Sep 26, 2022  
2017-2018 
    
2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Interdisciplinary Humanities

  
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    IHU 120W - Introduction to Global Peace Studies

    Credits: 4
    Provides an interdisciplinary foundation for global peace studies. Focuses on identifying the various factors that interact to generate peace and/or conflict at the personal, local, national, and international levels. Includes analysis of how the interaction of economic and political influences, as well as the availability of environmental resources and cultural norms and values can result in peace or conflict. (Successful completion of this course satisfies the civic engagement requirement in the AA and AS degrees).Credit may be earned in IHU 120W or SSI 120W  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities, Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze the impact of various forces on peace or conflict.
      1. Examine the primary social forces influencing peace and conflict in our world: cultural, geographic, ideological, political, religious, and socioeconomic.
      2. Compare different theories of human nature that affect the development of hostile or peaceful interactions.
      3. Examine different conceptions of peace in the following areas: pacifist, rational, religious, and cultural.
      4. Demonstrate competency in using the terminology of conflict management and conflict resolution in formal and informal written assignments and oral presentations.
      5. Explore the role that technology and the "drive for progress" plays in creating the conditions for conflict or peace, and the impact that this has upon our planet.
    2. Evaluate appropriate strategies to mediate conflict.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the various stages of conflict and the ability to apply appropriate conflict mediating strategies at each stage.
      2. Complete the online certificate course in "Conflict Analysis" available through the United Stated Institute of Peace.
      3. Analyze principles of mediation and conflict resolution through examining case studies at the local, national, and/or international level.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to function in a variety of conflict situations.
      1. Demonstrate ability to take the perspective of the other and to apply mediation/resolution strategies to conflicts at the interpersonal level.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of the commonalities shared by all humans, and the ability to positively apply this knowledge of common needs, wants, desires and values to cross-cultural and/or conflict laden situations.
      3. Practice and demonstrate the ability to recognize aggression in oneself and others, and to regulate emotional responses to maintain calm and poise in a variety of situations.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively in a variety of formats.
      1. Communicate ideas clearly through formal and informal written assignments, formal presentations and group debates.
      2. Develop skills to effectively communicate with people who have different value systems, or different backgrounds, in small and large group discussions.
    5. Demonstrate engagement in a democratic society.
      1. Complete a civic engagement project (at least 15 non-classroom hours of public activity).
        1. Assess a public problem or issue.
        2. Represent the public problem in course context.
        3. Identify one's own civic and cultural values.
        4. Formulate and implement a plan to address the public problem or issue.
        5. Reflect on issues encountered and insights gained from engagement in the public activity.
  
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    IHU 161 - Projects in Cross-Cultural Learning

    Credits: 1
    Assign student volunteers to either community agencies providing cross-cultural experiences or to an international work experience. Supportive seminars will provide both structure and background knowledge of the particular country involved. (A minimum of 30 hours volunteer placement is required).

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Learn the values, norms, and behaviors associated with American culture.
      1. State aloud the values, norms, and behaviors associated with the American cultural experience in a 15-minute speech or conversation.
    2. Observe and identify an alternative cultural framework either in the United States or in a foreign country.
      1. State aloud the values and norms associated with an alternative cultural framework in a 15-minute speech or conversation.
    3. Apply knowledge within an on-site cross cultural experience.
      1. Write an analytical composition based on an on-site cross cultural experience that compares American cultural norms and behaviors with the alternative cultural framework.
  
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    IHU 162 - Projects in Cross-Cultural Learning

    Credits: 2
    Assign student volunteers to either community agencies providing cross-cultural experiences or to an international work experience. Supportive seminars will provide both structure and background knowledge of the particular country involved. (A minimum of 60 hours volunteer placement is required.)

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 60
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Learn the values, norms, and behaviors associated with American culture.
      1. State aloud the values, norms, and behaviors associated with the American cultural experience in a 15-minute speech or conversation.
    2. Observe and identify an alternative cultural framework either in the United States or in a foreign country.
      1. State aloud the values and norms associated with an alternative cultural framework in a 15-minute speech or conversation.
    3. Apply knowledge within an on-site cross cultural experience.
      1. Write an analytical composition based on an on-site cross cultural experience that compares American cultural norms and behaviors with the alternative cultural framework.
  
