Sep 26, 2022  
2017-2018 
    
2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Dental Hygiene

  
  •  

    DH 225 - Clinical Dental Hygiene IV

    Credits: 6
    Provides the opportunity to perfect dental hygiene skills learned in all previous dental hygiene courses and learn advanced instrumentation skills as well as application of pit and fissure sealants. (15-180)

    Prerequisite(s): DH 210W , DH 213 , DH 214W , DH 215 , DH 216W , and DH 219W   each with a "C" (2.0)
    Corequisite(s): DH 222W , DH 227W , DH 228 , DH 229 , LWA 206C .
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 180
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Assess, evaluate, and treat clinical patients with a high level of proficiency. The student will be competent to enter the workforce as an entry-level dental hygienist. Incorporate team concepts and instrument transfer.
      1. Complete and pass clinical patient services at 75% or better.
      2. Successfully complete the following clinical patient services:
        1. Dietary analysis
        2. Medicaments
        3. Pit and fissure sealants
        4. Polishing of amalgam restorations
        5. Root debridement
        6. Ultrasonic
        7. Air abrasive
      3. Successfully complete required process evaluations
  
  •  

    DH 227W - Community Dentistry II

    Credits: 1
    Provides opportunity for assessment of dental health needs for target populations. Includes design, implementation, and evaluation of dental health improvement programs in non-traditional settings. Evening, weekend, and holiday assignments may be required.

    Prerequisite(s): DH 210W , DH 213 , DH 214W , DH 215 , DH 216W  and DH 219W , each with a "C" (2.0) minimum grade.
    Corequisite(s): DH 222W , DH 225 , DH 228 , DH 229  and LWA 206C .
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand the similarity and differences from private practice and community health approaces to care of a population. A student will also have a basic understanding of the prcesses through which health policies are developed.
      1. Define health, public health, dental public health and epidemiology.
      2. Compare and contrast the roles and procedures of a private practitioner versus a public health practitioner.
      3. Describe the history and organization of dental public health services.
      4. Identify the issues of community oral health.
      5. Review and define epidemic, endemic and pandemic.
    2. Understand the basic concepts, including technical skills of assessing a community for development of dental public health programs.
      1. Identify the items to be assessed for a complete community profile.
      2. Define, differentiate and state indications for the different methods of assessment.
        1. DMF - (T) and (S)
        2. Def-t and dmf-t
        3. OHI-S
        4. PI-I
        5. GI
        6. PDI
        7. PSR-CPITN
        8. PHP
        9. RCI
        10. Community Fluorosis Index
        11. Interview
        12. Questionnaire
        13. Direct Observation
      3. Determine the outcomes of dental hygiene interventions using indices, instruments, examination techniques, and patient's self-report
      4. Analyze the data that may be gained
      5. Identify how providers are utilized
      6. Identify barriers to dental care
      7. Identify the financing options available to people
      8. Identify the major preventative activities currently in place in the community
      9. Describe types of inspections & screenings
      10. Analyze the data that may be gained.
    3. Understand the basic concepts, including technical skills involving planning of a variety dental public health programs. In addition the student will be exposed to the skills necessary to assume the leadership role in their community.
      1. Compile data in the correct way for needs to be presented so that priorities may be seen.
      2. Explain the criteria to construct solutions to the needs.
      3. Discuss the reasons for more than one proposed solution.
      4. Correctly write up a proposal for a health project.
    4. Understand the basic concepts, including technical skills, involving implementation and operation of dental public health programs. In addition the student will be exposed to the skills necessary to assume the leadership role in their community. The student will understand basic technical skills in areas of advocacy building.
      1. Identify and explain solutions to problems that can occur during implementation of different projects.
      2. Review and discuss educational strategies involved in implementation.
    5. Understand the basic concepts, including technical skills such as basic biostatistics, involving evaluation of dental public health programs.
      1. Explain the value of statistics.
      2. Discuss the limits of statistics.
      3. Define mean, median, mode, range, variance, standard deviation, correlation (R value), and statistical significance (p value), T-test, ANOVA, and Chi Square Test according to their characteristics, indications, advantages, limitations, and computations.
      4. Explain the purpose of graphs.
      5. Differentiate among bar graphs, histograms, frequency distribution, and pie diagrams, according to purpose and design.
      6. Explain the characteristics of standard normal curve.
      7. Define positively skewed and negatively skewed.
      8. List the places evaluation takes place; discuss process versus end product evaluation.
      9. Compare and contrast presentation of research results.
      10. Define the following terms:
        1. research and null hypothesis
        2. independent dependent variable, and extraneous variables
        3. experimental and control groups
        4. Hawthorne effect
        5. sampling techniques
      11. Compare and contrast the four measurement scales.
    6. Understand the basic concepts of promoting health through preventive activities through dental public health programs.
      1. Review procedures and list ways of preventing dental caries and periodontal disease.
      2. Discuss
  
  •  

    DH 228 - Dental Hygiene Seminar III

    Credits: 1


    Provides theory and techniques of treating patients with chemical dependencies and special needs. Includes the coordination of treatment phases of the AIDS patient.

    Prerequisite(s): DH 210W , DH 213 , DH 214W , DH 215 , DH 216W  and DH 219W   each with a “C” (2.0) minimum grade.
    Corequisite(s): DH 222W , DH 225 , DH 227W , DH 229 , LWA 206C .
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Recognize and assess the signs and symptoms of the oral tissue of a pregnant woman. The student will possess a general
            knowledge of treatment protocol in order to be able to explain how the pregnant patient 
    should care for themselves during this time
            period.

         A.          Review the various infectious diseases and drugs that can effect a fetus and infant if a pregnant woman encounters these diseases and
                      drugs.

         B.          Describe the clinical symptoms of the gingiva which may occur during pregnancy.

         C.          Explain how the physiological and psychological factors of a pregnancy affects a dental hygiene appointment.

         D.         Describe in detail the measures employed in the dental hygiene care of a pregnant woman, including patient instruction.

         E.          Describe how you would handle the numerous “old wives’ tales” when providing information to the pregnant woman. The most common
                      one is the misconception concerning the withdrawal of calcium from the mother’s teeth.

         F.          Explain how prenatal fluoride taken by the mother will or will not effect the caries rate in the newborn child.

    2.    Recognize and assess the signs and symptoms of the oral tissue of a preadolescent, adolescent and postmenopausal patients. The
           student will 
    possess a general knowledge of treatment protocol in order to be able to explain how these patient should care for
           themselves during this time

         A.          Define the following terms:

                      1.    Puberty          

                      2.    Adolescence

                      3.    Menopause

                      4.    Climacteric

                      5.    Acne vulgaris

                      6.    Pubescence

                      7.    Amenorrhea

                      8.    Dsymenorrhea

                      9.    Hemeostasis

                      10.  Hormonal replacement therapy

                      11.  Menarche

                      12.  Menses

                      13.  Olegomenorrhea

                      14.  Mastalgia

         B.          Describe the characteristics, psychological factors, and oral conditions of an adolescent patient (include puberty changes).

         C.          Describe in detail the measures employed in the dental hygiene care of an adolescent patient.

         D.          Discuss briefly the oral conditions of a patient going through menstruation and how oral contraceptives can effect the oral condition.

         E.          Describe the characteristics and oral conditions of a person going through menopause.

         F.           Describe in detail the measures employed in the dental hygiene care of a menopausal patient.

    3.    Properly demonstrate the care of a homebound, bedridden or helpless patient. The student will possess the general knowledge in
           how to treat 
    these patients and teach care givers how to provide proper oral hygiene care to patients in their care.

         A.          Define what a homebound patient is.

         B.          List and explain the five objectives in attaining optimal oral health for a patient that is homebound.

         C.          Explain the need for proper preparation for a home visit.

         D.          Write out a detail list of the equipment needed for a home visit.

         E.          List the different items that have to be taken into consideration when approaching a homebound patient.

         F.          Demonstrate various ways in which you would work on a patient that is confined to a bed or cannot be placed in an upright position.

         G.         State what constitutes a helpless patient.

         H.          List and explain the three objectives in attaining optimal oral health for a patient that is helpless or unconscious.

         I.           Explain at least two methods that you would apply in maintaining the oral health of a helpless patient.

         J.          Prepare a lesson plan for teaching a care giver how to properly care for a homebound, bedridden or helpless patient.

    4.    Recognize and assess the signs and symptoms of patient that is a substance abuser. The student will possess a general knowledge
           of treatment protocol
    in order to effectively treat these patients.

         A.          State at least three signs for each of the following:

                      1.    Alcohol intoxication

                      2.    Alcohol abuse

                      3.    Alcohol dependence

                      4.    Fetal alcohol syndrome

         B.          Discuss the possible causes of alcoholism in terms of the agent (ethyl alcohol), the host (drinker), and the environment
                      (psychosocial/cultural setting in which drinking occurs).

         C.          Identify short-term effects of alcohol on sensation and perception, emotions, sleep, motor skills, sexuality, and the function of the kidneys,
                       heart, blood vessels and liver.

         D.         Identify long-term effects of heavy alcohol consumption on the gastrointestinal system, the liver, nutritional status, nervous system,
                      endocrine system, mental functions, cardiovascular system, skeletal muscles and the development of certain cancers and specific
                      infectious diseases.

         E.          Describe the predisposing factors, features and complications with the “withdrawal syndrome.”

         F.          Name the three general stages of alcoholism treatment and rehabilitation.

         G.         Define the following terms:

                      1.    Detoxification

                      2.    Blackout

                      3.    “Dry-drunk”

                      4.    Phenomenon

                      5.    Antabuse

         H.         Distinguish among each of the following therapies for alcoholism:

                      1.    Psychotherapy

                      2.    Family therapy

                      3.    Rational emotive therapy

                      4.    Behavior therapy

                      5.    Transactional analysis

         I.           Develop a complete treatment plan for working with a patient that is abusing alcohol.

         J.          Identify several patterns and trends in the use of tobacco products.

         K.          Estimate the number and percentage of Americans who smoke and use smokeless products.

         L.          Define the following terms: lower-yield cigarette, snuff, “smokeless tobacco.”

         M.         List several complications resulting from maternal smoking during pregnancy.

         N.         Compare the health hazards associated with smoking with those now related to smokeless forms of tobacco.

         O.         Explain why people continue to smoke in spite of scientific evidence that smoking is harmful to health.

         P.          Describe five techniques for reducing the risks of smoking for those who cannot or will not stop.

         Q.         Name at least five benefits of smoking cessation.

         R.         Explain the role of a dental hygienist when dealing with a patient that abuses tobacco.

    5.    Recognize and assess the signs and symptoms of the oral tissues of an AIDS patient. The student will possess a general knowledge
           of treatment protocol in order to treat the AIDS patients and be able to explain how the AIDS 
    patients should care for themselves
           during this time period.

         A.          Explain the two phases of the life cycle of HIV:

                      1.    Establishment of the infection

                      2.    Production of new virus particles

         B.          State the clinical categories of the HIV classification system.

         C.          Explain the various symptoms of HIV disease.

         D.          Explain where the virus is found in the human body.

         E.          Identify the high to low behavior risk factors in relation to HIV infection.

         F.          Identify the numerous oral manifestations of HIV infection.

         G.         Explain some of the psychosocial aspects faced by people with AIDS (PWA’s).

         H.         Explain confidentiality is an extremely important issue in the treatment and work with HIV positive individuals.

         I.           Discuss three components of the role of the dental hygienist in providing oral health care for HIV-infected individuals.

         J.          List and explain five general techniques or procedures in providing oral hygiene care for HIV- infected patients.

  
  •  

    DH 229 - Seminar on Practical Exam

    Credits: 2
    Provides strategies and opportunities to practice skills to enhance success in licensure exams, position searches, and private practice.

    Prerequisite(s): DH 210W , DH 213 , DH 214W , DH 215 , DH 216W , and DH 219W  with a minimum grade of “C” (2.0).
    Corequisite(s): DH 222W , DH 225 , DH 227W , DH 228 , and LWA 206C  
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Inventory current knowledge of dental hygiene through self-evaluation and planning for success with personal study and practice needs for successfully completing the dental hygiene national and state (regional) licensing, and local anesthesia certification exams.
      1. Complete the pilot national exam(s).
      2. Assess deficient dental hygiene subject knowledge areas.
      3. Develop a plan for review and study to increase dental hygiene knowledge base.
      4. Recognize the organization of the national and NERB examinations including the following:
        1. Didactic
        2. Clinical
        3. Subjects covered
        4. Types of questions or exercises
        5. Criteria for patient selection
        6. Criteria for scoring
      5. Perform mock clinical exercises.
      6. Develop stress reduction techniques for each examination.
    2. Seek and adapt to a private practice position.
      1. Apply for graduation
      2. Explain and complete the application for Michigan Dental Hygiene licensure.
      3. Construct a cover letter and resume.
      4. Demonstrate effective interviewing techniques.
      5. Compare and contrast clinical dental hygiene school to private practice.
      6. Cite the current laws and rules governing the dental hygiene practice.
      7. Discuss the implementation of HIPAA in private practice.
      8. List the insurance codes for common dental hygiene services.
    3. Participate in and increase experience with private practice (real or simulated) clinical expectations.
      1. Complete patients in a real or simulated private practice in an efficient and quality controlled manner.
      2. Self evaluate areas of strengths and weaknesses in this setting.
      3. Develop a plan to increase strengths, and to lower/eliminate identified weaknesses.
    4. Analyze the professional roles of a dental hygienist.
      1. Research and present career opportunities including required level of education/type of degrees, professional experience, work reponsibilites and potential earnings.
      2. Design a degree completion plan.
  
  •  

    DH 290-299 - Special Projects in Dental Hygiene


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Diagnostic Medical Sonography

  
  •  

    DMS 100 - Patient Care and Management

    Credits: 1


    Develops knowledge and skills in basic concepts of patient care. Includes emergency care procedures, infection control, patient safety and transfers, communication, and patient education.

    Prerequisite(s): Must be accepted into the DMS program.
    Corequisite(s): DMS 105W , DMS 107 , DMS 107L , DMS 108W .
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Demonstrate the ability to evaluate and manage the physical and emotional needs of the patient.

         A.          Describe methods for evaluation of patient status.

         B.          Identify the information/data to be collected prior to patient examination.

         C.          Demonstrate methods of obtaining a patient history.

         D.          Describe vital signs used to assess patient condition.

         E.          State the normal temperature values for the oral and rectal methods of measurement for temperature.

         F.          Describe the method of monitoring respirations and state the normal values expected.

         G.         List the equipment necessary for acquisition of the blood pressure on a patient.

         H.         Identify the normal values for blood pressure for males and females.

         I.           Identify the major sites for monitoring the pulse and indicate the normal values.

         J.          Demonstrate the assessment of vital signs.

    2.    Demonstrate the knowledge and skills utilized in communicating with patients, patient’s family, colleagues, physicians, and other
           health care team
    members.

         A.          Define communication.

         B.          Identify methods of communication and discuss how each can be utilized.

         C.          Identify patient communication problems and determine possible solutions.

         D.          Discuss verbal versus nonverbal communication.

         E.          Discuss challenges in communication:

                      1.    non-English speaking patients

                      2.    hearing, vision, and speech impaired

                      3.    impaired mental function

                      4.    altered states of consciousness

                      5.    communicating with children/adolescents

                      6.    communicating with geriatric patients

                      7.    communicating under stress

                      8.    cultural diversity

                      9.    artificial speech

         F.          Discuss other factors that impede communication with patient, families, etc.

                      1.    colloquialism/slang

                      2.    medical terminology

         G.         Determine appropriate communication guidelines

         H.         Determine when to utilize listening and therapeutic silence

         I.           Discuss issues related to appropriate and necessary communication with other health care professionals.

    3.    Demonstrate the knowledge and skills related to the principles of body mechanics, safe patient transfer, and patient restraint.

         A.          Describe and demonstrate good principles of body mechanics applicable to patient care.

         B.          Demonstrate techniques for various types of patient transfer.

         C.          Describe and demonstrate the procedures for turning patients with various conditions.

         D.          Describe and demonstrate restraint techniques for various types of procedures and patient conditions.

         E.          Describe the aspects of patient comfort and discuss the importance of each to the care and safety of the patient.

    4.    Demonstrate an understanding of infection control and the utilization of Universal Precautions and aseptic procedures.

        A.          Define the following

                      1.    infectious pathogens

                      2.    communicable diseases

                      3.    nosocomial infections

                      4.    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

                      5.    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

                      6.    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)

         B.          Describe the utilization of Universal Precautions and Isolation Procedures.

         C.          Describe sources and modes of transmission of infections and diseases.

         D.          Describe the procedures for infection control through Universal Precautions.

         E.          Discuss psychological considerations for the management of patients utilizing Universal Precautions.

         F.          Identify the cycle of infection.

         G.         Differentiate between medical and surgical asepsis.

         H.         Demonstrate proper techniques

                      1.    opening packs

                      2.    gowning/gloving

                      3.    skin preparation

                      4.    draping

                      5.    wound care

                      6.    handling linens

                      7.    eye protection

         I.           Discuss isolation techniques and communicable diseases.

         J.          Demonstrate proper isolation procedure.

    5.    Demonstrate an understanding of basic medical emergencies including recognizing signs and symptoms and appropriate response.

         A.          Identify the signs and symptoms which manifest the following emergencies:

                      1.    cardiac arrest

                      2.    shock

                      3.    convulsion/seizure

                      4.    cerebral vascular accident

                      5.    hemorrhage

                      6.    airway obstruction

                      7.    diabetic coma/insulin shock

                      8.    reaction to contrast media

                      9.    other medical conditions

         B.          Discuss acute care procedures for each various emergencies.

         C.          Discuss the use of medical emergency equipment and supplies

         D.          Demonstrate the use of oxygen and suction equipment.

    6.    Demonstrate an understanding of the considerations necessary when performing sonographic procedures on patients with acute and
           special 
    conditions.

         A.          Identify the precautions necessary when working with a patient with

                      1.    fracture

                      2.    head injury

                      3.    spinal injury

                      4.    massive wounds

                      5.    burns

         B.          Explain the care and management of patients with nasogastric tubes.

         C.          Explain the steps in the operation and maintenance of suction equipment.

         D.         Determine a normal pattern from an abnormal pattern when given an EKG strip.

  
  •  

    DMS 101W - Introduction to Sonography

    Credits: 2
    Introduces various aspects of sonography and health care including terminology, legal and ethical issues, patient care, and imaging modalities.

    Prerequisite(s): DMS 100 , DMS 105W , DMS 107 , DMS 107L , DMS 108W  all with a minimum grade of “B” (3.0)
    Corequisite(s): DMS 103 , DMS 104 , and DMS 106W  
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Utilize skills in communicating with patients, patient’s family, colleagues, physicians, and other health care team members.
      1. Identify methods of communication and discuss how each can be utilized.
      2. Identify patient communication problems and determine possible solutions.
      3. Explain verbal versus nonverbal communication.
      4. Discuss factors that impede communication with patients and possible solutions.
      5. Determine appropriate communication guidelines.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the ethical standards of behavior for allied health care.
      1. Differentiate between the systems of ethics, laws, and morals.
      2. Identify moral dilemmas involving patient relationships, physician relationships, and relationships with other health professionals.
      3. Recognize values associated with ethical decision making in the practice of medical imaging.
      4. Apply critical analysis to ethical decision making.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of introductory law in the imaging sciences.
      1. Differentiate between the various types of laws.
      2. Describe the standard of care and how it is established.
      3. Discuss the concept of tortious conduct and causes of action based upon behaviors of a health care practitioner.
      4. Recognize the importance of privacy of records and the relation between privacy of records and patient confidentiality issues.
      5. Justify the need for informed consent.
      6. Discuss the information needed by a patient prior to giving informed consent.
      7. Differentiate between professional and legal standards.
    4. Understand the difference between the various imaging modalities and relate them to sonographic imaging.
      1. Describe the primary imaging modalities in the Radiology Department.
      2. Correlate other radiologic imaging to sonographic imaging.
      3. Demonstrate a knowledge of alternative imaging exams for body structures not well demonstrated with sonographic imaging.
    5. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the science of pathology and relate it to sonographic imaging.
      1. Describe the sonographic terms used to describe pathology.
      2. Demonstrate the basic types of pathology commonly seen in ultrasound.
      3. Demonstrate the proper method for documenting pathological findings.
      4. Demonstrate the proper method to present pathological findings to the interpreting physician.
  
  •  

    DMS 103 - Introduction to Abdominal Sonography

    Credits: 3


    Studies basic anatomy and physiology relating to abdominal sonography. Teaches proper scanning techniques and protocols for identifying normal and abnormal sonographic patterns. Discusses clinical signs and symptoms, along with interpretation of clinical lab tests.

    Prerequisite(s): DMS 100 , DMS 105W , DMS 107 , DMS 107L , DMS 108W  each with a minimum grade of “B” (3.0)
    Corequisite(s): DMS 101W , DMS 104 , and DMS 106W  
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Understand structure, orientation, and sonographic appearance of the liver.

         A.          Describe the location of the liver relating to other body parts.

         B.          Identify and describe the vasculature of the liver.

         C.          Identify with the correct terminology the ligaments, segments, and fissures of the liver.

         D.          Describe the sonographic appearance of the liver.

         E.          Define key words relating to the liver in sonography.

    2.    Understand structure, orientation, and sonographic appearance of the biliary system and pancreas.

         A.          Describe the gross anatomy of the biliary system and pancreas.

         B.          Explain the basic function of the biliary system and pancreas.

         C.          Recognize the sonographic appearance of the biliary system and pancreas.

         D.          Identify other imaging modalities that might be used to evaluate the biliary system and pancreas.

         E.          List the epigastric vessels that surround the pancreas.

         F.           Explain the blood supply to the pancreas.

         G.          Describe the sonography of the pancreas in longitudinal and transverse planes using vascular landmarks.

         H.          Define key words relating to the biliary system and pancreas in sonography.

    3.    Understand structure, orientation, and sonographic appearance to the 

         A.          Explain the function of the urinary system.

         B.          Identify the location of the kidneys, urinary bladder, and urethra.

         C.          Describe the size and structure of the kidneys, ureters, urinary bladder, and urethra.

         D.          Recognize the sonographic appearance of the urinary system.

         E.          Define key words relating to the urinary system in sonography.

    4.    Understand structure, orientation, and sonographic appearance of the spleen and GI system.  

         A.          Explain the function of the spleen.

         B.          Identify the location of the spleen.

         C.          Define size relationships of the spleen.

         D.          Describe the sonographic appearance of the normal spleen.

         E.          Differentiate the structures of the GI tract.

         F.           Identify 5 principle layers of bowel.

         G.          Know the vasculature of the GI tract.

         H.          Describe the location of the GI components.

         I.           Recognize the sonographic appearance of the GI tract components.

         J.          Define key words relating to the spleen and GI tract in sonography.

    5.    Understand structure, orientation, and the sonographic appearance of the aorta, inferior vena cava, and portal venous system.

         A.          Discuss the embryologic development of the aorta and its major branches.

         B.          Describe the normal course, location, and size of the aorta.

         C.          Identify the layers of an artery.

         D.          Describe the location of the aortic and IVC branches and the organs supplied by those branches.

         E.          Explain the function of the aorta and IVC.

         F.          Recognize the sonographic appearance of the aorta and IVC and their branches.

         G.         Define key words relating to the aorta and IVC in sonography.

    6.    Understand normal sonographic anatomy, as well as pathologic and disease processes of the liver.    

         A.          Outline normal anatomic structure of the liver.

         B.          Describe hepatic circulation.

         C.          Recognize developmental and congenital anomalies of the liver.

         D.          Differentiate between different infectious diseases of the liver and correlate with sonographic imaging.

         E.          Identify vascular abnormalities of the liver.

         F.          Differentiate between benign and malignant hepatic lesions.

         G.         Explain how interventional procedures of the liver correlate with sonographic imaging.

         H.         Understand basic scanning techniques to identify normal and abnormal liver anatomy.

    7.    Understand normal sonographic anatomy, as well as pathologic and disease processes of the gallbladder and biliary system.

        

         A.          Outline normal anatomic structure of the gallbladder and biliary system.

         B.          List gallbladder pathology identified with sonographic scanning.

         C.          Understand the role of ultrasound in treatment options for gallbladder disease.

         D.          Differentiate between benign and malignant biliary lesions.

         E.          Correlate biliary disease processes with sonographic imaging.

         F.           Identify rare biliary conditions encountered in clinical imaging.

         G.          Recognize biliary obstruction and list causes for obstruction.

         H.          Understand basic scanning techniques to identify normal and abnormal gallbladder and biliary anatomy.

    8.    Understand normal sonographic anatomy, as well as pathologic and disease processes of the pancreas.    

         A.          Outline normal anatomic structure of the pancreas.

         B.          Recognize congenital anomalies of the pancreas.

         C.          Describe and identify inflammatory processes of the pancreas.

         D.          Differentiate between benign and malignant lesions of the pancreas.

         E.          List differential diagnosis for pancreatic neoplasms.

         F.          Understand basic scanning techniques to identify normal and abnormal pancreas anatomy.

    9.    Understand normal sonographic anatomy, as well as pathologic and disease processes of the urinary system.

         A.          Understand embryology and development of the urinary system.

         B.          Outline normal anatomic structure of the urinary system.

         C.          Recognize congenital anomalies of the urinary system.

         D.          Describe and recognize infectious processes of the urinary system.

         E.          Recognize urinary stones and calcifications in clinical scanning.

         F.          Differentiate between benign and malignant lesions of the urinary system.

         G.         List and understand renal cystic disease.

         H.         Describe the sonographic findings of the urinary system trauma.

         I.          Identify vascular abnormalities of the urinary system.

         J.          Explain medical diseases of the urinary system along with the sonographic findings.

         K.          Identify a neurogenic bladder.

         L.          Recognize a transplanted kidney and explain the sonographic findings.

         M.         List medical complications seen with a transplanted kidney and their related sonographic findings.

         N.         Understand the basic scanning techniques to identify normal and abnormal urinary anatomy.

    10. Understand normal sonographic anatomy, as well as pathologic and disease processes of the retropeitoneum and great vessels.    

