groups.
      3. Describe task roles in small groups.
      4. Model the basic problem-solving steps in a group setting.
      5. Demonstrate conflict resolution as a member of a small group.
      6. Demonstrate leadership in a small group.
    8. Demonstrate ability to deliver a researched oral presentation.
      1. Deliver various types of oral presentations.
      2. Differentiate between trait and situational communicator anxiety.
      3. Develop personalized techniques to overcome communicator anxiety.
      4. Analyze and adjust to specific audiences.
      5. Demonstrate outlining techniques in a research speech.
      6. Demonstrate use of verbal source citations.
      7. Develop and use visual supporting materials.
      8. Demonstrate delivery techniques in an oral presentation.
    9. Use writing to promote learning all of the above Outcomes and Objectives.
  
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    COM 212W - Listening

    Credits: 3
    Focuses on the theory, behavior, and skills of listening. Includes discussion of the key components of listening such as hearing, understanding, remembering, interpreting, evaluating, and responding.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Determine the importance of listening in daily life.
      1. Discuss ways that listening power generates knowledge.
      2. Identify how listening generates success in personal and professional life.
      3. Apply the principles of active listening to conversations.
      4. Discover the misconceptions people hold about listening.
    2. Identify how the types of listening affect the listening process.
      1. Identify different types of listening.
      2. Apply successful techniques to improve listening.
    3. Explain the difference between hearing and listening.
      1. Describe the basic model of the listening process.
      2. Explain the hearing process and its relationship to listening.
    4. Identify ways to enhance listening comprehension.
      1. Identify the methods of self-preparation for listening.
      2. Identify different note-taking procedures and when to use them.
      3. Employ techniques to facilitate the listening process.
    5. Identify the ways that emotions can affect listening.
      1. Discover emotional filters that affect the listening process.
      2. Evaluate techniques to control emotional interference.
    6. Examine ways that attention, concentration, and memory can be improved.
      1. Describe techniques to focus attention.
      2. Evaluate concentration techniques.
      3. Identify memory improvement methods.
    7. Analyze the way nonverbal communication is related to the listening process.
      1. Identify the nonverbal cues of the listening process.
      2. Apply techniques to improve nonverbal listening skills.
    8. Identify the impact gender and culture has upon the listening process.
      1. Examine different cultural listening norms.
      2. Analyze the impact of gender roles upon listening.
    9. Use writing to promote learning of the above Outcomes and Objectives.
  
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    COM 214W - Small Group Communication

    Credits: 3
    Focuses on small group communication theories, strategies, and skills for successful group participation. Increases student competency as effective team members and leaders.

    Prerequisite(s): COM 114W , READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Examine the nature of small group communication.
      1. Define small group communication.
      2. Differentiate between various theoretical perspectives of group communication.
      3. Identify group process.
      4. Examine types of groups.
    2. Describe the development and membership of small groups.
      1. Identify group development stages.
      2. Examine group norms.
      3. Examine goals for small groups.
      4. Identify diversity within small groups.
      5. Differentiate between task oriented and social oriented group roles.
      6. Perform roles in small groups.
    3. Employ effective communication in the small group.
      1. Identify effective verbal and nonverbal communication skills.
      2. Distinguish the various types of listening in the small group.
      3. Identify the impact of communication climate on the function of a group.
      4. Utilize effective listening strategies.
      5. Demonstrate effective communication in small groups.
    4. Identify group decision making and problem solving techniques.
      1. Differentiate between problem solving and decision making.
      2. Identify methods of problem solving and decision making.
      3. Identify barriers to effective problem solving and decision making.
      4. Practice problem solving methods.
      5. Practice decision making methods.
    5. Demonstrate effective methods for conflict management in small groups.
      1. Identify conflict management styles and strategies.
      2. Practice effective conflict management in small groups.
    6. Employ leadership skills in small groups.
      1. Define leadership.
      2. Identify leadership styles.
      3. Identify leadership functions and traits.
      4. Employ leadership principles.
    7. Determine effective strategies to achieve group meeting success.
      1. Investigate effective planning strategies for group meetings.
      2. Identify procedures for conducting group meetings.
      3. Identify communication skills for effective participation in group meetings.
      4. Analyze a group meeting.
    8. Demonstrate skills for effective group presentations.
      1. Identify types of group presentations.
      2. Employ effective planning for a group presentation.
      3. Demonstrate effective delivery skills for a group presentation.
      4. Particpate in a group presentation.
      5. Critique a group presentation.
    9. Use writing to promote learning.
  
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    COM 215W - Introduction to Theatre

    Credits: 3
    Offers insight into all the various aspects of theatrical production. Observes and critiques dramatic productions whether on stage, film, or the T.V. screen. Analyzes plays and experiences in acting, directing, scenery, and lighting.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Apply the basic criteria for criticism of a theatrical performance.
      1. Identify the difference between a critic and a reviewer
      2. Recognize the basis for criticism of a theatrical performance.
      3. Evaluate a live theatrical performance.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the challenges of acting.
      1. Examine how actors master the craft of acting by using the body and voice to portray characters.
      2. Examine how actors train to make believable characters.
      3. Recognize the use of synthesis and integration in acting.
    3. Examine the role of directors and producers in theater.
      1. Identify the historical evolution of the director.
      2. Identify the types of directors.
      3. Examine the director at work.
      4. Identify the director’s collaborators.
      5. Identify the role of producers in commercial and noncommercial theaters.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the types of theater spaces.
      1. Describe the characteristics and history of the proscenium stage.
      2. Describe the characteristics and history of the thrust stage.
      3. Describe the characteristics and history of the arena stage.
      4. Describe created or found spaces.
      5. Understand the use of multi-focus environments.
      6. Examine all-purpose and experimental spaces.
    5. Examine the use of designers and their relationship to theatrical performance.
      1. Describe the scene designer’s objectives.
      2. Identify the physical aspects of scene design.
      3. Identify the process of scene design.
      4. Describe the costume designer’s responsibilities.
      5. Identify the costume designer’s objectives.
      6. Understand the elements of costume design including makeup, hair, and masks.
      7. Describe the objectives of lighting design.
      8. Understand the qualities of stage lighting.
      9. Discover the lighting designer’s resources.
      10. Understand sound design technology.
      11. Look at special lighting and sound effects.
    6. Examine the playwright’s task in theater.
      1. Examine the playwright’s centrality and use of subject, focus, and dramatic purpose.
      2. Examine the genres of tragedy, comedy, heroic drama, melodrama, domestic comedy, and tragicomedy.
      3. Understand the essentials of dramatic structure: plot, action, conflict, opposed forces, and balance of forces.
      4. Examine different dramatic structures.
      5. Understand the types of dramatic characters.
      6. Prepare a short script in a group for performance.
      7. Perform the prepared short script onstage.
    7. Demonstrate an understanding of the historical background of theater production.
      1. Examine the beginnings of theater from the Greeks through modern times by reading and viewing representative plays.
      2. Examine the diversity of modern theater through reading and discussion.
    8. Demonstrate an understanding of the collaboration that is necessary for a theatrical production through Service Learning.
      1. Recognize the connections between all of the theatrical aspects of a production.
      2. Select an area of theater to gain practical experience by participating in a play production.
      3. Participate in an actual production of a play through service learning.
      4. Report on Service Learning experience.
    9. Perform writing tasks to promote learning of concepts.
      1. Document attainment of skills learned.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of the subject.
  
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    COM 216W - Theatre History

    Credits: 3
    Introduces the student to the various historical areas of the theatre, from the ancient Greeks to the present. Emphasizes the development of the physical theatre, representative playwrights, and the development of actor and the director.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the historical development of theatre beginning with the ancient Greeks through the modern playwrights.
      1. Identify the characteristics of the following historical periods of theatre history: Greek and Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, 1660-1875, Modern, Contemporary, Ethnic.
      2. Read and analyze representative plays from selected historical periods.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the differences and growth of the physical structures used for presenting plays from the ancient Greeks through the present time.
      1. Identify the physical characteristics of the Greek and Roman theatre.
      2. Describe the Medieval theatre staging areas.
      3. Describe the development of Renaissance theatre.
      4. Describe the development of the Globe theatre.
      5. Describe the growth of the stage from the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries.
      6. Describe the different types of staging areas in use in modern day theatre.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of representative playwrights for the historical periods studied.
      1. Describe tragedy using a representative historical play.
      2. Describe comedy using a representative play.
      3. Analyze the importance of the growth of realism by studying a representative play.
      4. Look critically at the Theatre of Social Problems by studying a representative play.
      5. Discuss the growth of Modern Theatre by studying a representative play.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the historical emergence of the director and how this relates to modern theatre.
      1. Explain the function of the director within each historical period studied.
      2. Identify the historical period that an actual director emerged with that title.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the historical roles of actors from the Ancient Greeks through modern theatre.
      1. Describe the use of actors and actresses in the representative plays selected for study.
      2. Describe the differences and similarities in the evolution of acting styles throughout the historical period studied.
    6. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      1. Analyze course content in written form.
      2. Explain the subject matter in a coherent writing style.
  
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    COM 222 - Introduction to Acting

    Credits: 3
    Introduces the fundamentals of stage terminology, stage movement, use of voice, and believable character creation for an audience in both improvisational and written scenes. Emphasizes preparation and presentation of scenes before a classroom audience.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze basic dramatic elements contained in theatrical productions.
      1. Articulate understanding of plays through discussion and writing.
      2. Identify the elements of dramatic action, objectives, obstacles, conflicts, and tactics in the building of characterization for stage presentation.
      3. Develop characterizations based on script analysis.
      4. Demonstrate knowledge of stage directions.
    2. Analyze and evaluate self and other’s dramatic creations.
      1. Analyze scripts in order to produce a believable characterization on stage.
      2. Use observation and imitation in the creation of characters.
      3. Use constructive criticism effectively to aid others in their quest for believability.
      4. Use self-evaluation in order to improve on stage presentation of character.
      5. Use constructive criticism to incorporate character changes for a believable performance.
    3. Demonstrate improvement of vocal and physical action on stage.
      1. Apply relaxation and concentration techniques.
      2. Use proper voice control, breathing, diction, and projection for stage presentation.
      3. Demonstrate usage of appropriate vocal inflections and variety in presenting emotions of character to audience.
      4. Demonstrate knowledge of body positions, stage positions, levels and planes used in the dramatic presentations.
    4. Prepare and perform on stage scenes.
      1. Develop individual and group scenes that demonstrate knowledge of acting fundamentals.
      2. Practice team building skills as an ensemble to present scenes on stage for a classroom audience.
      3. Demonstrate ability to act and react with class members within the context of the scene assignments.
      4. Deliver memorized lines appropriately.
      5. Demonstrate the ability to stay in character during performance.
      6. Deliver a believable performance.
  
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    COM 224W - Nonverbal Communication

    Credits: 3
    Focuses on nonverbal communication as it relates to interpersonal and professional behavior. Analyzes kinesics, facial expressions, eye contact, body movement and posture, physical characteristics, haptics, chronemics, proxemics, artifacts, paralanguage and environment. Discusses prevalent theories and current research underlying nonverbal behavior. Applies effective nonverbal communication in various contexts, including small groups.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Define nonverbal communication and its characteristics and functions.
      1. Explain the history of nonverbal communication as a field of study.
      2. Describe the major functions of nonverbal communication.
      3. Identify the components of nonverbal communication.
    2. Describe the communicative value of physical appearance.
      1. Explain how clothing affects perceptions.
      2. Explain how artifacts affect perceptions.
      3. Explain how body type affects perceptions.
    3. Explain perspectives in kinesics research.
      1. Contrast major perspectives in kinesics research.
      2. Identify types of kinesics.
    4. Explain how facial expressions and eye movement communicate important messages to others.
      1. Describe the universality of facial expressions.
      2. Identify basic emotional facial expressions.
      3. Identify basic types of eye movement.
    5. Explain the communicative aspects of environment, proxemics, and territoriality.
      1. Define proxemics.
      2. Identify how the environment shapes perceptions.
      3. Identify the factors that influence territoriality.
    6. Explain the communicative value of haptics.
      1. Identify the categories of touch.
      2. Identify the messages that touch communicates.
    7. Describe how paralanguage influences meaning.
      1. Define paralinguistics.
      2. Explain the types of paralinguistics.
    8. Explain nonverbal cultural differences.
      1. Identify cultural differences in physical appearance.
      2. Identify cultural differences in kinesics.
      3. Identify cultural differences in eye movement.
      4. Identify cultural differences in the environment.
      5. Identify cultural differences in proxemics.
      6. Identify cultural differences in territoriality.
      7. Identify cultural differences in haptics.
      8. Identify cultural differences in paralanguage.
      9. Describe examples of nonverbal behaviors that contribute to stereotyping.
    9. Demonstrate knowledge of nonverbal research through writing a research paper.
      1. Identify an area of nonverbal research.
      2. Conduct research in a variety of sources.
      3. Synthesize research.
      4. Write research paper.
      5. Include appropriate documentation of sources.
    10. Demonstrate ability to work effectively in small groups, with emphasis on effective nonverbal communication.
      1. Practice working in small groups, online and in face-to-face interactions.
      2. Apply theories of effective nonverbal communication in small groups.
      3. Demonstate effective use of nonverbal communication in small group interactions, online and/or face-to-face interactions.
    11. Use writing to promote learning of all of the above Outcomes and Objectives.
  
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    COM 235W - Principles of Persuasion

    Credits: 3
    Introduces the study and practice of persuasion focusing on the dual roles as producers and consumers of persuasive messages. Examines persuasion in a variety of contexts using both the rhetorical and behavioral science traditions; applies theory and research to practical situations and develops strategies for constructing effective and ethical persuasive messages.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe persuasion as a type of human communication activity.
      1. Understand the individual’s role as a producer of persuasive messages
      2. Understand the individual’s role as a consumer of persuasive messages
      3. Recognize the ubiquitous nature of persuasion in human interaction
    2. Explain theories of persuasion.
      1. Identify qualitative theories of persuasion.
      2. Identify quantitative theories of persuasion.
      3. Identify mass media theories of persuasion.
      4. Describe various models of persuasion.
      5. Analyze the application of theories of persuasion in real-world situations.
    3. Demonstrate the ethical responsibilities of a persuader.
      1. Describe the ethical constructs inherent in persuasion.
      2. Distinguish between ethical and unethical persuasive messages.
    4. Examine the premises of persuasion.
      1. Describe the process premises of persuasion.
      2. Describe the content premises of persuasion.
      3. Describe the cultural premises of persuasion.
      4. Describe the nonverbal premises of persuasion.
    5. Apply critical thinking in evaluating persuasive messages.
      1. Criticize arguments in oral, written, and mass media messages.
      2. Evaluate message strategies in oral, written, and mass media messages.
    6. Apply principles of persuasion.
      1. Develop ethical persuasive strategies.
      2. Adapt persuasive messages to variables in the communication environment.
      3. Apply principles of persuasion in the delivery of persuasive messages.
      4. Develop a persuasive compaign.
      5. Deliver a researched persuasive oral presentation.
    7. Use writing to promote learning of all of the above Outcomes and Objectives.
  
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    COM 236W - Advanced Oral Communication

    Credits: 3
    Develops an advanced understanding of theories and strategies in the delivery of oral presentations. Advanced speaking skills are developed from an historical and contemporary rhetorical context. Emphasis is on analyzing and practicing speech discourse conventions, along with advanced information literacy skills as a key to effective delivery of speeches.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 AND WRITING LEVEL 3 and “C” or better in COM 112W  or COM 202W   or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Define origins of current conventions of effective public speaking.
      1. Analyze the role of classical writers in the development of standards of speech.
      2. Analyze classical origins and contemporary theory in current speeches.
      3. Apply rhetorical theory to analysis and delivery of presentations.
    2. Demonstrate the ethical responsibilities of a speaker.
      1. Analyze speaker and audience motives.
      2. Adapt to the audience in ethical ways.
      3. Identify unethical communication from audience.
      4. Address unethical communication from audience.
    3. Develop content, including researched speeches, to meet audience needs.
      1. Employ advanced audience analysis strategies.
      2. Demonstrate advanced information literacy techniques.
      3. Engage a wide variety of scholarly and mass media sources.
      4. Demonstrate outlining techniques.
      5. Use language to synthesize and write speeches.
    4. Demonstrate advanced skills in the delivery of impromptu, extemporaneous (informative and persuasive researched speeches) and manuscript speeches.
      1. Demonstrate advanced delivery techniques
      2. Use a variety of types of visual aids for different contexts.
      3. Deliver speeches in a variety of settings and in the community.
      4. Practice techniques for interacting with audience.
      5. Demonstrate speech self-assessment techniques.
    5. Practice speech strategies for media interviews.
      1. Analyze various types of media interviews.
      2. Practice techniques as an interviewee.
      3. Practice techniques as an interviewer.
      4. Practice assessment of video recorded interviews.
    6. Use writing to promote learning of all of the above Outcomes and Objectives.
  