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    IHU 201HW - Honors Colloquy

    Credits: 3
    Required of all Honors students. Explores the elements of critical and creative thinking. Emphasizes relationships among thinking, writing, and productive interaction with others, as well as the interdisciplinary nature of truth and knowledge. Includes project and/ or research writing at instructor’s discretion. Provides opportunities to engage in independent intellectual inquiry to foster deeper learning. Credit may be earned in one of the following: ENG 201HW , LIT 201HW, ENG 201HW  or IHU 201HW.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4 and WRITING LEVEL 4 or permission of Honors Office
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Explain and apply the elements of creative and critical thinking.
      1. Read materials related to the theory and practice of thinking, e.g. evaluating an argument, distinguishing fact from opinion, the stages of creative thinking.
      2. Apply the elements of thinking through writing and discussion of relevant issues, e.g. questions regarding truth, knowledge, fact, opinion, etc.
      3. Read and interpret assigned readings for the purpose of applying creative and critical thinking.
    2. Apply creative and critical thinking in varied situations.
      1. Read material about thinking and other high level subject matter that requires range and depth of thought.
      2. Apply creative/ critical thinking in writing, e.g. analyze an argument, narrate an incident related to elements of thinking.
      3. Use thinking skills in verbal discussions about reading, life situations, academic material and discourse.
    3. Interact productively with peers and instructor for the purpose of improving thinking skills.
      1. Write clearly about the elements of listening and speaking as these reflect creative and critical thinking.
      2. Listen effectively in varied situations.
      3. Articulate various points of view about particular subjects.
      4. Explain verbally and in writing how thinking is both and individual and collaborative activity.
    4. Practice intellectual curiosity and apply it in independent ways to deepen their understanding of course material
      1. Complete at least one significant project, either individually or as a group depending on the instructor’s discretion, and work with the instructor to assure that the project demonstrates intellectual curiosity and academic rigor.
      2. Actively engage with their peers in conversations, seminars, or in other formats at the instructor’s discretion to enhance the depth of knowledge of the relevant material.
  
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    IHU 202 - Women’s Studies

    Credits: 3
    Introduces the academic field of women’s studies. Explores the diversity of women’s experiences and achievements both in the present and in the past from a variety of interdisciplinary perspectives. Addresses social structures and the intersections of gender, class, race, ethnicity, religion, ages, abilities, and sexual identities.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand how women’s studies have evolved as an academic field.
      1. Read and discuss the history of women’s movements and women in higher education.
      2. Memorize historical facts that have contributed to the accumulation of women’s studies as a body of knowledge.
      3. Review personal narratives and academic essays written by people with different feminist viewpoints.
    2. Identify the complex web of social relationships that impact our understanding of what we call “womanhood.”
      1. Reflect critically on the diverse materials presented.
      2. Analyze the intersections of gender, race, class, and sexuality within various social realms.
      3. Collaborate in group discussions or key concepts.
    3. Know key words and concepts pertaining to feminist/womanist theories.
      1. Define vocabulary terms during in-class quizzes.
      2. Relate key words and concepts to other media such as television, advertising, music, etc.
    4. Develop an ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing.
      1. Participate in group discussions about course readings and topics.
      2. Compose response papers relating to the assigned readings, guest speakers, and videoi. supplements.
      3. Write a final research paper.
    5. Develop a critical perspective and unique voice as a citizen in a democratic society.
      1. Identify their social location within the complex web of social relationships that describe society.
      2. Compare opinions with authors, presenters, critics and other students in the class in a
      3. respectful manner.
      4. Investigate local social services agencies in the community.
      5. Select a topic and lead discussion for one class period.
  
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    IHU 210 - Death and Dying