         A.          Outline normal anatomy of the retroperitoneum.

         B.          Recognize retroperitoneal pathology and differentiate between solid masses, fluid collections, and infections.

         C.          Outline normal anatomy of the aorta.

         D.          Recognize aorta pathology.

         E.          List the three types of aortic aneurysms.

         F.           Identify the branches of the aorta.

         G.          Outline normal anatomy of the inferior vena cava.

         H.          Recognize IVC pathology.

         I.           Identify branches and tributaries of the IVC.

    11. Understand the clinical lab values in relation to various disease processes and pathological conditions of the abdomen.

         A.          Recognize appropriate lab tests to evaluate different organ systems.

         B.          Correlate abnormal lab values with appropriate disease processes.

         C.          Describe sonographic findings compared to specific abnormal lab values.

         D.          Know how to find clinical data and labs in a patient’s medical records.

    12. Understand normal sonographic anatomy, as well as pathologic and disease processes of the retroperitoneum and great vessels.

         A.          Outline normal anatomy of the retroperitoneum.

         B.          Recognize retroperitoneal pathology and differentiate between solid masses, fluid collections, and infections.

         C.          Outline normal anatomy of the aorta.

         D.          Recognize aorta pathology.

         E.          List the three types of aortic aneurysms.

         F.          Identify the branches of the aorta.

         G.         Outline normal anatomy of the Inferior vena cava.

         H.         Recognize IVC pathology.

         I.           Identify branches and tributaries of the IVC.

  
  •  

    DMS 104 - Introduction to OB/GYN Sonography

    Credits: 2


    Discusses various aspects of OB/GYN sonography. Studies normal sectional anatomy and development, fetal assessment, normal and abnormal sonographic patterns, along with techniques and protocols.

    Prerequisite(s): DMS 100 , DMS 105W , DMS 107 , DMS 107L , DMS 108W  each with a minimum grade of “B” (3.0)
    Corequisite(s): DMS 101W , DMS 103 , and DMS 106W .
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Understand structure, orientation, and the sonographic appearance of the female pelvis.    

         A.          Describe the anatomy, physiology, and function of the female reproductive organs of the pelvis.

         B.          Recognize the sonographic appearance of the organs, muscles, and surrounding structures of the true pelvis.

         C.          Define key words relating to the female pelvis in sonography.

     2.    Understand normal sonographic anatomy, as well as pathologic and disease processes of the pelvis.    

         A.          Outline normal anatomic structure of the uterus and ovaries.

         B.          Recognize congenital abnormalities of the uterus.

         C.          List abnormalities of the myometrium and correlate with sonographic findings.

         D.          Describe abnormalities of the endometrium and correlate with sonographic findings.

         E.          Identify the features of non-neoplastic lesions.

         F.           List ovarian neoplasms and describe the sonographic findings.

         G.          List uterine neoplasms and describe the sonographic findings.

         H.          Define pelvic inflammatory disease.

         I.            Know the sonographic findings of the pelvic inflammatory disease.

         J.           Recognize non-gynecologic pelvic masses.

         K.          Understand post-menopausal changes and the sonographic findings.

         L.          Identify post-partum pelvic pathological conditions.

    3.    Demonstrate a basic understanding of human reproduction and embryology.

         A.          Identify basic anatomy of the femal reproductive system.

         B.          Explain the functions of estrogen.

         C.          Explain the functions of progesterone.

         D.          Describe the ovarian cycle.

         E.          Discuss the differences between FSH and LH.

         F.          Define the the following terms:

                      1.    Menstrual cycle

                      2.    Proliferative phase

                      3.    Secretory phase

         G.         Correlate and describe ovarian cycle, hormonal cycle, and menstrual cycle.

         H.         Define the following terms:

                      1.    Embryo

                      2.    Fetus

                      3.    Zygote

                      4.    Blastocyst

                      5.    Trophoblast

         I.           Define implantation.

         J.          Identify the anatomy relating to the placenta.

         K.         List the three primary germ layers of the embryonic disk.

         L.         Explain the developmental process of the embryo during the first 12 weeks.

         M.        Identify the extraembryonic membranes.

    4.    Recognize and understand the first trimester pathology in a pregnancy.

         A.          Recognize the signs of embryonic demise.

         B.          Know the amnion and yolk sac criteria for a normal pregnancy.

         C.          Recognize the normal measurement parameters in a 1st trimester pregnancy.

         D.         Correlate clinical labs with sonographic findings in 1st trimester pregnancy.

         E.          List the classic signs and symptoms of ectopic pregnancy.

         F.          Describe the sonographic findings of ectopic pregnancy.

         G.         Explain the terms “missed AB” and “Blighted Ovum”.

         H.         Identify normal and abnormal masses in 1st trimester pregnancy.

    5.    Understand structure, orientation, and sonographic appearance of a fetus in an obstetrical sonographic exam.    

         A.          Describe the locations and functions of the early support tissues of the gestation.

         B.          Explain the early embryogenesis of the fetal organs and organ systems.

         C.          Recognize the sonographic appearance of the gestational sac and early embryo.

         D.          Know the role of the placenta in supporting gestation.

         E.          List the organs that become visible during the second trimester and describe their sonographic appearance.

         F.          Describe the sonographic measurements of the fetus performed during the second and third trimesters.

         G.         Define key words relating to obstetric sonography.

     6.    Understand the role of obstetric sonography and the steps to produce a quality obstetric examination.

         A.          Know the differences between the different levels of obstetric ultrasound evaluation.

         B.          List the indications for an obstetric ultrasound.

         C.          Explain the term “Biochemical screening”.

         D.          Describe the objectives of an obstetric ultrasound.

         E.          Know the protocol for a complete obstetric ultrasound.

         F.          Recognize normal fetal anatomy.

         G.         Understand basic screening techniques to identify normal fetal anatomy.

    7.    Understand normal fetal growth parameters.

         A.          Know the protocol for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd trimester dating.

         B.          Understand basic scanning techniques for obtaining fetal parameters.

         C.          Correlate fetal parameters with gestational age.

         D.          Explain the recommended approach to fetal weight estimation.

         E.          Assess fetal weight in relation to fetal age.

  
  •  

    DMS 105W - Ultrasound Physics and Instrumentation I

    Credits: 2
    Introduces the basic acoustic physics including a history of instrumentation, ultrasonic propagation principles, transducer parameters, and basic equipment types.

    Prerequisite(s): Must be accepted into the DMS program or have consent of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): DMS 100 , DMS 107 , DMS 107L , DMS 108W  
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand ultrasonic propagation and how they relate to ultrasonic imaging.
      1. Know the definition of sound and understand the relation of sound waves to ultrasound imaging.
      2. Know the definition and units of a period along with the typical values of ultrasound period in clinical diagnostic imaging.
      3. Know the definitions, units, and formula for frequency and the typical value of ultrasound frequency in clinical imaging.
      4. Identify the three parameters that relate to the size of a sound wave.
      5. Know the definition and units of amplitude.
      6. Describe how power relates to the strength of the sound wave and know the units for power.
      7. Differentiate how power is related to amplitude.
      8. Know the definition and units of intensity and the typical values of ultrasound intensity in clinical imaging.
      9. Identify the formula and units for wavelength.
      10. Differentiate how propagation speed relates to the medium through which sound travels.
      11. State the average speed of sound in biologic “soft tissue”.
      12. Define a pulse of ultrasound and the 5 descriptors of pulsed ultrasound.
      13. Know the definition and units of pulse duration along with typical ranges in clinical imaging.
      14. Describe pulse repetition period and how it relates to imaging depth.
      15. Know the definition and units of pulse repetition frequency and the range in clinical imaging.
      16. Identify the formula for Duty factor and the range for clinical imaging.
      17. Correlate spatial pulse length to wavelength, frequency, cycles, and pulse.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of ultrasound intensities and how they relate to attenuation of traveling sound.
      1. Understand the definition of intensity and know the units it is expressed in.
      2. Describe the four ways to measure intensity.
      3. Identify the formula for Beam Uniformity Coefficient and how it relates to intensity.
      4. Demonstrate how to convert from one intensity to another.
      5. Explain what the unit Decibel is used to describe and know the difference between negative and positive decibels.
      6. Know the definition of attenuation and how it relates to the sound wave.
      7. In the clinical setting, determine what frequency transducer to use in relation to the amount of attenuation.
      8. Identify the three processes that attenuation results from.
      9. Explain Rayleigh scattering.
      10. Calculate the Attenuation Coefficient for a given set of parameters.
      11. State the formula for Half-value Layer thickness.
      12. Know the definition and units of impedance.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of ultrasonic beam transmission.
      1. Know the relationship between intensity and transmission in clinical imaging.
      2. State the definition of Intensity Reflection Coefficient and Intensity Transmission Coefficient.
      3. Explain normal incidence and its relation to reflection and transmission.
      4. Determine how refraction is associated with transmission.
      5. Define Snell’s law.
      6. Discuss the Range equation and how an ultrasound imaging system determines the depth of a reflecting surface.
      7. Understand what a transducer is, and what a transducer does in the process of clinical imaging.
      8. Name the components of a transducer.
      9. Identify the formula for the operating frequency of a transducer.
      10. Explain how bandwidth related to the frequency of a transducer.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of sound beams and their effect on resolution.
      1. Diagram the anatomy of a sound beam.
      2. Understand Huygen’s principle.
      3. Explain beam characteristics in relation to crystal attributes.
      4. Describe the four methods of focusing.
      5. List factors that affect resolution.
      6. Compare longitudinal and lateral resolution.
  
  •  

    DMS 106W - Ultrasound Scanning

    Credits: 4
    Provides hands on experience in sonographic imaging. Teaches basic operations of the ultrasound machine along with transducer orientation. Includes an overview of abdominal and pelvis imaging, scan plane recognition, and basic imaging concepts.

    Prerequisite(s): DMS 100 , DMS 105W , DMS 107 , DMS 107L , DMS 108W  each with a minimum grade of “B” (3.0)
    Corequisite(s): DMS 101W , DMS 103 , and DMS 104  
    Lecture Hours: 75 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate a basic ability to recognize normal abdominal/pelvic anatomy.
      1. Recognize normal anatomy of the abdomen/pelvis
      2. Demonstrate basic scanning techniques to obtain images of abdomen/pelvis anatomy.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate image optimization techniques.
      1. Adjust the image appropriately for under or over penetration.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to zoom or magnify an image.
      3. Adjust the focal zone for the object to be scanned.
      4. Demonstrate how to adjust contrast resolution.
      5. Choose the appropriate transducer for the object to be scanned.
    3. Demonstrate proficiency in obtaining basic abdominal images for interpretation.
      1. Obtain satisfactory images for interpretation for the following anatomy:
        1. Gallbladder
        2. Pancreas
        3. Kidneys
        4. Spleen
    4. Demonstrate proficiency in obtaining basic pelvis images for interpretation.
      1.  
        1. Uterus
        2. Ovaries
        3. Pelvis Cavity
  
  •  

    DMS 107 - Introduction to Ultrasound Scanning

    Credits: 0.5
    Provides an introduction to sonographic imaging. Teaches basic operations of the ultrasound machine along with transducer orientation and imaging scan planes.

    Prerequisite(s): Must be accepted into the DMS program.
    Corequisite(s): DMS 100 , DMS 105W , DMS 108W , DMS 107L  
    Lecture Hours: 7.5 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the basic operations of the ultrasound machine and transducer orientation.
      1. Identify the following controls on the ultrasound machine and know their function:
        1. On/Off Button
        2. Overall Gain
        3. TCG
        4. Print
        5. Depth Control
        6. Focal Zone
        7. Annotation
        8. Transducer Adjustments
        9. Calipers
        10. Zoom/Magnify
    2. Demonstrate the ability to scan planes and body positions when scanning the abdomen/pelvis.
      1. Recognize the main body planes when scanning.
      2. Demonstrate the following scan positions:
        1. Supine
        2. Prone
        3. LLD
        4. RLD
        5. RPO
        6. LPO
        7. Trendelenberg
    3. Demonstrate basic concepts to optimize image presentation.
      1. Recognize under or over penetration and know how to adjust the image appropriately.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to zoom or magnify an image.
      3. Adjust the focal zone for the object being scanned.
      4. Adjust depth appropriately for the object being scanned.
      5. Demonstrate how toadjust contrast resolution.
      6. List ideal transducer frequencies for the object being scanned.
      7. Demonstrate how to take 2-dimensional measurement.
      8. Differentiate between enhancement and shadowing.
  
  •  

    DMS 107L - Introduction to Ultrasound Scanning Lab

    Credits: 1.5
    Provides an introduction to sonographic imaging. Teaches basic operations of the ultrasound machine along with transducer orientation and imaging scan planes.

    Prerequisite(s): Must be accepted into the DMS program.
    Corequisite(s): DMS 100 , DMS 105W , DMS 108W , DMS 107  
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 22.5
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate proficiency in obtaining basic abdominal images for interpretation.
      1. Obtain satisfactory images for interpretation for the following anatomy:
        1. Aorta
        2. Liver
        3. Gall bladder
        4. Pancreas
  
  •  

    DMS 108W - Becoming a Master Sonography Student

    Credits: 2


    Assists in obtaining skills critical to success in the DMS program. Demonstrates and practices strategies in test taking, textbook reading, memory, and thinking critically. Identifies DMS expectations and explores college resources and life skills related to success in an occupational health program. Begins to explore professionalism for the healthcare worker. Demonstrates and practices working in a group, teamwork, and interpersonal skills.

    Prerequisite(s): Must be accepted into the DMS program.
    Corequisite(s): DMS 100 , DMS 105W , DMS 107 , DMS 107L  
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.   Examine how individual affective strengths and weaknesses impact college success

         A.          Discuss how honesty with self affects one’s ability to recognize strengths and weaknesses and plan for positive change.

         B.          Describe the characteristics of a successful “master” student.

         C.          Identify and examine personal strengths and weakness in such areas as: attitude, motivation responsibility, self-discipline, dedication,
                       adaptability and perspective.

         D.          Explain how the characteristics in objectives A, B and C impact success in the DMS program.

    2.    Develop strategies to maximize strengths and strengthen weaknesses in affective areas.    

         A.          Identify and discuss strategies for improvement.

         B.          Describe emotional intelligence.

         C.          Discuss how emotional intelligence could contribute to a negative or positive college and clinical experience.

         D.          Create an ANT (automatic negative thought) plan for specific experiences that will be encountered in the DMS program.

         E.          Discuss how multiple generations in the classroom and clinical experience could affect positive or negative outcome.

     3.    Identify and examine external issues that impact college success and identify strategies for successfully dealing with these external
            issues.

         A.          Identify and examine external issues such as influence of family, friends, children, health, finances, change, transition to academic culture,
                      and dealing with the responsibilities and stresses in their lives outside of college, and discuss how these affect their college performance.

         B.          Identify and discuss strategies for dealing effectively with the issues above.

     4.    Use effective study and test preparation techniques for course assignments and tests.

         A.          Understand the importance of asking clarifying questions when unsure of information.

         B.          Discuss and explain the benefits of immediate, short and long term review.

         C.          Create and use review tools such as audio tapes, flashcards, mind mapping, mnemonics, and study groups to prepare for classroom tests.

         D.          Describe tips for taking tests.

         E.          Discuss why various study techniques were successful for each test.

         F.           Evaluate ways to be more successful preparing for future tests.

    5.    Demonstrate knowledge and use of active DMS textbook reading strategies.

         A.          Discuss how to read a reference style textbook such as used in the DMS program.

         B.          Practice reading chapters for specific information,.

         C.          Identify key components of a chapter.

    6.    Demonstrate knowledge and use of memory techniques and mnemonic devices.    

         A.          Identify and explain several memory techniques such as association, repetition, chunking, recitation.

         B.          Describe the purpose of mnemonic devices.

         C.          Explain how to creat mnemonic devices including acronyms, rhymes, songs and stories.

         D.          Creat mnemonic, devices for a test or quiz.

    7.    Demonstrate ability to use individual and group presentation skills.

         A.          Identify the parts of an effective oral presentation (introduction, body and conclusion).

         B.          Identify the nonverbal components of oral presentations.

         C.          Discuss techniques for successful group work on a particular project or problem.

         D.          Practice working together in groups to solve a problem and/or creat a project.

         E.          Create an individual and group presentation to present to the class.

    8.    Demonstrate knowledge of and practice using the critical thinking process.

         A.          Define critical thinking and explain its value and uses in the DMS program.

         B.          Define assumptions and explain how assumptions impact critical thinking.

         C.          Participate in critical thinking exercises throughout the class.

         D.          Discuss the results of these critical thinking exercises.

    9.    Identify appropriate college resources including students, instructors, services and activities to facilitate college success.    

         A.          Discuss ways to support, share insights with, and cooperate with fellow students.

         B.          Participate in creating an in-class atmosphere and environment which promotes safety, trust, and sharing among students and between

                       students and instructor.

         C.          Identify expectations of the DMS program faculty.

         D.          Investigate resources provided by the library, computer labs, conseling center, TLC, elearning, and others that may be pertinent to a
                       pertinent need.

         E.          Practice using electronic and library resources for a classrom assignment.

     10. Identify and examine professional behaviors of a healthcare professional.

         A.          Discuss program expectations for professional behavior.

         B.          Discuss how professional behavior (or lack of) may affect student success.

         C.          Discuss how professional behavior (or lack of) may affect one’s career.

         D.          Demonstrate professional behavior throughout the class.

  
  •  

    DMS 112 - Small Parts Sonography

    Credits: 1
    Covers the fundamentals of superficial parts sonography. Presents basic small parts anatomy, as well as proper scanning techniques and protocols for identifying normal and abnormal sonographic patterns.

    Prerequisite(s): DMS 101W , DMS 103 , DMS 104 , and DMS 106W  each with a minimum grade of “B” (3.0) and LW 206A  with a minimum grade of “C” (2.0)
    Corequisite(s): DMS 113 , DMS 114 , DMS 115 , DMS 116W , and DMS 117W  
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify normal sonographic anatomy, as well as pathologic and disease processes of the thyroid and parathyroid glands.
      1. Identify Normal thyroid and parathyroid anatomy.
      2. Identify congenital thyroid disease.
      3. Recognize nodular thyroid disease.
      4. Discuss diffuse thyroid disease.
      5. Describe imaging techniques to differentiate between normal and abnormal thyroid and parathyroid anatomy.
      6. Correlate clinical labs with sonographic findings.
      7. Discuss other imaging modalities used to evaluate the thyroid and parathyroid.
    2. Identify normal sonographic anatomy, as well as pathologic and disease processes of the prostate.
      1. Identify normal prostate anatomy.
      2. Discuss proper scan orientation for the prostate gland.
      3. Define the peripheral, transition, and central zones of the prostate.
      4. Discuss transducer design and equipment requirements for imaging the prostate.
      5. Recognize benign prostatic diseases.
      6. Discuss the clinical aspects of prostate cancer.
      7. Describe clinical staging and grading of prostate cancer.
      8. Describe sonographic technique for prostatic biopsy.
    3. Identify normal sonographic anatomy, as well as pathologic and disease processes of the breast.
      1. Identify normal breast anatomy.
      2. Explain the scanning technique for breast ultrasound.
      3. Discuss appropriate transducer and equipment utilization for breast sonography.
      4. Describe the approach used to evaluate breast masses.
      5. Differentiate between malignant and benign breast masses.
      6. List imaging criteria for proper differentiation between malignant and benign breast masses.
      7. Describe patient preparation and sonographic technique for breast interventional procedures.
    4. Identify normal sonographic anatomy, as well as pathologic and disease processes of the scrotum.
      1. Identify normal scrotal anatomy.
      2. Describe sonographic imaging technique for scrotal ultrasound.
      3. Differentiate between benign and malignant scrotal masses.
      4. Discuss scrotal calcifications and the clinical implications.
      5. Recognize and identify abnormal extratesticular anatomy.
      6. Define testicular torsion.
      7. List the sonographic findings of epididymitis and orchitis.
  
  •  

    DMS 113 - Advanced Abdominal Sonography

    Credits: 1
    Presents pathology and disease processes, normal and abnormal sonographic patterns, clinical correlation, and differential diagnosis of the abdominal cavity.

    Prerequisite(s): DMS 101W , DMS 103 , DMS 104  and DMS 106W  each with a minimum grade of “B” (3.0) and LW 206A  with a minimum grade of “C” (2.0)
    Corequisite(s): DMS 112 , DMS 114 , DMS 115 , DMS 116W , and DMS 117W .
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify normal sonographic anatomy, as well as pathologic and disease processes, of the gastrointestinal tract.
      1. List the four layers of the gut.
      2. Recognize the “gut signature”.
      3. Recognize basic gut wall pathology.
      4. List four types of GI neoplasms.
      5. Identify the sonographic findings of Chrohn’s disease.
      6. Describe the technique for evaluating the appendix.
      7. Describe the sonographic and clinical features of appendicitis.
      8. Define diverticulitis and describe the sonographic findings.
      9. Outline sonographic findings in GI tract infections.
      10. Have a basic knowledge of the various miscellaneous GI tract abnormalities.
      11. Describe enodosonography.
    2. Identify normal sonographic anatomy, as well as pathologic and disease processes of the abdominal wall, peritoneum, and diaphragm.
      1. Differentiate between lesions, hernias, and hematomas of the abdominal wall.
      2. Identify abdominal wall fluid collections.
      3. Recognize vascular lesions of the abdominal wall.
      4. Identify the peritoneum and diaphragm.
      5. Have a basic understanding of various peritoneal pathologies.
      6. Describe the sonographic findings of a diaphragmatic hernia.
      7. Recognize artifacts when imaging the diaphragm.
    3. Identify normal sonographic anatomy, as well as pathologic and disease processes of the thorax.
      1. Define pleural space.
      2. Explain the different approaches to scanning pleural fluid.
      3. Define pneumothorax.
      4. Recognize the normal sonographic appearance of lungs parenchyma.
      5. Recognize the normal sonographic appearance of the mediastinum.
    4. Identify normal sonographic anatomy, as well as pathologic and disease processes of the pediatric abdomen.
      1. Outline normal abdominal anatomy in the pediatric abdomen.
      2. Explain the following terms:
        1. Choledochal Cyst
        2. Biliary Atresia
        3. Neonatal Hepatitis
        4. Neonatal Jaundice
      3. Recognize the sonographic features of liver abscess.
      4. Describe the various types of renal cystic diseases.
      5. Differentiate between the various types of hydronephrosis.
      6. Differentiate between Wilm’s tumor, neuroblastoma, and mosoblastic nephroma.
      7. Describe the scanning technique for pyloric stenosis.
      8. List the parameters for pyloric stenosis.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of basic procedures using sonographic guidance.
      1. Explain sterile technique procedures when using ultrasound for an interventional procedure.
      2. List needle selection choices for interventional procedures.
      3. Describe a basic biopsy procedure using ultrasound guidance.
      4. Describe a basic drainage procedure using ultrasound guidance.
      5. Explain techniques for needle visualization during invasive procedures.
      6. List indications for invasive procedures in the abdomen, pelvis, and small parts.
      7. List indications for invasive procedures in an obstetrical patient.
      8. Discuss sterile techniques and protocols for intraoperative scanning.
    6. Identify normal sonographic anatomy, as well as pathologic and disease processes of the spleen.
      1. Understand embryology and anatomy of the spleen.
      2. Recognize anatomic structures of the spleen.
      3. Differentiate between benign and malignant lesions of the spleen.
      4. Describe the sonographic findings with spleen trauma.
      5. List congenital abnormalities of the spleen.
      6. Understand basic scanning techniques to identify normal and abnormal splenic anatomy.
  
  •  

    DMS 114 - Advanced OB/GYN Sonography

    Credits: 2


    Presents pathology and disease processes, normal and abnormal sonographic patterns, clinical correlation, and differential diagnosis of the obstetrical and gynecologic patient.

    Prerequisite(s): DMS 101W , DMS 103 , DMS 104 , and DMS 106W , each with a minimum grade of “B” (3.0) and LW 206A  with a minimum grade of “C” (2.0)
    Corequisite(s): DMS 112 , DMS 113 , DMS 115 , DMS 116W , and DMS 117W  
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Recognize abnormal sonographic anatomy and pathology of the fetal thorax and abdomen.