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    COM 244W - Family Communication

    Credits: 3
    Offers an understanding of interpersonal communication in the context of family systems. Studies family communication through the lens of family systems theory, rules, and interaction theory. Applies and operationalizes theories through various assignments related to their family of origin, existing family, and family configurations in other cultures.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify the foundational concepts related to the study of family communication.
      1. Explain the characteristics of the communication system of a family.
      2. Discuss differences between social construction theory, systems theory, interaction theory, and the dialectical process.
      3. Examine the family narrative approach to understanding family processes.
    2. Explain the purpose family rules have in the study of family communication.
      1. Identify the rules by which a family is governed.
      2. Examine how rules impact communication in the family.
    3. Explain the function relational stages play in the study of family communication.
      1. Identify relational stages in families.
      2. Examine the factors that influence the relational stages in the family.
      3. Identify the factors that impact relational formation in the family.
    4. Define the function roles have in the study of family communication.
      1. Identify the roles of family members.
      2. Explain how role relationships influence communication in a family.
      3. Identify the role of culture in family configurations.
    5. Define the function changes in the family play in the study of family communication.
      1. Identify changes in family structure.
      2. Examine how changes in families influence communication.
    6. Use writing to promote learning of all of the above Outcomes and Objectives.
  
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    COM 245W - Intercultural Communication

    Credits: 3
    Provides an analysis of issues associated with communicating with an emphasis on how communication is influenced by culture and how culture is influenced by communication. Utilizes concepts drawn from sociology, psychology, anthropology, and communication. Applies theories and research related to intercultural communication in order to increase understanding of the relationship between culture and communication and to develop skills to communicate effectively with people of other cultural groups.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe the rationale for studying intercultural communication and how diversity affects us as citizens of a community, a nation, and the world.
      1. Describe the reasons for studying intercultural communication: economic, technological, demographic, peace, self-awareness, and ethical.
      2. Analyze intercultural communication challenges within organizations.
      3. Analyze intercultural opportunities within organizations.
    2. Describe the importance of history and identity in understanding contemporary intercultural communication issues.
      1. Describe the importance of constructing history through narrative.
      2. Describe how multi-faceted histories influence cultural and self-identity.
      3. Describe how identities are multiple and reflect gender, age, race, ethnicity, physical ability, religion, class, nationality, sexual orientation and other aspects of our society and culture.
      4. Analyze how identity is expressed through core symbols, labels, and norms of behaviors.
      5. Describe how identity develops for various groups.
      6. Describe how that identity process impacts communication.
    3. Identify the building blocks of and the barriers to effective intercultural communication.
      1. Define culture, communication, context, and power.
      2. Explain barriers to intercultural communication: ethnocentrism, prejudice, and discrimination.
      3. Discuss how different cultural groups are portrayed in the media.
      4. Define pop-culture.
      5. Describe the ways in which pop-culture forms images of culture groups.
      6. Describe how those images influence consumption of pop-culture products.
    4. Describe verbal and nonverbal aspects of intercultural communication.
      1. Describe the components of language and the cultural variations in language.
      2. Describe the relationship between language and power.
      3. Describe universal and culture-specific aspects of nonverbal communication.
      4. Discuss how nonverbal communication can provide a basis for stereotyping and prejudice.
    5. Demonstrate listening skills.
      1. Describe strategies for effective listening in intercultural communication situations.
      2. Describe barriers to effective listening in intercultural communication situations.
      3. Demonstrate effective listening in intercultural communication situations.
    6. Demonstrate the skills that facilitate productive activity in intercultural communication.
      1. Identify characteristics of intercultural conflict.
      2. Describe how conflict management varies from culture to culture.
      3. Describe the personal and social aspects of conflict.
      4. Demonstrate effective conflict management strategies.
      5. Describe how relationships may differ across cultures.
      6. Describe the challenges of intercultural relationships.
      7. Describe the benefits of intercultural relationships.
    7. Use writing to promote learning of all of the above Outcomes and Objectives.
  
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    COM 246W - Social Media and Communication

    Credits: 3
    Identifies the impact of social media on interpersonal relationships. Explores communication through different types of social media. Applies communication theory to analysis of current social media outlets.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify the guiding principles of social media in interpersonal contexts.
      1. Define social media.
      2. Recognize differences between old media, new media, social media, and new media.
      3. Examine the impact of social media on communication.
    2. Analyze the impact of different types of social media on communication.
      1. Examine the role of online communities (e.g., Facebook) in interpersonal contexts.
      2. Examine the role of immediate limited-text communication (e.g., Twitter) in interpersonal contexts.
      3. Examine the role of viral videos (e.g., YouTube) in interpersonal and educational contexts.
      4. Examine the role of online encyclopedias (e.g., Wikipedia) in interpersonal and educational contexts.
      5. Examine the role of blogging in interpersonal contexts.
      6. Identify how social media norms and rules impact communication.
    3. Evaluate the dark side of social media.
      1. Identify negative trends in social media.
      2. Examine the negative impact of social media on interpersonal relationships and society.
      3. Identify the factors that impact negative uses of social media.
    4. Identify the connections between social media functions and communciation theory.
      1. Define the role of social presence in social media.
      2. Discuss self-presentation and identity management in social media outlets.
      3. Define media richness as it relates to social media.
      4. Discuss the role of Social Information Processing Theory as it relates to social media.
      5. Identify the impact of self-disclosure and privacy in social media outlets.
    5. Apply communication theory to social media practices.
      1. Analyze how communication theory is used in the construction of social media.
      2. Explain the impact of social media on communcation theory development.
      3. Identify how communication theory guides your use of social media.
      4. Conduct research analyzing social media practices as they relate to communication theory.
    6. Interact productively with others in small group communication to promote learning in all of the above Outcomes and Objectives.
    7. Use writing to promote learning of all of the above Outcomes and Objectives.
  
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    COM 290-299 - Special Projects in Communication


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Computer Aided Design

  
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    CAD 114 - Introduction to CAD

    Credits: 3
    Introduces 2D and 3D CAD drawing, including basic drawing and editing commands. Studies CAD systems interface, hardware, a current operating system, file management techniques, creating templates, creating and modifying geometry, dimensions and text styles, block and external reference insertion, attributes and creating tables, model space/paper space layouts, rendering and plotting techniques. Credit may be earned in only one of the following: ARC 114 , CAD 114, or SKCA 114 .

    Prerequisite(s): CST 103  recommended or basic knowledge of the Windows Operating System.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use reading and writing skills to gather information from technical texts.
      1. Complete assignments by gathering information from reading.
      2. Use the index of CAD texts to access information regarding commands and processes.
      3. Create a notebook as an essential reference.
      4. Record sufficient notes from which to work.
    2. Use a computer, a current operating system and word processing software.
      1. Start and exit software as required.
      2. Use disk directories and change directory paths to access files and programs.
      3. Use Save AS and name files as prescribed.
      4. Perform file management skills such as copying, pasting, and deleting files as prescribed.
      5. Identify and properly use CAD file extensions.
      6. Use a word processing program for all written assignments.
    3. Demonstrate mastery of CAD program basics.
      1. Identify the features of the system interface.
      2. Differentiate between methods of entering commands and determine which method is most efficient for the purpose.
      3. Create absolute, relative and polar coordinate methods correctly.
      4. Demonstrate several object selection methods.
    4. Manipulate geometry using CAD drawing aids.
      1. Use Zoom. Panning and Viewing tools for navigation.
      2. Apply the proper Osnap features to drawing situations for accurate drawing.
      3. Use Undo, Redo and Regenerate drawing when necessary.
      4. Distinguish and change properties efficiently.
      5. Utilize and control accuracy enhancement tools such as Ortho, Grid, Snap and Osnap.
      6. Use Object Tracking and Polar tools to enhance efficiency.
    5. Use basic construction and modification commands of a CAD program in the accurate completion of 2D CAD drawings.
      1. Use drawing commands to effectively create lines, circles, arcs, polylines and polygons,
      2. Modify existing geometry using erase, copy, mirror, offset, move, trim extend, fillet, array, stretch, scale and break commands.
      3. Apply and modify hatching fills and patterns.
      4. Create and insert Blocks.
      5. Insert ready-made blocks from the CAD program and from online sources.
      6. Use Wblock, Copy and Paste, and External References to move drawings and parts of drawings.
      7. Create table styles and insert information.
      8. Add attributes to blocks and extract data to tables.
    6. Develop and use a drawing prototype template.
      1. Set the appropriate drawing Units and Limits.
      2. Create Text using the prescribed syle and size.
      3. Creat appropriate layers assigning colors, linetypes and lineweights as necessary.
      4. Modify Dimension and Leader variables to create a dimension style.
    7. Apply complete and orderly dimensions and text to CAD drawings.
      1. Use associative dimensioning to apply linear, radial, diameter, aligned and angular dimensions.
      2. Use dimension according to prescribed dimensioning conventions.
      3. Apply text and use text editing tools.
    8. Use the 3D Workspace to create solid models.
      1. Analyze information about coordinates in 3D space in the completion of 3D objects.
      2. Create models using 3D primitive shapes, region, extrude and press-pull tools.
      3. Use Boolean editing tools to modify 3D geometry.
      4. Use View Manager, navigation tools and visual style tools to create views.
      5. Render views to a file.
    9. Demonstrate appropriate printing techniques.
      1. Set up printing parameters for printing from Model Space.
      2. Access and configure Layout mode for printing from Paper Space.
      3. Create, scale and align viewports in Layout mode.
      4. Determine the proper viewports for a multi-view drawing.
    10. Demonstrate productive interaction with others.
      1. Practice citizenship by respecting each person’s drawing file as their personal property.
      2. Ask and respond to questions during drawing demonstrations.
      3. Demonstrate teamwork skills.
      4. Use effective listening skills during classroom demonstrations.
  
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    CAD 120 - Introduction to CAM

    Credits: 3
    Introduces the basics in computer geometry creation including line, arc, curve creation and manipulation. Gives a foundation to build on advanced CAD/CAM techniques. Instructs students on file transfer systems from CAD to CAM with emphasis on proper drawing techniques, including file type-save-transfer. Projects will be drawn, checked and created on appropriate equipment. Shows links between CNC machines on the shop floor and their relationship with the design process. Generates code from created drawings to be run on Computer Numerical Controlled equipment. Credit may be earned in CAD 120 or SKCA 120  but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): DRF 104  or DRF 105  or SKDR 101 ; and CST 103  or CAD 114  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the ability to draw a part based on a specific blueprint
      1. Interpret blueprint symbols and relate their meaning to a specific part print.
      2. Complete 2 and 3 dimensional part drawings for specified manufacturing applications.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to process a part configuration into G and M code for acceptance into the controller.
      1. Recognize printed G and M code.
      2. Conceptualize the process of G and M code formatting and its function in the CNC process.
      3. Explore the role of post processors and understand their use.
      4. Evaluate the part configuration for transference into G and M code.
      5. Generate G and M code commonly used in the manufacturing process.
      6. Edit G and M code so the Controller can understand it.
      7. Post part configurations out to respective vertical milling equipment.
    3. Understand the relationship of CAD to CAM formation and processing.
      1. Demonstrate the correct manner in which to hold down and cut a given part configuration.
      2. Visualize the design intent versus practical machining ability.
      3. Relate Computer Aided Drafting to Computer Aided Manufacturing processes.
    4. Demonstrate a working knowledge of CAM’s ability to create, modify, rotate, mirror and transform part geometries.
      1.   Create computer graphically generated lines, arcs and curves for a CAD/CAM format.
      2. Manipulate and edit graphically created lines, arcs and curves for a CAD/CAM format.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to create toolpath from CAD drawing
      1. Identify tooling offsets and compensations to created part geometries.
      2. Use simulation and backplotting as a verification tool.
      3. Send the part configuration to a CNC milling machine controller and understand the transfer process.
    6. Demonstrate ability to load NC file to proper machine tool for part creation.
      1. Examine common tooling and set-ups used in the machining process.
      2. Operate a CNC milling machine controlling.
      3. Change tool values as needed to make the part.
      4. Replace tooling as needed and requalify the machine after the tooling has been replaced.
    7. Demonstrate the ability to load and export parts to optional CAD/CAM formats for further processing.
      1. Identify various CAM Controller code formats used by manufacturers.
      2. Create computer graphically generated lines, arcs and curves for various CAD/CAM formats.
      3. Manipulate and edit graphically created lines, arcs and curves for various CAD/CAM formats.
    8. Demonstrate the ability to print out projects and machine code.
      1. Use problem-solving techniques to transfer the part blueprint configuration to workable machine code.
      2.   Print given projects in 2 and 3 dimensions.
      3. Print out machine code for the project.
  
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    CAD 214 - CAD Techniques

    Credits: 2
    Drafting and design experience is a plus. Designed for the user with some previous CAD experience. Training courseware is used to thoroughly investigate the various options available in drawing commands, modification commands and dialog boxes. Practical real-world examples used to practice each functionality. Learning objectives of the lessons and exercises in this course support preparation for a computer aided design certification exam.

    Prerequisite(s): CAD 114  or permission of instructor and knowledge of a windows operating system
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use interface tools efficiently
      1. Identify and state the purpose of the main interface elements
      2. Identify and use keyboard functions
      3. Use the shortcut menu to access commands and options
      4. Open, create, and save drawings
      5. Use different Zoom commands to control view navigation
      6. Use a wheel mouse to zoom and pan in the drawing
      7. Use the Regen command to regenerate the drawing
    2. Create basic geometry as building blocks for complex drawings.
      1. Identify Absulute, Relative and Relative Polar Coordinate systems.
      2. Use direct distance entry and dynamic input in the completion of geometry
      3. Use Line, Circle, Arc, Erase, Rectangle and Polygon commands to create and delete geometry
      4. Employ object snaps to accurately place and create objects in the drawing
      5. Activate and use polar tracking and Polar Snap to create accurate geometry
      6. Enable and use object snap tracking to position geometry
      7. Use the Unit command to set up the drawing environment
    3. Modify and manipulate geometry to edit a drawing
      1. Use various selection methods effectively
      2. Practice the options of the Move, Copy, Rotate, Mirror, Scale and Array commands
      3. Edit objects and display geometric information using grips
      4. Change the length of objects using the Trim and Extend commands.
      5. Create paraallel and offset geometry
      6. Combine multiple objects into a single object using the Join command
      7. Use the Break and Break at Point commands
      8. Apply radius and angled corners using the Fillet and Chamfer commands
      9. Alter the shape of objects using the Stretch command
    4. Use the electronic drawing environment to organize and drawing and obtain geometric information from drawing objects
      1. Create and manage layers
      2. Load and set linetypes
      3. Describe the purpose of Layer 0
      4. Use Properties and Quick Properties to modify object properties
      5. Apply properties from a source object to destination objects using Match Properties
      6. Use the Inquiry commands: Distance, Area, List and ID to obtain geometric information
    5. Create and edit annotation objects
      1. Use the Mtext command to create multiline text
      2. Create single line text
      3. Use different methods to edit text
      4. Create text styles to manage text
    6. Create. Edit, and manage dimensions in a typical design environment
      1. 6A. Dimension linear and curved objects
      2. 6B. Create and use dimension styles to manage dimensions
      3. 6C. Create and edit multileader sytles and multileaders
      4. Use various commands and methods to edit dimensions
    7. Access and use reusable content
      1. Create a block definition and insert a block into a drawing
      2. Add attribute information to blocks
      3. Use Design Center to reuse the data in a drawing
      4. Build a custom tool palette
      5. Access and use reusable content from online sources
    8. Create advanced drawing objects
      1. Create and edit polylines
      2. Use the Spline command
      3. Create ellipes and ellipical arcs
      4. Use table styles to create and edit tables
      5. Extract attribute information from blocks to create tables
      6. Create hatch and gradient fill patterns on objects
      7. Edit hatch and gradient fill patterns
    9. Prepare documents for plotting
      1. Create drawing templates
      2. Create a new layout
      3. Describe the purpose and key properties of layouts
      4. Create and scale a viewport
      5. Move, copy, resize, and delete viewports
      6. Create and apply page setups to layouts
      7. Plot design geometry from model space or from a layout
  
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    CAD 226 - 3D Parametric Solid Modeling

    Credits: 3
    Develops skills in the use of 3D parametric solid modeling software. Converts solid models to 2D multi-view drawings and generates assembly and animation files. Culminates in Rapid Prototyping project and final presentation.