    Credits: 3
    Studies attitudes, practices, beliefs, theories, institutions of death and dying in contemporary, historical western and also some non-western societies. Addresses issues of pain management, doctor-assisted suicide, quality versus quantity of life, organ donation, bereavement, the funeral industry, living wills and durable powers of attorney.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111 , ENG 111A  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities, Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use the language and terminology of the theories, institutions and controversies of death and dying.
      1. Describe western and non-western attitudes toward death and dying.
      2. State definitions and criteria of death.
      3. Explain the differences between types of suicide and euthanasia.
      4. Clarify the death system in societies and the stages of grief.
    2. Articulate upon demand many of the basic legal, social, biological, medical and psychological facts essential to an informed understanding of the realities and issues of death and dying in the USA today.
      1. Describe the main causes of death.
      2. Clarify the basic laws about wills, living wills, durable powers of attorney, and the right to refuse treatment.
      3. State the extent to which pain can and cannot be relieved in various cases by medical treatment.
      4. Explain the view that US society embodies a cultural denial of death.
    3. Demonstrate awareness and sensitivity to differing attitudes and beliefs regarding practices and institutions of death and dying.
      1. Formulate a practical and sensitive approach to communicating effectively with a dying person.
      2. Articulate an approach for coping with the loss of an important person in one’s own private life.
      3. Clarify some of the advantages of a variety of traditional European, US, minority group, native and tribal ways of coping with death and grief.
    4. Think critically about attitudes, practices, beliefs, theories and institutions of death and dying in America.
      1. State arguments for and against alternative positions on issues regarding passive and active euthanasia, doctor-assisted suicide, the existence of life after death and whether dying patients should be told the truth about their conditions.
      2. Explain the risks and advantages of discussing death with children and with the aged.
      3. Clarify the controversy over the funeral industry in America.
  
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    IHU 226W - Introduction to Film

    Credits: 3
    Follows the creation of a film from the original idea to final production. Examines film as a mode of popular entertainment and as an art form. Focuses on identifying the media’s components and developing the viewers’ standards of appreciation. Credit may be earned in IHU 226W or LIT 226W but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): Any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Identify the common terms referring to film language (photography, mise en scene, editing, sound, acting, drama, story, and screenplay) within various films screened in and out of class.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Develop fluency in film criticism.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical context for this body of literature.
      1. Describe how films reflect the culture and the historical moments of their production.
      2. Contrast commercial vs. artistic value systems.
      3. Explain how close examination of film enriches formal and cultural interpretation.
  
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    IHU 232W - Exploring Human Nature

    Credits: 3
    Explores the question “What does it mean to be human?” from interdisciplinary perspectives. Identifies and discusses the relative importance of traits and characteristics that “make us human.” Examines and evaluates major traditional and contemporary views of human nature and introduces alternative ways of understanding the self in relation to nature, society, religion, and the state. Credit may be earned in IHU 232W or SSI 232W  but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): WRITING LEVEL 4 or a minimum grade of “C” in a college level composition I course
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities, Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify and explain how humans can be distinguished from other species in terms of physical characteristics, psychological/intellectual capacities, and moral questioning.
      1. Explain how the evolution of human physical and psysiological characteristics (genetics, our relatively large brains, opposable thumbs, etc.) can be used to distinguish humans from other species.
      2. Assess whether and how human intellectual characteristics such as the use of language, the development of a sense of self, the ability to learn, plan, and the “need” to understand contribute to human uniqueness.
      3. Explain the role that morality plays in “being” human, and assess the value or purpose in evaluating actions in terms of “right” and “wrong.”
    2. Identify, evaluate, and synthesize relevant traditional and contemporary theoretical perspectives concerning human nature.
      1. Explain the evolutionary processes by which humans have acquired human characteristics, analyze these characteristics in relation to the current state of human connectedness to our natural environment (Darwin, E.O. Wilson, Lorenz).
      2. Explain the basic positions of freewill and determinism (Sarte and Skinner).
      3. Describe humans in terms of both individuality (Freud, Nietzsche, Maslow) and sociality (Fromm and Rousseau).
      4. Evaluate and synthesize relevant aspects of thie above perspectives to construct and support a position concerning human nature, and communicate the position in informal presentations and formal writing assignments.
    3. Research and evaluate how human creations influence and shape human behavior, knowledge, and potential.
      1. Explain, evaluate, and appraise how human technology has and continues to influence humanity.
      2. Explain, evaluate, and assess the impact that political forces have upon human needs to simultaneously have a unique identity and still be part of a group.
      3. Identify and assess the functions of human spiritual questioning and traditions, and assess the strengths and weaknesses of such traditions in shaping our understandings of reality.
      4. Speculate on possible futures for our species using writing tasks.
    4. Research, organize, and apply knowledge of human nature to formulate, articulate, and support a particular position as part of a team debate.
      1. Research, organize, and present information concerning human individual needs, social obligations, and moral imperatives as relevant to a specific, current, moral issue in formal presentation.
      2. Work cooperatively with others to articulate and generate support for a position, and identify and refute weaknesses in an opposing position.
      3. Analyze and develop an appreciation for the complexity of human ethical dilemmas.
  