         A.          Differentiate between the different types of diaphragmatic hernias.

         B.          Recognize the different abnormalities associated with the fetal lungs.

         C.          Recognize normal and abnormal anatomy of the mediastinum.

         D.          Identify normal fetal abdominal anatomy.

         E.          Explain the following pathologies:

                      1.    Duodenal Atresia

                      2.    Meconium Ileus

                      3.    Meconium Peritonitis

                      4.    Hirschsprung’s Disease

                      5.    Echogenic Bowel

                      6.    Anorectal Atresia

    2.    Recognize abnormal sonographic anatomy and pathology of the fetal head and spine.

         A.          Understand embryology of the brain.

         B.          Recognize the difference in sonographic anatomy between the 1st, 2nd, and 3rdtrimesters.

         C.          List the components of ultrasound examination of the fetal head.

         D.          Give parameters for fetal ventricular size and the ventricle-to-hemisphere ratio.

         E.          Discuss the different anomalies.

         F.           Describe the embryology of the neural tube.

         G.          Differentiate between level 1 and level 2 sonogram.

         H.          Explain scanning techniques to image the fetal spine.

         I.            List associated cranial abnormalities associated with spina bifida.

         J.           List associated non-cranial abnormalities associated with spina bifida.

         K.           List associated chromosomal abnormalities associated with spina bifida.

         L.           Define the different anomalies.

    3.    Recognize abnormal sonographic anatomy of the fetal urinary tract.

         A.          Discuss embryology of the urinary tract.

         B.          Define amniotic fluid volume.

         C.          Describe the following anomalies:

                      1.    Renal Agenesis

                      2.    Horseshoe Kidney

                      3.    Bladder Exstrophy

                      4.    Upper Urinary Tract Dilatation

                      5.    Lower Urinary Tract Dilatation

                      6.    Renal Cystic Disease

                      7.    Meckel-Gruber Syndrome

         D.         Recognize renal neoplasms.

         E.         Discuss scanning techniques to visualize the fetal urinary system.

     4.    Recognize and identify high-risk pregnancies and pregnancy complications.

         A.          Discuss the sonographic diagnosis and complications of twin and mutifetal pregnancies.

         B.          Describe the sonographic features of hydrops.

         C.          Differentiate between immune and nonimmune hydrops.

         D.          Discuss prenatal therapy options and prognosis.

         E.          List the three sonographic techniques to evaluate the cervix.

         F.           Identify normal cervical parameters.

         G.          Recognize abnormal cervical appearances.

         H.          Discuss the pitfalls in sonographic diagnosis of the cervix.

         I.            Define incompetent cervix.

         J.           Discuss ultrasound criteria for prediction of preterm labor.

    5.    Demonstrate an understanding of the placenta and of placental pathology.

         A.          Understand the normal embryological process of the placenta.

         B.          List normal variations of the placenta.

         C.          Identify intraplacental normal lesions with their sonographic findings.

         D.          Identify intraplacental abnormal lesions with their sonographic findings.

         E.          Describe the three different types of placental creta.

         F.           Recognize normal placental contractions.

         G.          List the three types of antepartum hemorrhage and correlate with sonographic findings.

         H.          Explain the sonographic findings in the different stages of hemorrhage resolution.

     6.    Demonstrate the protocol for evaluating the cervix and classify the findings.

         A.          Explain the difference between the transabdominal, transperineal, and transvaginal approach to scanning the cervix.

         B.          List the normal parameters for the cervix.

         C.          Identify abnormal cervical appearances and correlate with outcome of pregnancy.

         D.          Describe the term “incompetent cervix.”

         E.          Correlate clinical and sonographic findings in evaluating for preterm labor.

         F.           Understand the clinical implications of ultrasound findings associated with preterm labor.

    7.    Demonstrate understanding of the fetal Biophysical Profile scoring method and classify the findings.

         A.          Outline the five parameters of a Biophysical Profile.

         B.          Explain the scoring method for a Biophysical Profile.

         C.          Recognize normal patterns of behavior when performing a Biophysical Profile.

         D.          Correlate the Biophysical Profile score wit clinical results.

         E.          Understand the method of evaluating amniotic fluid.

         F.           Correlate the AFI with gestational parameters.

         G.          Correlate the AFE with clinical outcome.

         H.           Understand basic scanning techniques to obtain an accurate AFI and Biophysical Profile.

         I.             List the criteria for doing a cord doppler.

         J.            Correlate umbilical cord doppler with clinical outcome.

    8.    Recognize abnormal sonographic anatomy of the fetal abdominal wall.

         A.          Describe the following anomalies:

                      1.    Omphalocele

                      2.    Gastroschisis

                      3.    Limb-body wall complex

                      4.    Amniotic band syndrome

                      5.    Bladder extrophy

         B.          Describe normal physiologic herniation of the abdominal contents during embryology.

         C.          Discuss scanning techniques to differentiate between omphalocele and gastroschisis.

     9.    Identify multigestation pregnancies.

         A.          Differentiate between monochorionic and dichorionic pregnancy.

         B.          Differentiate between monoamniotic and diamniotic pregnancy.

         C.          Discuss complications and implications of a multigestation pregnancy.

         D.          Explain twin-twin transfusion.

         E.          Define stuck-twin syndrome.

         F.          Define twin embolization syndrome.

         G.         Discuss conjoined twins.

  
  •  

    DMS 115 - Ultrasound Physics and Instrumentation II

    Credits: 2
    Presents the fundamentals of Doppler ultrasound, scanning artifacts, quality assurance, and biologic effects, and safety. Includes an overview of the components of an ultrasound system.

    Prerequisite(s): DMS 101W , DMS 103 , DMS 104 , and DMS 106W  each with a minimum grade of “B” (3.0) and LW 206A  with a minimum grade of “C” (2.0)
    Corequisite(s): DMS 112 , DMS 113 , DMS 114 , DMS 116W , and DMS 117W  
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the basics of ultrasound physics.
      1. Define basic ultrasound physics formulas.
      2. Describe the parameteres of a sound wave.
      3. Explain the differences with pulsed ultrasound.
      4. Describe attenuation.
      5. Define and explain axial and lateral resolution.
      6. Explain the effects of focusing.
      7. Distinguish between refraction and reflection.
      8. Describe ultrasound imaging modes.
    2. Demonstrate understanding of the fundamental principles of Doppler ultrasound for use in the clinical setting.
      1. Define “Doppler Shift”.
      2. Differentiate between speed and velocity.
      3. Explain the relationship between frequency and blood flow.
      4. Explain the relationship between frequency and angle.
      5. Describe the Doppler equation.
      6. Identify the known elements of the Doppler equation.
      7. Describe the difference between continuous wave and pulsed wave doppler.
      8. Understand doppler signal processing.
      9. Define spectral analysis.
      10. Describe the three methods of Doppler signal processing.
    3. Demonstrate understanding of the fundamental principles of color Doppler ultrasound for use in the clinical setting.
      1. Define color flow Doppler.
      2. Explain the steps in creating a color flow image.
      3. Interpret color maps.
      4. Describe the difference between velocity mode and variance mode.
      5. Identify the technique of choice for spectral analysis of color flow Doppler.
    4. Demonstrate understanding of the components of an ultrasound system.
      1. List the six electrical components of an ultrasound system.
      2. Describe the function of a pulser.
      3. List the three pulser modes.
      4. Describe the function of the receiver.
      5. Define the term “compensation”.
      6. Diagram a TGC curve.
      7. Explain compression and demodulation.
      8. Identify a cathode ray tube and describe its basic function.
      9. Describe the function of a scan converter.
      10. Differentiate between pre and post processing.
      11. Differentiate between analog and digital scan converters.
    5. Define and identify artifacts in clinical scanning.
      1. Differentiate between axial and lateral resolution.
      2. Describe enhancement.
      3. Explain propagation speed error.
    6. Describe and adequately perform ultrasound quality assurance.
      1. Define quality assurance.
      2. List the four requirements for a quality assurance program.
      3. Identify the various types of test objects used in quality assurance.
      4. Describe and perform performance measurements.
      5. Explain what a hydrophone is used for.
      6. Explain the difference between a calorimeter and a thermocouple.
    7. Demonstrate understanding of the biological effects and safety of ultrasound.
      1. Define dosimetry.
      2. Differentiate between mechanistic and empirical approaches to study bioeffects.
      3. Explain the proposal of thermal mechanism.
      4. Describe cavitation.
      5. Differentiate between stable and transient cavitation.
      6. Define epidemiology.
      7. Be familiar with the AIUM statements on the following:
        1. Thermal Bioeffects
        2. Epidemiology
        3. In Vitro Biological Effects
        4. In Vivo Biological Effects
        5. Clinical Safety
        6. Safety in Training and Research
    8. Demonstrate an understanding of the various methods of ultrasound imaging and display.
      1. Describe A-mode, M-mode, and B-mode imaging.
      2. Define real-time imaging.
      3. Explain the difference between mechanical and array transducers.
      4. Differentiate between switched array and phased array focusing.
      5. Define a vector array transducer.
      6. Identify image shape in relation to transducer type.
    9. Demonstrate an understanding of ultrasound harmonic imaging.
      1. Define harmonic imaging.
      2. Define the fundamental frequency.
      3. Distinguish between tissue and contrast harmonics.
      4. Explain the mechanical index.
  
  •  

    DMS 116W - Clinical Seminar I

    Credits: 0.5
    Provides a clinical overview of sonographic procedures of the abdomen, pelvis, fetus, and small parts. Emphasizes identification of normal anatomy and basic pathology.

    Prerequisite(s): DMS 101W , DMS 103 , DMS 104 , and DMS 106W  each with a minimum grade of “B” (3.0) and LW 206A  with a minimum grade of “C” (2.0)
    Corequisite(s): DMS 112 , DMS 113 , DMS 114 , DMS 115 , and DMS 117W  
    Lecture Hours: 7.5 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify normal and abnormal sonographic patterns.
      1. Begin to gain proficiency in recognizing normal vs. abnormal sonographic patterns.
      2. Determine the sonographic differential diagnosis when analyzing hard copy film.
      3. Discuss patient history, clinical findings, normal and abnormal anatomy, differential diagnosis, and associated findings for each case presented.
    2. Discuss methods to produce high quality diagnostic sonograms.
      1. Discuss proper scanning techniques and protocols for each case presented.
      2. Discuss patient history, clinical findings, normal and abnormal anatomy, differential diagnosis, and associated findings for each case presented.
      3. Present orally and in writing assigned case studies.
      4. Develop cognitive writing skills necessary to prepare case reports, articles, and abstracts relating to sonography.
      5. Determine if an exam is of high quality and how to improve the quality if not.
  
  •  

    DMS 117W - Clinical Education I

    Credits: 5
    Provides structured clinical experience necessary to perform sonographic procedures of the abdomen, pelvis, fetus, and small parts.

    Prerequisite(s): DMS 101W , DMS 103 , DMS 104 , and DMS 106W  each with a minimum grade of “B” (3.0) and LW 206A  with a minimum grade of “C” (2.0)
    Corequisite(s): DMS 112 , DMS 113 , DMS 114 , DMS 115 , and DMS 116W  
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 440
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate understanding of the clinical facility and department policies and procedures.
      1. Attend hospital orientation or go through orientation with designated instructor.
      2. Identify the location of all crash carts, fire alarms and extinguishers.
      3. Learn the emergency number to dial for a code or other emergencies.
      4. Become knowledgeable in basic department mechanics.
    2. Demonstrate professional behavior in the workplace.
      1. Adhere to the department dress code.
      2. Demonstrate punctuality.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to communicate with patients and staff.
      4. Appreciate the worth and dignity of every patient.
      5. Demonstrate appropriate interaction techniques for various types of patients.
      6. Show concern for the patient’s modesty at all times.
      7. Maintain patient confidentiality at all times.
      8. Demonstrate the appropriate procedure for patient transfer.
    3. Demonstrate abilities needed to perform an ultrasound exam.
      1. Describe and demonstrate methods that obtain patient history.
      2. Select appropriate transducer(s) and machine settings for a specific exam.
      3. Understand and demonstrate the process for film acquisition.
      4. Show the ability to properly fill out an exam worksheet.
      5. Demonstrate a knowledge of all machine controls and functions.
      6. Begin to show competence in the following areas:
        1. Scan plane recognition
        2. Identification of normal Anatomy of the abdomen, pelvis, and fetus
        3. Image acquisition of normal anatomy of the abdomen, pelvis,, and 1st trimester pregnancy
      7. Begin to show skills in the following areas:
        1. Identification of pathology in the abdomen, pelvis, and fetus
        2. Image acquisition of pathology in the abdomen, pelvis, and fetus
        3. Identification and image acquisition of normal and abnormal small parts anatomy.
        4. Identification of pathology and image acquisition of 1st, 2nd, and 3rd trimester pregnancies
        5. Basic doppler skills of the abdomen and extremity vasculature
        6. Invasive procedures and sterile technique
        7. Intraoperative procedures
  
  •  

    DMS 201 - Introduction to Neurologic and Vascular Sonography

    Credits: 3
    Provides an overview of sonographic imaging of the neonatal and infant brain. Includes normal and abnormal anatomy and sonographic patterns. Looks at basic vascular ultrasound with emphasis on normal anatomy, imaging techniques, and basic pathology.

    Prerequisite(s): DMS 112 , DMS 113 , DMS 114 , DMS 115 , DMS 116W , and DMS 117W  each with a “B” (3.0) minimum grade.
    Corequisite(s): DMS 202 , DMS 206W , DMS 207 , LWA 206B , and LWA 206C  
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand normal and abnormal sonographic findings of the neonatal and infant brain.
      1. Describe sonographic techniques in neurological imaging.
      2. Differentiate between coronal and sagittal brain scans.
      3. Recognize the normal developmental anatomy with sonographic findings.
      4. List the various disorders of neural tube closure along with their associated findings.
      5. Differentiate between alobar, semilobar, and lobar holoprosencephaly.
      6. Define Schizencephaly.
      7. Describe three destructive lesions of the neonatal brain.
      8. Discuss the sonographic findings and etiologies of hydrocephalus.
      9. Describe the four grades of hemorrhage.
      10. Define periventricular leukomalacia.
      11. Discuss the sonographic findings of infection.
    2. Demonstrate understanding of abdominal and vascular Doppler imaging.
      1. List the reasons to obtain a doppler scan of the abdomen.
      2. Describe the protocol in evaluating the following:
        1. Renal Transplants
        2. Cirrhotic Liver Disease
        3. Assessment of High-Risk Pregnancy
        4. Liver Transplants
      3. Identify the formula for resistive index.
      4. Describe the basic Doppler waveform of the following vessels:
        1. Aorta
        2. IVC
        3. Renal Arteries
        4. Hepatic Arteries
        5. Portal Veins
        6. Celiac Axis
        7. SMA
      5. Describe the techniques used to obtain Doppler images of the abdomen.
      6. Correlate Doppler findings with vascular tumors.
      7. Discuss the protocol of a carotid artery Doppler exam.
      8. Recognize normal and abnormal parameters of a carotid artery doppler exam.
      9. Discuss the protocol of a lower extremity venous duplex exam.
      10. Identify the following lower extremity vessels:
        1. Common Femoral Vein
        2. Superficial Femoral Vein
        3. Deep Femoral Vein
        4. Saphenous Vein
        5. Popliteal Vein
        6. Femoral Artery
      11. Define Baker’s cyst.
      12. Define spectral broadening.
      13. Discuss techniques to adjust the doppler image.
      14. Describe “reverse flow.”
      15. Define aliasing.
    3. Discuss advances in the field of sonography.
      1. Discuss the need for contrast agents in ultrasound.
      2. Describe the type of contrast agents used in sonography.
      3. Discuss the impact of contrast enhancement.
      4. List artifacts found in conrast studies and techniques to avoid them.
      5. Describe new developments in contrast imaging.
    4. Demonstrate understanding of fundamental elements for establishing and operating an ultrasound department.
      1. List the main criteria for a quality assurance and improvement program.
      2. Discuss how a quality assurance program would be established and operated.
      3. Discuss record maintenance of an imaging department.
      4. Discuss fiscal management of an imaging department.
      5. Outline specifications for a hypothetical ultrasound lab.
      6. Explain criteria used in determining what types of ultrasound equipment should be purchased for specific needs.
      7. Describe methods for establishing and maintaining a teaching file system for the purpose of continuing education and improvement in accuracy of diagnosis.
      8. Discuss personnel management in an imaging department.
      9. Outline basic trends in health care systems.
  
  •  

    DMS 202 - Ultrasound Seminar I

    Credits: 4
    Presents basic techniques and protocols for invasive and intraoperative sonography. Looks at advanced sonographic imaging procedures, new advances in the field of sonography, and the fundamental elements for maintaining an ultrasound department.

    Prerequisite(s): DMS 112 , DMS 113 , DMS 114 , DMS 115 , DMS 116W , and DMS 117W  each with a “B” (3.0) minimum grade
    Corequisite(s): DMS 201 , DMS 206W , DMS 207 , LWA 206B , and LWA 206C  
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate skills in research analysis and presentation.
      1. Explain how to find literature and books on particular medical subjects.
      2. Extrapolate information in a particular ultrasound subject and organize it into informative oral and/or written presentations.
      3. Develop cognitive writing skills needed to prepare case reports, technical articles and abstracts relating to sonography.
    2. Recognize abnormal sonographic anatomy of the fetal skeletal system.
      1. Discuss development of the fetal skeleton.
      2. Know how to obtain fetal skeletal parameters.
      3. Describe the approach to the sonographic evaluation of a fetus with skeletal dysplasia.
      4. Recognize the sonographic findings with the various lethal and non-lethal skeletal defects.
      5. Differentiate between the various limb reduction defects and associated conditions.
      6. Discuss sonographic findings of hand and foot deformities.
      7. List skeletal findings associated with aneuploidy.
    3. Recognize normal and abnormal sonographic anatomy of the fetal heart.
      1. Describe scanning techniques to obtain images of fetal heart anatomy.
      2. List the views and anatomy included in an evaluation of the fetal heart.
      3. Recognize structural anomalies of the fetal heart.
      4. Describe the findings with cardiomyopathy.
      5. Describe the normal orientation of the heart within the fetal chest.
      6. Correlate pathology of the fetal heart with chromosomal anomalies.
      7. Discuss sonographic evaluation of fetal heart arrhythmias.
    4. Demonstrate understanding of the numerous chromosomal abnormalities along with their sonographic findings.
      1. Identify chromosomal abnormalities along with their associated anomalies.
      2. Explain the association of the single umbilical cord with fetal chromosomal abnormalities.
      3. Explain the association of IUGR with fetal chromosomal abnormalities.
      4. Describe the approach to sonographic assessment of patients with chromosomal abnormalities.
    5. Demonstrate understanding of normal sonographic anatomy in musculoskeletal imaging.
      1. Identify normal anatomy of the rotator cuff.
      2. Discuss the scanning technique for the rotator cuff.
      3. Recognize preoperative abnormalities of the rotator cuff.
      4. Recognize postoperative appearances of the rotator cuff.
      5. Discuss pitfalls in rotator cuff scanning.
      6. Identify basic muscleskeletal anatomy of the following:
        1. Shoulder
        2. Elbow
        3. Hand and wrist
        4. Knee
        5. Foot and ankle
      7. Discuss the sonographic appearance of complete and incomplete tears.
      8. Discuss the sonographic appearance of muscleskeletal inflammation.
      9. Discuss other imaging modalities for muscleskeletal imaging.
      10. Explain the imaging technique for scanning the pediatric hip.
    6. Recognize normal and abnormal anatomy of the spinal cord.
      1. Describe a tethered spinal cord.
      2. List malformations of the spinal cord and recognize their sonographic appearance.
    7. Discuss the role of sonography in evaluating and treating infertility.
      1. Discuss epidemiology of infertility.
      2. Describe the normal reproductive process.
      3. Discuss ultrasound diagnosis of conditions leading to infertility.
      4. Describe the use of ultrasound in follicular tracking.
      5. Discuss techniques for induction of ovulation.
      6. Understand the role of ultrasound in assisted reproductive technologies.
      7. Recognize complications of ovarian hyperstimulation.
      8. Define GIFT and ZIFT.
    8. Practice skills in image interpretation and case analysis.
      1. Use appropriate sonographic terms to describe pathology.
      2. Demonstrate the proper method for documenting pathological findings.
      3. Analyze a sonographic case to determine pathology differentials.
      4. Identify key pathology differentials based on patient clinical data and sonographic findings.
  
  •  

    DMS 206W - Clinical Seminar II

    Credits: 0.5
    Provides a clinical overview of sonographic procedures of the abdomen, pelvis, fetus, and superficial parts. Emphasizes identification of pathology, recognition of disease processes, sonographic differentials, and clinical correlation.

    Prerequisite(s): DMS 112 , DMS 113 , DMS 114 , DMS 115 , DMS 116W , and DMS 117W  each with a “B” (3.0) minimum grade.
    Corequisite(s): DMS 201 , DMS 202 , DMS 207 , LWA 206B , and LWA 206C .
    Lecture Hours: 7.5 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate perceptive skills in recognizing normal and abnormal sonographic patterns and discuss methods to produce high quality diagnostic sonograms.
      1. Show proficiency in recognizing normal vs. abnormal sonographic patterns in all areas of general sonography including basic vascular, muscleskeletal, and neuro sonography.
      2. Determine the differential diagnosis when analyzing hard copy film.
      3. Determine if an exam is of high quality and how to improve the quality if not.
      4. Demonstrate cognitive writing skills necessary to prepare case reports, articles, and abstracts relating to sonography.
      5. Present orally and in writing assigned case studies from all areas of general sonography.
      6. Discuss patient history, clinical findings, normal and abnormal anatomy, differential diagnosis, and associated findings for each case presented.
      7. Discuss proper scanning techniques.
  
  •  

    DMS 207 - Clinical Education II

    Credits: 5
    Provides structured clinical experience necessary to perform sonographic procedures of the abdomen, pelvis, fetus, small parts, and vascular system.

    Prerequisite(s): DMS 112 , DMS 113 , DMS 114 , DMS 115 , DMS 116W , and DMS 117W  each with a “B” (3.0) minimum grade.
    Corequisite(s): DMS 201 , DMS 202 , DMS 206W , LWA 206B , and LWA 206C .
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 440
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Become familiar with the clinical facility and department policies and procedures.
      1. Attend hospital orientation or go through orientation with designated instructor.
      2. Identify the location of all crash carts, fire alarms and extinguishers.
      3. Learn the emergency number to dial for a code or other emergencies.
      4. Become knowledgeable in basic department mechanics.
    2. Display professionalism in manners, communication, and dress.
      1. Adhere to the department dress code.
      2. Demonstrate punctuality.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to communicate with patients and staff.
      4. Appreciate the worth and dignity of every patient.
      5. Demonstrate appropriate interaction techniques for various types of patients.
      6. Show concern for the patient’s modesty at all times.
      7. Maintain patient confidentiality at all times.
      8. Demonstrate the appropriate procedure for patient transfer.
    3. Demonstrate abilities needed to perform an ultrasound exam.
      1. Describe and demonstrate methods that obtain patient history.
      2. Select appropriate transducer(s) and machine settings for a specific exam.
      3. Understand and demonstrate the process for film acquisition.
      4. Show the ability to properly fill out an exam worksheet.
      5. Demonstrate a knowledge of all machine controls and functions.
      6. Enhance all previously learned skills in the following areas:
        1. Scan plane recognition
        2. Identification of normal Anatomy of the abdomen, pelvis, and fetus
        3. Image acquisition of normal anatomy of the abdomen, pelvis,, and 1st trimester pregnancy
      7. Show competency in the following areas:
        1. Identification of pathology in the abdomen and pelvis
        2. Image acquisition of pathology in the abdomen and pelvis
        3. Identification and image acquisition of normal and abnormal small parts anatomy.
      8. Begin to show competency in
        1. Identification of pathology and image acquisition of 1st, 2nd, and 3rd trimester pregnancies
      9. Begin to show skills in the following areas:
        1. Basic doppler skills of the abdomen and extremity vasculature
        2. Invasive procedures and sterile technique
        3. Intraoperative procedures
  
  •  

    DMS 212 - Ultrasound Seminar II

    Credits: 4


    Discusses all aspects of sonographic imaging including scanning techniques and protocols, normal and abnormal sonographic patterns, pathologic and disease processes, and differential diagnosis. Includes preparation for the ARDMS certifying examinations.

    Prerequisite(s): DMS 201 , DMS 202 , DMS 206W , and DMS 207  each with a “B” (3.0) minimum grade and LWA 206B  and LWA 206C  each with a “C” (2.0) minimum grade.
    Corequisite(s): DMS 217  
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Demonstrate complete understanding of ultrasound physics and instrumentation in preparation for the certifying examination required
           to 
    work in diagnostic sonography.

         A.          Define specific terms and ultrasonic units of measurement related to ultrasound physics and instrumentation.

         B.          Describe the main theories of ultrasonic physics including wave propagation, tissue and ultrasound interaction, piezo and reverse
                       piezoelectric effect.

         C.          List the main components of an ultrasound transducer.

         D.          Discuss operating frequency, bandwidth, transducer Q and curie point.

         E.          Describe the different fields within the sound beam, along with the factors that control them, and the effect of varying these factors.

         F.           Describe axial and lateral resolution, the factors that control them and the effect of varying these factors.

         G.          List the basic components of pulse echo, B-scan and Real time ultrasound system along with the factors that control them.

         H.          Define gain and time compensated gain and their use to obtain high quality sonographic image.

         I.            Identify the standard ultrasound test objects and the parameters they evaluate.

         J.           Discuss possible biological effects produced by ultrasonic propagation through human  tissues.

    2.    Demonstrate a complete understanding of abdominal/pelvic sonography in

        A.          Recognize normal and abnormal anatomy of the liver, gallbladder, pancreas, spleen, adrenal glands, kidneys, great vessels,
                      retroperitoneum, and the general abdominal cavity.

         B.          Discuss major disease processes of the above mentioned anatomy.

         C.          Describe routine scanning protocols for the major organs and related normal measurements.

         D.          Discuss clinical laboratory tests for abdominal organs and correlate their values with

                       sonographic findings and disease processes.

         E.          List differential diagnosis’ for a given sonographic pattern in abdominal/pelvis sonography.

    3.    Demonstratea complete understanding of obstetrical and gynecologic sonography in preparation for the certifying examination
           required to work in
    diagnostic sonography.

         Objective

         A.          Recognize normal and abnormal anatomy of the female pelvis and gravid uterus.

         B.          Recognize abnormal sonographic patterns related to major disease processes of the female

                      pelvis and gravid uterus.

         C.          Describe scanning techniques and protocols, along with related measurements, for

                       obstetrical and gynecologic sonography.

         D.          Discuss clinical laboratory tests for the female reproductive system and developing fetus and correlate their values with sonographic
                       findings and disease processes.

         E.           List differential diagnoses for given sonographic patterns in obstetrical and gynecologic sonography.

    4.    Demonstrate a complete understanding of small parts sonography in preparation for the certifying examination required to work in
           diagnostic 
    sonography.

         A.          Recognize normal and abnormal anatomy of the thyroid, neck, breast, scrotum and prostate.

         B.          Discuss major disease processes of the above-mentioned anatomy.

         C.          Describe routine scanning protocols for small parts imaging and related normal measurements.

         D.          Discuss clinical laboratory tests for small parts anatomy and correlate their values with sonographic findings and disease processes.