    Prerequisite(s): CST 103  recommended or basic knowledge of the Windows Operating System
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use reading and writing skills to gather information from technical texts.
      1. Complete assignments by gathering information from reading.
      2. Use reading strategies to disseminate and organize information.
      3. Create a notebook as an essential reference.
      4. Record sufficient notes from which to work independently.
    2. Use a computer, a current operating system, and word processing software.
      1. Start and exit software as required and name files as prescribed.
      2. Demonstrate the correct handling and operation of storage media.
      3. Format and label two 100MB or 250 MB zip disks.
      4. Demonstrate proper file management and backup procedures.
      5. Use a word processing program for all written assignments.
    3. Develop effective sketch mode abilities.
      1. Use the sketching environment and interpret the sketch commands to create a rough sketch of the model.
      2. Add parameters in the form of dimensions and constraints.
      3. Set values for the dimensions.
    4. Use higher level drawing to produce a 3D model from the sketch using basic parametric modeling techniques.
      1. Use navigational tools such as Rotate, Pan, and Zoom in the modeling mode.
      2. Create user-defined work planes.
      3. Create 3D models using Extrude, Revolve, Loft, Sweep, and Coil features.
      4. Modify the 3D solid using Cut, Fillet, Chamfer, and Shell features.
      5. Use Boolean editing features to modify 3D solid models.
      6. Add materials to 3D solid models.
      7. Analyze the shape of the model and determine which method(s) of producing 3D objects and which Boolean operations are necessary for the completion of the model.
    5. Produce other types of working drawings.
      1. Generate multi-view working drawings from a 3D solid model.
      2. Produce working assembly drawings using 3D solid composite models.
      3. Develop animated presentation drawing files from 3D composite assembly files.
    6. Generate a stereo lithography file and 3D printed part.
      1. Convert 3D solid model to a stereo lithography file.
      2. Use 3D printer interface software to create 3D Printer file.
      3. Create 3D plastic part.
    7. Prepare a visual presentation to be used as an electronic resume.
      1. Use presentation software effectively.
      2. Access, analyze, and use gathered information for an electronic presentation.
      3. Develop comprehensive presentation that shows ability in several CAD modes.
      4. Add pertinent information needed for a professional resume.
    8. Demonstrate productive interactions with others.
      1. Practice citizenship by respecting each person’s drawing files as their personal property.
      2. Ask and respond to questions during drawing demonstrations.
      3. Display a willingness to help classmates.
      4. Demonstrate employability, interpersonal, teamwork, and leadership skills necessary to function in a multicultural business setting.
      5. Use effective listening skills during classroom demonstrations.
  
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    CAD 232 - Introduction to Rapid Prototyping

    Credits: 2
    Develops elements of creative thinking and problem solving used in the design process, including the techniques and methods used to construct prototypes and models. Introduces modern rapid prototyping techniques and provides opportunity to conceive, design and produce a product, using rapid prototyping methods and computer-aid design techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): CAD 226  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Explain the fundamentals of Rapid Prototyping and Additive Manufacturing.
      1. Distinguish between the different methods of rapid prototyping and additive manufacturing.
      2. Critique the 3D printer technology and most effective methods of prototyping and manufacturing.
      3. Distinguish between material options used in rapid prototyping
    2. Demonstrate the ability to create parameterized three-dimensional models.
      1. Build 3D parametric models appropriate for rapid prototyping.
      2. Determine the most appropriate model construction techniques.
      3. Evaluate appropriate model settings.
      4. Interpret the limitations on model construction due to specific Rapid Prototype processes.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to produce a rapid prototype model.
      1. Convert 3D solid model to a stereo lithography file and other appropriate file type(s).
      2. Distinguish between individual machine settings to software specific 3D printer technology.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to produce a rapid prototype.
      1. Plan and produce a successful 3D model.
    5. Demonstrate how to effectively operate 3D printer technology.
      1. Critique the 3D printer technology and accompanying software interface.
      2. Evaluation the appropriate 3D printer settings to produce quality prototypes
      3. Employ the 3D printer start-up and shut-down procedures for selected 3D printer(s).
      4. Apply safety procedures and protocols to individual 3D printer(s).
  
  •  

    CAD 290-299 - Special Projects in Computer Aided Drafting


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Computer Numerical Control

  
  •  

    CNC 162 - Computer Numerical Control Theory

    Credits: 4
    Uses various methods, such as a text editor, machine control unit, and CAD/CAM (MasterCam) to produce alpha-numeric code (G-Code) which will run CNC machinery. Uses blueprints to problem solve and program both point-to-point and complex contours on machining centers and turning centers. Discusses machines with 2, 3, 4, and 5 axis controls. Emphasizes common formats of programming. Discusses machine tool controllers including HAAS, Funac, and Okuma. Includes hands-on activities. Credit may be earned in either CNC 162 or SKCN 162  but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): SKTR 181W  or MS 181W , and SKMA 103  or MTH 103  or MT 110 , or Instructor permission.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 40 Lab Hours: 20
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand the importance of headers, machine tape information, and operator information.
      1. Identify importance of program headers.
      2. Understand what information is important in setup and machining documentation.
      3. Explain the functions of tooling information in a header.
    2. Understand the basics of Blueprint Reading for CNC Programmers.
      1. Identify the sizes and format for CNC prints.
      2. Describe a section view and the types of section views used in prints.
      3. Understand how to read tolerances.
      4. Obtain a fundamental knowledge of how to Interpret geometric dimensioning and tolerancing notes and symbols.
    3. Write CNC programs for a machining center as well as a turning center.
      1. Gain knowledge in most important fixed cycles for hole drilling.
      2. Demonstrate hole operation programs with the aid of canned cycles.
      3. Understand sequence commands required for executing linear profiling.
      4. Compute cutter offsets for inclined line profiling.
      5. Understand the commands used for clockwise and counterclockwise circular interpolation.
      6. Code complete CNC programs for executing line-arc profiling operations.
      7. Recognize the advantages of invoking cutter diameter compensation in programs.
      8. Apply cutter diameter compensation in programming milling operations.
    4. Use the mathematics for CNC programming.
      1. Compute the sides of right triangles.
      2. Determine the angles of right triangles.
      3. Understand useful angle concepts.
    5. Work with subprograms.
      1. Understand what a subprogram is.
      2. Interpret the commands and rules for creating and processing subprograms.
      3. Comprehend the advantages of subprogramming.
      4. Write complete programs by utilizing subprogramming.
    6. Understand the advantages of using off-line programming.
      1. Understand the advantages of using a computer-aided programming language.
      2. State the key elements comprising a CAD/CAM system.
      3. Explain how part programs are developed with the aid of CAD/CAM.
      4. Understand how knowledge-based machining software simplifies the job of creating part programs.
    7. Students will have the knowledge to program and input/output programs for vertical and horizontal machining centers and turning centers.
      1. Understand the role of CNC personnel
        1. Programmer
        2. Set-up Person
        3. Operator
      2. Interpret blueprint points (using trigonometry)
      3. Obtain fundamental knowledge of tolerances and GD&T
      4. Understand how to construct a logical program
        1. Beginning (tool preparation)
        2. Middle (machining operation)
        3. End (tool return and next tool prep)
      5. Program both point-to-point and complex contours
      6. Understand computer to controller communications
      7. Basic knowledge of CAD/CAM use and benefits
  
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    CNC 216 - CNC with Machining Applications

    Credits: 4
    Emphasizes the programming methodology for producing quality parts using the CNC machines. Discusses conversational programming language with secondary emphasis on tooling setups, part setups, and machining. Utilizes horizontal and vertical machining center for program testing. Credit may be earned in SKCN 216  or CNC 216 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): CAD 120  or SKCA 120 , MS 181W  or SKTR 181W , CNC 162  or SKCN 162 , MS 181W  or SKTR 181W  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 60
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Write a program for the CNC control.
      1. Learn machine format using the manufacturer’s programming manual
      2. Find and apply canned cycles using the manufacturer’s programming manual
      3. Enter a program into the control using the manufacturer’s programming manual as a guide
      4. Learn machine’s control panel layout and functions using the manufacturer’s operation manual
      5. Determine depth of cut
      6. Determine width of cut
      7. Calculate feed rate
      8. Calculate spindle speed
      9. Locate required surface finish on the part print
      10. Calculate the surface finish
      11. Calculate spindle horsepower
      12. Down-load/Up-load part program(s) from/to the control
    2. Set up the machine to cut the part.
      1. Determine tooling required to perform the necessary tasks illustrated on the part print
      2. Change fixturing scheme if necessary
      3. Mount work piece
      4. Install cutting tools
      5. Measure cutting tools
    3. Cut and inspect part.
      1. Learn machine’s control panel layout and functions using the manufacturer’s operation manual
      2. Learn to use single block mode
      3. Determine tooling required to inspect the finished part
      4. Make oversize/undersize trial cuts
      5. Inspect trial cuts
      6. Adjust tool offsets as required
      7. Learn to use automatic cycle mode
      8. Inspect the finished part
  
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    CNC 225 - Mastercam

    Credits: 4
    Teaches the advanced concepts of CNC programming for lathe work, mill 3 and 4 axis work, and/or other machinery, shop floor programming, and the principles of CNC operations. Emphasizes various machining operations, accompanied by demonstrations, student programming, and hands-on setup and machine operation. Emphasizes the creation of error free part programs using the MASTERCAM programming language, including part geometry, tool path, and debugging with secondary emphasis on the downloading of a program to the turning center, mill, machining center/system, or wire EDM. Credit may be earned in either SKCN 225  or CNC 225 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): CAD 120  or SKCA 120 , and CNC 162  or SKCN 162   or instructor permission
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Write a program using the off-line software.
      1. Learn software format using the software vendor’s programming manual
      2. Enter a program into the computer using the software vendor’s programming manual as a guide
      3. Identify file extensions
      4. Determine thickness of material
      5. Determine width of cut
      6. Locate required surface finish on the part print
      7. Calculate the surface finish
      8. Set up tool libraries in order to machine the part within print tolerances
      9. Create a tool path that will properly machine the part
    2. Send/Receive a post processed program to/from a CNC machine in the lab.
      1. Post process a program using the software vendor s programming manual as a guide
      2. Post process a computer-generated program into a usable and proper machinery language format with 100% accuracy for a particular control in the lab
      3. Obtain a part printout from the printer/plotter
      4. Obtain a machine program printout from the printer
      5. Down-load/Up-load part program(s) to/from a CNC machine in the lab
  
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    CNC 260 - CNC Multi Axis

    Credits: 4
    Introduces and demonstrates concepts for multi axes machining techniques beginning with 3 plus 2 axis utilizing planes then advancing to true 5 axis machining. Imports engineering drawings and electronic CAD files into CAM software to perfect geometry and tool path routines, then outputs G-code specific to the multi-axes machine. Focuses on complex applications and the true efficiency of multi-axes machining through individual and/or team assignments. Credit may be earned in CNC 260 or SKCN 260  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): CNC 225  and CNC 216   or instructor permission
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the ability to determine which multi axis machine tool to use for the job.
      1. Identify the different axes available in the machine tool.
      2. Select the proper machine for the job.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to conceptualize a part in 3 dimensional space.
      1. Identify features on a part and determine proper machinery to use.
      2. Relate the part to the machining processes and demonstrate understanding of the reasoning behind choosing a particular machine.
      3. Show proficiency in plane manipulation.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to create part geometry using solids and surfaces with CAM software in 3 dimensional space.
      1. Select the best geometry creation technique for the part features to be machined.
      2. Create geometry using proper drawing techniques appropriate for multi-axis tool pathing
    4. Demonstrate proper tool path selection for the application based on part geometry.
      1. Determine proper tool path for material removal.
      2. Select proper tooling from tool library.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to use CAM software to back plot and verify for axis and tool motion control.
      1. Simulate tool path using the verification feature built into the CAM software, checking for proper motion and tool gouge.
      2. Simulate tool path for proper motion, using the back plot feature built into the CAM software, checking the efficiency of tool motion.
    6. Output code based on parameters of the machine tool limits to ensure efficiency of cycle time.
      1. Select proper machine type when outputting code from CAM software.
      2. Select proper speeds and feeds for tool motion based on machine limits and set up.
    7. Demonstrate ability to load, edit, and proof tool path programs.
      1. Demonstrate ability to load G-code into machine tool from portable drive.
      2. Demonstrate ability to load G-code into machine tool using NULL cable.
      3. Demonstrate ability to load G-Code into machine tool using direct numerical control (DNC).
    8. Demonstrate ability to properly set up and operate multi axis CNC machinery
      1. Select proper machine for the job.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to load fixturing.
      3. Demonstrate ability to load tooling.
      4. Demonstrate ability to locate part origin and set work coordinate system (WCS) zero.
      5. Demonstrate ability to set tool length offsets.
      6. Demonstrate ability to load part program.
      7. Demonstrate ability to simulate part on graphics screen.
      8. Demonstrate ability to use auto probing for work coordinate zero.
      9. Demonstrate ability to use tool probing preset system.
      10. Demonstrate ability to adjust offsets to ensure part specifications and tolerances.
  
  •  

    CNC 285W - Computer Numerical Control Capstone

    Credits: 4


    Demonstrates application-based activities that tie a majority of previous manufacturing learning together. Incorporates skills learned in drafting, CAD, manual and CNC machine tools, and CAM to complete the capstone project. Applies critical thinking and spatial analysis abilities in the processing of this project. Applies the fundamentals of tool design and tool making, fixture building, and geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T). Credit may be earned in CNC 285W or SKCN 285W  but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): CNC 216 , CNC 225 , CNC 260  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 60
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Practice safe working habits.

         A.          Identify proper work attire and personal protection items.

         B.          Demonstrate safe work habits when operating equipment.

    2.    Use reading and writing skills to gather information from technical texts.

         A.          Complete assignments by gathering information from reading.

         B.          Use reading strategies to disseminate and organize information.

         C.          Create a notebook as an essential reference.

         D.          Record sufficient notes from which to work independently.

    3.    Select order of operations given part blank dimensions.

         A.          Select order of operations given part blank dimensions.

                      1.    End Milling

                      2.    Face Milling

                      3.    Pocket Milling

                      4.    Contouring

                      5.    Center Drilling

                      6.    Drilling

                      7.    Reaming

                      8.    Bolt Circle Cycle

                      9.    Chamfering

                      10.  Tapping

                      11.  Dowling

                      12.  Facing

                      13.  Back-facing

                      14.  Turning

                      15.  Back-turning

                      16.  Boring

                      17.  Back-boring

                      18.  Counter boring

                      19.  Countersinking

                      20.  Trepanning

                      21.  OD/ID Tapers, Contouring, Necking

                      22.  Indexing

                      23.  Timing

                      24.  Spline Machining

    4.    Compute spindle speed for optimum performance.   

         A.          Find the cutting speed range of the given material in a reference chart or book.

         B.          Measure rotary tool diameter.

         C.          Measure stationary tool nose radius.

         D.          Manipulate RPM formula.

    5.    Calculate feed rates for maximum feed per revolution or feed per minute.

         A.          Find the feed per tooth of a given tool geometry in a reference chart or book for a given material.

         B.          Find the feed per revolution of a given tool geometry in a reference chart or book for a given material.

         C.          Count the number of teeth on the rotary tool.

         D.          Select and manipulate the appropriate formulae.

    6.    Optimize speeds and feeds for given horsepower of the machine tool.

         A.          Compute the horsepower on a given machine.

         B.          Compute the maximum RPM on a given machine.

         C.          Compute the maximum inch per minute coordinated feed rate of a given machine.

         D.          Manipulate the horsepower formula.

    7.  Calculate feed rates to attain part print surface finish requirement(s).

         A.          Measure rotary tool diameter.

         B.          Measure stationary tool nose radius.

         C.          Count the number of teeth on the rotary tool.

         D.          Manipulate surface finish formulae.

    8.    Use a computer, current operating system, and word processing software.

         A.          Start and exit software as required.

         B.          Name files and the file extension as prescribed.

         C.          Demonstrate the correct handling and operation of storage media.

         D.          Format portable storage media as prescribed.

         E.          Demonstrate proper file management and backup procedures.

         F.          Use the word processing software for all written assignments.

         G.         Create part prints using available computer assisted design software.

         H.         Design ID tool using available CAD software.

         I.           Design trepanning tool using available CAD software.

         J.          Design two milling fixtures using available CAD software.

         K.         Convert CAD data into format recognized by the available CAM software.

         L.         Import CAD files into the CAM software.

         M.        Set up tool libraries in order to perform the above operations within print tolerances.

         N.        Generate a tool path to perform the above operations.

         O.        Obtain a part printout from the printer.

         P.         Obtain a tool path printout from the printer.

         Q.        Post-process a computer generated program into a usable and proper machinery language format for a particular control in the lab.

         R.        Verify the post-processed program is 100% accurate.

         S.        Obtain the machine program printout from the printer.

    9.     Down-load/up-load part programs to/from the control.

         A.          Operate the given communication software on the CNC machine tool.

         B.          Operate the given communication software on the computer.

         C.          Open the line of communication between the CNC machine tool and the computer.

         D.          Transmit the program.

         E.           Verify transmission has occurred.

         F.           Close the line of communication between the CNC machine tool and the computer.

         G.          Demonstrate that the program works correctly:

                       1.    graphics display, or

                       2.    dry run feature.