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    IHU 234W - World Religions

    Credits: 4
    Introduces religion and the primary “living” religions of the world. Examines the principles and functions of religion, the origins and cultures of the world’s major religions, and their beliefs and primary ritual practices. Discusses and critically examines how religious belief systems and practices influence the thoughts and behaviors of adherents in everyday life. Credit may be earned in SSI 234W  or IHU 234W but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 or WRITING LEVEL 2.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities, Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify the function of religion to the individual, and describe how religious belief and practice influences the thought, behaviors, and emotional experiences of individuals.
      1. Distinguish between religion as a personal experience and religion as a social institution.
      2. Identify and describe how religion performs the following functions for the individual:
        1. Provides answers to questions of human existence (Why are we here? What happens after we die?)
        2. Provides a standard of moral thought and behavior.
        3. Provides a sense of belongingness and security.
        4. Provides opportunities and motivation for spiritual experience and development.
      3. Identify and evaluate various definitions of religion, and synthesize and compose a personal “working” definition of religion.
    2. Identify and describe the function of religion to society, and explain why religion has and continues to be an integral part of human society.
      1. Identify and describe how religion performs the following social functions:
        1. Provides a source of group unity and social cohesiveness.
        2. Provides a means of social control.
        3. Provides an ethical code of behavior.
      2. Identify the position of secular humanism, and describe how this position finds fault with organized religion.
    3. Identify and describe the basic forms of religion and their origins, and identify how the fundamental principles of religious belief and practice become manifest in religions of various types.
      1. Identify and describe the following theories of the origin of religion:
        1. Nature worship
        2. Animism
        3. Original Monotheism
        4. Magic
        5. Projection of human needs
      2. Compare and contrast the basic beliefs and practices of religions of small societies (Native American and African tribal communities) and describe how these beliefs and practices are related to the needs and lifestyles of these societies.
      3. Identify the primary “families” of religion, and compare and contrast their beliefs and practices.
    4. Compare and contrast the characteristics of the world’s primary living religions in terms of origin, cultural context, beliefs concerning human purpose, relation to nature and/or the divine, and ritual practice.
      1. Identify, compare and contrast the geographical and cultural origins, beliefs, and basic practices of the following world religions:
        1. Hinduism
        2. Buddhism
        3. Confucianism
        4. Taoism
        5. Shintoism
        6. Judaism
        7. Christianity
        8. Islam
    5. Identify, evaluate, and appraise how knowledge of specific religions can be applied to better understand social structure and individual action.
      1. Participate in, reflect upon, and evaluate experiences in unfamiliar religious settings and synthesize your findings in formal written assignments.
      2. Identify and analyze religious symbolism found in popular culture, and communicate your findings in informal discussions and formal written assignments.
      3. Research, analyze and organize information of a religious artifact, and communicate your findings in a classroom presentation and a formal written assignment.
      4. Apply knowledge of religion to evaluate patterns of social interaction and how religious expectations can result in social harmony and / or in cultural conflict, and communicate your position in classroom discussions and formal written assignments.
  
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    IHU 240W - Leadership for Positive Change

    Credits: 4
    Prepares students to lead positive change in a variety of contexts (personal, family, community/social and organizational). Includes: leadership development, problem solving, service learning, team work, global citizenship, sustainability, and social action. Provides opportunities for individual practice and reflection and requires “change” project in service to family, community, or place of employment. (Successful completion of this course satisfies the civic engagement requirement in the AA and AS degrees). Credit may be earned in IHU 240W or SSI 240W  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities, Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify strategies or processes that have been used to solve problems.
      1. Understand and apply collaborative problem solving techniques to interpersonal issues and societal problems.
      2. Understand the importance of giving a “voice” to marginalized people, and utilize grass-roots social action methodology to foster change.
    2. Demonstrate key components of leadership for the purpose of making positive/transformational change.
      1. Understand and practice effective facilitation skills in a variety of settings.
      2. Understand and practice a variety of leadership styles as they relate to emancipation, social justice, and positive personal & social transformation.
    3. Apply facilitation skills to a “real-world” issue or problem.
      1. Identify a social problem, and intervention strategies that could be applied to affect positive change.
      2. Design and implement an intervention plan using key leadership and facilitation skills, and collect feedback.
      3. Compose and present a reflective analyses of the effectiveness of the project.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively in a variety of formats.
      1. Communicate ideas clearly through formal and informal written assignments, formal presentations, and group discussions and debates.
      2. Develop skills to effectively communicate with people who have different values systems, or different backgrounds, in small- and large-group discussions.
  