         E.          List differential diagnoses for a given sonographic pattern in small parts imaging.

    5.    Demonstrate skills in research analysis and presentation.

         A.          Demonstrate competency in extrapolating information on a particular ultrasound subject and organizing it into informative oral and/or
                      written presentations.

         B.          Demonstrate writing skills needed to prepare case reports, technical articles and abstracts relating to sonography.

         C.          Demonstrate basic communication and speech presentation skills.

     6.    Demonstrate skills in image interpretation and case analysis.

         A.          Use appropriate sonographic terms to describe pathology.

         B.          Demonstrate the proper method for documenting pathological findings.

         C.          Analyze a sonographic case to determine pathology differentials.

         D.          Identify key pathology differentials based on patient clinical data and sonographic findings.

  
  •  

    DMS 217 - Clinical Education III

    Credits: 5
    Provides structured clinical experience necessary to perform sonographic procedures of the abdomen, pelvis, fetus, small parts, and vascular system.

    Prerequisite(s): DMS 201 , DMS 202 , DMS 206W , and DMS 207  each with a “B” (3.0) minimum grade, and LWA 206B  and LWA 206C  each with a “C” (2.0) minimum grade.
    Corequisite(s): DMS 212  
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 440
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate understanding of the clinical facility and department policies and procedures.
      1. Attend hospital orientation or go through orientation with designated instructor.
      2. Identify the location of all crash carts, fire alarms and extinguishers.
      3. Learn the emergency number to dial for a code or other emergencies.
      4. Become knowledgeable in basic department mechanics.
    2. Demonstrate professional behavior in the workplace.
      1. Adhere to the department dress code.
      2. Demonstrate punctuality.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to communicate with patients and staff.
      4. Appreciate the worth and dignity of every patient.
      5. Demonstrate appropriate interaction techniques for various types of patients.
      6. Show concern for the patient’s modesty at all times.
      7. Maintain patient confidentiality at all times.
      8. Demonstrate the appropriate procedure for patient transfer.
    3. Demonstrate abilities needed to perform an ultrasound exam.
      1. Describe and demonstrate methods that obtain patient history.
      2. Select appropriate transducer(s) and machine settings for a specific exam.
      3. Understand and demonstrate the process for film acquisition.
      4. Show the ability to properly fill out an exam worksheet.
      5. Demonstrate a knowledge of all machine controls and functions.
      6. Enhance all previously learned skills in the following areas:
        1. Scan plane recognition
        2. Identification of normal anatomy of the abdomen, pelvis, and fetus
        3. Image acquisition of normal anatomy of the abdomen, pelvis, and 1st trimester pregnancy
      7. Show advanced competency skills in the following areas:
        1. Identification of pathology in the abdomen, pelvis, and fetus
        2. Image acquisition of pathology in the abdomen, pelvis, and fetus
        3. Identification and image acquisition of normal and abnormal small parts anatomy.
        4. Identification of pathology and image acquisition of 1st, 2nd, and 3rd trimester pregnancies
        5. Basic doppler skills of the abdomen and extremity vasculature
        6. Invasive procedures and sterile technique
        7. Intraoperative procedures
      8. Pass two program competencies demonstrating the ability to perform a pelvic and obstetrical sonogram.
  
  •  

    DMS 290-299 - Special Projects in Diagnostic Medical Sonography


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Drafting

  
  •  

    DRF 104 - Basic Mechanical Design

    Credits: 4


    Developed for students with no drafting experience, less than one year of high school mechanical drafting, or for students with less than a C (2.0) grade in mechanical drafting. Provides instruction and practice to develop skill in spatial visualization, sketching, multiview instrument drawing, section views, design concept presentation, pictorial drawing, and American National Standards Institute (ANSI) conventional drafting and dimensioning standards. Credit may be earned in DRF 104 or DRF 105  but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 105
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Clearly communicate graphically with sketches and drawings using traditional drafting tools.

         A.          Identify and demonstrate correct use of traditional sketching and drawing tools.

         B.          Use square and isometric grid paper to make one view, multiview, and pictorial sketches.

         C.          Identify and correctly draw conventional line symbols to make sketches and drawings.

         D.          Neatly place hand-made standard letters and numbers on sketches and drawings.

         E.          Make free- hand well proportioned sketches of simple machine part shapes to include circle, arc, and polygon plane figures, and
                       polyhedral solids.

    2.    Create, record, and communicate design ideas using American National Standards Institute (ANSI) practices.

         A.          Demonstrate correctly visualized real and imagined objects by making standard drawings and sketches.

         B.          Read, write, and correctly use the nomenclature of technical design graphics.

         C.          Correctly demonstrate orthographic projection theory and conventional ANSI practices by reading and making orthographic multiview,
                       isometric and oblique pictorial, and sectional view representations typical of engineered objects.

         D.          Execute course work accurately, legibly, neatly, and in a timely manner.

     

     3.    Delineate graphic representations of points, lines, and plane and solid shapes using the principles of graphic geometry.

         A.          Use prescribed geometric methods to:

                      1.    Bisect lines, arcs, and angles,

                      2.    Divide lines, areas, and volumes into equal and proportional parts,

                      3.    Copy, enlarge, or reduce the size of geometric figures in any prescribed orientation,

                      4.    Construct points, lines, polygons, planes, and curves, and

                      5.    Construct lines, arcs, and circles with specified tangent conditions.

         B.          Use traditional drafting tools and standard methods to make accurate drawings to dimensional specifications.  Examples include tools, jigs,
                       fixtures, injection molds, etc.

     4.    Read and describe with standard dimensioning practices the size of objects by using various fractional and decimal inch, and metric scales to place and specify conventional numeric dimensions and notes.

         A.          Correctly demonstrate the ANSI concepts of contour dimensioning and geometric

         B.          breakdown for giving size and location of various geometric shapes.

         C.          Identify the features and parts of dimension information.

         D.          Distinguish between size and location dimensions.

         E.          Create and read technical drawings at any specified scale.

         F.           Use ANSI standard practices to place text information to drawings.

    5.    Follow ANSI conventional practices and use traditional drafting tools to make multiview technical drawings.    

         A.          Interpret, read, and draw any or all of the six standard orthographic views using conventional practices.

         B.          Correctly transfer height, width, and depth distances between views.

         C.          Display correct conventional representations of standard geometric features.

         D.          Identify and correctly display hidden, center, and visible lines in all views.

         E.          Draw and identify normal, inclined, and oblique lines and surfaces in all views.

         F.           Correctly draw positive and negative cylinders and cylinder deformations in all views.

         G.          Plan drawing views to fit properly within the sheet area at the intended scale.

    6.    Follow ANSI practices for manual drawing to make technical drawings with conventional sectional views.

         A.          Demonstrate understanding of cutting-plane theory by correctly placing the cutting-plane line within technical

         B.          drawings.

         C.          List the names and identify the seven standard types of section views.

         D.          Demonstrate understanding of standard practices for conventional features.

         E.          Consistently draw correctly sectioned views when provided two orthographic views.

         F.          Demonstrate correct hidden line practices for sectioned views.

         G.         Correctly represent and place conventional break symbols, section-lining, and view identification where necessary.

     7.    Make pictorial representations of objects using axonometric and oblique drawing methods.

         A.          Recognize the difference between orthographic projection, isometric drawing, perspective drawing, and oblique drawing.

         B.          Make sketches on grid paper of objects with normal, inclined, oblique, cylindrical, and

                      deformations of cylinders when provided two orthographic views.

         C.         Consistently measure only along the isometric or oblique axes.

         D.         List the advantages and limitations of orthographic multiview, isometric, and oblique representations of objects.

         E.         Make isometric and oblique drawings with normal, inclined, oblique, cylindrical, deformations of cylinders, and irregular curves when
                     provided two orthographic views.

  
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    DRF 105 - Beginning Mechanical Design

    Credits: 3
    Provides instruction and practice to develop skill in spatial visualization, sketching, multiview instrument drawing, section views, design concept presentation, pictorial drawing, and American National Standards Institute (ANSI) conventional drafting and dimensioning standards. Credit may be earned in DRF 104  or DRF 105 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 75
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use standard drafting instruments and pencils to letter and construct standard geometrical figures.
      1. Construct and apply standard mechanical lettering.
      2. Construct and apply standard mechanical linetypes to the construction of geometrical figures
    2. Use standard drafting instruments and pencils to letter and construct single views of mechanical components.
      1. Construct and apply standard mechanical lettering to mechanical components.
      2. Construct and apply standard mechanical linetypes to the construction drawings of single mechanical components.
    3. Use standard drafting instruments and pencils to letter and construct multi-views of single mechanical components.
      1. Construct and apply standard mechanical lettering to mechanical components.
      2. Construct and apply standard mechanical linetypes to multi-view drawings of single mechanical components.
      3. Apply the principles of orthographic projection to construct a multi-drawing of single mechanical components, such as tooling, jigs, fixturing, injection molds, etc.
    4. Visualize mechanical components three dimensions.
      1. Construct isometric views of single mechanical components using standard mechanical linetypes.
      2. Construct cabinet views of single mechanical components using standard mechanical linetypes.
      3. Construct cavalier views of single mechanical components using standard mechanical linetypes.
    5. Construct sections of single mechanical components.
      1. Construct a full section view of a mechanical component using standard mechanical linetypes and section representation.
      2. Construct a half section view of a mechanical component using standard mechanical linetypes and section representation.
      3. Construct a revolved section view of a mechanical component using standard mechanical linetypes and section representation.
      4. Construct a broken out section view of a mechanical component using standard mechanical linetypes and section representation.
      5. Construct a removed section view of a mechanical component using standard mechanical linetypes and section representation.
  
  •  

    DRF 107 - Intermediate Mechanical Design

    Credits: 3
    Applies computer-aided and manual methods to the mechanical design process using single and multi-view dimensioning, tolerancing, limit dimensions, thread representation and symbols, orthographic projection, auxiliary views, revolution views, design specifications, working drawings, and vectors for analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): DRF 121  or SKDR 101 ; and CAD 114 .
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Draw, dimension, and annotate a single view, or a multi-view mechanical design drawing of a single part according to current ANSI standards.
      1. Review and draw geometric figures.
      2. Draw and dimension
      3. Demonstrate standard Metric and US Customary ANSI tolerancing to features on engineering design drawings of mechanical components.
      4. Draw fastener thread symbols and notes and apply them to engineering design drawings of single mechanical components.
      5. Draw graphical analytical solutions to elementary engineering mechanics vector problems.
    2. Draw, dimension, and annotate a single view, or multi-view mechanical design working drawings of an assembly of parts according to current ANSI standards.
      1. Draw engineering design working drawings consisting of an assembly of mechanical components and details of the components according to standard engineering practice.
      2. Demonstrate standard Metric and US Customary ANSI tolerancing to features on engineering design drawings of mechanical components.
      3. Draw and dimension
      4. orthographic single view engineering design drawings of a mechanical component according to current Metric and US Customary ANSI drawing and dimensioning standards. Projects include tooling, jigs, fixturing, injection molds, etc.
      5. Draw fastener thread symbols and notes and apply them to engineering design working drawings of an assembly of mechanical components.
    3. Construct primary auxiliary views of single mechanical components.
      1. The student will draw auxiliary views of mechanical components on engineering design drawings through orthographic projection.
      2. The student will draw auxiliary views of mechanical components on engineering design drawings through revolution.
  
  •  

    DRF 121 - Blueprint Reading

    Credits: 3


    Introduces blueprint symbols and their meaning as used in a manufacturing operation. Provides instruction and practice to develop skill in spatial visualization, sketching, orthographic projection, including auxiliary and sectional views, detail and assembly drawings, dimensioning and tolerances, title blocks, material lists, and notes for use by various manufacturing personnel and American National Standards Institute (ANSI) conventional drafting and dimensional standards. Credit may be earned in DRF 121 or SKDR 101  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Clearly communicate graphically with sketches and drawings using traditional drafting tools.

         A.          Identify and demonstrate correct use of traditional sketching and drawing tools.

         B.          Use square and isometric grid paper to make one view, multiview, and pictorial sketches.

         C.          Identify and correctly draw conventional line symbols to make sketches and drawings.

         D.          Neatly place hand-made standard letters and numbers on sketches and drawings.

         E.          Make free-hand well proportioned sketches of simple machine part shapes to include circle, arc, and polygon plane figures, and polyhedral
                       solids.

    2.    Create, record, and communicate design ideas using American National Standards Institute (ANSI) practices.

         A.          Demonstrate correctly visualized real and imagined objects by making standard drawings and sketches.

         B.          Read, write, and correctly use the nomenclature of technical design graphics.

         C.          Correctly demonstrate orthographic projection theory and conventional ANSI practices by reading and making orthographic multiview,
                       isometric and oblique pictorial, and sectional view representations typical of engineered objects.

         D.         Execute course work accurately, legibly, neatly, and in a timely manner.

    3.    Delineate graphic representations of points, lines, and plane and solid

         A.          Use prescribed geometric methods to:

                      1.    Bisect lines, arcs, and angles.

                      2.    Divide lines, areas, and volumes into equal and proportional parts.

                      3.    Copy, enlarge, or reduce the size of geometric figures in any prescribed orientation.

                      4.    Construct points, lines, polygons, planes, and curves.

                      5.    Construct lines, arcs, and circles with specified tangent conditions.

         B.          Use traditional drafting tools and standard methods to make accurate drawings to dimensional specifications.

    4.    Read and describe with standard dimensioning practices the size of objects by using various fractional and decimal inch, and metric
           scales to place and 
    specify conventional numeric dimensions and notes.

         A.          Correctly demonstrate the ANSI concepts of contour dimensioning and geometric breakdown for giving size and location of various
                       geometric shapes.

         B.          Identify the features and parts of dimension information.

         C.          Distinguish between size and location dimensions.

         D.          Create and read technical drawings at any specified scale.

         E.          Use ANSI standard practices to place text information to drawings.

     5.    Follow ANSI conventional practices and use traditional drafting tools to make multiview technical drawings.

         A.          Interpret, read, and draw any or all of the six standard orthographic views using conventional practices.

         B.          Correctly transfer height, width, and depth distances between views.

         C.          Display correct conventional representations of standard geometric features.

         D.          Identify and correctly display hidden, center, and visible lines in all views.

         E.          Draw and identify normal, inclined, and oblique lines and surfaces in all views.

         F.           Correctly draw positive and negative cylinders and cylinder deformations in all views.

         G.          Plan drawing views to fit properly within the sheet area at the intended scale.

     6.    Follow ANSI practices for manual drawing to make technical drawings with conventional sectional views.

         A.          Demonstrate understanding of cutting-plane theory by correctly placing the cutting-plane line within technical drawings.

         B.          List the names and identify the seven standard types of section views.

         C.          Demonstrate understanding of standard practices for conventional features.

         D.          Consistently draw correctly sectioned views when provided two orthographic views.

         E.          Demonstrate correct hidden line practices for sectioned views.

         F.           Correctly represent and place conventional break symbols, section-lining, and view identification where necessary.

     7.    Make pictorial representations of objects using axonometric and oblique drawing methods.

         A.          Recognize the difference between orthographic projection, isometric drawing, perspective drawing, and oblique drawing.

         B.          Make sketches on grid paper of objects with normal, inclined, oblique, cylindrical, and deformations of cylinders when provided two
                       orthographic views.

         C.          Consistently measure only along the isometric or oblique axes.

         D.          List the advantages and limitations of orthographic multiview, isometric, and oblique representations of objects.

         E.          Make isometric and oblique drawings with normal, inclined, oblique, cylindrical, deformations of cylinders, and irregular curves when
                       provided two orthographic views.

  
  •  

    DRF 122 - Blueprint Reading for Welders and Fabricators

    Credits: 2
    Applies principles specifically designed for welders and fabricators working with welding drawings. Interprets basic blueprint information, orthographic projection, assembly drawings, and geometric tolerancing. Places emphasis on welding symbols and welding drawings. Credit may be earned in DRF 122 or WELD 122  but not both. (30-0)

    Prerequisite(s): DRF 121  or SKDR 101  or WELD 120  or basic knowledge of blueprint reading
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify and apply general blueprint information.
      1. Reads and interprets textural information on engineering design drawings of single components.
      2. Reads and interprets textural information on engineering design drawings of an assembly of components.
    2. Read orthographic engineering drawings.
      1. Applies the principles of orthographic projection to interpret a multi-view drawing of single components.
      2. Applies the principles of orthographic projection to interpret a multi-view drawing of an assembly of components.
      3. Interprets the usage of line types used in the design of components and assemblies.
    3. Read fillet weld symbols.
      1. Identifies fillet weld symbols.
      2. Interprets the meaning of fillet weld symbols
      3. Constructs and apply fillet weld symbols.
    4. Read groove and plug weld symbols.
      1. Identifies groove and plug weld symbols.
      2. Interprets the meaning of groove and plug weld symbols
      3. Constructs and applies groove and plug weld symbols.
    5. Read spot and seam weld symbols.
      1. Identifies spot and seam weld symbols.
      2. Interprets the meaning of spot and seam weld symbols
      3. Constructs and applies spot and seam weld symbols.
    6. Read welding assembly drawings.
      1. Applies the principles of welding assembly to interpret a multi-view drawing of an assembly of components.
      2. Interprets the usage of line types used in the design of components and assemblies.
    7. Read geometric tolerancing symbols.
      1. Identifies geometric tolerancing symbols.
      2. Interprets the meaning of geometric tolerancing symbols.
  
  •  

    DRF 124 - Blueprint Reading for Machine Tool Operators

    Credits: 2
    Instructs machinists, lathe operators, mill operators, and grinder operators in more in-depth treatment of working drawings, supplementary views and information, materials and processes commonly found in machining drawings.

    Prerequisite(s): DRF 120
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Interpret dimensional tolerances.
      1. Explains the purpose of tolerance dimension
      2. Describes the techniques of displaying tolerance dimension
      3. Recognizes standard tolerance blocks
    2. Interpret common surface finish notations.
      1. Interprets the following surface finish conditions: waviness, roughness height, lay, and roughness width cutoff
    3. Recognize standard blueprint machining terms.
      1. Correctly interprets the following terms: fillet, runout, reaming, counterbore, countersink, spotface, chanfer
    4. Interpret gear drawings.
      1. Explains the basic gear theory
      2. Explains the meaning of the common gear terms used on industrial prints
      3. Describes how to calculate additional gear data from handbook tables
    5. Interpret the properties of ferrous, non-ferrous and plastics.
      1. Names the basic types of materials used in industry
      2. Describes the difference between iron and steels
      3. Lists the different types of steels
      4. Explains the importance of carbon content in steels
      5. Explains the steel classification numbering system
      6. Lists the common types of non-ferrous metals
      7. Lists the common types of plastics
    6. Correctly interpret the symbols of geometric dimensioning.
      1. Explains why geometric dimensioning is needed
      2. Defines the common geometric dimensioning terms
      3. Lists the basic rules of geometric dimensioning
      4. Describes how feature control frames (symbols) are displayed on industrial prints
    7. Interpret the basics of numerical control and interpret NC blueprints.
      1. Describes the ordinate and tabular dimensioning systems
      2. Discusses the difference between fixed zero and floating zero numerical control systems
      3. Describes the relationship between numerical control (NC) and computer numerical control (CNC)
    8. Demonstrate competency in the basics of computer-aided drafting.
      1. Explains the advantages of using CAD in the drafting field
      2. Discusses the functions of CAD hardware
      3. Distinguishes the difference between a hand-drawn print and a CAD-developed print
    9. The student will interpret metric dimensioned, and dual-dimensioned blueprints.
      1. Evaluates the linear measuring system
      2. Discusses reasons for using the metric measuring system
      3. Describes the dual dimensioning system used on industrial prints
      4. Explains product liability notations that may appear on prints
  
  •  

    DRF 128 - Geometric Tolerancing

    Credits: 2
    Emphasizes geometric symbols used in place of written notes on industrial drawings including datum, symbols, and other items tolerancing to the geometry of the part. Credit may be earned in either DRF 128 or SKDR 128  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): DRF 121  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Translate geometric dimensions, tolerances and symbols into plainEnglish and vise versa.
      1. Describe the current GD&T symbols.
      2. Define the datum reference.
      3. Explain where to place symbols on a print.
      4. Translate drawing notes into GD&T symbols.
      5. Translate standard drawing dimensions and tolerances into GD&T symbols and tolerances.
      6. Translate GD&T symbols into drawing notes.
      7. Translate GD&T symbols and tolerances into standard drawing dimensions and tolerances.
      8. Discuss the advantage of GD&T symbols over notes.
  
  •  

    DRF 257 - Advanced Mechanical Design

    Credits: 4
    Focuses on individual and/or team assignments working from complex design layouts to presentation of complete sets of working drawings, including product design, piping design, welding design, and plant layout. Emphasizes the CAD/CAE system, the design process, engineering references, and use of supplier catalogs.

    Prerequisite(s): DRF 107 , DRF 128 , MS 113 , or permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Apply knowledge and skills from previous technical classes to provide solutions to complex mechanical designs.
      1. Participate in the design process to organize, communicate, and draw sets of working drawings as an individual or as a member of a design team.
      2. Demonstrate the design process of identify the problem, propose concepts & ideas, develop solutions, and prepare working drawings based on the design process.
      3. Demonstrate work on a variety of projects such as plant layout, piping, machine design, welding fabrication and fixtures.
    2. Present professional quality mechanical designs.
      1. Draw professional level drawings using current catalog components, current drafting standards, and current graphic techniques.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge and skills previously acquired in technical classes.
      3. Demonstrate skills in layout, dimensioning, tolerancing, multi-view & auxiliary projections, sectioning, and other related techniques.
      4. Projects may include tooling, fixturing, injection molds, robotics componentry and end effectors, etc. Projects may include the use of the 3-D printer and coordinate measuring machine.
  
  •  

    DRF 290-299 - Special Projects in Drafting


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Economics

  
  •  

    ECN 221W - Principles of Macroeconomics

    Credits: 4
    Studies the impact of consumer, business and government decisions on the macro economy. Includes: supply and demand analysis, measures of macroeconomic performance, money and banking, and various schools of macroeconomic thought and their policy implications.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 or WRITING LEVEL 2 and one of the following: MATH LEVEL 4, MGT 110 , SKMA 111 .
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify, generate and manipulate basic economic models and their assumptions.
      1. Use the production possibilities frontier to discuss scarcity, opportunity costs, factors of production, limitations on production, gains from trade and limitations of simple economic models.
      2. Use supply and demand to determine market changes in price and quantity.
    2. Identify basic macroeconomic models, their assumptions and their policy implications.
      1. Demonstrate a historical understanding of the roots of competing macroeconomic theories.
      2. Identify, compare and contrast, and discuss the underlying assumptions, strengths, weaknesses and workings of the competing macroeconomic theories.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of the U.S. economy’s place in the global economy.
    3. Demonstrate basic macroeconomic models using graphical methods.
      1. Identify, graph and manipulate macroeconomic states in aggregate demand/aggregate supply and Keynesian models of the economy.
      2. Demonstrate graphically an economy’s moving to full employment using the competing macroeconomic models and the impacts of the labor and funds markets in these transitions.
      3. Demonstrate the impacts of fiscal and monetary policy on the economy through the various macroeconomic models.
    4. Derive basic macroeconomic statistics and discuss their strengths and weaknesses.
      1. Define government measures of economic activity.
      2. List the strengths and weaknesses of government measures of economic activity.
      3. Compute economic growth rates, inflation rates, and unemployment rates and compare them over time.
    5. Identify the special role of the financial sector in economic activity.
      1. Describe the role of financial institutions in the U.S. banking system and their links to monetary policy.
      2. Describe and analyze the role of central banks and the unique nature of the Federal Reserve System in terms of their potential impact on the economy as a whole.
      3. Compare and contrast the strengths and weaknesses of monetary policy and fiscal policy.
    6. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      1. Articulate clearly important ideas.
      2. Select, organize, and present details to support a main idea.
      3. Employ the conventions of written, edited, standard English.
      4. Use appropriate vocabulary for the audience and purpose.
    7. Utilize writing to promote learning in any or all of the above Outcomes and Objectives.
  
  •  

    ECN 222W - Principles of Microeconomics

    Credits: 4
    Studies the behavior of individual decision making units of the economy. Includes foundations of supply and demand, business behavior based on market structure, regulated business, international trade and finance, and selected current topics.

    Prerequisite(s): ECN 221W  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand how elasticity and utility form consumer demand.
      1. Summarize how elasticities affect supply and demand of a good.
      2. Using marginal analysis explain how consumers maximize their budgets.
      3. Apply examples of different elasticity to real world scenarios.
      4. Demonstrate how changes in income and prices affect the consumer’s decision making process.
      5. Calculate elasticities and how the different elasticities impact quantity.
    2. Explain business behaviors through market structure and marginal analysis.
      1. Identify the goal of the traditional firm.
      2. Differentiate between economic costs and profits and accounting costs and profits.
      3. Compute and graph the firm’s cost curves.
      4. Apply marginal analysis to explain how firms can maximize their short run and long run profits.
      5. Identify the assumptions behind the various market structures.
      6. Graphically depict the profit maximizing price and output, while showing firm profits or losses for each market structure.
      7. Compare and contrast different market structures.
      8. Analyze market failure using marginal analysis.
      9. Apply current economic events to market theory.
    3. Explain why economists are generally for free trade.
      1. Demonstrate an awareness of the impact of a global economy on the U.S. economy including employment, job patterns, and industry shifts.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of absolute and comparative advantage and why nations can gain from trade.
      3. Identify and describe the types of protectionist trade restrictions and their rationale.
      4. Describe and graphically illustrate the various forms of protectionism and summarize the arguments for and against them, including how they affect production, consumption and trade.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of exchange rate models.
      1. Discuss the U.S.’s Balance of Payments accounts and role of a nation in the global economy.
      2. Describe and evaluate trade theory, its policy implications, and its impact on the macro/micro economy.
      3. Explain the trends and patterns in international trade.
    5. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      1. Articulate clearly important ideas.
      2. Select, organize, and present details to support a main idea.
      3. Employ the conventions of written, edited, standard English.
      4. Use appropriate vocabulary for the audience and purpose.
    6. Promote learning and demonstrate learning concepts through writing.
      1. Understand and analyze information in written form.
      2. Explain the subject matter in a coherent writing style.
      3. Evaluate the information.
  