    10.  Operate a manual lathe, mill, vertical band saw, horizontal band saw, and oxy-acetylene torch.

         A.          Cut all stock to length using a horizontal band saw.

         B.          Manufacture ID tool.

         C.          Manufacture trepanning tool.

         D.          Manufacture fixture(s).

         E.          Heat treat cutting tools.

    11. Locate the work piece in the work holding device for the turning center.

         A.          Assemble work holding device.

         B.          Align work holding device for trueness.

         C.          Secure work piece using appropriate hardware.

         D.          Establish and set work piece zero.

    12. Locate the work piece in the work holding device for the machining center.

         A.          Assemble work holding device.

         B.          Align work holding device for trueness.

         C.          Secure work piece using appropriate hardware.

         D.          Determine and set fixture offset.

         E.          Determine and set work piece zero.

    13. Prepare the cutting tools required on the machining and turning center to perform the necessary  operations.    

         A.          Prepare the cutting tools required on the machining and turning center to perform the necessary (following, but not limited to) operations:

                      1.    End, Face, and Pocket Milling,

                      2.    Contouring,

                      3.    Drilling and Center Drilling,

                      4.    Reaming,

                      5.    Bolt Circle Cycle,

                      6.    Chamfering,

                      7.    Tapping, Dowling/Facing and Back-facing,

                      8.    Turning and Back-turning,

                      9.    Boring, Back-boring, and Counter-boring,

                      10.  Countersinking,

                      11.  Trepanning,

                      12.  OD/ID Tapers, Contouring, and Necking,

                      13.  Indexing,

                      14.  Timing,

                      15.  Spline Machining.

         B.          Measure and record each tool’s geometry.

         C.          Enter tool geometry.

     14: Measure and record each tool’s geometry.    

         A.          Measure and record coolant level.

         B.          Measure and record lubrication oil level.

         C.          Measure and record lubrication oil pressure.

         D.         Measure and record hydraulic oil level.

         E.          Measure and record hydraulic oil pressure.

         F.          Measure and record air pressure.

      Outcome 15: Demonstrate productive interaction with others.

         A.          Practice citizenship by respecting each person’s computer files as their personal property.

         B.          Ask and respond to questions during drawing demonstrations.

         C.          Display willingness to help classmates.

         D.          Demonstrate employability, interpersonal, teamwork, and leadership skills necessary to

                      function in a multicultural business setting.

         E.          Use effective listening skills during classroom demonstrations.

  
  •  

    CNC 290-299 - Special Projects in Computer Numerical Control


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Computer Science & Information Technology

  
  •  

    CST 090 - Beginning Computer Concepts

    Credits: 3
    Provides the terminology needed to become familiar with a basic computer, the Windows operating system, the Internet, and office applications. Provides a hands-on setting focusing on basic computer techniques. Designed for those who lack familiarity with computer technology. This course does not count toward graduation.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use the Windows Operating System as it relates to the Internet.
      1. Open and close multiple internet applications.
      2. Use the Clipboard to Copy/Cut/Paste text and objects from a Web page.
      3. Save, Save As, and print files.
    2. Perform simple e-mail tasks.
      1. Receive e-mail messages in a Web-based e-mail application.
      2. Send e-mail messages.
      3. Reply, Reply All, Forward, Courtesy Copy, and Blind Courtesy Copy messages.
      4. Delete e-mail messages.
    3. Perform simple Web activities.
      1. Access various Delta College Web pages using links.
      2. Access a variety of Web pages given their addresses.
      3. Do simple research on the Internet using Search Engines and Web Directories.
    4. Use the Windows Operating System as it relates to application programs.
      1. Open and close multiple office applications.
      2. Use the clipboard to Copy/Cut/Paste text and objects within a document and from document to document.
      3. Save, Save As, and Print files.
    5. Perform basic skills in Word Processing.
      1. Define the basic terms used in Word Processing applications.
      2. Explore keyboarding techniques.
      3. Create new documents.
      4. Modify the content of existing documents.
      5. Apply simple formatting to documents such as bold, italics, underline, and centering.
    6. Perform basic skills in the use of an Electronic Worksheet.
      1. Define the basic terms used in Worksheet applications.
      2. Insert numbers and text in an existing Worksheet.
      3. Add the numbers in a column.
      4. Apply simple formatting to a Worksheet.
      5. Create a basic graph.
    7. Perform basic skills in Presentation Graphics.
      1. Define the basic terms used in Presentation Graphics applications.
      2. Modify an existing presentation.
      3. Create a basic presentation using basic slide layouts and a template.
      4. Display a slide show.
  
  •  

    CST 103 - Windows Foundations

    Credits: 1
    Provides a basic introduction to the Microsoft Windows Operating System. Includes the creation of folders and use and review of the basic concepts of storage on floppy and hard disk. Introduces the basic features of Windows including menus, icons, dialog boxes, and the title and menu bars. Emphasizes the use of multi tasking.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the MS Windows operating systems.
      1. Describe the various command level and graphical user interface operating systems.
      2. Use the various features of MS Windows
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts of PC operating systems.
      1. Define operating systems.
      2. Maximize, minimize, and close multiple windows.
      3. Use the menu bar, list box, drop down box, radio buttons, and desktop icons.
      4. Explore the control panel and help features.
      5. Demonstrate the ability to multitask applications.
    3. Work effectively with files and folders.
      1. Format a diskette and understand the format process.
      2. Work with text, such as selecting, using the clipboard (copy, cut and paste), and changing the font.
      3. Open folders and back up files and folders.
    4. Work with Windows Explorer in the organization of disks and diskettes.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to create new folders.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to rename, delete, copy and delete folders and files within folders.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to work with view, sort the information, expand and collapse the folder structure.
    5. Use search for files and folders.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to search using a filename or part of a filename.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to search for a particular file type.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to find a file if you only know the size or date it was created.
      4. Demonstrate the ability to find a file if you know some of the text within the file.
  
  •  

    CST 104 - Microsoft Word Foundations

    Credits: 1
    Introduces Microsoft Word software. Teaches how to create, format, save, retrieve, edit, and print documents.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3 and OAT 170  with a “C” (2.0) grade minimum or equivalent touch typing and computer background
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use the components of the Word window.
      1. Use the Office button for file operations and modifying Microsoft Word options.
      2. Apply features found in groups with the tabs on the ribbon.
      3. Use and modify the Quick Access toolbar.
      4. Use screen tips and shortcut menus.
      5. Display and interpret nonprinting characters.
      6. Use the scroll bar.
      7. Use the rulers.
      8. Use and modify the status bar.
      9. Recognize and use viewing buttons.
    2. Use basic document processing operations.
      1. Navigate through the document with the keyboard and the mouse.
      2. Use common keyboard shortcuts for file operations and formatting.
      3. Insert and delete text.
      4. Select text with the keyboard and the mouse.
      5. Use undo and redo.
      6. Use cut, copy, and paste operations.
      7. Use folders for file management.
      8. Manage files with save, print, open, close, and “save as.”
      9. Find and replace text.
    3. Use basic formatting of documents.
      1. Recognize program defaults.
      2. Use word wrap.
      3. Use caps lock, bold, underline, and italics.
      4. Change font size and style and apply font effects.
      5. Use styles for formatting documents.
      6. Change text alignments.
      7. Set and use tabs, change tab types, and delete tabs.
      8. Change line spacing.
      9. Change margins and indents.
      10. Insert page breaks.
      11. Apply bullets and numbers to paragraphs.
      12. Apply borders and shading to paragraphs.
    4. Demonstrate the use of electronic tools to improve the quality of the document.
      1. Use the Help feature.
      2. Use and modify the spell checker.
      3. Use and modify the grammar checker.
      4. Use and modify Auto Correct options.
  
  •  

    CST 105 - Outlook

    Credits: 1
    Introduces Microsoft Outlook and its e-mail, calendar, contacts, and tasks/notes components. Teaches how to send and receive e-mail, manage calendar activities, maintain contacts, and create tasks and notes. Also includes customization and integration of Outlook components.

    Prerequisite(s): OAT 171  or CST 133W  each with a grade of “C” or higher
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the ability to use e-mail.
      1. Analyze the principles of writing effective e-mail messages.
      2. Create and send an e-mail message.
      3. Use entries in a global address book.
      4. Create a signature.
      5. Reply to, forward, print, and delete e-mail messages.
      6. Attach files to a message.
      7. Create folders and move messages between folders.
      8. Apply follow-up flags to messages.
      9. Arrange and filter messages in the Contents Pane.
      10. Create a rule to automatically move messages to a folder.
      11. Analyze and evaluate e-mail options and customize for efficiency.
      12. Access and use information from Microsoft Help resources.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to schedule appointments and meetings on an electronic calendar.
      1. Schedule appointments and events.
      2. Schedule recurring appointments.
      3. Edit, move, and delete appointments.
      4. View and print daily, weekly, and monthly calendars.
      5. Change the current view to filter appointments and events.
      6. Interact productively with others by sending meeting requests and efffectively accepting and declining meetings.
      7. Update a meeting.
      8. Analyze and evaluate calendar options and customize for efficiency.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of managing contacts.
      1. Create an appointment from the contacts folder.
      2. Create, print, edit, and delete contacts.
      3. Change the contacts view.
      4. Flag a contact for follow-up.
      5. Sort and filter contacts.
      6. Analyze contacts and group into categories.
      7. Find a contact.
      8. Create multiple contacts folders for different purposes.
      9. Add a picture to the business card.
      10. Print contacts in card, booklet, and phone directory style.
      11. Analyze and evaluate contacts options and customize for efficiency.
      12. Send an e-mail message from the contacts folder.
      13. Schedule an appointment from the contacts folder.
      14. Create and use a distribution list for e-mail messages.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to organize tasks and notes.
      1. Create, update, print, and delete tasks.
      2. Create a recurring task.
      3. Assign a task to someone else.
      4. Respond to a task request.
      5. View and track assigned tasks.
      6. Send task information to other users.
      7. Analyze task lists and customize the view to optimize the use of task lists.
      8. Analyze and evaluate task options and customize for efficiency.
      9. Create, edit, and delete notes.
      10. Analyze notes and assign to categories.
      11. Analyze and evaluate note options and customize for efficiency.
      12. Change the note view.
      13. Use a note as a desktop reminder.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to customize the Outlook desktop.
      1. Analyze and evaluate the Outlook desktop and customize it for optimum use.
      2. Evaluate and change desktop alerts.
      3. Evaluate the Navigation Pane and customize it.
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of integrating the components of Outlook.
      1. Send a file as an Outlook attachment.
      2. Open and/or save e-mail attachments of different types.
      3. Add a contact to Outlook from an e-mail address.
      4. Create a contact from the global address book.
      5. Create a task from an e-mail message.
      6. Create a task from a note.
      7. Analyze the Outlook toolbar for similarities in every component of Outlook.
      8. Use keyboard shortcuts common to other Windows application software.
  
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    CST 106 - Internet Foundations

    Credits: 1
    Develops skills to access and use the Internet emphasizing easy information retrieval. Introduces essential Internet areas such as E-Mail and the use of Graphical Web Browsers. Credit may be earned in only one of the following: CST 106, CPS 160, CIS 160 or CIS 161.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate understanding of the features of an electronic mail system via Internet
      1. Compose and send e-mail
      2. Open, read, and delete receive e-mail
      3. Manage an e-mail account including archiving messages and the use of folders
      4. Create and manage entries in an e-mail address book
      5. Subscribe to and utilize a listserv and define the use and value of a listserv
    2. Demonstrate understanding and use of a graphical Web browser.
      1. Define what a URL is and the various URL domains
      2. Access a specific web page from a URL
      3. Navigate various Web pages through links
      4. Perform efficient searches of the World Wide Web for specific information using a variety of search tools.
    3. Apply essential Unix to support basic Internet usage.
      1. Log on to a personal Internet account
      2. Use a basic Unix text editor
      3. Create signature and ?plan? files
      4. Create and delete Unix directories
      5. Move and rename Unix files
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of Internet-related ethics and security.
      1. Define issues with personal and information security
      2. Describe Internet etiquette
      3. Define various ethical issues related to the emerging Internet
  
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    CST 107 - Microsoft Publisher

    Credits: 1
    Introduces the basics of using Microsoft Publisher to design and create publications for personal use and professional purposes.  Teaches principles of publication design and layout, including formatting text, using graphic manipulation tools, applying color schemes and styles, and working with templates.

    Prerequisite(s): CST 104  or OAT 171  or CST 133W  or CST 134  each with a “C” grade or higher or instructor permission.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use the basic components of Microsoft Publisher.
      1. Identify the parts of the Publisher window.
      2. Open and save a publication.
      3. Enter text in a text box.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of designing a publication.
      1. Identify the target audience.
      2. Identify the purpose of the publication.
      3. Determine the expected response of the publication.
      4. Identify elements of effective and ineffective design.
      5. Apply standard elements of design to the publication.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to create a new publication.
      1. Use layout and ruler guides.
      2. Format a text box.
      3. Add bullets and numbering.
      4. Add a graphic image.
      5. Group objects.
      6. Create columns.
      7. Adjust text overflows.
      8. Add drop caps.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to create a publication using a template.
      1. Choose an appropriate template.
      2. Replace existing text.
      3. Add a graphic image.
      4. Group objects.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to create a multipage publication.
      1. Add pages.
      2. Delete pages.
      3. Work with a master page.
      4. Create a header and footer.
      5. Add page numbers.
    6. Demonstrate the use of electronic tools to improve the quality of the publication.
      1. Use the Help feature.
      2. Check spelling.
      3. Run design checks.
      4. Use the show/hide tool to display nonprinting characters.
      5. Use the format painter tool.
    7. Demonstrate an understanding of preparing a publication for printing.
      1. Identify the differences between preparing a publication for personal use versus commercial printing.
      2. View the publication in print preview to assess overall appearance.
      3. Choose an appropriate file format for printing purposes.
  
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    CST 110 - Web Content Development

    Credits: 1
    Develops skills to create and maintain a basic Web content using a content management system. Introduces content management systems, content formatting, theme and appearance customization, and plugins. Examines best practices for attribution, security, accessibility, usability, and developing content for target audiences.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Develop and publish content targeted to a specific audience.
      1. Develop appropriate content for target audience.
      2. Apply formatting to content using content management system editor.
      3. Incorporate appropriate graphics and multimedia.
      4. Publish content utilizing pages and posts.
      5. Apply best practices in page and post creation, naming, and linking.
    2. Customize site appearance and attributes in accordance with branding targeted to a specific audience.
      1. Apply appropriate theme using built in theme explorers.
      2. Customize themes and site styles in accordance with site branding.
      3. Optimize home page content and features for intended audience.
      4. Customize menu appearance and location to comply with site branding.
      5. Optimize menu features for intended audience.
    3. Optimize site usability and functionality across platforms.
      1. Organize site content to maximize usability.
      2. Create user friendly navigation menus using menu editors.
      3. Apply platform and device appropriate theme/mobile themes.
      4. Customize site plugins for target audience and desired features.
      5. Test site on platforms, browsers, and devices to be used by intended audience.
    4. Apply best practices for site and content design.
      1. Optimize site settings for security and privacy.
      2. Apply copyright and licensing regulations of graphics and content appropriately.
      3. Develop usability strategy for target audience.
  
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    CST 115W - e-Commerce Concepts

    Credits: 3
    Provides an explanation of traditional commerce and e-commerce, which is doing business over the web. Describes an overview of the economic structures in which businesses operate and describe how electronic commerce fits into those structures. Includes a review of different Web-based tools, the software necessary, security concerns and strategies for Marketing, Sales and Promotion on the Web.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the difference between traditional commerce, e-commerce and e-business
      1. Define the basic terminology of the above concepts
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of the Internet and World Wide Web
      3. Describe the economic forces in e-commerce
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of the Web-based tools available for e-Commerce
      1. Be able to evaluate Web Servers and their role in your e-Commerce decision
      2. Be able to manage your site and demonstrate an understanding of the software available for this
      3. Demonstrate portals, search engines, push technologies and intelligent agents
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the different e-Commerce software available
      1. List and explain the software available to provide a catalog display, shopping cart capabilities , transaction processing and the tools to populate the store catalog and facilitate storefront displays
      2. Explain the advantages of a Web Host over Self-Hosting
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the security threats of e-commerce
      1. Explain and be able to withstand threats of security
      2. Explain and be able to withstand integrity threats
      3. Explain and be able to withstand Web Server threat
      4. Describe how to deal with Cookies and how to use Anti virus software
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of how to set up an effective electronic payment system
      1. Explain the different methods to collect payments
      2. Demonstrate how credit and debit cards are processed
      3. Explain the role of smart cards in e-Commerce
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of the various strategies for Marketing, Sales and Promotion
      1. Learn how to establish an effective business presence on the Web
      2. Describe promotional techniques
      3. Describe how to identify and reach customers
      4. Explain the different business models for selling on the Web
    7. Demonstrate an understanding of the different strategies for Web Auctions, Virtual Communities and Web Portals
      1. Explain the characteristics of the major auction types
      2. Describe the strategies for Web auction sites
      3. Describe how businesses can use virtual communities to increase awareness and sales
      4. Explain the strategies for Web portal sites
    8. Demonstrate an understanding of the various Business Plans for implementing e-Commerce
      1. Explain how to set objectives for the benefits and costs of e-Commerce plans
      2. Decide which elements to outsource
      3. Select Web hosting services
      4. Describe staffing e-Commerce activities
  
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    CST 120 - MS Command Line Operating System

    Credits: 1
    Provides a basic introduction to Command Line Operating Systems Interface using the Disk Operating System (DOS) as an example. Includes basic commands and emphasizes commands for managing files and directories. Introduces basic features of managing and backing up a hard disk and surveys troubleshooting tools. Includes the creation and use of batch files.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use the DOS command line interface.
      1. Issue basic commands.
      2. Recall and modify commands.
      3. Use switches, filters and redirection.
      4. Access and analyze help for commands.
    2. Manage files and directories.
      1. Create and delete files.
      2. Copy and move files.
      3. Display and print files.
      4. Create and remove directories.
      5. Navigate within a directory hierarchy.
      6. Display contents of directories.
      7. Use wildcards.
      8. Search for files.
    3. Manage a hard disk.
      1. Organize files on a hard disk.
      2. Develop a backup/restore strategy.
      3. Develop a troubleshooting strategy.
      4. Describe troubleshooting tools such as check disk and defragmentation.
      5. Describe standard file systems and booting options.
    4. Interpret binary and hexadecimal numbers.
      1. Convert numbers from base to base using the decimal, binary and hexadecimal number systems.
      2. Decode binary and hexadecimal error codes, masks, and other data.
      3. Use an ASCII code table.
    5. Use batch program files.
      1. Create batch program files.
      2. Use batch program files.
      3. Use parameters in batch program files.
      4. Use general batch program file commands.
      5. Document batch programs.
      6. Use decision and looping batch file commands.
  