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    IHU 245W - Biblical Literature: Old Testament

    Credits: 3
    Studies critically the literature of the Old Testament. Examines the Old Testament Canon in its historical development. Also examines both the literary styles and changing theological and ethical ideas. Credit may be earned in only one of the following: IHU 245W, ENG 245W  or LIT 245W.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Distinguish between works of national history, poetry, and narrative in the Old Testament.
      1. Cite different examples and traits of these genres.
      2. Explain the elements of these different types in written homework.
    2. Recognize some of the cultural/historical sources that affect Old Testament literature.
      1. Cite differences of place and time, and how those shape the writings.
      2. Compare the world of the Old Testament to the contemporary world.
    3. Analyze Old Testament works for dominant themes and motifs.
      1. Identify details gained from close reading of various books in the Old Testament, and presenting those in discussion.
      2. Compose an interpretation of a specific work in writing.
    4. Pursue and consider metaphysical issues based on an understanding of Old Testament readings.
      1. Discuss such issues as the nature of God and God’s relationship with humanity.
      2. Address these issues in writing while incorporating and citing particular evidence for the Old Testament literature.
    5. Utilize writing to promote learning in any or all of the above Outcomes and Objectives.
  
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    IHU 267 - Producing A Student Publication

    Credits: 3
    Provides a guided opportunity to learn about publishing by compiling, selecting, editing, and designing an annual publication of student writing, photography, and artwork. Focuses on hands-on experience in critical reading, writing, and thinking; editing; layout; production details; marketing; design; and distribution. Credit may also be earned in ART 267 but not in the same semester.

    Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of “C” in any approved composition II course or OAT 152  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Recognize and establish standards for quality in both the written and visual arts.
      1. Share in a critique/selection process which includes recognized parameters of quality, interest, and publication.
      2. Appreciate and value the common design elements that the written and visual arts share.
      3. Gain a greater awareness of the creativity and craft artists bring to their work.
    2. Refine critical reading, writing, and thinking skills.
      1. Read student submissions for publication.
      2. Analyze written and visual arts submitted by students.
      3. Discuss and evaluate student works submitted.
    3. Participate in the processes and techniques involved in producing and marketing a published work in book form.
      1. Prepare pre-production layout.
      2. Operate current technological equipment that is used to prepare publications.
      3. Establish and meet deadlines.
      4. Interact effectively with members of Delta and Tri-Cities communities in the process.
    4. Collaborate with other students, instructors, and technicians in the processes of reviewing and preparing student work for publication.
      1. Demonstrate cooperative working skills.
      2. Assume responsibility as a participant in a group process.
    5. Discover possibilities of current and future technologies and a variety of career options available in the publishing field.
      1. Discuss the methods of Communication Art from print and Internet.
  
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    IHU 268 - International Studies in Interdisciplinary Humanities

    Credits: 1-4
    Provides an interdisciplinary study-travel experience focused on examining two or more aspects of the Humanities in a region outside the United States. Involves reading, writing, and travel. Expenses for travel and overseas study must be paid by the student.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15-60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the region using two or more perspectives from the Humanities.
      1. Read about the culture of the region before travel. Choose two or more humanities disciplines (e.g. art, music, language, history, literature, communication, philosophy) as focus of reading.
      2. Compare and contrast how each of the chosen disciplines contribute to the culture of the region.
      3. Discuss the impact of the chosen disciplines on the culture of the region.
    2. Visit multiple sites and experience the culture of the region. Write a paper or journal that will integrate personal experiences and relevant information from Humanities readings.
      1. Visit sites in the region.
      2. Experience the culture of the region.
      3. Record experiences.
      4. Communicate ideas clearly through chosen written format.
    3. Design and complete a project that reflects upon, summarizes, and presents what was learned through the reading and the travel experience.
      1. Apply broad principles of chosen Humanities disciplines to the travel experience.
      2. Describe how personal attitudes and perspectives affect one’s own perceptions of and interactions with a new or different culture.
      3. Examine changes in personal attitudes and perspectives as a result of the travel.
      4. Evaluate travel experiences as part of overall educational goals.
      5. Present project to instructor and/or class through oral, written and/or multimedia formats.
  