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    ECN 290-299 - Special Projects in Economics


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Education

  
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    ED 200AW - Exploratory Teaching (Elementary)

    Credits: 3
    Frequent consultation with an academic advisor regarding credits applicable to the transfer pre-ed program of choice is strongly urged. Provides aspiring elementary teachers with experience, study and discussion to enable them to make informed career decisions. Requires at least 90 hours of field work in an elementary school, plus at least 15 hours of seminar. Credit may be earned in ED 200AW or ED 200BW  but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  and ENG 112  with minimum grade of C+ (2.3); COM 112W  or COM 114W  (in accordance with transfer institution requirements) with a minimum grade of C+ (2.3); PSY 211W  and MTH 115W ; and a minimum of 24 credits with a cumulative 2.5 or higher GPA.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate both in the course and in fieldwork academic ability in reading, writing, speaking, and listening.
      1. Reflect on field experience and readings through regular written and oral response.
      2. Use appropriate written form, grammar, and style.
      3. Use appropriate spoken language.
      4. Listen and learn from others.
      5. Address topics appropriate to a pre-service education course.
      6. Compile a growing document of professional development.
      7. Initiate the reading of selected education texts.
      8. Seek, read, examine, understand, and apply texts appropriate to aspiring teachers.
    2. Demonstrate professionalism in the field.
      1. Punctually adhere to the fieldwork schedule.
      2. Groom and dress appropriately for the field setting.
      3. Complete at least 90 hours of successful fieldwork in an approved K-12 classroom.
      4. Achieve at least a satisfactory evaluation by the mentor.
      5. Communicate effectively with the mentor, school staff, parents, and community.
      6. Develop a respectful working relationship with a mentor, other district professionals, and students.
      7. Show courtesy, sensitivity, confidence, and enthusiasm to mentor, students, parents and faculty.
      8. Support mentor and school staff as directed in curricular and behavior management matters.
      9. Demonstrate interest in extra learning opportunities.
      10. Prepare and complete tasks and projects assigned by the mentor and/or ED 200 instructor promptly and comprehensively.
    3. Demonstrate professionalism in ED 200 seminars.
      1. Observe consistent punctuality and adhere to the ED 200 seminar schedule.
      2. Show leadership in seminar participation.
      3. Respect student confidentiality in speech and writing.
      4. Model intellectual honest and academic integrity.
      5. Show courtesy, respect, and sensitivity to others.
      6. Maintain effective communication with the ED 200 instructor at all times during the semester.
    4. Demonstrate an awareness of and exposure to fundamentals of pedagogy.
      1. Demonstrate beginning knowledge of elements of lesson construction.
      2. Recognize that students differ in learning styles.
      3. Initiate an awareness of special needs students.
      4. Demonstrate a basic understanding of classroom management.
      5. Focus on relevant contemporary educational issues in the community, state, and nation.
      6. Model tolerance in the classroom and promote the importance and value of diversity in the classroom and the world.
    5. Participate in “writing to learn” activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
  
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    ED 200BW - Exploratory Teaching (Secondary)

    Credits: 3
    Provides aspiring secondary teachers with experience, study and discussion to enable them to make informed career decisions. Requires at least 90 hours of field work in a secondary school, plus at least 15 hours of seminar. Credit may be earned in ED 200AW  or ED 200BW but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  and ENG 112  with minimum grade of C+ (2.3); COM 112W  or COM 114W  (in accordance with transfer institution requirements) with a minimum grade of C+ (2.3); PSY 211W ; and a minimum of 24 credits with a cumulative 2.5 or higher GPA; minimum of 2 courses in planned secondary teaching major and/or minor with at least a C+ (2.3) in each.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate both in the course and in fieldwork academic ability in reading, writing, speaking, and listening.
      1. Reflect on field experience and readings through regular written and oral response.
      2. Use appropriate written form, grammar, and style.
      3. Use appropriate spoken language.
      4. Listen and learn from others.
      5. Address topics appropriate to a pre-service education course.
      6. Compile a growing document of professional development.
      7. Initiate the reading of selected education texts.
      8. Seek, read, examine, understand, and apply texts appropriate to aspiring teachers.
    2. Demonstrate professionalism in the field.
      1. Punctually adhere to the fieldwork schedule.
      2. Groom and dress appropriately for the field setting.
      3. Complete at least 90 hours of successful fieldwork in an approved K-12 classroom.
      4. Achieve at least a satisfactory evaluation by the mentor.
      5. Communicate effectively with the mentor, school staff, parents, and community.
      6. Develop a respectful working relationship with a mentor, other district professionals, and students.
      7. Show courtesy, sensitivity, confidence, and enthusiasm to mentor, students, parents and faculty.
      8. Support mentor and school staff as directed in curricular and behavior management matters.
      9. Demonstrate interest in extra learning opportunities.
      10. Prepare and complete tasks and projects assigned by the mentor and/or ED 200 instructor promptly and comprehensively.
    3. Demonstrate professionalism in ED 200 seminars.
      1. Observe consistent punctuality and adhere to the ED 200 seminar schedule.
      2. Show leadership in seminar participation.
      3. Respect student confidentiality in speech and writing.
      4. Model intellectual honest and academic integrity.
      5. Show courtesy, respect, and sensitivity to others.
      6. Maintain effective communication with the ED 200 instructor at all times during the semester.
    4. Demonstrate an awareness of and exposure to fundamentals of pedagogy.
      1. Demonstrate beginning knowledge of elements of lesson construction.
      2. Recognize that students differ in learning styles.
      3. Initiate an awareness of special needs students.
      4. Demonstrate a basic understanding of classroom management.
      5. Focus on relevant contemporary educational issues in the community, state, and nation.
      6. Model tolerance in the classroom and promote the importance and value of diversity in the classroom and the world.
    5. Participate in “writing to learn” activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
  
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    ED 201W - Education of the Exceptional Child

    Credits: 3
    Emphasizes the characteristics of exceptional children, including an overview of their educational needs and the approaches of various programs.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand the history of the diagnosis/treatment of children with exceptional needs.
      1. Examine the progression of laws which address the education of exceptional children
      2. Analyze the diagnostic terminology previously used in describing exceptional children.
      3. Identify interventions used in the past with exceptional children.
    2. Understand the current definitions and characteristics of children with exceptional needs.
      1. Examine and evaluate the diagnostic classifications of exceptional children, e.g., mental retardation, learning disabilities, emotional/behavioral disabilities, communication disorders, deafness, blindness, physical/health impairments, multiple disabilities, and gifted and talented.
    3. Understand the current intervention approaches used with exceptional children.
      1. Evaluate the advantages/disadvantages of segregated and inclusive models of intervention.
      2. Examine the effectiveness of prevention/early intervention.
      3. Examine special education in a culturally and linguistically diverse society.
      4. Examine the family’s role in special education services.
      5. Examine the importance of planning for the transition from childhood to adulthood.
    4. Participate in “writing to learn” activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
  
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    ED 268 - International Studies in Education

    Credits: 1-4
    Involves the study of one or more aspects of the educational system of a country other than the United States including class lectures and individual consultation. Overseas study is an integral part of the course. Expenses for travel and overseas study must be borne by the student.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

  
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    ED 290-299 - Special Projects in Education


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Education for Professional Development

  
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    EDU 214 - Modern Manufacturing Processes

    Credits: 1-4
    Open to educators who have recently completed a Delta College developed internship or job-shadowing experience in a modern manufacturing environment. Seeks to develop classroom lessons, projects, and performance assessments based on educator workplace experiences and current educational standards. Provides opportunity for collaboration and includes implementation of the unit of instruction in the participant’s classroom from development through construction and assessment.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30-60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Correlate the workplace experience to relevant grade level curriculum standards
      1. Correlate common manufacturing themes to current, relevant standards such as Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM), Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), etc.
      2. Identify common themes between workplace experiences through discussion with classmates.
      3. Formally present workplace experience to the class.
    2. Develop a Modern Manufacturing Unit of Instruction for a Middle School Classroom
      1. Present the anticipated unit of instruction to peers for feedback.
      2. Outline an assessment plan for the unit of instruction.
      3. Devise methods for students to use in testing/evaluating their manufactured product.
      4. Invite a local business partner to visit the classroom during the Unit of Instruction.
      5. Determine calendar dates for teaching the unit.
      6. Identify materials and equipment needed for the unit of instruction.
      7. Design a Unit of Instruction based on Modern Manufacturing themes and NGSS targets.
      8. Identify NGSS performance targets.
      9. Select a format/approach for a Unit of Instruction: (daily lessons, multi-day project, or multi-week project).
    3. Implement a Modern Manufacturing Unit of Instruction in a Middle School Classroom
      1. Conduct Assessment.
      2. Administer “Student Perception of Manufacturing Survey” (Post).
      3. Record student reactions and/or attitudes that emerge during the unit.
      4. Estimate out of class time spent by students.
      5. Log classroom hours spent on task.
      6. Engage students in the Modern Manufacturing Unit of Instruction.
      7. Administer “Student Perception of Manufacturing Survey” (Pre).
    4. Evaluate value of the Modern Manufacturing Unit of Instruction (written report and presentation)
      1. Present a summary of the Unit of Instruction to the class.
      2. Compose a summary to advise other instructors on the use of the Modern Manufacturing Unit.
      3. Submit instructions/lesson plans for teaching the Modern Manufacturing Unit.
  
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    EDU 220 - Introduction to STEM Explorer: Surface Explorations

    Credits: 1
    Prepares 6th through 8th grade teachers for a visit from the STEM Explorer for participation in the Surface Exploration modules. Helps teachers to maximize the experience for their students by providing an opportunity for them to engage in each of the modules prior to the visit. Create lessons to prepare students for the STEM Explorer activities. Prepare follow-up lessons that tie in specific grade level performance expectations from the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and the Michigan K-12 Science Standards.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the STEM Explorer Surface Exploration modules.
      1. Articulate the vision, goals, and objectives of the STEM Explorer program.
      2. Successfully complete each of the training modules on or outside the STEM Explorer vehicle.
      3. Review and provide feedback on the pre-designed introductory and follow-up classroom activities.
    2. Prepare and plan for the Surface Exploration modules.
      1. Choose one long and two short modules for the STEM Explorer visit to the teacher’s school in the upcoming school year and show how it fits into the current curriculum.
      2. Create one grade-level appropriate introductory lesson related specifically to NGSS Performance Expectations, the Michigan Math Standards and/or the National Education Technology Standards (NETS) to prepare students for the STEM Explorer visit.
      3. Create one grade-level appropriate follow-up lesson related specifically to NGSS Performance Expectations to implement after the STEM Explorer visit.
      4. Share the lessons related on the Delta College eLearning site and participate in an online discussion board.
    3. Prepare for implementation and follow-up.
      1. Schedule the STEM Explorer visit.
      2. Implement the developed lesson in anticipation of the STEM Explorer visit.
      3. Implement the follow-up lesson in the classroom.
      4. Present introductory and follow-up lessons at an informal, required gathering at the end of the school year that includes a provided rubric.
  
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    EDU 225 - Introduction to STEM Explorer: Deep Dive

    Credits: 2
    Prepares 9th through 12th grade teachers wishing to participate in the STEM Explorer Deep Dive program with their students in the upcoming school year. Teachers are introduced to the features of the STEM Explorer and how it can be used to support the Deep Dive, a Project-Based Learning experience. Teachers learn how to lead their students through the engineering process as it relates to their specific discipline(s). Teachers also learn the basics of 3D parametric solid modeling and how to guide students through the rapid prototyping process.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the STEM Explorer Deep Dive Project.
      1. Articulate the vision of the STEM Explorer Deep Dive program.
      2. Identify the specific NGSS performance expectations that connect the Deep Dive project to the specific discipline(s).
      3. Design a theoretical solution to a discipline-based engineering problem.
      4. Complete a series of tutorials to become acclimated to the features and capabilities of Solid Works (a feature-based, parametric, solid modeling program).
    2. Produce lessons for the Deep Dive Project
      1. Use Solid Works to create and 3D print a prototype model as a design solution to the engineering problem.
      2. Contribute meaningfully to the eLearning online discussion threads concerning the engineering problem as well as the Solid Works program.
      3. Create one NGSS-based lesson to build background knowledge necessary to implement the Deep Dive project in the specific discipline(s).
      4. Create one NGSS-based follow-up lesson to implement after the Deep Dive project has been completed.
    3. Implement the Deep Dive Project.
      1. Schedule initial and follow-up visits from the STEM Explorer team for the upcoming school year.
      2. Present the prototype design solution to the class and participate in an end-of-class wrap up discussion on site at Delta College (before work with students begins).
      3. Work with the students and the STEM Explorer team to implement the Deep Dive project in the teacher’s classroom.
      4. Participate in three discussion threads on eLearning: reflections on the pre-project lesson, working with students on Solid Works, and reflections on the post-project lesson.
      5. Accompany students at the end-of-year Deep Dive gathering where group projects are judged for various awards and recognition.
  
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    EDU 230 - Michigan K-12 Science Standards

    Credits: 1
    Open to teachers, principals, and other K-12 school leaders in the Great Lakes Bay Region interested in becoming more familiar with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Three-Dimensional Learning, a fundamental pedagogical frame shift, demonstrated with particular emphasis on Developing and Using Models and Engaging in Argument from Evidence. Learn how to create phenomena-based lessons that follow the Performance Expectations of the NGSS.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).
      1. Show how the NGSS aligns to the National Research Council’s (NRC) Framework for K-12 Science Education.
      2. Demonstrate how phenomena-based teaching helps with the shift toward Three-Dimensional Learning.
      3. Identify the eight Science and Engineering Practices, the seven Cutting Concepts, and the Disciplinary Core Ideas found in the NGSS document.
    2. Design and develop lesson plans specific to NGSS.
      1. Identify one phenomenon that can be used to teach the practice of Modeling in the first three weeks of school.
      2. Develop a series of three (3) grade-level appropriate lesson plans that includes at least one Practice, one Cross Cutting Concept, and one Disciplinary Core Idea.
      3. Share the newly created lesson plans on the Delta College eLearning site and participate in an online discussion board.
    3. Implement the prepared lessons.
      1. Implement the modeling practice in the classroom.
      2. Assess student learning.
      3. Note adjustment for continuous process improvement.
    4. Disseminate results from implementation and follow up.
      1. Participate in the informal presentation on the development and implementation of the three NGSS lesson plans by reporting back to the class during a 2-hour wrap-up session that includes a provided rubric.
  
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    EDU 368W - Educating for Global Participation

    Credits: 2
    Assists educators in various aspects of global education, including exploring the meaning of global education, developing and participating in learning abroad experiences, and discussing how educators can help students, colleagues, and members of the community become more globally educated. Credit may be earned in ED 368W or EDU 368W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): Open to all full and part-time faculty and staff and by permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate awareness and understanding of the importance and usefulness of Global Education for the 21st century.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the interconnectedness of human activity and the impact on others at various levels (local, national, international).
      2. Increase awareness of resources, organizations, and institutes for additional information and professional development in the area of Global Peace and Sustainability.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the complex, interdisciplinary nature of our global society, and apply this understanding in courses taught or in related projects.
      1. Recognize that there are many different perspectives to a single issue (such as-poverty, crime, hate, injustice).
      2. Demonstrate the ability to write about a single issue from various perspectives (economic, historical, environmental, political).
      3. Analyze global issues from a sustainability perspective (people, planet, profit).
      4. Demonstrate the application of flexible, creative and positive problem solving strategies to complex global issues.
      5. Facilitate an interdisciplinary dialog among students in the courses they teach or incorporate global interdisciplinary understanding in a project or initiative.
  
  •  

    EDU 369W - Educating for Global Participation with Travel

    Credits: 3
    Assists educators in various aspects of global education, including exploring the meaning of global education, developing and participating in learning abroad experiences, and discussing how educators can help students, colleagues, and members of the community become more globally educated. Requires participation in a learning abroad experience. Credit may be earned in ED 369W or EDU 369W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): Open to all full and part-time faculty and staff and by permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate awareness and understanding of the importance and usefulness of Global Education for the 21st century.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the interconnectedness of human activity and the impact on others at various levels of (local, national, international).
      2. Increase awareness of resources, organizations, and institutes for additional information and professional development in the areas of Global Peace and Sustainability.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the complex, interdisciplinary nature of our global society, and apply this understanding in courses taught or in related projects.
      1. Recognize that there are many different perspectives to a single issue (such as-poverty, crime, hate, injustice).
      2. Demonstrate the ability to write about a single issue from various perspectives (economic, historical, environmental, political).
      3. Analyze global issues from a sustainability perspective (people, planet, profit)
      4. Demonstrate the application of flexible, creative and positive problem solving strategies to complex global issues.
      5. Facilitate an interdisciplinary dialog among students in the courses they teach or incorporate global interdisciplinary understanding in a project or initiative.
    3. Demonstrate the knowledge needed to develop and lead high quality, safe, and affordable learning abroad experiences sponsored by Delta College or another approved institution.
      1. Apply the process for proposing and developing approved learning abroad experiences at Delta College or another approved institution.
      2. Demonstrate familiarity with processes needed to organize and lead a learning abroad experience.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of the educational requirements needed for an approved credit or non-credit learning abroad experience.
      4. Practice group and independent travel skills to maximize educational goals.
  
  •  

    EDU 370W - Educating for Global Participation with Module

    Credits: 3
    Assists educators in various aspects of global education, including exploring the meaning of global education, developing and participating in learning abroad experiences, and discussing how educators can help students, colleagues, and members of the community become more globally educated. Requires class module or project. Credit may be earned in ED 370W or EDU 370W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): Open to all full and part-time faculty and staff and by permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate awareness and understanding of the importance and usefulness of Global Education for the 21st century.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the interconnectedness of human activity and the impact on others at various levels of (local, national, international).
      2. Increase awareness of resources, organizations, and institutes for additional information and professional development in the areas of Global Peace and Sustainability.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the complex, interdisciplinary nature of our global society, and apply this understanding in courses taught or in related projects.
      1. Recognize that there are many different perspectives to a single issue (such as-poverty, crime, hate, injustice).
      2. Demonstrate the ability to write about a single issue from various perspectives (economic, historical, environmental, political).
      3. Analyze global issues from a sustainability perspective (people, planet, profit)
      4. Demonstrate the application of flexible, creative and positive problem solving strategies to complex global issues.
      5. Facilitate an interdisciplinary dialog among students in the courses they teach or incorporate global interdisciplinary understanding in a project or initiative.
    3. Develop and implement a Global Peace Studies module or project for infusion into one of their primary courses or related college activities.
      1. Create a module that facilitates the development of student awareness and knowledge of global issues, and help them develop the skills necessary to participate globally in a positive manner.
      2. Assess the module or project’s effectiveness in developing a global perspective among students and/or participants.
  
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    EDU 379W - Assessment for Programs and Disciplines

    Credits: 1
    Explores the program and discipline assessment process at Delta College, while providing a forum for collaboration and development of program and discipline assessment projects. Prepares reporting assessment activities through the database, presentation to the Student Learning Assessment Committee, and sharing with the greater College community.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the academic assessment process at Delta College.
      1. Describe assessment-related terminology.
      2. Describe the roles of the various assessment-related entities at Delta College.
      3. Explain the process of assessment reporting and accountability.
      4. Demonstrate use of the Assessment Database to report assessment activities.
      5. Participate in the Academic Assessment Committee presentation process.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the program assessment cycle.
      1. Describe the program assessment cycle in relation to various program report examples.
      2. Identify and evaluate program examples that meet the standards of good program models.
      3. Apply the program assessment cycle to current program or discipline assessment activities.
    3. Create a comprehensive assessment plan for his/her program or discipline.
      1. Formulate and assess program outcomes.
      2. Develop assessment projects related to his/her program.
      3. Discuss and plan for the use of project results.
      4. Plan for continued assessment of his/her program or discipline as a tool for continuous quality improvement.
    4. Develop program assessment information to share with the greater college community.
      1. Document program or discipline assessment information for the database and the Academic Assessment Committee.
      2. Plan to share program or discipline assessment information with appropriate groups in the greater College community.
  
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    EDU 384 - Delta College Staff Ambassador Development

    Credits: 3
    Provides Delta College staff with an opportunity to learn about the divisions, departments, processes, and systems at Delta College. Explores the contribution of the employee’s role to the College mission, vision, and values. Credit may be earned in ED 384 or EDU 384 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Discuss the history and philosophy of the community college.
      1. Describe community college’s unique role, history, and mission.
      2. Discuss the purpose of the League for Innovation and the importance of Delta’s Board Membership. Explore the Learning College Concept.
      3. Review Delta’s history.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of essential processes/systems campus-wide.
      1. Describe basic elements of the admissions, financial aid, and registration processes.
      2. Discuss the scheduling process.
      3. Trace the curriculum development and revision process.
      4. Discuss the difference between academic assessment and institutional effectiveness.
      5. Describe basic elements of the recruitment and hiring process.
      6. Describe business - related processes (travel, requisitions, etc.)
    3. Describe each department/division’s contribution to the mission, vision, and values of the College.
      1. Identify the contributions of the various Delta College departments (and their sub-groups) to student success and the mission, vision, and values of the College. Departments such as - Academic Services - Student and Educational Services - Business and Finance - Administrative Services - President’s Office - Corporate Services - Communications Technology - Institutional Advancement - Off-campus Centers
    4. Participate in a job-shadowing experience.
      1. Identify the staff member whose work will be observed and schedule the observation.
      2. Reflect on the contribution to the College made, and the relationship between, the observed work and the student’s own work.
    5. Describe the integration of Delta’s Strategic Plan into daily work.
      1. Examine the purpose and meaning of the strategic plan and the strategic planning process.
      2. Examine ways in which the initiatives can be integrated into daily work.
    6. Discuss the AQIP process and its relationship to Delta’s Organizational Culture.
      1. Examine AQIP’s continuous quality improvement principles
      2. Review the requirements to become an AQIP accredited institution.
      3. Discuss the requirements to maintain AQIP accreditation through the Higher Learning Commission.
    7. Discuss the components that create Delta’s “culture”.
      1. Describe formal and informal elements of Delta’s culture.
      2. Utilize the Center for Organizational Success (COS) to meet organizational, personal and professional growth needs.
      3. Recognize the contribution each employee makes to creating, maintaining, and changing Delta College’s culture.
    8. Demonstrate active progress toward own professional goals.
      1. Continue to update portfolio.
      2. Identify and begin (or continue) meeting with a mentor.
  
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    EDU 385 - Leadership Culture

    Credits: 3
    Prepares Delta College employees to enhance their responsibilities by understanding, developing, and demonstrating their leadership skills and abilities. Practices leadership activities in College or community. Explores the focus on worklife contributions within the learning centered organization. Credit may be earned in ED 385 or EDU 385 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): One year Delta College employment.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Define characteristics of great leadership and recognize ways that this knowledge can be applied in the workplace.
      1. Review College values and consider how we use them in our daily worklife.
      2. Consider various leadership styles and their impact on motivation and performance.
      3. Describe servant leadership and empowerment.
      4. Employ effective communication skills, such as empathetic listening, problem solving, and clarifying feedback.
    2. Practice and apply leadership tools.
      1. Practice meeting facilitation and presentation.
      2. Demonstrate use of Robert’s Rules of Order.
      3. Practice goal setting.
      4. Explore Learning Café, Appreciative Inquiry, and other collaborative meeting strategies.
      5. Discuss strategic planning and AQIP processes.
    3. Discuss the elements of a learning organization.
      1. Discuss the disciplines of systems thinking, personal mastery, mental models, shared vision, and team learning.
      2. Describe the benefit of collaborative problem-solving.
      3. Increase the use of personal strengths in worklife and the contribution of those strengths to the team.
    4. Apply knowledge and skills attained by serving the College and its communities in a leadership role.
      1. Select an organization or committee (College or community) and participate in its work.
      2. Explain your participation, citing aspects of your leadership.
    5. Explain the importance of continuous professional growth in leadership.
      1. Continue development of the employee’s portfolio.
      2. Present portfolio for review.
      3. Participate in a program post-assessment or exit interview to communicate goals for continued professional growth.
  
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    EDU 386W - Communication in the Classroom

    Credits: 2
    Focuses on identifying, describing, and then explaining communication between students and between students and instructor. Explores aspects of verbal and nonverbal communication such as impact of voice, facial expression, body language, body movement, and physical proximity. Includes research highlighting the impact of an instructor’s communication repertoire on student success. Requires completion of a project focused on development of improved/refined communication strategies for instruction. Credit may be earned in ED 386W or EDU 386W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Apply effective communication principles to teaching and learning.
      1. Develop shared language and meaning within the classroom setting.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of perception and its impact on classroom communication.
      3. Effectively facilitate group communication in the classroom.
    2. Examine management strategies for conflict in the classroom.
      1. Identify the needs of parties involved in a conflict situation.
      2. Develop effective management strategies for numerous classroom situations.
    3. Demonstrate effective listening skills as a teacher, in and out of the classroom.
      1. Recognize individual listening habits and work to improve active listening skills.
      2. Identify types of and barriers to listening.
    4. Examine the role that nonverbal communication plays in the classroom setting.
      1. Assess the importance of nonverbal communication in the classroom.
      2. Identify the functions of nonverbal communication in the classroom.
    5. Develop a project focused on awareness and improvement of one’s classroom communication skills.
      1. Identify an aspect of verbal and/or non-verbal communication in one’s own teaching for reflection and development.
      2. Collaborate with instructors and peers to design a focused project.
      3. Set goals for future application of refined techniques in classroom communication.
  