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    CST 123 - Windows Operating System

    Credits: 1
    Provides a continuing orientation to PC Operating Systems. Emphasizes the Windows Operating System features needed in the daily operation of microcomputers including customizing and managing the desktop, maintaining the system and backing up data. Includes the customizing of windows for increased productivity, creation of graphics and the concepts of Object Linking and Embedding.

    Prerequisite(s): CST 103  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Student is able to modify their desktop for their own use
      1. Demonstrate an ability to create Document icons and Shortcuts on their desktop
      2. Demonstrate an ability to modify their desktop appearance
      3. Demonstrate an ability to use the Control Panel to review Accessibility settings including the use of their mouse
    2. Student is able to modify and create graphics using Paint
      1. Demonstrate an ability to use drawing tools
      2. Demonstrate an ability to enlarge a view of the graphic and work with the individual pixels in modifying a graphic
    3. Student is able to use Object Linking and Embedding
      1. Demonstrate an ability to use Paste to combine objects from one document to the next
      2. Demonstrate an ability to embed a portion of a graphic in a document
      3. Demonstrate an ability to insert a graphic in a document
      4. Demonstrate an ability to modify an embedded graphic, change it to an icon, modify the appearance of the icon and its label and create a Link to the original graphic
      5. Demonstrate the ability to Link to objects like video clips
    4. Student should be able to manage their print jobs, install new hardware devices and use the various fonts
      1. Open and control the Print Queue
      2. Understand how to install new hardware and the appropriate software
      3. Be able to understand and use the different fonts that are available
    5. Student should be able to understand what is necessary for Disk Maintenance
      1. Understand how disks become fragmented and how to defragment them
      2. Understand and be able to Scan our disks for errors
      3. Understand and be able to Backup our disks and folders
      4. Understand how to compress a disk and the reasons for doing so
    6. The Student should be able to understand and be able to use some of the common DOS commands
      1. Understand and be able to use the common commands of DIR, TYPE, FORMAT, COPY, VOL and LABEL
      2. Understand how to make directories and work with them
      3. Understand the differences between a Text-based Operating System and a Graphical User Interface
  
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    CST 126 - Unix/Linux Operating System

    Credits: 2
    Provides a basic orientation to the Unix and Linux Operating Systems. Emphasizes how to create, display, copy and print files. Includes how to work with directories, and how to connect to the Internet. Credit may be earned in CST 126 or CIS 109, but not both

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Recognize and know how to use some common commands of UNIX.
      1. Recognize and be able to issue commands available with all Shells of Unix.
      2. Learn the History of Unix as an Operating System and why it’s still in use.
      3. Learn how to use the online Manuel
    2. Learn how to use common editors
      1. Importance of vi will be stressed
      2. student will be introduced to pico as an alternative to vi
    3. Learn how to use some of the common commands in file maintenance
      1. Recognize how to use who, ou, ls, wc, sort, cat, colrm, tr, cut, paste, w, grep and lpansi
      2. Be able to use Redirection and Pipes
      3. Recognize how to use wildcards with the above commands
    4. Be able to create directories and subdirectories
      1. Be able to change and work with all directories
      2. Be able to work with files in various directories
    5. Recognize and write Alias and Script Files
      1. Be able to use and control Aliases.
      2. Be able to use if, do and case in Script files
    6. Learn how to use Pine for email
      1. Understand how to set up your Address file
      2. Be able to compose and reply to email
      3. Learn how to set up a .signature and .plan file
    7. Know how to control the Processing of a program
      1. Understand how to control whether a program runs in foreground or background
      2. Understand how to terminate jobs
  
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    CST 128 - Computer Hardware and Troubleshooting

    Credits: 4
    Uses hands-on experiences to examine the internal hardware components of computers with an emphasis on troubleshooting and repair. Discusses interaction of operating system and hardware in running application programs. Explores upgrading and optimizing computers to solve typical hardware and software problems.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of computer hardware.
      1. Differentiate between motherboard components, their purposes, and properties.
      2. Compare and contrast RAM types and features.
      3. Install and configure expansioncards and storage devices.
      4. Identify connector types and associated cables.
      5. Differentiate among various CPU types and features.
      6. Compare and contrast various connection interfaces and explain their purposes.
      7. Configure and apply BIOS settings.
      8. Identify different power supplies.
    2. Demonstrate essential Networking skills.
      1. Identify types of network cables and connectors.
      2. Categorize characteristics of connectors and cabling.
      3. Explain properties and characteristics of TCP/IP.
      4. Explain common TCP and UDP ports, protocols, and their purposes.
      5. Install and configure a wireless/wired router using appropriate settings.
      6. Compare and contrast wireless networking standards and encryption types.
      7. Compare and contrast Internet connection types and features.
      8. Identify various types of networks.
      9. Compare and contrast network devices and their functions and features.
    3. Configure laptop hardware and components.
      1. Compare and contrast laptop features.
      2. Disassemble and reassemble a laptop.
    4. Configure printers.
      1. Use appropriate printer drivers for a given operating system in a wireless environment.
      2. Explain the differences between the various types of printers.
    5. Demonstrate standard operating procedures.
      1. Given a scenario, use appropriate safety procedures.
      2. Explain environmental impacts and the purpose of environmental controls.
    6. Demonstrate proper communication and professionalism.
      1. Deal with difficult customer situations.
      2. Deal appropriately with customers’ confidential materials.
  
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    CST 129 - Mac OS Troubleshooting

    Credits: 2
    Prepares help desk specialists, technical coordinators, service technicians, system administrators, and others who support Mac users to knowledgeably address customer concerns and questions. Studies in-depth technical information and procedures to install, configure, maintain, and diagnose Mac computers running OS X.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Utilize troubleshooting skills.
      1. Generate, assess, and validate solutions to an installation problem.
      2. Identify tips and techniques for troubleshooting.
      3. Connect to common network resources, network user accounts with directory services, Bonjour, and the network browser.
      4. Identify applications supported in Mac OS X, tools to monitor and manage processes and Boot Camp.
      5. Identify file systems supported by Mac OS X.
    2. Utilize the Mac OS X features.
      1. Define directory attributes, security, password selection, keychain, and file vault.
      2. Explore online resources.
      3. Search and access information via the Internet.
      4. Enable network services on a Mac OS X client.
      5. Explore basic networking configuration, TCP/IP networking, wi-fi and multiple network connections.
    3. Interpret technical materials and observations.
      1. Describe relevant symbols used with MAC OS.
      2. Apply data using MAC OS.
    4. Setup and configure MAC printing.
      1. Set up a default printer.
      2. Install printer settings.
      3. Set up network printing.
  
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    CST 133W - Computer Concepts & Competencies

    Credits: 4


    Prepares for the on-going ethical, environmental, societal and global issues of technology. Presents computer concepts including input and output of data and how information is processed, stored, and shared. Examines the purpose of networks, their technologies, scopes, and connectivity issues. Gives major consideration to Internet technology and access emphasizing research, education, communication, e-commerce, and security. Provides an introduction to software engineering and the analysis and design of computer systems. Discusses computer platforms, architectures, and system software. Develops PC competencies and skills including file management, word processing, spreadsheets, presentation graphics, database, Internet, Web pages, and graphics. Credit may be earned in CST 133W or CIS 133, but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Recognize the components of a computer system and  identify the different pieces of hardware.

         A.          Describe various hardware devices used for input

         B.          Describe various hardware devices used for output

         C.          List the differences and use of various types of computers

         D.          Describe storage media and devices, drive interfaces and how to measure and improve performance

         E.          Describe emerging hardware technologies

     2.    Define and describe the various categories of software.

         A.          Explain the different Operating Systems and User Interfaces (GUI and Command)

         B.          Define Multitasking and Object Linking and Embedding

         C.          Describe the integrating of information among multiple applications

         D.          Describe how operating systems organize files

         E.          Describe the functions of operating system utility software

         F.          Identify and explain the use of selected Application Software from each of the five main categories (Word processing, Spreadsheet,
                      Database, Graphics, and Communications)

         G.         Describe the various file formats involved with applications and their compatibility

         H.         Compare and contrast the use of bitmap and vector graphics files

         I.           Describe emerging media software technologies

    3.    Define the Systems Development Life Cycle and the role of Systems Analysis and Design.

         A.          Describe how Information Systems are enhanced by the use of computers

         B.          Describe how hardware and software interact to solve problems

         C.          Define the different Information Systems and their components, including Office Automation Systems, Transaction Processing Systems,
                       Decision Support Systems, Management Information Systems and Expert Systems

         D.          List the members of an Information Systems Department and their roles

         E.          Define the phases of the Systems Development Life Cycle as it applies to systems development and program development

         F.           Compare and contrast developing Custom Software and use of Pre-packaged programs

         G.          Describe how algorithms are developed

         H.          Describe the programming techniques used in standardized software development

         I.           Compare and contrast the different generations of programming Languages

         J.           List ways to build a program and the steps in program development

         K.          Compare and contrast Structured Programming and Object Oriented Programming

         L.           Identify Language Interpreters and Compilers and how they function

         M.          Identify Source Code versus Object Code

         N.          Describe the use of Database Management Systems and determine the data file organization that is needed by various applications,
                       including flat file and relational data bases

         O.          Describe the methods of processing and determine when one would use Batch and Interactive Processing

         P.           Define Source Data Automation, its use and importance

         Q.          Identify uses of Multimedia, Artificial Intelligence, Robotics, Virtual Reality and Expert Systems

    4.    Describe Computer Architecture and how information is processed and stored inside the computer.

         A.          Describe the Central Processing Unit, its different parts and how it functions.

         B.          Define the internal clock and machine cycle and describe how computer performance is measured

         C.          Explain how data is represented and the different encoding schemes and number bases (Binary, Hexadecimal, and Decimal)

         D.          Describe the functions of RAM, ROM and cache memory and their addressing

         E.          Describe other components such as bus, expansion slots, boards and ports

    5.    Explain Data/Telecommunications.

         A.          Identify the characteristics in different communications media and describe the different methods of transmission and media used

         B.          Explain the use of Networks (LAN and WAN)

         C.          Describe Client/Server Networks and Peer-to-Per Networks

         D.          Explain how data and peripheral devices are shared

         E.          Identify the different telecommunications applications

         F.          Describe the different types of networks and the topology of each

         G.         Describe how the Internet works and how traffic is routed

         H.         Describe the major features and uses of the Internet

    6.     Explain how computers affect our lives.

         A.          Explain the issues of Privacy versus Security

         B.          Identify what constitutes Computer Crime and how we can protect ourselves against it

         C.          Identify the role of Ethics in the computer field

         D.          Describe ergonomic and other health issues associated with using a computer

         E.          Define the career opportunities and education needed for each field associated with computers

     7.    Use the software as presented in lab.    

         A.          Use the Operating System

                      1.    Multitask and share information within an application and between applications

                      2.    Format and organize storage media using folder and file management

                      3.    Search for files and folders on various storage media

                      4.    Use utility programs supplied by the operating system

                      5.    Use the Graphical User Interface of Windows and the Command Line Interface of UNIX to perform various tasks

         B.          Use a Word Processing application

                      1.    Enter, edit and format text

                      2.    Use special features and language tools, including spell checker

                      3.    Add graphics, including clip art and word art

                      4.    Ceate and manipulate data within a table

                      5.    Create and define data fields and forms to perform mail merge

                      6.    Convert a document to a web page, upload to the Internet and view it

         C.          Use a Spreadsheet application

                      1.    Enter, edit and format numbers and text

                      2.    Manipulate data with functions and formulas and perform “What-If Analysis”

                      3.    Copy formulas, functions, numbers and text using relative and absolute addressing

                      4.    Sort data

                      5.    Validate results of a spreadsheet

                      6.    Create charts from spreadsheet data

         D.         Use a Database application

                      1.    Create and modify tables of data

                      2.    Create queries including natural joins of multiple tables

                      3.    Create other database objects such as reports and charts

                      4.    Perform calculations using table data

         E.          Use a Presentation Graphics application

                      1.    Create and edit presentations to include text and graphic elements

                      2.    Use transition techniques and animation

                      3.    Use features of the application program including outlines, handouts and notes pages

         F.          Work with Graphics

                      1.    Use clip art in a variety of applications

                      2.    Create a bitmapped drawing and use it in a variety of applications

         G.         Perform Application Integration

                      1.    Create a mail merge document that includes word processed  text, a spreadsheet chart object, and a drawing. Merge using data from
                             a database management application

         H.         Use the Internet

                      1.    Send and receive e-mail

                      2.    Create a web page that includes hypermedia and graphics, use a file transfer program to upload it to the Internet, and view it

                      3.    Search the web and access information

         I.          Perform elementary programming

                      1.    Create and test Visual Basic programs that display data in a window given step-by-step instructions

    8:    Gather information about computers by reading technical text. Communicate effectively in reading and writing.

         A.          Identify and summarize the main points of a technical reading

         B.          Derive meaning from a technical reading

    9.    Write effectively for a technical audience and purpose by using writing tasks to promote learning. Communicate effectively in reading
           and writing.


         A.          Organize and integrate information into a format that illustrates patterns, clusters and hierarchies of information

         B.          Articulate important technical ideas to demonstrate knowledge of computers

         C.          Organize written information into tables, charts and graphs using word processing, spreadsheet, presentation graphics, and database to
                       facilitate interpretation

         D.         Employ conventions of written, edited, standard English (WESE)

         E.          Interpret and present information accurately in tables, charts and graphs

         F.          Document sources in conventional style

         G.         Use appropriate technical vocabulary for the audience and purpose

         H.         Document attainment of knowledge/skills learned

    10. Choose, organize and develop the content of a presentation. Communicate effectively in speaking and listening.

         A.          Choose a specific topic and purpose, develop main points, provide supporting evidence for the topic, and determine who the target
                       audience is

         B.          Use software tools to develop the message with a recognizable introduction, development and conclusion

         C.          Use software tools to prepare appropriate supporting materials

    11. Use effective listening skills. Communicate effectively in speaking and listening.

         A.          Pay attention and listen carefully and respectfully to technical discussions and directions

         B.          Make sense of a technical message

         C.          Act appropriately and effectively based on the technical information

    12. Interpret technical statements, texts, theories, problems, symbols and observations. Think critically and access, analyze and use
          information 
    including using current computer technology.

         A.          Identify important questions of a written or spoken technical text

         B.          Clarify and analyze the meanings of technical words, phrases and statements

         C.          Learn the meanings of relevant symbols used with computers and ways to use them

         D.          Develop a perspective with regards to various computer concepts

         E.          Generate and collect relevant observable or measurable information or data using application software

         F.          Organize and present information or data in tables, charts and graphs

    13. Formulate a question or need, develop a strategy to meet that question or need to solve a technical problem.  Think critically and access, analyze and use information including using current computer technology.    

         A.          Generate, assess and validate solutions to a technical problem

         B.          Develop and question alternative formulations of a technical problem

         C.          Search and access information via computer networks and databases

         D.         Evaluate information or data for quality, validity and bias to determine if it is objective and reliable

         E.         Question assumptions, data and formulations of problems and proposed answers

    14. Understand and practice the intellectual and participatory skills identified with effective citizenship.  Value and practice

         A.          Identify, describe, explain and evaluate important public issues associated with computer technology

         B.          Recognize the role of core values associated with computer technology in the workings of a diverse society          

  
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    CST 134 - Micro Computers in Business Using MS Office

    Credits: 3
    Surveys small computer systems used for personal, business, and industrial applications including hardware, software, and operating systems. Uses MS Office for word processing, spreadsheets, and database software as well as the evaluation and selection of systems.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate understanding of Microsofts Word’s basic features.
      1. Demonstrate basic features of Word: entering text, editing text, spelling and grammar checking, saving, printing, retrieving, cutting and pasting text and graphics, and other text enhancement functions.
    2. Produce a technical paper.
      1. Plan, organize and write a technical paper or web page.
    3. Demonstrate understanding of Microsoft Excel’s basic features.
      1. Demonstrate ability to create a simple spreadsheet.
      2. Use add, subtract, multiply, and divide in formulas.
      3. Use built in functions.
      4. Design spreadsheets using sound design that are easy to understand.
    4. Demonstrate understanding of Microsoft Access’s basic features.
      1. Demonstrate ability to create a database.
      2. Demonstrate ability to create a table.
      3. Demonstrate ability to create a simple query
      4. Demonstrate ability to create a report with derived totals, sums, and level breaks.
    5. Demonstrate understanding of Microsoft PowerPoint’s basic features.
      1. Demonstrate ability to create a PowerPoint presentation.
      2. Demonstrate ability to create a presentation utilizing a template.
      3. Demonstrate ability to utilize slide transitions.
      4. Demonstrate ability to edit, enhance, and customize presentations.
      5. Demonstrate ability to use graphics and multimedia objects in presentations.
  
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    CST 135 - Help Desk Fundamentals

    Credits: 1
    Explores computer support processes and procedures that are used in business. Examines methods of communicating with users. Describes how service agreements are established with users. Defines problem solving procedures and methods to track and measure a problem until it is solved.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Define an overview of End-User computing.
      1. Examine some historical changes in computer use.
      2. Describe the types of end users.
      3. List the main categories of computer applications.
      4. Define the problems that accompany the growth of end-user computing.
    2. Apply communication and interpersonal skills.
      1. Define the importance of communication skills and customer service relationships.
      2. Build and communicate understanding.
      3. Develop a call management strategy.
    3. Identify problem-solving situations and how user support specialists solve them.
      1. Identify the types of common end-user computer problems.
      2. Identify the problem-solving process user support specialists follow to solve several typical support problems.
    4. Apply tools and strategies that help desks use to support end users in an effective and efficient way.
      1. Identify the tools that are available to track problems.
      2. Identify how we are able to have asset control and problem control.
      3. Apply these tools in an efficient manner.
    5. Obtain an understanding of the managerial perspective.
      1. Identify some of the tasks, skills, issues and concerns that confront user support and help desk management.
      2. Develop a mission statement.
      3. Identify the purpose of staffing and training.
  
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    CST 147 - Electronic Media Communication

    Credits: 2
    Develops beginning/intermediate best practices for business and education presentations and electronic media. Focuses on developing attractive, professional, effective, and well-timed visuals for different business settings. Students will use cloud-based technologies to create and share presentation media and supplemental materials.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 AND WRITING LEVEL 2.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Develop strategies to create audience and context appropriate for electronic media communication.
      1. Understand different contexts in which electronic presentations are most suitable.
      2. Identify the audience for a presentation when given the context and manner in which it will be presented and shared.
      3. Plan a presentation that is appropriate for the audience and context in which it will be used.
    2. Produce presentations using a variety of current presentation applications or delivery methods.
      1. Research and gather resources for electronic media communication.
      2. Create and design presentations.
      3. Modify or redesign an existing presentation.
      4. Present or share a presentation.
      5. Effectively use presentation tools.
      6. Use social media and networks to share and promote presentations.
      7. Understand copyright and Fair Use guidelines related to the use and sharing of electronic and other copyrighted materials.
      8. Demonstrate attribution of resources.
      9. Create unique electronic resources utilizing open source, social media, cloud-based and other applications and tools.
      10. Apply best design practices related to audience, context and venue(s) of delivery.
      11. Create and share supplemental presentation materials.
  
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    CST 150W - Information Security Policies, Procedures, and Fundamentals

    Credits: 3
    Covers terminology; security systems development and implementation; and legal, ethical, and professional issues. Provides knowledge and experience to develop and maintain security policies and procedures.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe characteristics and components of information systems security policy management.
      1. Describe what is information systems security.
      2. Describe what is information assurance.
      3. Understand why information system security policies are important.
      4. Understand why enforcing and winning acceptance for policies is challenging.
    2. Describe business drivers for information security policies.
      1. Discuss maintaining compliance.
      2. Describe mitigating risk exposure.
      3. Describe minimizing liability of the organization.
      4. Discuss implementing policies to drive operational consistency.
    3. Discuss U.S. compliance laws and information security policy requirements.
      1. Describe how these laws came about.
      2. Discuss who the laws protect.
      3. Describe aligning security policies and self-regulation.
      4. Discuss industry leading standards.
    4. Discuss information security policy implementation issues.
      1. Discuss human nature in the workplace.
      2. Discuss the importance of executive management support.
      3. Describe the role of human resources.
      4. Describe policy roles, responsibility, and accountability.
    5. Discuss how to design, implement, and update IT security policies.
      1. Discuss policies and standards design considerations.
      2. Describe considerations for implementing policies and standards.
      3. Describe maintaining your policies and standards library.
      4. Discuss best practices for policies and standards maintenance.
    6. Describe IT infrastructure security policies.
      1. Discuss the anatomy of an infrastructure policy.
      2. Describe workstation domain policies.
      3. Discuss best practices for IT infrastructure security policies.
      4. Discuss case studies and examples of IT infrastructure security policies.
      5. Describe Incident Response Team (IRT) Policies.
    7. Discuss IT security policy implementation and policy enforcement.
      1. Describe the implementation issues for IT security policies.
      2. Discuss security awareness policy implementations.
      3. Describe implementation dissemination.
      4. Discuss overcoming technical hindrances.
  
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    CST 151 - Spreadsheet Fundamentals

    Credits: 2
    Surveys Microsoft Excel including evaluation of spreadsheets, database applications, graphics, report formatting, and macros as applied to small business and industrial settings. Credit may be earned in either CST 151 or CST 155 , but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 2 and OAT 171  with a “C” or higher
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Recognize and use the components of the Excel window.
      1. Ues basic spreadsheet file operations.
      2. Apply features found in groups within the tabs on the ribbon.
      3. Use and modify the Quick Access toolbar.
      4. Use the Help feature.
      5. Use shortcut menus.
      6. Use the scroll bar.
      7. Use the formula bar.
      8. Use the status bar.
      9. Use viewing buttons.
    2. Create and print worksheets.
      1. Plan, design, build, and review a worksheet.
      2. Enter labels, values, and formulas.
      3. Edit cell entries.
    3. Demonstrate skill in enhancing a worksheet.
      1. Change font and font style and apply font effects.
      2. Add borders and shading.
      3. Create and print headers and footers.
      4. Copy formulas.
      5. Identify relative and absolute cell references.
      6. Format numbers.
    4. Create and print charts, illustrations, and tables.
      1. Create charts, illustrations, and tables.
      2. Specify titles, legends, and axis labels.
      3. Preview and print charts, illustrations, and tables.
    5. Use built-in functions.
      1. Use the SUM, AVG, COUNT, MAX, and MIN functions.
      2. Use various financial functions.
      3. Use various date and time functions.
      4. Use various logical functions.
      5. Use various lookup and reference functions.
    6. Create and use macros.
      1. Record, place, and play a macro.
      2. Name a macro and create a macro button.
      3. Edit and debug a macro.
    7. Create and use a worksheet database.
      1. Create a database.
      2. Sort data and queries in a database.
      3. Find records in a database.
    8. Combine and integrate worksheet applications.
      1. Combine and link multiple worksheets.
      2. Paste, link, and embed objects between various software applications.
    9. Demonstrate professionalism appropriate for the workplace.
      1. Participate in class.
      2. Follow written and oral directions.
      3. Complete and submit assignments on time.
      4. Participate constructively in activities.
  
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    CST 152 - Implementing Network Security

    Credits: 3
    Provides knowledge and the practical experience necessary to evaluate, implement, and manage secure information transferred over computer networks. Includes network security, intrusion detection, types of attacks, methods of attacks, security devices, basics of cryptography, and organizational security elements.

    Prerequisite(s): CST 150W  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Discuss network defense fundamentals.
      1. Discuss TCP/IP networking.
      2. Discuss the threats to network security.
      3. Discuss goals of network security.
      4. Discuss using network defense technologies in layers.
      5. Discuss the impact of defense.
    2. Discuss security policy design: risk analysis.
      1. Discuss the fundamental concepts of risk analysis.
      2. Discuss the approaches to risk analysis.
      3. Discuss risk analysis as an ongoing process.
      4. Discuss deciding how to minimize risk.
    3. Discuss network traffic signatures.
      1. Discuss understanding signature analysis.
      2. Discuss detecting traffic signatures.
      3. Discuss identifying suspicious events.
      4. Discuss using the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) Standard.
    4. Discuss Virtual Private Network (VPN) Concepts.
      1. Discuss what VPNs are and why establish them.
      2. Discuss VPN core activity 1: Encapsulation.
      3. Discuss VPN core activity 2: Encryption.
      4. Discuss VPN core activity 3: Authentication.
      5. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of VPNs.
    5. Discuss VPN implementation.
      1. Discuss designing a VPN.
      2. Discuss configuring VPNs.
      3. Discuss using VPNs with firewalls.
      4. Discuss adjusting packet-filtering rules for VPNs.
      5. Discuss auditing VPNs and VPN policies.
    6. Discuss intrusion detection system concepts.
      1. Describe intrusion detection system components.
      2. Discuss intrusion detection through the 7 steps.
      3. Discuss options for implementing intrusion detection systems.
      4. Discuss the evaluation of intrusion detection systems.
    7. Discuss intrusion detection and incident response.
      1. Discuss developing IDS filter rules.
      2. Discuss developing a Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).
      3. Discuss how to respond: the incident response process.
      4. Discuss dealing with false alarms.
      5. Discuss dealing with legitimate security alerts.
    8. Discuss choosing and designing firewalls.
      1. Discuss firewalls in general.
      2. Discuss approaches to packet filtering.
      3. Discuss creating rules and establishing restrictions.
      4. Discuss designing firewall configurations.
      5. Compare software and hardware firewalls.
    9. Discuss firewall topology.
      1. Discuss securing network perimeters.
      2. Discuss choosing a bastion host.
      3. Discuss working with proxy servers.
      4. Discuss using NAT.
      5. Discuss authenticating users.
    10. Discuss strengthening and managing firewalls.
      1. Discuss managing firewalls to improve security.
      2. Discuss Check Point NGX.
      3. Discuss Microsoft ISA Server.
      4. Discuss managing and configuring IP tables.
    11. Discuss strengthening defense through ongoing management.
      1. Discuss security event management.
      2. Discuss security auditing.
      3. Discuss managing an IDS.
      4. Discuss improving defense in-depth.
      5. Discuss keeping pace with network needs.
      6. Discuss maintaining your own knowledge base.
  
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    CST 153 - Implementing Firewalls

    Credits: 3
    Includes planning, designing, installing, configuring, and managing Firewalls and Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) that will allow key services while maintaining security. Includes protecting the internal IP services, configuring a firewall for remote access.

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor Approval
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe Firewalls.
      1. Discuss a hardware based Firewall.
      2. Discuss a software based Firewall.
      3. Discuss Security Policy Management.
      4. Demonstrate configuring a hardware based Firewall.
      5. Demonstrate configuring a software based Firewall.
      6. Design and implement a security policy.
    2. Discuss encryption and VPNs.
      1. Discuss secuting communication.
      2. Discuss encryption and VPNs.
      3. Discuss certificate authorities.
    3. Discuss VPNs.
      1. Discuss the Check Point VPN.
      2. Discuss the Microsoft VPN.
      3. Discuss the Cisco VPN.
      4. Discuss Open Source VPNs.
    4. Discuss site-to-site VPNs.
      1. Discuss domain and route based VPNs.
      2. Configure domain and route based VPNs.
      3. Discuss VPN tunnel management.
      4. Discuss wire mode.
    5. Discuss remote access VPNs.
      1. Discuss directional VPN enforcement.
      2. Discuss multiple entry point VPNs.
      3. Discuss traditional mode VPNs.
  
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    CST 155 - Microsoft EXCEL

    Credits: 3
    Presents EXCEL features using personal and business applications. Emphasizes features and techniques to develop solutions to spreadsheet problems. Includes evaluation of spreadsheets, data base, report formatting, and macros. Compares EXCEL with other electronic spreadsheets. Credit may be earned in CST 151  or CST 155 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 3 and READING LEVEL 2. Recommend CST 103  and CST 123  or CST 133W  .
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate understanding of electronic spreadsheets’ basic concepts.
      1. Effectively use the features for entering values, labels, and formulas.
      2. Effectively use the editing features of Excel.
      3. Effectively use the basic “built-in-functions” of Excel.
      4. Understand the features supplied by the Graphical User Interface of Operating System; including the Menu and Icon/Tool bars.
      5. Understand and is able to explain the terminology of electronic spreadsheets.
    2. Use Excel’s charting/graphing features.
      1. Understand the basic concepts of relating presentation graphics to sets of numbers.
      2. Creates Bar, Area, Line, and Pie Charts.
      3. Creates, places and manipulates charts on a worksheet.
    3. Use Excel’s database features.
      1. Understand the basic concepts of list management.
      2. Prepare a list of records.
      3. Perform sorts on database records.
      4. Perform queries within database records.
      5. Set up selection criteria/filtering and output spaces.
    4. Demonstrate ability to create elementary Macros.
      1. Record a Macro.
      2. Run a Macro.
      3. View a Macro.
  
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    CST 159 - Database Operations

    Credits: 2
    Covers the concepts of relational databases and the powerful SQL programming language. Provides the essential SQL skills that allow database operators to write queries against single and multiple tables, manipulate data in tables, and create database objects. Explains how to use single row functions to customize output, use conversion functions and conditional expressions and use group functions to report aggregated data.

    Prerequisite(s): CST 133W  or CST 134 .
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Retrieve data using the SQL SELECT statement.
      1. Generate a report of data from the output of a basic SELECT statement.
      2. Use arithmetic expressions and NULL values in a SELECT statement.
      3. Use column aliases.
      4. Display the table structure.
    2. Restrict and sort data.
      1. Write queries with a WHERE clause to limit the output retrieved.
      2. Use comparison and logical operators.
      3. Use character string literals in the WHERE clause.
      4. Sort the output retrieved from queries.
      5. Use substitution variables.
    3. Use single-row functions to customize output.
      1. Differentiate between single row and multiple row functions.
      2. Manipulate strings using character functions.
      3. Manipulate numbers with functions.
      4. Manipulate dates with date functions.
      5. Perform arithmetic with date data.
    4. Use conversion functions and conditional expressions.
      1. Use conversion functions to convert data types.
      2. Nest multiple functions.
      3. Apply functions to NULL data.
      4. Use conditional decision/branching logic in a SELECT statement.
    5. Report aggregated data using group functions.
      1. Use aggregation functions in SELECT statements to produce meaningful reports.
      2. Use arithmetic functions.
      3. Create queries that divide the data in groups by using a GROUP BY clause.
      4. Create queries that exclude groups of data by using a HAVING clause.
    6. Display data from multiple tables.
      1. Write SELECT statements to access data from more than one table.
      2. View data that does not meet a join condition by using outer joins.
      3. Join a table by using a self-join.
      4. Create cross joins.
    7. Use sub-queries to solve queries.
      1. Use a sub-query to solve a problem.
      2. Execute single-row sub queries.
      3. Aggregate data results with group functions in a sub-query.
      4. Use multiple-row sub-queries.
  
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    CST 160 - Networking Essentials

    Credits: 3
    Explores all aspects of networking technologies, media, topologies, devices, management, tools and security.

    Prerequisite(s): CST 133W  
    Corequisite(s): May be take concurrently with CST 133W  with instructor permission
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate understanding of the functions of common networking protocols.
      1. Detect the existence of other endpoints or nodes.
      2. Explain how sessions or connections are started and terminated.
      3. Illustrate how messages are formatted.
      4. Explain how corrupted or improperly formatted messages are handled.
      5. Identify commonly used TCP and UDP (User Datagram Protocol) default ports.
      6. Evaluate proper use of MAC and IP address formats, addressing technologies, and addressing schemes.
      7. Explain the purpose and properties of routing.
      8. Compare the characteristics of wired and wireless communication standards.
    2. Demonstrate understanding of network media and topologies.
      1. Categorize standard cable types and their properties.
      2. Identify common connector types.
      3. Identify common logical and physical network topologies.
      4. Differentiate between appropriate wiring standards.
      5. Categorize LAN and WAN technology types and properties.
    3. Demonstrate understanding of network devices.
      1. Configure, and differentiate between common network devices.
      2. Identify the functions of specialized network devices.
    4. Demonstrate understanding of network management.
      1. Explain the function of each layer of the OSI (Open Systems Interconnection) model.
      2. Identify types of configuration management documentation.
      3. Evaluate a network based on configuration management documentation.
      4. Conduct network monitoring to identify performance and connectivity issues.
      5. Explain different methods and rationales for network performance optimization.
      6. Troubleshoot common connectivity issues and select an appropriate solution.
    5. Demonstrate understanding of network tools.
      1. Use command line interface tools and interpret the outputs.
      2. Identify the uses of network hardware tools.
      3. Explain the purpose of network scanners and protocol analyzers.
    6. Demonstrate understanding of network security.
      1. Explain the function of hardware and software security devices.
      2. Explain common features of a firewall.
      3. Explain common methods of network access security.
      4. Explain common methods of user authentication.
      5. Explain issues that affect device security.
      6. Identify common security threats.
  