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    EDU 387W - Reflective Practice: Education for Personal and Professional Growth

    Credits: 2
    Explores, in a communal atmosphere of trust and thoughtfulness, the roles of reflection, community, and creativity in the development of meaning and purpose in the personal and professional lives of educators. Explores questions of pedagogical meaning and purpose common to educators, and connects these with practices such as reflective writing, readings in a variety of disciplines, and creativity intended as springboards for personal and classroom applications. Includes a meaningful project such as a series of self-guided readings, an introspective practice like meditation, a journal, memoir, revamped syllabus, set of classroom practices, or other appropriate self-generated project. Credit may be earned in ED 387W or EDU 387W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): Open to all full and part time faculty and staff and by permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use ongoing reflective practices and tools including writing, reading, guided introspection, and interactions with fellow educators to further professional and personal growth.
      1. Demonstrate through writing and verbal representation that one is using meaningful practices of reflection.
      2. Create and apply a personally meaningful practice that furthers development and growth as an educator.
      3. Identify, through reading and introduction to and modeling of various reflective practices, guest speakers, and interactions with class and instructor, a practice that will be of continuing use for professional and personal growth.
    2. Create a project that is professionally and personally meaningful:
      1. Present a version of the project to the class, and, if appropriate, to the Delta community.
      2. Develop and implement the project
      3. Generate ideas, with help of class and instructor, for the project, which may include development of an introspective practice, a series of writings such as poems, or a memoir.
    3. Work cooperatively with colleagues for growth and renewal of professional practice through reflection and on-going connection.
      1. Develop a support system that encourages an ongoing relationship with a colleague or colleagues beyond the time frame of the course that will support reflective practice leading to professional and personal growth and community-building.
      2. Develop, individually and as a group, a strong sense of mutually-supportive cohesion through techniques such as shared writing, shared teaching/educating stories, online communication, pairing and group activities.
  
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    EDU 388W - Exploring Diversity

    Credits: 3
    Explores themes, issues, perspectives and experiences related to diversity. Provides an opportunity to reflect and practice an interdisciplinary approach to the study of diversity in a global world. Credit may be earned in only one of the following: SSI 288W , SSI 289W , EDU 388W, EDU 389W , IHU 280W , or IHU 281W .

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Expand the definition of diversity beyond traditional views.
      1. Define diversity and identify variables of diversity.
      2. Identify discrimination through self-reflection and exposure to a variety of voices and perspectives.
      3. Develop a scale or continuum of diversity perspectives and reflect on one’s personal growth along that continuum.
    2. Explore how variables of diversity influence society.
      1. Explore biological, sociological, psychological, and anthropological theories associated with diversity
      2. Identify individual and societal losses due to intolerance.
      3. Describe how diversity impacts the classroom, community, or workplace.
    3. Practice communication techniques that foster a safe and inclusive environment.
      1. Practice communication techniques that foster an atmosphere that values all members.
      2. Recognize and demonstrate sensitivity to the variety of influences that shape an individual’s perspective on diversity.
      3. Reflect upon a variety of learning activities that promote diversity awareness and challenge intolerance and discrimination.
    4. Demonstrate personal and social responsibility as a global citizen.
      1. Evaluate one’s cultural assumptions and biases.
      2. Analyze and evaluate issues, positions, viewpoints and ideas when exploring diversity
      3. Identify behaviors that foster global citizenship
      4. Demonstrate intercultural knowledge in developing a global worldview.
    5. Develop resources for infusing diversity into the classroom.
      1. Create a learning activity or assignment that addresses diversity in a global world.
      2. Explore online resources related to diversity in the classroom
      3. Share activities or resources related to increasing awareness and respect for human diversity.
  
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    EDU 389W - Exploring Diversity/With Project

    Credits: 4
    Explores themes, issues, perspectives and experiences related to diversity. Provides an opportunity to reflect and practice an interdisciplinary approach to the study of diversity in a global world. Credit may be earned in only one of the following: IHU 280W , IHU 281W , IHU 281HW, EDU 388W , EDU 389W, SSI 288W , SSI 289W , SSI 289HW.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Expand the definition of diversity beyond traditional views.
      1. Define diversity and identify variables of diversity.
      2. Identify discrimination through self-reflection and exposure to a variety of voices and perspectives.
      3. Develop a scale or continuum of diversity perspectives and reflect on one’s personal growth along that continuum.
    2. Explore how variables of diversity influence society.
      1. Explore biological, sociological, psychological, and anthropological theories associated with diversity
      2. Identify individual and societal losses due to intolerance.
      3. Describe how diversity impacts the classroom, community, or workplace.
    3. Practice communication techniques that foster a safe and inclusive environment.
      1. Practice communication techniques that foster an atmosphere that values all members.
      2. Recognize and demonstrate sensitivity to the variety of influences that shape an individual’s perspective on diversity.
      3. Reflect upon a variety of learning activities that promote diversity awareness and challenge intolerance and discrimination.
    4. Demonstrate personal and social responsibility as a global citizen.
      1. Evaluate one’s cultural assumptions and biases.
      2. Analyze and evaluate issues, positions, viewpoints and ideas when exploring diversity
      3. Identify behaviors that foster global citizenship
      4. Demonstrate intercultural knowledge in developing a global worldview.
    5. Apply an understanding of the importance of diversity by participating in service learning.
      1. Choose a personally relevant project
      2. Provide meaningful service to the community
      3. Document the service learning experience
      4. Connect relevance of the experience to the diversity concepts addressed in Outcomes 1-4.
  
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    EDU 390W - Best Practices in Teaching and Learning

    Credits: 3
    Addresses topics and skills essential for effective and innovative teaching and learning practices. Explores the dynamics of teaching and learning and provides models, strategies, and options that emphasize active learning and reflective teaching. Credit may be earned in ED 390W or EDU 390W but not both

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Create an environment that fosters positive learning experiences.
      1. Identify, discuss, develop and implement effective and creative strategies to facilitate student learning.
      2. Identify and apply effective classroom management techniques.
      3. Identify teacher characteristics that help to nurture a positive learning environment.
      4. Develop strategies that foster the creation of a community within the classroom.
    2. Understand the educational and professional growth opportunities at Delta College to develop, improve, and support best teaching practices.
      1. Identify a mentor and initiate opportunities to grow from that individual’s experience and expertise.
      2. Demonstrate a beginning understanding of assessment processes at Delta College: classroom assessment, program assessment, and General Education assessment.
      3. Develop a growing understanding of, and begin to apply, Delta’s model of course learning Outcomes and Objectives in course planning and assessment.
      4. Recognize, locate, and use both physical and online locations of the various faculty and student support services at Delta College (i.e. eLearning, Audio/Visual, Faculty Center for Teaching Excellence).
      5. Demonstrate an understanding of the faculty promotion and tenure processes.
      6. Identify and utilize cohort relationships with Delta faculty and staff.
    3. Develop, implement and evaluate learning techniques to enhance teaching and learning effectiveness.
      1. Compare and contrast assessment and evaluation strategies.
      2. Identify educational technologies that can enhance the learning experience.
      3. Evaluate effectiveness of various new techniques and innovations in your courses to facilitate learning.
      4. Recognize how opportunities for learning can be enhanced through online strategies.
      5. Describe the rationale for, and representative applications of, some selected curricular innovations, including Writing to Learn; Academic Service-Learning; cooperative learning; learning communities, and programs for Under prepared and Honors students.
  
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    EDU 391W - Academic Service-Learning

    Credits: 1
    Introduces academic service-learning pedagogy across the disciplines. Develops a service-learning community-based project focusing on course outcomes and/or general education components. Incorporates the essential elements of enhanced academic learning meaningful to the community, and heightened civic engagement; and develops a plan to access all three elements. Credit may be earned in ED 391W or EDU 391W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): Open to all full and part-time faculty, community service partners, and by permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Know the pedagogy known as academic service-learning.
      1. Define academic service-learning.
      2. Explain the difference between volunteerism, academic service-learning, and internships.
      3. Develop an understanding of experiential learning as the context of community service conducted for academic service-learning.
      4. Develop an awareness of the current literature demonstrating the benefits of academic service-learning.
      5. Develop an awareness of the best practices and exemplary programs for academic service-learning.
    2. Apply academic service-learning to a current course, program, or activity.
      1. Develop a comprehensive plan for the infusion of academic service-learning, including the essential elements of enhanced course content, meaningful service, increased civic engagement, and sensitivity to diversity.
      2. Confirm a partnership/service agreement with a community agency.
      3. Develop reflection strategies for the service-learning activity.
      4. Draft an assessment plan for the acadmic service-learning component including
        1. concepts(s) being assessed,
        2. indicators to be measured,
        3. methods to measure the degree to which indicators demonstrate the desired concept(s), and
        4. sources for the data (students, faculty, community partner, etc.).
    3. Participate in “writing to learn” activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote and demonstrate learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
  
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    EDU 392W - Internet Teaching Techniques for Teachers

    Credits: 3
    Provides instructors with the essential pedagogical background to design and develop learning strategies applicable to online learning. Credit may be earned in ED 392W or EDU 392W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of LMS acquired by completing online modules, or equivalent training or mentoring previous use of an LMS, or a combination thereof.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. To demonstrate the use of steps needed to create appropriate learning objects
      1. Assess student learning needs and learning environment to create appropriate learning strategies
      2. Design and develop online learning strategies and assignments appropriate to learners’ content area in LMS and/or other web tool
      3. Implement learning strategies with group of students
      4. Evaluate the learning strategies used with students in terms of student success
    2. To demonstrate the use of different learning strategies in appropriate learning situations
      1. Create learning strategies by applying multiple theoretical approaches to pedagogy, i.e. constructivist, cognitive or behavioral theory.
    3. To evaluate online strategies for their appropriate use in instructors’ content areas
      1. Create formative assessment as to how students react to the learning process
      2. Create summative assessment as to the level to which students achieve an outcome/objective
  
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    EDU 392XW - Advanced Internet Teaching Techniques

    Credits: 3
    Provides those who have had experience teaching online with an opportunity to revise one area of their online course(s) through incorporating advanced communication and media tools. Credit may be earned in ED 392XW or EDU 392XW but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): EDU 392W  or at least one semester of teaching online or in a blended setting; or equivalent training and experience
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the use of best practices for online learning as outlined in the Best Practices Rubric
      1. Research current best practices for online learning
      2. Create learning strategy that employs a best practice in an online course
      3. Discuss best practices of online learning
    2. Demonstrate the use of current Internet applications
      1. Demonstrate the use of current Internet applications appropriate for  the individual’s  subject area
      2. Create instructions on how to use Internet applications
    3. Incorporate the use of current internet applications into an online course
      1. Create a learning strategy that uses a current Internet application to achieve or practice a course outcome/objective
  
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    EDU 393W - Understanding Student Learning

    Credits: 2
    Explores the process of learning and provides fuller understanding of the biological and sociocultural factors that influence human learning. Explores multiple intelligences and learning styles, neurological changes in the brain that accompany learning, cognitive development, motivation, and types of learning goals. Emphasizes the application of learning research to learning situations to encourage and enhance student learning. Credit may be earned in ED 393 or EDU 393 but not both

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify and explain the neurological and cognitive changes that accompany human learning.
      1. Explain the various ways in which the brain perceives and processes information.
      2. Explain how lasting changes in the neurology of the brain accompany mastery.
      3. Identify and use the principles of cognitive development to explain learning as a process of developing increasingly sophisticated mental representations of the world.
      4. Identify, evaluate and assess how knowledge of cognitive processes is useful to educators, and how such knowledge can be applied to learning situations to enhance the learning process.
    2. Identify and explain the primary factors that influence how human understandings are formed and altered.
      1. Identify biological factors such as temperament and emotional reactivity and explain how they can influence student learning.
      2. Identify the various forms of intelligence (multiple intelligences), and explain how individual differences in intellectual potentials influences how an individual best learns.
      3. Explain how a person’s beliefs about their ability to succeed in a task (self-efficacy) and self-esteem influence student learning and success.
      4. Explain how social and cultural factors such as social expectations, beliefs about ability (entity or incremental), learning styles, and the presence of social support influence student learning.
    3. Identify, evaluate and appraise how knowledge of human learning can be applied to educational settings.
      1. Work individually and cooperatively with others to develop and implement methods of assessing students learning levels, styles, and needs.
      2. Communicate in informal discussions and formal writing assignments personal observations and positions concerning how psychological and sociocultural factors affect student motivation, effort, persistence, and the attainment of learning goals.
      3. Work individually and cooperatively to evaluate and synthesize relevant factors that influence student learning, and experiment in constructing learning tasks and environments to effectively meet the learning needs of students.
      4. Develop an appreciation for the complexity of human learning.
  
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    EDU 394IW - Development of Learning Community Interest Groups

    Credits: 3
    Examines learning communities theories and models most closely resembling Interest Groups (often called Freshman Interest Groups and Clusters at other institutions). Discusses concepts of interdisciplinarity, community, and continuing development and evaluation of Interest Groups both individually as separate learning communities and collectively as a distinct identity. Includes participation in on-line interactive journaling about assigned and recommended readings. Develops a capstone project to plan an interest group learning community. Credit may be earned in ED 394 or EDU 394 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): Open to all full and part-time faculty and by permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Compare, contrast, and evaluate various definitions, models, and conceptual frameworks of learning communities most closely resembling the Interest Group model.
      1. Discuss and evaluate assigned readings.
      2. Respond interactively on-line to readings and to each other.
    2. Design an Interest Group learning community.
      1. Seek and give feedback on this work.
      2. Design at least one assessment means for this interest group.
      3. Prepare at least one assignment that integrates disciplines for this interest group.
      4. Develop a syllabus.
      5. Consult with counselors for help reaching the population for this course combination.
      6. Identify the likely population for their Interest Group.
    3. Collectively examine, articulate, and where appropriate modify, the culture, unique identity, and common means of assessment of Interest Groups at Delta.
      1. Choose a common assessment tool to be used by all Interest Groups in order to assess a common outcome. Use data collected by previous Interest Group faculty to close the assessment loop and continue future assessment of common outcomes.
      2. Collectively come to conclusions about the role and place of Interest Groups to the college culture and mission, general education, marketing, the use of the seminar-type hour, and any other issues that make Interest Groups a distinct body of Learning Communities. Review, articulate, and recommend modifications as appropriate.
      3. Collectively determine what common outcome(s) will exist beyond the course outcomes for all Interest Groups in their grouping or collectively review the common outcome(s) in light of data provided by previous Interest Group faculty. Forward modifications of these outcomes to the Learning Community Advisory Board for approval as appropriate
  
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    EDU 394W - Theory and Pedagogy of Learning Communities

    Credits: 2
    Examines (in classroom seminars and by on-line listserv) learning communities theories and models, including concepts of interdisciplinary and community. Includes participation in on-line listserv interactive journaling about course readings and a capstone project to prepare a syllabus, one or two possible assignments, and at least one means of assessment for a proposed learning community. Designed for faculty, future teachers, and administrators. Credit may be earned in ED 394 or EDU 394 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): Open to all full and part-time faculty and staff.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Compare, contrast, and evaluate various definitions, models, and conceptual frameworks of learning communities
      1. Discuss and evaluate assigned readings.
      2. Respond interactively on-line and in class seminars to readings and to each other.
    2. Design a learning community
      1. Select a marketable course combination.
      2. Consult with counselors about this course combination.
      3. Develop a syllabus, preferably with other involved faculty.
      4. Prepare assignments that integrate disciplines.
      5. Design means of assessment.
      6. Accept and give feedback on proposed learning communities both in person with their classroom peers or on a listserv.
    3. Participate in “writing to learn” activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
  
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    EDU 395RW - Introductory Theory and Methods of Reading Across Disciplines - Research Option

    Credits: 2
    Introduces theory and practice of reading across disciplines including theories of reading development and strategies improving reading. Provides instruction and support in researching content area reading in individual disciplines. Leads to development of annotated bibliography about reading process and pedagogy in their discipline. Student may earn credit in only one of the following: ED 395R, ED 395, EDU 395RW or EDU 395W  .

    Prerequisite(s): Open to all full-time and part-time faculty or by permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Articulate theories of reading development and design applications for fostering and assessing reading in a specific discipline or class.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of theories of reading development, including motivation and metacognition for the adult learner
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of diverse instructional approaches, ranging from direct teaching and practice of study skills through holistic approaches to reading
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of factors affecting text selection and assignment design
      4. Present to peers in the class a set of strategies for the integration ofreading into current teaching.
    2. Demonstrate ability to research reading process & pedagogy in one’s discipline.
    3. Participate in “writing to learn” activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
  
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    EDU 395W - Introductory Theory and Methods of Reading Across Disciplines

    Credits: 1
    Introduces theory and practice of reading across disciplines including theories of reading development and strategies improving reading. Student may earn credit in only one of the following: ED 395, ED 395R, EDU 395W or EDU 395RW  .

    Prerequisite(s): Open to all full-time and part-time faculty or by permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Articulate theories of reading development and design applications for fostering and assessing reading in a specific discipline or class.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of theories of reading development, including motivation and metacognition for the adult learner
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of diverse instructional approaches, ranging from direct teaching and practice of study skills through holistic approaches to reading
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of factors affecting text selection and assignment design
      4. Present to peers in the class a set of strategies for the integration ofreading into current teaching.
    2. Participate in “writing to learn” activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
  
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    EDU 396PW - Facilitating Developmental Learning with project

    Credits: 3
    Explores the process of assisting students in advancing from under-prepared to college-ready. Examines instructional methods conducive to promoting, developing, and sustaining student learning and success throughout the college curriculum. Synthesizes theory with best practices applicable to a variety of disciplines and learning levels. Course includes individual project. Credit may be earned in only one of the following: ED 396P, ED 396, EDU 396PW, or EDU 396W .

    Prerequisite(s): Open to all full and part-time faculty and staff
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Indentify and evaluate both barriers and pathways to success for developmental learners.
      1. Explain and address diverse learning styles.
      2. Analyze social and emotional factors affecting learning.
      3. Appreciate the importance of self-efficacy in academic success.
      4. Analyze by-pass strategies for specific learning challenges.
      5. Identify support systems the college has in place for student access and success.
    2. Identify, explain, and implement best practices for teaching developmental learners.
      1. Recognize value of mastery learning, strategic learning, and supplemental instruction.
      2. Identify opportunities for collaborative learning, including paired courses and learning communities.
      3. Formulate a variety of teaching approaches and methods, including computer-based instruction and/or other technologies.
      4. Explain the importance of consistent academic standards, supported by interface with college-level courses.
      5. Develop methods of scaffolding skills, assessing learning, and monitoring student performance.
    3. Design discipline-specific learning strategies that promote success for developmental learners.
      1. Visit at least one remedial teaching environment, recording impressions and implications.
      2. Formulate methods of embedding study skills, reading, writing, mathematics and/or critical thinking within a specific course.
      3. Promote transitional techniques that will help students evolve from under-prepared to college-ready.
      4. Design or modify a project to promote success for an increased number of learners.
    4. Develop a project to promote success for an increased number of learners.
      1. Identify a course, program, service, or policy need related to student learning.
      2. Use appropriate methods to research or analyze established approaches related to topic.
      3. Design or modify a course, program, service, or policy to improve student achievement.
  
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    EDU 396W - Facilitating Developmental Learning

    Credits: 2
    Explores the process of assisting students in advancing from under-prepared to college-ready. Examines instructional methods conducive to promoting, developing, and sustaining student learning and success throughout the college curriculum. Synthesizes theory with best practices applicable to a variety of disciplines and learning levels. Credit may be earned in only one of the following: EDU 396PW  or EDU 396W.

    Prerequisite(s): Open to all full and part-time faculty and staff
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Indentify and evaluate both barriers and pathways to success for developmental learners.
      1. Explain and address diverse learning styles.
      2. Analyze social and emotional factors affecting learning.
      3. Appreciate the importance of self-efficacy in academic success.
      4. Analyze by-pass strategies for specific learning challenges.
      5. Identify support systems the college has in place for student access and success.
    2. Identify, explain, and implement best practices for teaching developmental learners.
      1. Recognize value of mastery learning, strategic learning, and supplemental instruction.
      2. Identify opportunities for collaborative learning, including paired courses and learning communities.
      3. Formulate a variety of teaching approaches and methods, including computer-based instruction and/or other technologies.
      4. Explain the importance of consistent academic standards, supported by interface with college-level courses.
      5. Develop methods of scaffolding skills, assessing learning, and monitoring student performance.
    3. Design discipline-specific learning strategies that promote success for developmental learners.
      1. Visit at least one remedial teaching environment, recording impressions and implications.
      2. Formulate methods of embedding study skills, reading, writing, mathematics and/or critical thinking within a specific course.
      3. Promote transitional techniques that will help students evolve from under-prepared to college-ready.
      4. Design or modify a project to promote success for an increased number of learners.
  
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    EDU 397 - Introduction to Distance Learning

    Credits: 3
    Teaches strategies for distance education technology, with particular emphasis on instructional design, two-way interactive television (ITV), for application in any field. Credit may be earned in ED 397 or EDU 397 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): Open to all full and part-time faculty and staff and by permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. On completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate competency in the adaptation of traditional courses to the ITV format using distance education equipment.
      1. Demonstrate use of the equipment connected with ITV.
      2. Modify a teaching style when necessary.
      3. Dress, speak, and move in an appropriate manner for ITV.
      4. Foster student participation.
      5. Create a collaborative learning environment.
      6. Use inter-site student competition constructively.
      7. Make discussions work.
      8. Use small group exercises effectively.
      9. Use visual aids effectively.
      10. Use PowerPoint presentation software in the classroom.
  
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    EDU 398W - Writing to Learn

    Credits: 1
    Introduces theory and practice of “writing to learn,” (WTL) including informal writing strategies to promote student response to lectures, readings, fieldwork, labs, discussions, etc.; rehearsal for other activities including discussions and formal writing; reflection on learning progress and problems; and dialogue with peers and instructor. Credit may be earned in ED 398 or EDU 398 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): Open to all full and part-time faculty and by permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Know of the definitions and theory of WTL.
      1. Develop an understanding of the definition of WTL (what it is and is not).
      2. Develop an understanding of the theory of WTL (how it works).
      3. Develop an understanding of WTL at Delta (history, examples, success)
    2. Apply WTL strategies in current teaching.
      1. Develop WTL strategies and apply them to one or more courses.
      2. Reflect on value of the strategies.
      3. Share reflections with peers and instructor.
      4. Option: Mentor a peer not enrolled in the course to attempt WTL.
    3. Participate in “writing to learn” activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
  
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    EDU 399AW - Classroom Assessment Techniques

    Credits: 0.5
    Introduces classroom assessment techniques (CATs) and their use across disciplines. Develops and applies a variety of CATs to formatively assess different types of learning and student development. Credit may be earned in ED 399AW or EDU 399AW but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): Open to all full and part-time faculty and staff and by permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 7.5 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Design and implement Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs).
      1. Design and Administer simple and complex Classroom Assessment Techniques.
      2. Identify teaching goals for one or more courses using a Teaching Goal Inventory. (Distinguish a teaching goal from a course learning outcome.)
    2. Design and implement strategies for improving student learning based on information obtained from CATs.
      1. Analyze information obtained from the administration of CATs and use it to develop a plan of actions to enhance student learning.
      2. Identify and explain common problems that can occur with the use of CATs. Develop strategies for avoiding such problems.
      3. Identify ways to improve upon the CATs implemented.
      4. Evaluate the effects on student learning from using CATs.
  
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    EDU 399W - Using Classroom Assessment Techniques

    Credits: 2
    Introduces classroom assessment techniques (CAT’s) and their use across disciplines. Develops and applies a variety of CAT’s to formatively assess different types of learning and student development. Includes investigation and development of CAT’s as tools for classroom research. Credit may be earned in ED 399 or EDU 399W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): Open to all full and part-time faculty and staff and by permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Students gain knowledge of the nature of CAT’s across disciplines.
      1. Develop an understanding of CAT’s.
      2. Develop an understanding of what CAT’s measure.
      3. Develop an understanding of how CAT’s can improve teaching and learning.
      4. Develop an awareness of the potentials and limits of CAT’s.
      5. Develop an awareness of how to use the handbook.
      6. Develop an awareness of how colleagues are using CAT’s.
    2. Students develop and apply a variety of CAT’s in their current teaching assignment(s) to formatively assess different types of learning and student development.
      1. Clarify own teaching goals.
      2. Develop questions which can/should be asked about student learning related to those goals.
      3. Explore the adaptation and application of various CAT’s to answer those questions.
      4. Share experiences with others as to “successes” and “failures.”
    3. Students will investigate and develop CAT’s as tools for classroom research.
      1. Develop an understanding of the nature of Classroom Research
      2. Develop an understanding of how CAT’s can be used to develop Classroom Research
      3. Practice the development of a Classroom Research project using CAT’s.
    4. Participate in “writing to learn” activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.