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    CST 161 - CISCO - Introduction to Networking

    Credits: 3
    Introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and computer networks. Introduces the principles of IP addressing and fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations to provide a foundation for the curriculum. Builds simple LANs, performs basic configurations for routers and switches, and implements IP addressing schemes.

    Prerequisite(s): CST 133W 
    Corequisite(s): May be taken concurrently with CST 133W  or with instructor permission. CST 160 recommended.
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of IP data networks.
      1. Recognize the purpose and functions of various network devices.
      2. Select the components required to meet a given network specification.
      3. Identify common applications and their impact on the network.
      4. Describe the purpose and basic operation of the protocols in the OSI and TCP/IP models.
      5. Use the appropriate media, cables, ports, and connectors to connect network devices to other devices and hosts in a LAN.
    2. Implement a switched network.
      1. Determine the technology and media access control method for Ethernet networks.
      2. Identify basic switching concepts and the operations of switches.
      3. Configure and verify initial switch settings including remote access management.
      4. Describe how VLANs create logically separate networks and the need for routing between them.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of IPv4 and IPv6 addressing.
      1. Describe IPv4 and IPv6 addresses.
      2. Explain the operation and necessity of using private and public IP addresses for IPv4 addressing.
      3. Determine the appropriate IPv6 addressing scheme to satisfy addressing requirements in LAN/WAN environment.
      4. Determine the appropriate IPv4 addressing scheme using VLSM and summarization to satisfy addressing requirements in a LAN/WAN environment.
      5. Define the technological requirements for running IPv6 in conjunction with IPv4.
    4. Demonstrate understanding of IP routing technologies.
      1. Describe basic routing concepts.
      2. Configure and verify, utilizing the CLI, to set basic router settings.
      3. Configure and verify operation status of an Ethernet interface.
      4. Authenticate router configuration and network connectivity.
  
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    CST 162 - Introduction to Novell Network Administration

    Credits: 2
    Introduces Novell NetWare.  Covers installing NetWare. Covers installing NetWare, adding and deleting users,  working with Novell Directory Services, setting up network printers, and maintaining security.

    Prerequisite(s): CST 160   or CST 161  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate understanding of Novell Directory Services (NDS).
      1. Describe the components of NDS.
      2. Explain the use of each object in an NDS tree.
      3. Design an NDS tree.
      4. Use NetWare Administrator to create objects in an NDS tree.
      5. Create, move, rename and delete container objects.
      6. Create, move and rename leaf objects.
      7. Rename directory trees.
    2. Demonstrate ability to successfully install NetWare.
      1. Explain the steps to install NetWare on the server.
      2. Identify and load drivers.
      3. Create NetWare disk partitions and volumes
      4. Load and unload NetWare Loadable Modules.
      5. Install software to allow a Windows workstation access to the NetWare server.
    3. Demonstrate understanding of users, groups and login security.
      1. Explain how login security can restrict access to the server.
      2. Create new users and groups and assign access restrictions.
    4. Demonstrate understanding NetWare trustee rights.
      1. Identify the components of NetWare trustee rights.
      2. Explain the Inherited Rights Filter.
      3. Use NetWare utilities to grant trustee rights and determine user effective rights.
    5. Demonstrate understanding of network printing.
      1. Use NetWare Administrator to create, configure, and work with Novell Distributed Print Services Manager, gateways and printer agents.
      2. Configure workstations to direct printouts to the new NetWare printer.
      3. Manage print jobs using NetWare Administrator and Novell Print Manager.
  
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    CST 163 - Introduction to Windows Network Administration

    Credits: 3
    Introduces Microsoft Windows Networking.  Covers installing and configuring Microsoft Windows Server, printing, managing Active Directory, managing storage and files, configuring DHCP and DNS, and implementing security.

    Prerequisite(s): CST 160  or CST 161  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate understanding of Active Directory.
      1. Explain the contents of Active Directory.
      2. Plan Active Directory elements.
    2. Demonstrate ability to successfully install Windows Server.
      1. Explain the steps to install NetWare on the server.
      2. Explain the steps to install a service pack.
    3. Demonstrate ability to successfully configure Windows Server.
      1. Explain how to use the Control Panel.
      2. Install and configure hardware, protocols, and additional Windows Server components.
    4. Demonstrate understanding of groups, folders, files and object security.
      1. Set up local, global and universal groups.
      2. Manage objects through user rights and permissions.
      3. Determine how creating, moving and copying files and folders affect security.
    5. Demonstrate understanding of network printing.
      1. Explain and apply the fundamentals of Windows Server printing.
      2. Install local, network and Internet printing services.
      3. Manage printers and print services.
  
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    CST 164 - CISCO - Routing and Switching Essentials

    Credits: 3
    Configures a router and a switch for basic functionality. Configures and troubleshoots routers and switches and resolves common issues with RIPv1, RIPv2, single-area and multi-area OSPF, virtual LANs, and inter-VLAN routing in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks.

    Prerequisite(s): CST 161  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate nderstanding of LAN switching technologies.
      1. Configure and verify initial switch settings including remote access management.
      2. Verify network status and switch operation using basic utilities.
      3. Describe how VLANs create logically separate networks and the need for routing between them.
      4. Configure and verify VLANs.
      5. Configure and verify trunking on switches.
    2. Demonstrate understanding of IP routing technologies.
      1. Configure and verify routing settings for a static or default route.
      2. Differentiate methods of routing and routing protocols.
      3. Configure and verify OSPF (single area).
      4. Configure and verify inter-VLAN routing (router on a stick).
      5. Configure SVI.
    3. Configure IP services.
      1. Configure and verify DHCP.
      2. Describe the types, features, and applications of ACL.
      3. Configure and verify ACLs in a network environment.
      4. Identify the basic operation of NAT.
      5. Configure and verify NAT for given network requirements.
      6. Configure and verify NTP as a client.
    4. Configure network device security.
      1. Configure and verify network device security features.
      2. Configure and verify Switch Port security features.
      3. Configure and verify ACLs to filter network traffic.
      4. Configure and verify ACLs to limit access to the router.
    5. Troubleshoot network problems.
      1. Troubleshoot and resolve common problems associated with IP addressing and host configurations.
      2. Troubleshoot and resolve VLAN problems.
      3. Troubleshoot and resolve trunking problems on switches.
      4. Troubleshoot and resolve ACL issues.
      5. Troubleshoot and resolve Layer 1 problems.
  
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    CST 165 - Linux Networking I

    Credits: 3
    Introduces Linux as a network operating system. Covers installing Linux, configuring a simple file server, and administering basic network administration tasks with command-line and graphical user interface tools.

    Prerequisite(s): CST 126  and CST 160  (or CST 161 ); or instructor permission.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Discuss Linux as a network operating system.
      1. Describe the concept of open source software.
      2. Describe how Linux was created.
      3. Describe how Linux is now developed and has evolved.
      4. Explain the strengths and weaknesses of Linux.
      5. Describe the system requirements of Linux.
    2. Describe how to successfully install Linux.
      1. Explain the steps to install Linux.
      2. Explain a Linux disk partition.
      3. Identify which Linux components to install.
      4. Discuss installing different Linux distributions.
    3. Explain the Linux file system.
      1. Explain how to manage files with the comand-line user interface.
      2. Explain how to manage files with a graphical user interface.
      3. Discuss file properties.
      4. Discuss file permissions.
      5. Explain tar archive files.
    4. Identify Linux graphical user interfaces.
      1. Explain the X Window system.
      2. Identify the X Window interface.
      3. Identify the KDE interface.
      4. Identify the Gnome Desktop interface.
    5. Describe Linux system administration.
      1. Describe the duties of a Linux system administrator.
      2. Explain Linux configuration files.
      3. Discuss how Linux handles multiple users and multiple processes.
      4. Identify Linux administration commands.
    6. Explain basic Linux administration tasks.
      1. Explain different types of user accounts.
      2. Explain the concept of group accounts.
      3. Explain where user and group account files are stored.
      4. Identify how to create, format, and mount/unmount new file systems.
      5. Discuss swap space management.
      6. Explain disk quotas.
  
  •  

    CST 171 - Visual BASIC Programming I

    Credits: 2
    Introduces Visual Basic as a first class for Micro Computer programmers. Uses BASIC commands in a Windows environment. Emphasizes implementation of objects and event driven code. Presents screen design and Microsoft Visual Basic controls. Includes structured programming principles including internal and external program documentation; sequence, selection, and iteration constructs; and modular programming.

    Prerequisite(s): CST 173  (or CST 170) with a grade of “C” or better
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Design and document the logic and user interface.
      1. Follow standard conventions for object names, variables, and constants.
      2. Include internal and external documentation.
      3. Design a professional-looking and user friendly interface.
      4. Use proper modular programming in a structured environment.
    2. Demonstrate understanding of objects and event driven code.
      1. Understand data types and their proper use.
      2. Use string manipulation to check input data.
      3. Design screens for interactive programs.
    3. Use controls appropriately.
      1. Recognize when and how to use Visual Basic controls from the toolbox.
      2. Code the application using the form controls.
    4. Code the common basic commands.
      1. Create logical if statements.
      2. Create for/next and do loops.
      3. Use proper scope for declaring variables.
    5. Format and display output.
      1. Use proper output formatting.
      2. Implement screen display and printer output using labels and message boxes.
    6. Test and debug Visual Basic programs.
      1. Use debug tools to ensure accurate output.
      2. Prove the accuracy of the output.
  
  •  

    CST 173 - Introduction to Programming

    Credits: 2
    Introduces fundamental concepts and techniques used to design computer programs. Explores problem definition, algorithm development, and program documentation. Examines best practices, structured code, and object-oriented design. Implements design concepts in a programming language. Develops skills in basic operations on data, control structures, modules, arrays, classes, inheritance, polymorphism and error handling.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate understanding of variables and data types.
      1. Distinguish between variable and constant data.
      2. Utilize basic data types and define issues related to mixing data types.
      3. Declare variables appropriately required for a given computing solution.
      4. Demonstrate assignment of data to variables.
    2. Implement basic operations on data.
      1. Identify the arithmetic and relational operators.
      2. Describe the order of arithmetic operations.
      3. Use arithmetic operators in simple expressions to perform calculations.
      4. Recognize the use of relational operators in simple expressions to control program flow using selection and iteration.
      5. Implement user input and appropriate program output for given software problems.
    3. Create simple algorithms using design tools.
      1. Decompose a software problem statement into main tasks and subtasks using top-down design and step-wise refinement.
      2. Define standard flowcharting symbols and associate each with programming construct.
      3. Document various algorithms using flowcharts or pseudocode.
      4. Apply appropriate design tools to depict a top-down software solution.
      5. Apply subprogram constructs to implement a software solution with multiple modules.
    4. Apply basic structuring concepts to build working programs.
      1. Utilize the basic computing model of input-process-output.
      2. Perform basic arithmetic operations on data including counting and accumulation.
      3. Describe relational operators and use them to construct expressions to be utilized in selection and repetition control structures.
      4. Build selection statements with appropriate if/else constructs.
      5. Define the most appropriate use of loops.
      6. Apply a random number generator as part of an algorithm.
    5. Develop and implement solutions to computing problems using elementary graphical programming tools.
      1. Build and debug a variety of programming solutions employing fundamental concepts, including user input and selection and repetition structures.
      2. Implement a subprogram construct to decompose program code into modules.
      3. Define types of subprograms and appropriate methods for communication between subprograms.
      4. Implement arrays to solve problems involving data structures and lists.
      5. Traverse arrays to access list data and apply it to working program solutions.
      6. Perform searching algorithms on arrays.
      7. Document programming solutions adequately.
      8. Test software solutions for compliance to specifications and requirements.
      9. Implement a working software solution for evaluation.
    6. Demonstrate understanding of abstract data types and object oriented programming using pseudocode.
      1. Understand abstract data types, class definition and implementation, including access modifiers, and best practices.
      2. Define and implement abstract data types.
      3. Define class constructors demonstrating the concepts of polymorphism.
      4. Demonstrate the implementation of a class definition.
      5. Create accessro, mutator, and work methods within a class definition.
      6. Modify working examples of classes and their implementations.
      7. Create a UML diagram for a class.
  
  •  

    CST 180 - C++ Programming

    Credits: 3


    Uses the C++ language to solve software problems. Develops solutions to computing problems through algorithm design, development, implementation, and testing. Includes control structures, arrays, files, strings, pointers, and fundamental object-oriented programming. Credit may be earned in CST 180 or CST 181 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): CST 173  or CST 177 or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Design software solutions for a variety of problems.    

         A.          Create a logic plan to map design of a software solution.

         B.          Read and interpret algorithms represented in pseudocode or flowchart form.

         C.          Interpret requirements and specifications for a software problem to initiate accruate design of a computer program.

         D.         Construct program code to implement program design specifications.

    2.    Demonstrate computer literacy skills to successfully use software development environments.    

         A.          Utilize an integrated development environment to create a project workspace.

         B.          Enter and edit C++ source code using a text editor.

         C.          Manage multiple project, data, and source code files.

         D.          Use a compiler to check program diagnostics and correct syntax errors.

         E.          Implement a software application on more than one operating system.

    3.    Apply basic structuring concepts of C++ to build working programs.

         A.          Describe the basic program format and structure of a C++ program.

         B.          Describe and accurately apply rules for variable and identifier naming in C++.

         C.          Define and apply C++ primitive data types including the integer and floating point data type families.

         D.         Describe results and potential side effects for using mixed data type operations.

         E.          Effectively use and distinguish between variables and constants.

         F.          Define the uses and value of global constants.

         G.         Recognize usage of preprocessor directives and header files for required functionality.

         H.         Implement user-friendly console input and output with C++ programs.

         I.           Format program output using appropriate console formatting manipulators.

         J.          Describe C++ arithmetic operators including operator precedence and associativity.

         K.          Distinguish between operands and unary, binary, and tertiary operators.

         L.          Apply C++ arithmetic operators to build and evaluate arithmetic expressions.

         M.         Define issues with integer and floating-point division.

         N.         Convert basic mathematical formulas to C++ arithmetic expressions.

         O.         Utilize standard C++ function library including math and string functions.

         P.          Define and utilize the C++ Boolean data type for logical operations.

         Q.         Describe C++ relational operators and use them to construct relational expressions.

         R.          Describe C++ logical operators (AND, OR, NOT) including their truth tables.

         S.          Apply C++ logical operators to construct compound logical expressions.

         T.          Build selection statements with appropriate C++ if/else/switch constructs.

         U.         Define the most appropriate use of while, do/while, and for loops.

         V.          Build repetition statements with C++ to construct iterative algorithms.

         W.        Define and apply the basic random number generation feature available in C++.

    4.    Design modular programming solutions.

         A.          Implement programming problem sub-tasks into user-defined functions.

         B.          Describe rules for C++ function implementation including the use of prototypes.

         C.          Distinguish between void and value-return functions and correctly design functions using both.

         D.         Distinguish between value and reference parameters and define the uses and restrictions of using both.

         E.          Effectively pass value and reference parameters to and from functions.

         F.          Distinguish between global and local variables and define variable scope.

         G.         Define the value and purpose of separation of user-defined function specifications and implementations into multi-file projects.

         H.         Implement functions using separate specification (.h) and implementation (.cpp) files.

    5.    Use data organization techniques.

         A.          Allocate arrays and properly define index ranges for array processing.

         B.          Describe the risks and precaurtions necessary for safe array processing.

         C.          Process data elements of an array using looping algorithms.

         D.          Describe use of arrays for basic list processing algorithms.

         E.          Describe fundamental searching algorithms including the linear search and binary search.

         F.          Describe and apply fundamental sorting algorithms.

         G.         Desing and implement algorithms to process two-dimensional arrays using nested for-loops.

    6.    Build software solutions that apply input/output features.

         A.          Open, read, process, and close a sequential text input file stream.

         B.          Utilize loops to read and process the contents of a text file.

         C.          Write program output to a text output file.

         D.          Compare and contrast text files with binary files.

         E.          Compare and contrast sequential access files with direct access files.

         F.           Allocate pointer variables and access data using indirection.

         G.          Perform basic pointer operations including assignment, address-of, and dereferencing.

         H.          Pass pointers to and from functions.

         I.           Apply C++ pointers for dynamic data allocation with appropriate use of keywords “new” and “delete.”

         J.          Desing and implement solutions using record structures.

         K.         Correctly utilize a record structure including use of member selections of record fields.

         L.          Pass record structures to and from functions.

         M.         Allocate C++ character strings and manipulate strings using string character array processing.

         N.         Utilize standard C++ string functions to assign, compare, and concatenate strings.

         O.         Apply string functions and methods to solve character string manipulation problems.

     7.    Build software solutions that apply fundamental object-oriented programming concepts.

         A.          Define and discuss the object-oriented approach to programming.

         B.          Recognize specific terminology related to object-oriented programming.

         C.          Compare and contrast between procedural and object-oriented programming paradigms.

         D.          Define modularity and procedural abstraction.

         E.          Describe the purpose of information hiding.

         F.           Identify limitations of global variables.

         G.          List advantages of encapsulation as related to object oriented programming.

         H.          Discuss relationship of objects and classes.

         I.           Design an abstract data type from specifications.

         J.           Build a C++ class as an implementation of an abstract data type.

         K.          Implement a C++ class including both specification and implementation files.

         L.          Effectively apply a C++ class as data object for a specific problem.

    8.    Perform critical analysis to create C++ software solutions.

          A.          Analyze alternative solutions to a given programming problem and select the best approach.

         B.          Develop and implement a variety of testing strategies to verify correctness of C++ programs.

         C.          Diagnose and debug syntax, run-time, linker, and logic errors to create a working and correct software solution.

         D.         Document program source code for clarity and readability using accepted documentation standards including comments, indentation, and
                      other techniques.

         E.          Integrate and re-use previously working program code into new software development.

         F.          Develop systematic test plans, create test cases and test data to verify program correctness.

         G.         Execute tests and correct logic errors based on test results.

         H.         Build user-friendly computer programs for a variety of real-world problems.

  
  •  

    CST 183 - Principles of Computer Programming I

    Credits: 4


    Introduces programming abilities necessary for computer science. Includes control structures, subprograms, string handling, arrays, files, and use of graphical user interface components. Emphasizes object-oriented programming concepts. And use of classes. Introduces exception handling, drawing, and multithreading.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 4 and CST 173  (or CST 170) or instructor permission
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Apply basic computer programming and software engineering concepts.

         A.          Define the history and attributes of chosen programming language and its relationship to other programming languages.

         B.          Define the value and significance of high-level programming languages compared to past software development tools.

         C.          Describe issues and challenges of building quality software.

         D.         Define and apply the general softare engineering life cycle including problem definition, design, constructing source code, compiling it, and
                      executing object code.

    2.    Demonstrate computer literacy skills to successfully use software development environments.

         A.          Utilize an integrated development environment to create a project workspace.

         B.          Enter and edit source code using a text editor.

         C.          Manage multiple project, data, and source code files.

         D.          Use a compiler to check program diagnostics and correct syntax errors.

         E.          Deliver electronic files using online or magnetic disk storage.

         F.          Create document files or screen captures to demonstrate program code or output.

    3.    Design software solutions for a variety of problems.

         A.          Create a logic plan to map design of a software solution.

         B.          Recognize basic flowcharting symbols.

         C.          Graphically depict logic using flowcharting techniques.

         D.          Read and interpret algorithms represented in pseudocode.

         E.          Interpret requirements and specifications for a software problem to initiate accurate desing of a computer program.

         F.          Decompose a software problem statement into main tasks and subtasks using top-down design and step-wise refinement.

         G.         Construct program code to implement program design specifications.

    4.    Apply the basic contructs and operations of a programming language to build working programs.    

         A.          Define the history and attributes of the chosen programming language and its relationship to other programming languages.

         B.          Contrast compiled versus interpreted code and define the behavior and value of a “virtual machine.”

         C.          Describe the basic program format and structure of a program.

         D.          Perform basic user input/output using simple dialog boxes.

         E.          Define basic data types and variations in each data type family.

         F.          Define issues with numerical data type conversions.

         G.         Describe arithmetic operator precedence.

         H.         Build and evaluate arithmetic expressions using a programming language.

         I.           Define and utilize the Boolean data type for logical operations.

         J.           Describe relational operators and use them to construct logical expressions.

         K.          Describe logical operators (AND, OR, NOT) including their truth tables

         L.          Apply logical operators to construct compound logical expressions.

         M.         Build selection statements with appropriate if/else/switch programming constructs.

         N.         Define the most appropriate use of while, do/while, and for loops.

         O.         Build repetition statements with looping constructs.

         P.          Apply arrays for storing a variety of data and objects.

         Q.         Solve basic problems using two-dimensional arrays.

         R.          Effectively construct loops for arraw processing.

         S.          Apply string classes to perform a wide avariety of basic and advanced string manipulation.

    5.    Design modular programming solutions.

         A.          Implement programming problem sub-tasks into user-defined functions.

         B.          Effectively design and implement subprogram parameter input.

         C.          Distinguish between subprogram return type options and build subprogram solutions to match requirements.

         D.         Distinguish between global and local variables and define variable scope.

    6.    Define and implement programming applications that include graphical user interfaces.

         A.          Desing and implement programming solutions involving graphical user interface classes with labels, sliders, text boxes, text areas, and
                       buttons.

         B.          Design and implement programming solutions involving selection graphical user interface classes including drop-down lists, check boxes,
                       and radio buttons.

         C.          Describe and compare various “listener” classes and methods for implementing event listeners.

         D.          Construct correct event-handling methods for various user input requirements.

         E.          Desing graphical user interface layouts using basic layout managers.

         F.           Design graphical user interface layouts using interface containers.

     7.    Implement programming applications that include specialized concepts in introductory computer science.

         A.          Apply basic sorting algorithms and describe basic strategies utilized.

         B.          Apply searching algorithms and compare and contrast their relative efficiencies.

         C.          Practice various list processing algorithms for unordered and ordered lists.

     8.    Describe and apply specialized programming features.

         A.         Integrate exception-handling routines for various likely programming exceptions including number conversion, array processing, and file
                      input/output.

         B.         Apply basic dynamic memory allocation of objects and arrays.

         C.         Describe general strategies for memory management and practice these to avoid memory leaks.

         D.         Implement random number processing for simple games and simulations.

         E.         Define simple concurrent programming concepts and apply basic features of multithreading in a programming solution.

         F.          Display a graphic image within a user interface.

         G.         Utilize basic file processing to input or output external data.

         H.         Access text information from a web site URL.

         I.           Build graphics including lines, shapes, color, and font management.

     9.    Apply object oriented programming concepts.

         A.          Interpret specificaitons for classes that are part of the programming language.

         B.          Utilize standard programming language classes and methods in working applications.

         C.          Decompose problems into the interaction of a collection of objects.

         D.          Recognize specific terminology related to object-oriented programming.

         E.          Design an abstract data type from specifications.

         F.           Build classes for objects including the correct variables and methods.

         G.          Define “set” and “get” methods necessary for a class to protect private data members.

         H.          Define and implement class constructors. For user-defined classes.

         I.            Implement user-defined methods with appropriate parameter passing.

         J.           Define class inheritance and the behavior of the sub-class and super-class defined using inheritance.

         K.           Define basic class inheritance as it relates to utilizing a programming language.

         L.           Define class variables and distinguish between public, protected, and private member designation.

         M.          Distinguish and apply method overriding and method overloading.

         N.          Utilize class composition to integrate multiple classes into a software solution.

    10. Perform critical analysis to create working software solutions. 

         A.          Analyze alternative solutions to a given programming problem and select the best approach.

         B.          Develop and implement a variety of testing strategies to verify correctness of working programs.

         C.          Diagnose and debug syntax, run-time, linker, and logic errors to create a working and correct software solution.

         D.          Document program source code for clarity and readability using accepted documentation standards including comments, indetation, and
                       other techniques.

         E.          Integrate and re-use previously working program code into new software development.

         F.           Effectively create and import external code “packages” for storing and reusing classes.

         G.          Develop systematic test plans, create test cases, and test data to verify program correctness.

         H.          Execute tests and correct logic errors based on test results.

         I.            Locate on-line resources for the chosen programming language.

         J.           Build user-friendly computer programs for a variety of real-world problems.

         K.          Design and build event-driven programming solutions.

         L.          Deliver software solutions within given deadline requirements.

  
  •  

    CST 184 - Mobile Apps Programming - iOS

    Credits: 3
    Introduces iOS programming for mobile iPhone and iPad applications. Utilizes the Apple development tools and environment. Includes basic app interface design, view/navigation controllers, actions/outlets, and storyboards. Integrates data sources with apps and applies object oriented programming techniques for app development.

    Prerequisite(s): CST 180  or CST 183  both with a minimum grade of “C” or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Build and test iOS applications using Apple development tools.
      1. Launch xCode and configure a basic iOS project.
      2. Distinguish between iPhone, iPad, and universal development projects.
      3. Utilize essential features of xCode for iOS app development and testing.
      4. Apply the iOS Simulator to test app behavior.
      5. Describe the steps necessary for submission of apps to the Apple Store.
    2. Create user interfaces for iOS environment.
      1. Integrate labels and text fields into an app.
      2. Insert buttons, segmented control, and other controls to an app.
      3. Utilize toolbars and navigation bar controls for general app navigation.
      4. Insert Web Views into an app to link to web-based information.
      5. Integrate Navigation Controllers and Tab View Controllers into an app.
      6. Utilize a Page View Controller for general app navigation.
      7. Initialize and control Map Views.
      8. Use Scroll Views for extended view content.
      9. Integrate images into apps using Image Views.
    3. Integrate view and navigation controllers into the iOS apps.
      1. Utilize the Storyboard to manage app navigation.
      2. Manage app navigation programmatically.
      3. Create actions and outlets and associate with program code.
      4. Implement navigation control by “hooking up” programming code components.
      5. Design views and appropriately layer views.
      6. Create a basic Table View and integrate array data into the view.
      7. Create a Map View.
    4. Program using Objective-C.
      1. Distinguish between iOS development tasks best performed graphically versus programmatically.
      2. Utilize Objective-C data types including NSString, NSNumber, and NSArray as well as the primitive data types.
      3. Implement basic programming control structures using Objective-C syntax.
      4. Build and work with classes including use of properties and methods.
      5. Define Objective-C classes including header and implementation files.
      6. Define void and value-return methods including appropriate use of method parameters.
      7. Create objects as part of programming solutions and call methods relative to objects.
  
  •  

    CST 185 - Android Application Development

    Credits: 3
    Designs, develops, and maintains simple mobile applications geared toward Android devices. Focuses primarily on programming, graphic design, and application development for various mobile devices.

    Prerequisite(s): CST 173  with a minimum grade of “C” or instructor permission
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate understanding of the Android platform.
      1. Understand the market for Android applications.
      2. Describe the features of the Android devices.
      3. Identify languages used in Android development.
      4. Explain the role of the Android market.
    2. Create Android applications.
      1. Understand and use an integrated development environment (IDE) for building and integrating application development tools.
      2. Design the user interface of an application by understanding the Java code and XML layout files.
      3. Apply various widgets (text controls, image controls, button controls, etc.) to the user interface.
      4. Select a linear or relative layout for the user interface.
      5. Create an activity (also called Java class) to process user input to the Android Manifest file.
      6. Write Java event handlers.
      7. Debug errors in Java code.
      8. Test the application in the Android Emulator.
    3. Modify Android applications.
      1. Apply an Android theme.
      2. Understand how to define a Text Field for data entry and declare variables to hold data.
      3. Display a custom launcher icon.
      4. Code a RadioButton, an If statement, an If Else statement, and nested If statements.
      5. Display an Android toast notification.
    4. Build a user interface with advanced features.
      1. Use an array to create a list that displays to users in an application.
      2. Create an Android project using a splash screen and/or a tabular layout.
      3. Learn how to add audio, an image gallery, and video to your application.
    5. Create an Android application with animation.
      1. Understand Frame animation.
      2. Understand Tween animation.
      3. Identify the start() and stop() methods.
    6. Publish an Android app.
      1. Understand Google Play.
      2. Target various device configuations.
      3. Create a release-ready package that users can install and run on their devices.
      4. Prepare promotional materials.
      5. Learn how to register for a Google Play account.
  
  •  

    CST 186 - Introduction to Game Programming

    Credits: 2
    Introduces principles of game and simulation programming through hands-on creation of simple games. Explores text-based and graphics-based game development through algorithm design, development, implementation, testing, and documentation. Incorporates text, graphics, sound, and animations in game design. Includes Top-Down Design, Object Oriented Programming, simple physics, basic Artificial Intelligence, and game engines.

    Prerequisite(s): CST 173  (or CST 170) with “C” or better
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Define the specifications for a variety of games.
      1. Access and analyze specifications and information to plan and design games.
      2. Choose a text-based or Graphical User Interface environment for a game.
      3. Select objects to use in a game; e.g., text, graphics, sounds, and animations.
    2. Develop logic for text-based and simple Graphical User Interface game programs using critical thinking.
      1. Apply the sequence, selection, and iteration program constructs to game development.
      2. Compare and contrast the use of variables, strings, tuples, links, and dictionaries in the construction of a game.
      3. Use Top-Down Design to break the logic of a game into components.
      4. Apply Object Oriented Programming concepts to game program logic.
      5. Describe Artificial Intelligence and game engines.
    3. Translate the logic of a game or simulation algorithm into a programming language.
      1. Code game programs in a programming language.
      2. Compile and correct syntax errors.
      3. Test, debug, and correct logic errors.
    4. Use a variety of input/output media in game programming.
      1. Incorporate text and graphics in a game program.
      2. Enhance a game with music, sound effects, and animations.
      3. Store and display scores and game statistics.
    5. Produce documentation for games.
      1. Document game program code.
      2. Create internal help documentation and make it available to users executing a game.
      3. Create external documentation for a game.
  
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    CST 204 - Microsoft Word: Intermediate

    Credits: 2
    Develops further the practical working knowledge of Microsoft Word software. Refines formatting and focuses on page layout and design.

    Prerequisite(s): CST 104  with a “C” grade or higher
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the ability to manage documents efficiently.
      1. Select documents at a file list box.
      2. Rename, delete, copy, and print documents.
      3. Create, delete, and rename folders.
      4. Copy and move documents.
      5. Insert a file into a file.
      6. Use print preview and its tools.
      7. Use and modify the print dialog box settings.
      8. Arrange documents in multiple windows.
      9. Maximize, restore, and minimize documents.
      10. View documents side by side.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of customizing Word proofing options.
      1. Adjust AutoCorrect options.
      2. Use the AutoCorrect options button.
      3. Adjust AutoFormat options.
      4. Adjust Speller and Grammar check options.
    3. Enhance documents with special features.
      1. Insert symbols and special characters.
      2. Insert date and time.
      3. Insert and format images.
      4. Use SmartArt to create diagrams and charts.
      5. Insert and format text boxes.
      6. Create and modify WordArt.
      7. Apply styles and themes.
      8. Use contextual tabs.
    4. Customize documents with advanced document formatting features.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of using page breaks, section breaks, and column breaks in a document.
      2. Create, format, and edit newspaper columns.
      3. Create, format, and edit headers and footers.
      4. Create and print envelopes and labels.
      5. Insert, delete, and modify page numbering.
      6. Use vertical centering.
      7. Create a document with a Word template.
      8. Use mail merge to create customized letters, envelopes, and labels.
    5. Create and format tables.
      1. Insert a table into a document.
      2. Enter text in cells and move the insertion point within the table.
      3. Select cells, rows, and columns.
      4. Customize cell size direction.
      5. Change cell alignment.
      6. Change column width.
      7. Change table size and alignment.
      8. Move the table.
      9. Insert rows and columns.
      10. Delete cells, rows, and columns.
      11. Merge and split cells.
      12. Convert a table to text and text to a table.
      13. Sort text in a table.
      14. Perform calculations in a table.
      15. Apply a style to a table.
  
  •  

    CST 210 - Website Development

    Credits: 3
    Focuses on building websites in compliance with current standards and best practices. Develops skills in formatting and page layout using HTML and CSS. Emphasizes development for target audiences, extending web presence, and managing differences in web browsers and devices. Introduces incorporation of interactive elements using scripts, embedded media, and mash-ups. Examines Internet issues including ethics, accessibility, copyright, and security.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Develop websites using HTML and CSS.
      1. Create and modify HTML and CSS documents.
      2. Apply best practices for text and graphic content for web and mobile display.
      3. Format web page text and colors using CSS rules.
      4. Optimize graphics for web and mobile display.
      5. Link internal and external web pages.
      6. Utilize HTML container elements within web pages.
      7. Employ current W3C standards for HTML and CSS.
      8. Optimize web pages for search engines.
    2. Demonstrate advanced HTML/CSS techniques to create websites.
      1. Create page layouts according to current W3C standards using HTML and CSS.
      2. Create context appropriate content and menus using HTML and CSS.
      3. Incorporate embedded video and interactive components.
      4. Incorporate web page scripting to incorporate interactive features and enhance design.
    3. Implement extended web presence using social media and social networks.
      1. Develop social networking and/or social media accounts in accordance with website content and purpose.
      2. Communicate website branding visually within extended social networking and social media sites.
      3. Utilize social media and mash-ups to extend influence/web presence.
      4. Introduce application programming interfaces as a method to enhance interactive features and integrate social media.
    4. Apply current standards.
      1. Develop sites supported in contexts that fit the target audience.
      2. Develop context appropriate layouts, menus, and site features.
      3. Implement code which renders properly across common browsers, resolutions, platforms, and devices.
      4. Implement code which complies with current accessibility standards.
      5. Demonstrate the ability to test websites for proper functionality and usability in multiple browsers, resolutions, platforms, and devices.
    5. Employ proper site management techniques within client/server environments.
      1. Demonstrate understanding of proper site organization on client and server.
      2. Utilize proper naming conventions for files.
      3. Organize files and folders according to best practices.
      4. Demonstrate ability to upload and update website files.
      5. Understand fundamental Internet and website set-up concepts, including file transfer protocol, TCP/IP, uniform resource locators, domain name registration, hosting, and hosting applications.
 

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