Electrical Technology

  
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    ET 100 - Electrical Calculations

    Credits: 2
    Provides a foundation in the comprehension and analysis of computational skills required for the electrical field of study. Discusses scientific notation, metric prefixes, unit conversion, ratios, algebraic equations, right triangles, scalars, vectors, and graphing. Analyzes the sine wave by identifying characteristics that define the signal. Explains phasor representation of sine waves through the comparison of leading and lagging signals. Accomplishes addition and multiplication of phasors through the use of polar to rectangular conversions or right triangle calculations. Emphasizes entering calculations into a scientific calculator. Credit may be earned in SKET 100  or ET 100 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 3.
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in ET 110  is recommended.
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Discuss basic mathematics computations and develop problem-solving skills.
      1. Express quantitative data in scientific notation and perform math operations.
      2. Express quantitative data using metric prefixes and perform math operations.
      3. Translate quantitative data into different formats through the use of unit converstion techniques.
      4. Solve problems involving rations, decimals, reciprocal, exponents, and fractions.
      5. Discuss and arrange algebraic equations to solve for unknown variables.
      6. Interpret the rate of change as it applies to circuits, without computing the derivative.
      7. Employ the proper method for utilizing a scientific calculator to solve problems.
    2. Arrange quantitative data in table or graphical format and interpret the results.
      1. Identify the four quadrants of a graph and interpret how they relate to negative and postive quantities.
      2. Sketch tabulated data and inspect the graph to solve problems.
      3. Sketch and analyze the graphs of the sine and cosine as a function of time or angle.
      4. Graph and compute basic log and exponential functions.
      5. Modify the gain control on an oscilloscope to evaluate the maximum, minimum, and peak-to-peak values of a signal.
      6. Modify the time base control on an oscilloscope to evaluate the period and frequency of a signal.
    3. Identify and analyze characteristics of the sine wave.
      1. Explain the concept of angular frequency.
      2. Explain the concept of leading and lagging electrical signals.
      3. Identify and calculate the phase angle, instantaneous value, peak, maximum, minimum, peak-to-peak, root mean square, average value, period, and frequency for various periodic signals.
      4. Calculate the wavelength of a signal.
    4. Perform calculations required in the electrical field of study.
      1. Ananlyze right triangles by using the trigonometric equations (sin, cos, and tan) to solve for unknown sides and angles.
      2. Analyze right triangles by using the Pythagorean theorem to solve for unknown sides of the triangle.
      3. Differentiate between scalar and vector quantities.
      4. Resolve vectors into horizontal and vertical components.
      5. Add and subtract vectors by resolving the vectors into components and adding the horizontal and vertical components.
      6. Describe the phasor representation of an electrical signal and construct the phasor diagram for electrical circuits.
      7. Interpret phasor diagrams by representing the signals as leading or lagging signals in the time domain.
      8. Convert phasors between polar and retangular coordinates.
      9. Add and subtract phasors using rectangular coordinates.
      10. Multiply and divide phasors using polar coordinates.
  
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    ET 110 - DC Circuits

    Credits: 2
    Introduces the basic concepts of electricity as it applies to DC circuits. Explains the basic structure of the atom and electron theory. Reviews batteries and other sources of electricity. Explains the schematic symbols for devices used in DC circuits. Determines the total resistance for series and parallel combinations of resistors. Uses Ohm’s law, Kirchhoff’s voltage law, and Kirchhoff’s current law to solve combination DC circuits. Explains the design and application of a Wheatstone bridge. Uses meters during lab activities to apply concepts learned during class. Credit may be earned in SKET 110  or ET 110 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in ET 100  is recommended.
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of electrical terminology and scientific theory for DC circuits.
      1. Explain the basic structure of the atom and electron theory.
      2. Explain the construction and operation of batteries and other sources of electricity.
      3. Associate basic electrical terms, units, and abbreviations with their meanings.
      4. Describe the concepts of electrical potential, current flow, and resistance.
    2. Describe charateristics and perform calculations for DC circuits.
      1. Identify resistors by color code combination.
      2. Recognize and draw the schematic symbols for devices used in DC circuits. Differentiate between different symbols, conventions, and terminology.
      3. Characterize DC voltage and current sources.
      4. Utilize voltage, current, resistance, power, energy, and efficency relationships to solve for DC circuit values.
      5. Analyze series, parallel, and combination DC circuits to determine voltage, current, resistance, and power relationships.
      6. Differentiate between Ohm’s Law, Kirchhoff’s voltage law, Kirchhoff’s current law, superposition theorem, Thevenin’s theorem, Norton’s theorem, and the maximum power transfer theorem. Utilize the appropriate laws and theorems to solve DC circuits.
      7. Explain the application and operation of a Wheatstone bridge circuit.
    3. Conduct laboratory experiments to reinforce lecture material.
      1. State, comprehend, and comply with safety precautions when working on electrical equipment.
      2. Construct circuits using electrical components and laboratory equipment. Calculate, measure, and analyze characteristics of DC circuits.
      3. Measure electrical values of current, voltage, and resistance in DC circuits.
      4. Develop troubleshooting techniques.
  
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    ET 120 - AC Circuits

    Credits: 2
    Introduces the basic concepts of electricity as it applies to AC circuits. Explains inductance, capacitance, and the phasor relationships between electrical signals. Explains the schematic symbols for devices used in AC circuits. Determines the total impedance for series and parallel combinations of resistors, inductors, and capacitors. Uses Ohm’s law, Kirchhoff’s voltage law, and Kirchhoff’s current law to solve combination AC circuits using phasor analysis. Also covers include series and parallel resonant frequencies, harmonics, filters, and time constants. Uses oscilloscopes and meters during lab activities to apply concepts learned during class. Credit may be earned in SKET 120  or ET 120 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): ET 100  and ET 110  both with a minimum grade of “C”.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of electrical terminology and scientific theory for AC circuits.
      1. Explain the basic concepts of magnetism, electromagnetism, flux density, magnetic field intensity, saturation, and hysteresis.
      2. Explain the basic operation of generators as a source of AC electricity.
      3. Associate basic electrical terms, units, and abbreviations with their meanings.
      4. Describe the concepts of AC voltage, current, resistance, reactance, and impedance.
      5. Differentiate between the equations used for AC and DC circuits.
      6. Apply the phasor representation of electrical signals to AC circuits. Analyze the phasor diagram to contrast leading and lagging electrical signals.
    2. Describe characteristics and perform calculations for AC circuits.
      1. Recognize and draw the schematic symbols for devices used in AC circuits. Differentiate between different symbols, conventions, and terminology.
      2. Calculate inductive reactance, capacitive reactance, and impedance for AC circuits.
      3. Utilize voltage, current, resistance, power, energy, and efficiency relationships to solve for AC circuit values.
      4. Analyze series, parallel, and combination AC circuits using phasor analysis.
      5. Differentiate between Ohm’s Law, Kirchhoff’s voltage law, and Kirchhoff’s current law. Utilize the appropriate laws and theorems to write loop equations and node equations.
      6. Calculate the resonant frequency for series and parallel LC circuits.
      7. Identify the fundamental frequency for a signal and the harmonics required to create other waveforms.
      8. Perform calculations to determine bandwidth and criteria for high and low pass filter design.
      9. Analyze the response of inductors and capacitors in DC circuits. Calculate time constants to determine the response of the system.
    3. Conduct laboratory experiments to reinforce lecture material.
      1. State, comprehend, and comply with safety precautions when working on electrical equipment.
      2. Construct circuits using electrical components and laboratory equipment. Calculate, measure, and analyze characteristics of AC circuits.
      3. Measure electrical values of current, voltage, and impedance in AC circuits.
      4. Develop troubleshooting techniques.
  
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    ET 122 - Programmable Logic Controllers

    Credits: 5
    Builds on the skills developed in ET 130  and applies the concepts learned to Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) systems. Includes hardware topics installation procedures, wiring diagrams, system architecture, and I/O modules and software topics basic logic elements, timers, counters, program control, math functions, data manipulation, sequencers, shift registers, and file/word transfers. Includes lab activities utilizing RSLogix and RSLinx software for creating, editing, saving, downloading, and uploading programs. Applies subject material from lecture in the laboratory through the use of PLC training systems. Uses drawings to construct control circuits, analyze the process, make revisions to wiring or set-up configurations as necessary, and evaluate the proper operation of the PLC circuit. Credit may be earned in SKET 122  or ET 122 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): ET 130  with a minimum grade of “C”.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Recognize and explain the operation of hardware in a PLC system.
      1. Identify and describe the operation of a PLC input and a PLC output card.
      2. Identify and describe the functions of a CPU in a PLC system.
      3. Identify and describe the operation of a power supply in a PLC system. Determine the proper sizing of a power supply to meet the power requirements of a PLC system.
      4. Configure, connect, and utilize a PC to communicate with a PLC processor.
      5. Integrate hardware devices used in control circuits to a PLC system. Explain the state for various input devices required to energize a PLC input. Determine the requirements to energize a PLC output.
      6. Recognize and draw the schematic symbols for devices used in PLC circuits. Differentiate between different symbols, conventions, and terminology from wiring diagrams.
      7. Differentiate between fixed and modular PLC architectures.
      8. Explain the procedures required to properly install a PLC system.
    2. Recognize and explain the operation of software in a PLC system.
      1. Differentiate between data files and program files in a PLC.
      2. Describe a PLC scan including the order of operation and the scan time required to perform all tasks.
      3. Identify and describe the operation of basic logic elements in a PLC program.
      4. Identify and describe the operation of timers and counters in a PLC program.
      5. Explain how program control elements allow the PLC to alter the normal execution of the PLC scan.
      6. Describe the use and operation of math functions for performing calculations on data in PLC programs.
      7. Explain how sequencers can be used to perform repetitive operations using event driven or time driven control.
      8. Differentiate between various forms of data manipulation techniques including the use of move instructions, shift registers, and file/word transfers.
      9. Identify and describe the use and operation of a one shot instruction.
      10. Differentiate between main program files and subroutines.
      11. Differentiate between bit and word instructions and data.
    3. Demonstrate ability to configure and use programming software.
      1. Configure and utilize RSLinx software to establish a connection between a PC and the PLC.
      2. Utilize RSLogix for creating, editing, saving, downloading, and uploading programs.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to make online program edits.
      4. Demonstrate the ability to view and modify the contents of words in the data file.
      5. Demonstrate the ability to troubleshoot PLC logic programs.
      6. Differentiate between different modes of operation for the PLC processor including RUN, PROGRAM, and REMOTE modes
    4. Relate knowledge about electrical devices to PLC systems.
      1. Explain the use of the PLC in safety circuits.
      2. Recognize and discuss the use of PLC systems in machine and process control. Differentiate between relay control and PLC control systems.
      3. Recognize and explain the integration of failsafe design practices.
      4. Recognize and explain the need for effective panel layouts, the use of wiring terminals, and the importance of preventative maintenance in industrial PLC systems.
      5. Apply NEC and NFPA standards to PLC circuits.
    5. Conduct laboratory experiments to reinforce lecture material.
      1. State, comprehend, and comply with safety precautions when working on electrical equipment.
      2. Construct control circuits using electrical devices and laboratory PLC equipment. Predict and analyze the proper operation of PLC circuits. Troubleshoot and make wiring modifications, if necessary, to obtain the desired results of the control schematic.
      3. Evaluate the proper operation of the PLC program using programming software.
      4. Design, program, and troubleshoot PLC circuits from a narrative description.
      5. Develop troubleshooting techniques.
  
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    ET 130 - Conventional Controls

    Credits: 3
    Identifies control devices commonly used throughout industry and relates each device to the proper symbol that is used in the electrical drawings. Develops a thorough comprehension for the devices by describing the proper operation of a control circuit that is comprised of various components that are integrated together. Applies the subject material from lecture in the laboratory through the use of electro-pneumatic training boards. Uses drawings to construct control circuits, analyze the process, make revisions to wiring or set-up configurations, as necessary, and evaluate the proper operation of the control circuit. Credit may be earned in SKET 130  or ET130 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): ET 120  with a minimum grade of “C”.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 22.5 Lab Hours: 22.5
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Recognize and explain the operation of electrical control devices.
      1. Identify and describe the functionality of operator interface devices (e.g. pushbuttons, selector switches, etc.).
      2. Identify and describe the operation and the components of a control relay, contactor, and motor starter.
      3. Identify and describe the operation of common sensors used in industry (e.g. pressure switches, limit switches, proximity switches, temperature sensors, etc.). Differentiate between sensors and transducers used on industrial equipment.
      4. Differentiate between the normally open and normally closed states for pushbuttons, relays, and sensors.
      5. Identify and describe the operation of output devices (e.g. pilot lights, horns, heaters, etc.)
      6. Explain the operation of timers and counters in control circuits.
      7. Recognize and draw the schematic symbols for devices used in control circuits. Differentiate between different symbols, conventions, and terminology.
      8. Determine the proper wire size and color for use in electrical wiring circuits per NFPA standards.
      9. Explain the use and operation of disconnect switches and circuit breakers.
      10. Differentiate between various fuse types and sizes for different applications.
    2. Recognize and explain the operation of fluid power devices.
      1. Identify and describe the operation of a solenoid.
      2. Identify and describe the operation of a two position valve, three position valve, manifold, and cylinder.
      3. Explain the operation and use of pressure regulators and flow control in fluid power applications.
      4. Recognize and draw the schematic symbols for devices used in fluid power circuits. Differentiate between different symbols, conventions, and terminology.
    3. Analyze electrical control and fluid power circuits.
      1. Apply knowledge about electrical control and fluid power devices to their integration into a control circuit.
      2. Predict and discuss the proper operation of electrical control and fluid power circuits.
      3. Modify the design of control circuits to accomplish different tasks.
    4. Relate knowledge about electrical devices to control systems.
      1. Explain the process of risk assessment and the safety components necessary to comply with safety requirements.
      2. Differentiate between open loop and closed loop systems. Explain the various forms of PID control and predict the response of the system to various changes in parameters.
      3. Recognize and discuss the use of PLC systems in machine and process control.
      4. Explain the transfer of data in an industrial application. Differentiate between different protocols and network systems.
      5. Recognize and explain the integration of failsafe design practices.
      6. Recognize and explain the need for effective panel layouts, the use of wiring terminals, and the importance of preventative maintenance in industrial control systems.
      7. Apply NEC and NFPA standards to control circuits.
    5. Conduct laboratory experiments to reinforce lecture material
      1. State, comprehend, and comply with safety precautions when working on electrical equipment.
      2. Construct circuits using electrical and pneumatic components on laboratory equipment. Predict and analyze the proper operation of electrical control and fluid power circuits. Troubleshoot and make wiring modifications, if necessary, to obtain the desired results of the control schematic.
      3. Measure electrical values of current, voltage, and resistance in circuits.
      4. Develop troubleshooting techniques.
  
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    ET 134 - Transformers

    Credits: 2
    Principles of transformers are discussed and applied to single phase transformers, three phase transformers, wye and delta connections, and isolation transformers. This course develops competency in the understanding and application of the National Electrical Code (NEC) as it applies to transformer installations. Calculations for turns ratio, voltage ratio, and current ratio are used to determine circuit relationships between voltage and current.

    Prerequisite(s): ET 120  with a minimum grade of “C”
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Explain the theory of operation for transformers and identify primary components.
      1. Explain the principle of self-inductance and mutual-inductance and how it applies to transformers.
      2. Explain the concept of electromagnetism and how it is used to create a magnetic field in a transformer coil.
      3. Identify the primary components in transformers.
      4. Describe the basic operation of single phase transformers.
      5. Explain the basic operation of three phase transformers.
      6. Describe the generation of 3 phase power and differentiate between delta and wye connections.
      7. Explain the construction techniques for various types of transformers.
      8. Describe preventative maintenance procedures for transformers.
    2. Apply the knowledge of transformer operation to perform calculations.
      1. Perform calculations to determine current, voltage, and turns ratio for single phase transformers.
      2. Perform calculations to determine current, voltage, and turns ratio for three phase transformers.
      3. Describe how to select a transformer for a given application.
      4. Develop circuit diagrams for the basic operation of various transformers.
      5. Interpret transformer nameplate data to determine expected values for a properly functioning transformer.
    3. Differentiate between different types of transformers
      1. Describe the use and operation of power generation and distribution transformers.
      2. Explain the use and operation of control transformers.
      3. Describe the use and operation of reactors and isolation transformers.
      4. Explain the use and operation of autotransformers.
      5. Describe the use and operation of buck-boost transformers.
      6. Describe the use and operation of special transformers.
    4. Apply knowledge of transformers to NEC requirements.
      1. State and comprehend safety precautions when working on electrical equipment.
      2. Describe procedures for installing transformers and making transformer connections.
      3. Identify and explain NEC transformer requirements.
      4. Develop troubleshooting techniques.
  
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    ET 136 - Grounding

    Credits: 2
    Develops competency in the comprehension and application of the National Electrical Code (NEC) as it applies to the effective grounding and bonding of electrical devices, equipment, and systems. Examines how to properly read and interpret the NEC tables and how to properly calculate the size of the conductors for the application. Credits may be earned in ET 136 or SKET 136 , but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): ET 100  with a minimum grade of “C”.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Explain the characteristics of an effectively grounded and bonded system.
      1. Describe the purposes of grounding and bonding.
      2. Explain the intermittent problems and difficult to diagnose issues resulting from poor grounding practices.
      3. Identify the types of systems that cannot be grounded.
      4. Explain the requirements and methods used for grounding electrical equipment.
      5. Explain residential requirements and methods for grounding receptacles and running a grounding rod.
      6. Explain the requirements for grounding electrodes and grounding conductors.
      7. Describe methods for effective bonding in electrical applications.
      8. Explain the use, operation, and proper wiring procedure for Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI).
    2. Apply the knowledge of effective grounding and bonding.
      1. Perform calculations to determine the proper sizing of grounding conductors.
      2. Apply knowledge to the proper integration of surge and transient protection.
      3. Explain method of correctly shielding sensitive communication cables from noise and interference.
      4. Explain the hazards associated with lightning and describe methods of protection against lightning.
      5. Integrate grounding symbols and wiring connections for circuit diagrams used in industrial applications.
      6. Describe methods for determining an effectively grounded installation.
    3. Apply knowledge of over-current protection to NEC and NFPA requirements.
      1. State and comprehend safety precautions when working on electrical equipment.
      2. Identify and interpret NEC tables and applicable standards for grounding and bonding requirements in industrial applications.
      3. Identify and interpret NEC tables and applicable standards for grounding and bonding requirements in residential applications.
      4. Develop troubleshooting techniques for identifying and correcting grounding, bonding, and surge problems.
  
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    ET 140 - Motor Controls and Drives

    Credits: 4
    Applies the basic principles of control circuits to an intermediate study of DC motors, AC motors, and servo motors. Performs armature reaction, CEMF, and basic motor calculations. Analyzes motor control including starting requirements, forward/reverse control, and sequencing of motors. Emphasizes the extension of motor control to drive systems including SCR armature control, field weakening, Pulse Width Modulation, and Variable Frequency Drives. Explains principles of drive operation, set-up, calibration, and troubleshooting in lecture and applies in laboratory exercises. Credit may be earned in SKET 140  or ET 140 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): ET 130  with a minimum grade of “C”.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Explain the operation of DC motors and generators.
      1. Identify the primary components of a DC motor and generator.
      2. Describe the basic operation of a DC motor and generator.
      3. Explain the concepts of torque, armature reaction, and CEMF.
      4. Apply knowledge of what compensating windings are, and why they are used.
      5. Describe the winding configurations for shunt, series, and compound wound DC motors.
      6. Interpret motor nameplate data.
      7. Perform calculations to determine speed regulation, horsepower, and efficiency for DC motors.
    2. Explain the operation of AC motors and alternators.
      1. Identify the primary components of an AC motor and alternator.
      2. Describe the basic operation of an AC motor and alternator.
      3. Differentiate between revolving armature and revolving field alternators.
      4. Explain the generation of 3 phase power and differentiate between delta and wye connections.
      5. Explain how the rotating field of an AC motor is produced.
      6. Describe the wiring configurations for dual voltage AC motors.
      7. Differentiate between synchronous, wound round, and squirrel cage AC motors.
      8. Interpret motor nameplate data.
      9. Perform calculations to determine frequency, speed, starting current, and percent slip.
      10. Differentiate between different types of single phase AC motors.
    3. Apply knowledge of basic control circuitry to motor applications.
      1. Identify the components of a motor starter and explain the operation of motor circuits.
      2. Utilize NEMA starter ratings to determine the correct size starter for an application.
      3. Integrate timing controls to properly sequence the starting of multiple motor loads.
      4. Integrate timing controls to properly sequence the stopping of multiple motor loads.
      5. Integrate forward and reversing motor starters to properly reverse the direction of a motor.
    4. Apply knowledge of DC motors and electronic circuits to DC drive systems.
      1. Explain the firing operation of SCRs to provide armature control for a DC motor.
      2. Explain the process of field weakening to run a DC motor above base speed.
      3. Explain the process of Pulse Width Modulation to control a DC motor.
      4. Describe the method used for reversing a motor using a DC drive system.
      5. Describe how speed control is integrated into a DC drive system.
      6. Define the proper set-up and calibration procedures for a DC drive system.
    5. Apply knowledge of AC motors and electronic circuits to AC drive systems.
      1. Explain the operation of Variable Frequency drives to control an AC motor.
      2. Describe the method used for reversing a motor using an AC drive system.
      3. Describe how speed control is integrated into an AC drive system.
      4. Define the methods required to adjust parameters in an AC drive system.
      5. Define the proper set-up and calibration procedures for an AC drive system.
      6. Describe how closed loop systems operate and explain the operation of common feedback devices.
      7. Explain the general operation of a servo system including main feedback loops and the integration of control signals.
    6. Conduct laboratory experiments to reinforce lecture material.
      1. State, comprehend, and comply with safety precautions when working on electrical equipment.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to operate, set-up, and calibrate DC and AC drive systems.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to troubleshoot DC and AC drive systems.
      4. Demonstrate the ability to utilize meters to measure signals on DC and AC drive systems.
      5. Demonstrate the ability to utilize oscilloscopes to analyze waveforms on DC and AC drive systems.
      6. Demonstrate the ability to utilize programming tools to modify parameters in AC drive systems.
      7. Develop troubleshooting techniques.
  
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    ET 162 - Industrial Robotics I

    Credits: 3
    Studies modern industrial robotic systems. Introduces the operation, use and safety of industrial robots. Includes feedback mechanisms, actuators, sensors, power supplies, micro-controllers, P.C. computer control and programming. Emphasizes a hands-on approach to system analysis, critical thinking, solution to open-ended problems, computer usage, and teamwork. Credit may be earned in ET 162 or SKET 162  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): ET 120  or EET 235  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate Robot basics.
      1. Understand and follow safety guidelines and demonstrate use of emergency-stops and servo lockouts.
      2. Properly power up robot controller and demonstrate fault recovery procedures.
      3. Place robot in following operating modes: automatic, low speed, and 100 percent manual mode.
    2. Identify system components.
      1. Identify manipulator motors, resolvers, calibration marks, counterbalance devices, hard stops, brake release buttons, and end of arm tooling.
      2. Identify a robot controller’s computer and I/O modules, servo amps, motor relays, power supply.
      3. Demonstrate proper teach pendant’s enabling device, motion device, e-stop and teach pendant buttons.
      4. Demonstrate proper control panel emergency stop button, motors on/off indicators, key switch, fault reset button, and floppy drive.
      5. Use the calibration program to verify robot synchronization.
    3. Oerate the teach pendant functions.
      1. Use the teach pendant to safely manipulate the robot in a work cell.
      2. Energize and de-energize the robot motors.
      3. Locate and indentify different teach pendant keys and their functions.
      4. Locate the origin for motors for jogging each type of coordinate system.
      5. Select various tool center points.
      6. Select between joint, base and tool coordinate systems.
      7. Access program instruction and test cycle menus.
      8. Select and test cycle programs to demonstrate program flow and the use of subroutines.
      9. Cycle the robot to taught positions.
      10. Cycle the robot through selected routines.
      11. Manipulate the program pointer and cursor.
      12. Interpret and respond to error codes.
      13. Identify the function of each component with a motion command.
      14. Identify the function of the most commonly used program instructions.
      15. Access input and output screens.
      16. Set and reset outputs to operate end-of arm-tooling.
      17. Recover from faults and prepare robot to run in automatic mode.
    4. Perform programming functions
      1. Edit position date including motion types, position name, velocity, and accuracy.
      2. Edit and touch up existing programs and positions.
      3. Cut, edit, mark, paste, and delete lines of the program.
      4. Create, declare, and edit of routines of data types such as registers and robtargets.
      5. Alter if-then statements using optional argument key.
      6. Program subroutines for proper program flow.
      7. Program basic motion commands.
      8. Program the robot using proper motion techniques.
    5. Demonstrate proper file utilities
      1. Upload programs from disk to the robot.
      2. Save programs from the robot to the floppy drive.
  
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    ET 164 - Robotics Electrical Service & Troubleshooting

    Credits: 3
    Identifies the electrical components of robots, theory of operation. Introduces proper troubleshooting procedures for the robot controller and manipulator. Approximately 50 percent of the course is hands-on troubleshooting of actual robot system and controller. Credit may be earned in ET 164 or SKET 164  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): ET 120  and MT 220  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate robot basics.
      1. Follow safety guidelines and demonstate use of emergency-stops and servo lockouts.
      2. Properly power up robot controller and demonstrate fault recovery procedures.
      3. Place robot in the following operating modes: automatic, low speed, and 100 percent manual modes.
    2. Identify system components
      1. Identify manupulator motors, resolvers, calibration marks, counterbalance devices, hard stops, brake release buttons, and end-of-arm tooling.
      2. Identify robot controller and computer and I/O modules, servo amps, motor relays, power supply.
      3. Demonstrate proper teach pendant: enabling device, motion device, e-stop and teach pendant buttons.
      4. Demonstrate proper panel emergency stop button, motors on/off indicators, key switch, fault reset button, and floppy drive.
      5. Use the calibration program to verify robot synchronization.
    3. Understand Robotics circuits diagrams
      1. Understand theory of operation of the robot controller.
      2. Describe components in the robot controller.
      3. Explain principles of logical troubleshooting from power up through emergency stop loop and servo system.
      4. Describe input/output interfacing between the S4C+ robot controller and peripheral equipment.
      5. Operate the controller control panel and programming unit.
      6. Read and interpret robot circuit diagrams on the robot controller.
    4. Perform troubleshooting techniques successfully
      1. Use safety precautions used while troubleshooting the robot controller electrical system.
      2. Set up commutation, resolver, counters, limit and sync switches.
      3. Analyze and interpret system fault codes.
      4. Diagnose and repair basic electrical faults.
      5. Analyze servo-system data and make basic adjustments.
      6. Diagnose and rectify emergency stop conditions.
      7. Make I/O connections to peripheral equipment and safety devices.
      8. Repair and replace systems components.
      9. Review “Cold-Boot” procedure.
  
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    ET 210 - Introduction to Electronics

    Credits: 4
    Identifies basic electronic devices commonly used throughout industry and relates each device to the proper symbol that is used in the electrical drawings. Describes the proper operation of an electronic circuit that is comprised of various components that are integrated together. Applies lecture material in the laboratory through the use of electronic circuit training boards. Constructs electronic circuits from drawings, analyzes the process, makes revisions to wiring as necessary, and evaluates the proper operation of the circuit. Discusses and uses troubleshooting techniques and basic test instruments. Credit may be earned in SKET 210  or ET 210 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): ET 120  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of basic semiconductor devices.
      1. Explain how semiconductor material is formed.
      2. Recognize and draw schematic symbols for semiconductor devices.
      3. Explain electrical behavior within semiconductor devices.
      4. Demonstrate understanding of the effects of DC biasing on semiconductor devices.
      5. Interpret device data sheets to
        1. Identify physical shape (package outline) and lead placement.
        2. Determine maximum electrical ratings.
    2. Apply knowledge of device function to electric circuits.
      1. Interpret schematic circuits using semiconductor devices.
      2. Explain function of device as it is used within an electric circuit.
      3. Analyze DC electric values including current, voltage, and power of semiconductor circuits.
      4. Determine circuit operation when semiconductor devices fail open or shorted.
      5. Identify functional blocks within a schematic circuit.
      6. Explain circuit’s ability to control current to a load using
        1. Open loop and closed loop techniques.
        2. Phase control.
    3. Utilize test equipment in a lab environment to reinforce lecture material.
      1. State, explain, and comply with safety precautions while using electrical equipment.
      2. Use hand held meters and oscilloscopes to test semiconductor devices.
      3. Use hand held meters and oscilloscopes to measure device and circuit operation.
      4. Safely use and accurately set power supplies and signal generators for circuit operation.
      5. Wire simple electric circuits to demonstrate component function.
      6. Practice ability to troubleshoot electric circuit and component failures.
  
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    ET 250 - Programmable Logic Controllers II - Siemens

    Credits: 4
    Builds on the skills developed in an introduction to PLCs and applies the concepts learned to a Siemens Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) system. Explains the hardware platform for the Siemens PLC along with the logic elements that comprise the instruction set used for programming the logic. Applies material taught in lecture in the laboratory through the use of PLC training systems. Constructs control circuits from drawings, analyzes the process, makes revisions as necessary, and evaluates the proper operation of the PLC circuit. Credit may be earned in ET 250 or SKET 250  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): ET 122  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Recognize and explain the operation of hardware in Siemens PLC system.
      1. Identify and describe the operation of the PLC input and output cards.
      2. Identify and describe the functions of the CPU in a PLC system.
      3. Identify and describe the operation of the power supply in a PLC system. Determine the proper sizing of a power supply to meet the power requirements of a PLC system
      4. Configure, connect, and utilize a PC to communicate with the PLC processor.
      5. Recognize and draw the schematic symbols for devices used in PLC circuits. Differentiate between different symbols, conventions, and terminology from wiring diagrams.
      6. Explain the procedures required to properly install a PLC system.
    2. Recognize and explain the instruction set used in Siemens PLC system.
      1. Differentiate between data files and program files in a PLC.
      2. Describe a PLC scan including the order of operation and the scan time required to perform all tasks.
      3. Identify and describe the operation of basic logic elements in a PLC program.
      4. Identify and describe the operation of times and counters in a PLC program.
      5. Explain how program control elements allow the PLC to alter the normal execution of the PLC scan.
      6. Describe the use and operation of math functions for performing calculations on data in PLC programs.
      7. Differentiate between various forms of data manipulation techniques including the use of move instructions, shift registers, and file/word transfers.
      8. Identify and describe the use and operation of a one shot instruction.
      9. Differentiate between various data types.
      10. Differentiate between bit and word instructions and data.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to configure and use programming software.
      1. Configure and utilize communication software to establish a connection between a PC and the PLC.
      2. Create, edit, save, download, and upload programs.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to make online program edits.
      4. Demonstrate the ability to view and modify and the contents of words in the data file.
      5. Demonstrate the ability to troubleshoot PLC logic programs.
    4. Conduct laboratory experiments to reinforce lecture material.
      1. State, explain, and comply with safety precautions when working on electrical equipment.
      2. Construct control circuits using electrical devices and laboratory PLC equipment. Predict and analyze the proper operation of PLC circuits. Troubleshoot and make wiring modifications, if necessary, to obtain the desired results of the control schematic.
      3. Evaluate the proper operation of the PLC program using programming software.
      4. Design, program, and troubleshoot PLC circuits from a narrative description.
      5. Develop troubleshooting techniques.
  
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    ET 252 - Programmable Logic Controllers II - AB ControlLogix

    Credits: 4
    Builds on the skills developed in an introduction to PLCs and applies the concepts learned to an AB ControlLogix Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) system. Explains the hardware platform for the AB ControlLogix PLC along with the logic elements that comprise the instruction set used for programming the logic. Applies lecture subject material in the laboratory through the use of PLC training systems. Constructs control circuits from drawings, analyzes the process, makes revisions as necessary, and evaluates the proper operation of the PLC circuit. Credit may be earned in ET 252 or SKET 252  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): ET 122  with a minimum grade of “C”.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Recognize and explain the operation of hardware in AB ControlLogix PLC system.
      1. Identify and describe the operation of the PLC input and output cards.
      2. Identify and describe the functions of the CPU in a PLC system.
      3. Identify and describe the operation of the power supply in a PLC system. Determine the proper sizing of a power supply to meet the power requirements of a PLC system.
      4. Configure, connect, and utilize a PC to communicate with the PLC processor.
      5. Describe the function of tags and explain how the tag is used to map to hardware on the PLC
      6. Recognize and draw the schematic symbols for devices used in PLC circuits. Differentiate between different symbols, conventions, and terminology from wiring diagrams.
      7. Explain the procedures required to properly install a PLC system.
    2. Recognize and explain the instruction set used in AB ControlLogix PLC system.
      1. Differentiate between data files and program files in a PLC.
      2. Describe a PLC scan including the order of operation and the scan time required to perform all tasks.
      3. Identify and describe the operation of basic logic elements in a PLC program.
      4. Identify and describe the operation of timers and counters in a PLC program.
      5. Explain how program control elements allow the PLC to alter the normal execution of the PLC scan.
      6. Describe the use and operation of math functions for performing calculations on data in PLC programs.
      7. Differentiate between various forms of data manipulation techniques including the use of move instructions, shift registers, and file/word transfers.
      8. Identify and describe the use and operation of a one shot instruction.
      9. Differentiate between various data types.
      10. Differentiate between main program files and subroutines.
      11. Differentiate between bit and word instructions and data.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to configure and use programming software.
      1. Configure and utilize RSLinx software to establish a connection between a PC and the PLC.
      2. Create, edit, save, download, and upload programs utilizing RSLogix.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to make online program edits.
      4. Demonstrate the ability to view and modify the contents of words in the data file.
      5. Demonstrate the ability to troubleshoot PLC logic programs.
    4. Conduct laboratory experiments to reinforce lecture material.
      1. State, explain, and comply with safety precautions when working on electrical equipment.
      2. Construct control circuits using electrical devices and laboratory PLC equipment. Predict and analyze the proper operation of PLC circuits. Troubleshoot and make wiring modifications, if necessary, to obtain the desired results of the control schematic.
      3. Evaluate the proper operation of the PLC program using programming software.
      4. Design, program, and troubleshoot PLC circuits from a narrative description.
      5. Develop troubleshooting techniques.
  
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    ET 262 - Industrial Robotics II

    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ET 162 . Emphasizes programming, advanced manipulation, grip load instructions, velocity and acceleration instruction, offline editing, handling errors, and robot configuration. Discusses programming concepts and structures in the C+ programming language, industry-like applications and system integration projects. Emphasizes a hands-on approach to system analysis, critical thinking, solutions to open-ended problems, computer usage, and teamwork. Credit may be earned in ET 262 or SKET 262  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): ET 162  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrat robot basics.
      1. Follow safety guidelines and demonstrate use of emergency-stops and servo lockout.
      2. Properly power up robot controller and demonstrate fault recovery procedures.
      3. Demonstrate the abilty to energize and de-energize the robot motors.
      4. Locate and identify different teach pendant keys and their functions.
      5. Place robot in the following operating modes: automatic, low speed, and 100 percent manual modes.
    2. Perform robot manipulation functions.
      1. Understand and define a tool center point using the 4-point, 5-point, and 6-point methods.
      2. Define and use work objects.
      3. Create and use a user frame and an object frame.
      4. Define different acceleration and ramp speed rates.
      5. Demonstrate the abilty to change the robot’s velocity, acceleration and deceleration speeds for smoother motion.
      6. Demonstrate the abilty to use different commands in order to setup an interrupt, turn on or off an interrupt, trap errors, and trigger routines from I/O motion.
    3. Perform programming functions.
      1. Use decision-making, register and math, and time instructions in a program.
      2. Use offsets for movement instructions.
      3. Use work objects for movement references.
      4. Edit position date including motion types, position name, velocity, and accuracy
      5. Create and edit existing programs and positions.
      6. Cut, edit, mark, paste, and delete lines of the program.
      7. Create, declare, and edit of routines of data types such as registers and robtargets.
      8. Program subroutines for proper program flow.
      9. Program advanced motion commands.
      10. Program the robot using proper motion techniques.
      11. Demonstrate the abilty to distinguish and create different data types and data tables.
      12. Define and understand the programming techniques for data arrays for error messages and positions.
      13. Use the robot controller service port to transfer files between the robot controller and a computer, understand syntax of offline programs and I/O, and edit and reload programs offline.
    4. Demonstrate advanced robot control.
      1. Define different error handling methods and how to use them.
      2. Understand the instructions that are used with error handling and how they will affect program flow.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to use the different instructions in order to setup an error handling routine.
      4. Understand and define different world zones, limit motion, and set digital outputs using world zones.
      5. Explain and solve wrist configuration and singularity problems during program execution.
      6. Set teach pendant programmable keys.
  
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    ET 280 - Industrial Computer Networks

    Credits: 3
    Builds on the skills developed in an introduction to PLC’s and applies the concepts learned to the integration of various devices to form an industrial computer network system. Emphasis is placed on the Ethernet communication protocol. Construct a computer network, establish communications between all connected devices, and evaluate the proper operation of a control system. Develops skills of selecting, connecting, and operating sensors and transducers in an industrial environment in order to perform maintenance actions. Credit may be earned in SKET 280  or ET 280 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): ET 122  with a grade of “C” or better.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the ability to collect and analyze data.
      1. Practice setting up and testing a computer network.
      2. Establish communications between all connected devices on a computer network.
      3. Use data acquisition software and hardware to collect and analyze data from a physical system.
    2. Recognize problems on industrial equipment and explain methods used to identify and resolve the problem.
      1. Explain methods used to recognize when a problem exists on industrial equipment.
      2. Explain methods used to identify the source of a problem by using various problem solving techniques.
      3. Identify the tools required to troubleshoot specific problems on industrial equipment.
      4. Explain methods used to resolve problems on industrial equipment.
    3. Conduct laboratory experiments to reinforce lecture material.
      1. State, comprehend, and comply with safety precautions when working on industrial equipment.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to recognize when a problem exists on industrial equipment.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to identify the source of a problem by using problem solving techniques.
      4. Demonstrate the ability to select the proper tools required to troubleshoot industrial equipment
      5. Demonstrate the ability to resolve problems on industrial equipment.
      6. Demonstrate the ability to effectively troubleshoot hardware, software, and mechanical problems on PLC systems.

Electronic Engineering Technology

  
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    EET 120 - Digital Circuits

    Credits: 3
    Studies fundamental concepts of digital electronics, including the +5 volt TTL family of integrated circuits, digital number systems, Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, combinational logic circuits, counters, latches, flip-flops and shift registers. Introduces basic memory concepts and circuits.

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 097   or H.S. equivalent
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of digital number systems.
      1. Describe the binary, decimal, octal and hexadecimal number systems
      2. Convert values from one number system to another
      3. Perform mathematical operations in various number systems
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of basic logic gates.
      1. List the basic logic gates
      2. Draw the symbol for the basic logic gates
      3. Write the truth table for the basic logic gates
      4. Write the Boolean expression for the basic logic gates
      5. Test the operation of basic logic gates
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of Boolean algebra.
      1. List the 12 rules of Boolean algebra
      2. Convert between truth table, Boolean expression and logic circuit diagram
      3. Simplify Boolean expressions using algebraic techniques
      4. Simplify Boolean expressions using Karnaugh mapping techniques
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of combinational logic circuits.
      1. Describe the operation of basic combinational logic circuits
      2. Design combinational logic circuits
      3. Fabricate and test combinational logic circuits
      4. Troubleshoot combinational logic circuits
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of sequential logic circuits.
      1. Describe the operation of basic sequential logic circuits
      2. Design sequential logic circuits
      3. Fabricate and test sequential logic circuits
      4. Troubleshoot sequential logic circuits
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of registers.
      1. Describe the operation of registers circuits
      2. Draw register circuits
      3. Construct and test register circuits
      4. Troubleshoot register circuits
  
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    EET 215 - Electrical Controls and Automation

    Credits: 5
    Studies industrial control logic design and application with emphasis on ladder logic, relay and T-switch logic formats. Uses Modicon micro 84 to study programmable controller logic. Covers 4-layer semiconductors (SCRS-TRIACS-UJTS-PUTS-DIACS), their characteristics and applications. Studies application of electronic control systems to machine processes with emphasis on transducers, I/O interfaces, control processors and output drivers.

    Prerequisite(s): EET 235  with a minimum “C” grade
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of conventional control concepts.
      1. Analyze basic sequential machine control circuits
      2. Design basic sequential machine control circuits
      3. Generate ladder diagrams for sequential machine control
      4. Generate logic circuits for sequential machine control
      5. Generate a sequence table, truth table and Boolean expression from a ladder diagram
      6. Generate a sequence table, truth table and Boolean expression from a logic circuit
      7. Draw standard industrial control symbols
      8. Analyze motor starter control circuits
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of 4-layer semiconductor devices.
      1. Describe the basic operation of a SCR, TRIAC, UJT, PUT and DIAC
      2. Calculate the power capability of a SCR, TRIAC, UJT, PUT and DIAC
      3. Analyze a phase angle control power system
      4. Design a phase angle control power system
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of basic control systems.
      1. Describe the operation of an open loop control system
      2. Analyze the operation of an open loop control system
      3. Describe the operation of a closed loop control system
      4. Analyze the operation of a closed loop control system
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of transducers.
      1. Describe the operation of a linear displacement (LVDT) transducer
      2. Describe the operation of angular and rotational position transducers
      3. Describe the operation of a force transducer
      4. Describe how to interface analog and digital transducers to a control system
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of programmable controllers.
      1. Describe the operation of a programmable controller
      2. Describe programmable controller inputs and outputs
      3. Analyze the operation of a programmable controller
      4. Design a sequential machine control circuit using a programmable controller
  
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    EET 226 - Computer Electronics

    Credits: 6
    Introduces computer electronics with an emphasis on programming microcontroller computers using the C programming language. Teaches students to design projects that combine hardware and software to create applications that interface microcontrollers to other computers and to analog and digital circuits.

    Prerequisite(s): EET 120 .
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 90 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the C programming language.
      1. Write C language microcontroller programs
      2. Compile and troubleshoot C language microcontroller programs
      3. Transfer machine language programs to microcontrollers
      4. Test the operation of microcontroller applications
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the electrical behavior of a microcontroller.
      1. Explain the use of a microcontroller for parallel input and output
      2. Explain the use of a microcontroller for serial input and output
      3. Explain the use of a microcontroller for operate electronic displays
      4. Explain the use of a microcontroller timer
      5. Explain the use of a microcontroller interrupts
      6. Construct and test microcontroller circuits
      7. Troubleshoot microcontroller applications
  
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    EET 230 - Soldering Techniques

    Credits: 1
    Develops skill in soldering and printed circuit board fabrication and repair, using commonly accepted industrial practices. Covers safety, chemical handling, contamination of work area, grounding, materials, and waste handling. Producing a functioning printed circuit assembly is required.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 8 Lab Hours: 22
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Discuss safety precautions applied to soldering.
      1. Identify and discuss the need for personal safety precautions as applied to soldering
      2. Identify and discuss the need for workplace safety precautions as applied to soldering
      3. Describe and discuss the Right-to-Know law
      4. Correctly identify common chemicals in soldering and circuit board fabrication
      5. Describe hazards associated with contamination of common chemicals used in soldering and circuit board fabrication
      6. Identify correct procedures for disposal of common chemicals used in soldering and circuit board fabrication
    2. Discuss proper soldering techniques.
      1. Discuss material content
      2. Discuss temperature requirements
      3. Identify causes of cold solder joints
      4. Identify results of contamination in the soldering process
    3. Describe mechanical and electrical connections.
      1. Identify mechanical connections in electrical and electronic assemblies
      2. Identify electrical connections in electrical and electronic assemblies
      3. Identify soldered connections in electrical and electronic assemblies
      4. Describe the need for mechanical and electrical connections
    4. Describe the negative resist photo masking process in printed circuit board fabrication.
      1. Identify negative and positive artwork
      2. Examine and repair artwork before usage
      3. Identify and discuss procedures used to create PC-board
      4. Demonstrate negative resist photo masking process by creating a usable PC-board
    5. Demonstrate soldering techniques associated with printed circuit component installation and repair.
      1. Identify repairable/non-repairable faulty PC-board
      2. Demonstrate appropriate techniques for repair of PC-board traces
      3. Demonstrate appropriate techniques for repair of PC-board of donuts and lands
      4. Demonstrate proper use of soldering station
      5. Demonstrate proper solder removal techniques using solder suckers and wicking wire
      6. Demonstrate proper removal of components from PC-board
      7. Demonstrate proper soldering techniques
      8. Demonstrate proper solder rework techniques
      9. Demonstrate proper component installation techniques
      10. Identify proper appearance of solder joints
      11. Identify cold solder joints
      12. Complete assembly of PC-Board
    6. Demonstrate connector assembly procedures.
      1. Identify types of electrical connectors, both commercial and mil-spec
      2. Determine whether connector is solder or crimp type
      3. Identify common instrumentation connectors
      4. Demonstrate proper connector assembly procedures
  
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    EET 235 - Electrical Circuits

    Credits: 3
    Studies DC and AC circuit fundamentals including a general introduction to industrial control concepts.

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 119W  or MTH 119AW  or appropriate assessment scores
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand electrical safety.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of basic electrical safety techniques
    2. Make electrical measurements.
      1. Measure ac and dc current and voltage
      2. Measure electrical resistance
      3. Determine electrical continuity
    3. Understand basic electrical circuits.
      1. Analyze ac and dc series, parallel, combined series-parallel and bridge circuits
      2. Fabricate ac and dc series, parallel, combined series-parallel and bridge circuits
      3. Troubleshoot ac and dc series, parallel, combined series-parallel and bridge circuits
    4. Understand transformer and electric motor principles.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of single phase and three phase transformers
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of dc motors
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of single phase and three phase ac motors
    5. Outcome 5 Understand the electrical control of machines.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of proper wire size and color
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of electrical position sensors
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of basic electrical control devices: switch, timer, electromechanical relay, solid-state relay, contactor and motor starter
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of the programmable control of machines
      5. Demonstrate an understanding of electrical machine control wiring diagrams
  
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    EET 290-299 - Special Projects in Electronic Engineering Technology


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Electronic Media

  
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    EM 180 - Digital Cinematography for Film

    Credits: 3
    Provides basic knowledge of the visual aesthetics of long and short narrative film through film study and hands-on operation of camera and lighting equipment . Introduces concepts such as storyboarding, shot lists, filming and post-production processes using basic editing and color grading techniques. Provides hands-on experience with video equipment and associated accessories to tell a story visually.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 20 Lab Hours: 40
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Distinguish different filming and lighting styles of films and other media to develop an understanding of the visual language of film.
      1. Study and discuss cinematographers and their unique styles. Identify different visual styles and how they contribute to storytelling in film.
      2. Discuss how camera movement influences the narrative of film.
    2. Use various techniques to translate a written story into a workable shooting schedule by organizing and breaking down visual concepts.
      1. Identify the visual aspects of a screenplay or Audio/Visual script and create sketches organized into a storyboard.
      2. Break down storyboard and other elements into a working shot list, translated into a shooting schedule to create an organized production plan.
    3. Demonstrate ability in the use of cameras and associated support systems to capture visual concepts originating from storyboards. Understand and execute the use of natural and artificial light to create the appropriate look for a film.
      1. Learn how different types of cameras (such as video, DSLRs and use of 35mm adapters) influence cinematography.
      2. Demonstrate the use of different camera support systems in relation to handheld techniques, sliders, jibs and tripods.
      3. Identify and use multiple lighting techniques that add to the overall aesthetic of the film.
    4. Demonstrate the basics of simple editing techniques and color grading using non-linear editors.
      1. Utilize basic editing and color grading to put the final touches on the visual look of a narrative film.
      2. Gain experience with specific software such as Final Cut Pro, Adobe Premiere and Adobe After Effects as they relate to film.
  
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    EM 280 - Digital Film Capstone

    Credits: 3
    Provides experience in designing and producing digital short and/or partial feature films as part of production teams. Identifies, through teamwork, the specific production and postproduction needs for the projects and evaluates the clarity and quality of the writing, production design, and overall digital film product generated. (15-45)

    Prerequisite(s): EMB 155  & ENG 258W  with a minimum grade of “C”
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Study professional film productions and demonstrate the ability to critically examine director styles and production techniques.
      1. Develop film aesthetics.
      2. Present and discuss critical analysis of professionally produced film productions.
      3. Identify production styles and techniques that could be emulated to enhance team produced student productions.
    2. Develop teamwork and interpersonal communication skills on a professional level.
      1. Coordinate efforts with team members to organize and maximize the various abilities of the team’s members.
      2. Apply professional communication skills to determine the pre-production needs for selected digital film productions.
    3. Identify digital film productions to be produced and meet with producers/directors to ascertain unique and specific pre-production, production and post-production needs.
      1. Identify media products necessary to meet producer/director needs in the most effective and appropriate way.
      2. Determine timeline and deadlines for individual elements to be completed.
    4. Design production plan for each facet of overall digital films to be produced.
      1. Create a unified media concept for implementation in all facets of the project.
      2. Determine continuity of media elements and individuals who will be given specific assignments to coincide with predetermined timeline.
    5. Apply skills in each individual production position within the team to effectively meet the specific needs of the selected digital film production.
      1. Apply knowledge to achieve specific and quantifiable results.
      2. Coordinate with team members to achieve continuity in each facet of the project.
    6. Deliver final product to producers/directors and instructor for evaluation and presentation.
      1. Complete all elements of production for execution and delivery.
      2. Submit final product for evaluation and presentation.
  
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    EM 290-299 - Special Projects in Electronic Media


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Electronic Media Broadcasting

  
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    EMB 131 - Visual Graphic Presentation Applications

    Credits: 2
    Introduces and explains a variety of traditional and online visual graphic presentation applications for effective visual communication tools. Concentrates primarily on graphic design basics, organizational techniques, digital media preparation, and presentation software that supports and enhances visual communication.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify effective visual graphic design composition utilizing lines, space, typography, color theory, and digital media as it applies to presentation application.
      1. Examine basic graphic design concepts in order to produce layouts based upon composition specifications.
    2. Identify effective presentation guidelines and organizational techniques to visually enhance and creatively engage a target audience.
      1. Contrast and compare completed presentations to measure the most and least successful visual deliveries.
    3. Employ digital image editing applications to prepare the necessary media elements for visual presentations.
      1. Assemble digital elements and utilize digital image editing software applications to construct media and graphics.
    4. Execute communication projects produced with a variety of presentation applications.
      1. Utilize traditional applications to produce effective digital communication presentation projects.
      2. Utilize online applications to produce effective digital communication presentation projects.
  
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    EMB 140 - Electronic Media History

    Credits: 3
    Concentrates primarily on Broadcasting History, its roots and parentage. Compares relationships between past issues and personalities with those of today. Answers the question: Where do we come from and where are we going as a profession?

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of Electronic Media’s rich and fascinating history and its relationship to the present with the following skills:
      1. Identify historical broadcast personalities, i.e., inventors, entrepreneurs, on-air talent, regulators, etc.
      2. Identify the various broadcasting landmarks in the areas of technology, business and regulation.
      3. Summarize the issues that have significantly confronted the profession from the beginning and how they were addressed.
      4. Characterize trends, i.e., programmatic, organizational, industrial, etc.
      5. Understand the accumulated decisions and responses made in our past and its influence on today’s Electronic Media.
      6. Project the future, i.e., ownership, delivery systems and pricing, by understanding past practices.
  
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    EMB 141W - Fundamentals of Audio Production

    Credits: 2
    Introduces basic audio production methods and equipment, including non-linear editors, microphones, recorders and supporting hardware. Emphasizes developing comprehension of communication using aural mediums, and the variety of media types and formats available. Introduces the basic production skills necessary for developing audio projects. Uses radio labs and equipment to instruct students in basic elements of audio acquisitions, editing, and production.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Acquire basic understanding of audio acquisition theory and become familiar with basic methods and terminology of recording and editing audio.
      1. Demonstrate basics of audio composition and acquisition utilizing digital audio recorders, microphones, and other recording devices.
      2. Identify a variety of media files and formats and describe differences, uses and application within the context of different types of audio productions.
    2. Demonstrate ability in basic audio production techniques.
      1. Demonstrate basic understanding of audio construction techniques and aesthetics.
      2. Demonstrate the creative use of software based digital signal processors.
      3. Apply techniques to successfully complete audio lab and project works.
      4. Properly manage and archive audio sessions and files.
    3. Acquire knowledge of basic audio producing skills, including production planning methods and scripting.
      1. Use scripting techniques for a variety of formats including news, feature, non-commercial and commercial productions.
      2. Apply production planning techniques, incorporating outlines, scripts and timeliness.
 

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