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    IHU 269W - Interdisciplinary Study with Domestic Travel

    Credits: 1-4
    Provides an interdisciplinary study-travel experience focused on examining the factors, issues, and forces that impact the course topic within the United States. Historical and contemporary perspectives will also be used to examine various cultural contexts and lifestyles. Involves readings, writing, discussion, and travel. Requires domestic travel with expenses to be paid by the student. Credit may be earned in IHU 269W or SSI 269W , but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15-60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and analyze the influences relevant to the study-travel topic using research of the historical and contemporary developments within the travel region.
      1. Visit significant historical and contemporary sites in the region of travel, examining and evaluating the impact that its geography, socio-political history, and current economic situation has upon the life conditions of residents (sustainability).
      2. Explore the role that access to information, business practices and health science plays in creating the cultural and lifestyle conditions.
      3. Describe how human conditioning and motivation affects the positive or negative quality of individual and social interactions.
    2. Demonstrate an ability to adapt to the people and situations experienced within the travel region.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively and positively with people from different backgrounds and life situations.
      2. Identify, explore, and practice interpersonal and social interaction methods to enact positive change in real life situations.
      3. Identify and practice methods of problem-solving throughout the study-travel experience.
      4. Demonstrate effective application of perspective-taking, conflict analysis and resolution skills in real life situations.
      5. Demonstrate an understanding of ethics and apply this understanding to real life situations.
    3. Reflect upon, summarize and clearly present what was learned through the travel experience through oral, written, and multimedia means.
      1. Communicate ideas clearly through formal and informal written assignments, academic journals, discussion, formal presentations and multimedia projects.
      2. Describe how personal attitudes and perspectives affect how one perceives and interacts with others, and summarize the learned value of this knowledge.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to write about a single issue from various perspectives (cultural, economic, historical, environmental, geographic, political, etc.).
      4. Synthesize and describe in various modes what was learned through the travel, cross-cultural, and study experience.
  
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    IHU 274 - Conflict Transformation

    Credits: 3
    Introduces conflict management, resolution, and transformation. Identifies and practices approaches, methods and techniques to manage, resolve and transform conflicts. Utilizes simulations and role plays to practice and refine not only knowledge of conflict management techniques but skill in applying them. Can be taken as either IHU 274 or SSI 274 , but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities, Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify and analyze the influence of factors attributed to conflict.
      1. Identify different types of conflict.
      2. Identify different stages of conflict while assessing issues of power, inequity, exploitation and damage or harm.
      3. Identify, analyze, and evaluate the relative role that each of the following play in any given conflict, including but not limited to:
        1. The history and identity of the actors in the conflict.
        2. The power (type and amount) of the primary and secondary actors.
        3. The actors’ goals, values and biases.
        4. The cultural context of the conflict.
    2. Identify various techniques in managing, resolving, and transforming conflict.
      1. Explain the difference between competitive and collaborative negotiation.
      2. Describe methods to build collaboration with other negotiators.
      3. Demonstrate effective listening skills.
      4. Identify and interpret nonverbal aspects of communication.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to apply conflict management and resolution techniques to conflict situations.
      1. Identify mediation techniques likely to be effective at managing and/or resolving specific conflicts.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to flexibly apply multiple models of conflict resolution and mediation to any given conflict.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of persuasive techniques (power, relationship, etc.) and manage them effectively in mediating, transforming and resolving conflict.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively in a variety of formats.
      1. Communicate ideas clearly through formal and informal written assignments, formal presentations and group debates.
      2. Demonstrate the skills needed to effectively communicate with people who have different value systems, or different backgrounds, in small and large group discussions.
  
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    IHU 280W - Exploring Diversity

    Credits: 3
    Explores themes, issues, perspectives and experiences related to diversity. Provides an opportunity to reflect and practice an interdisciplinary approach to the study of diversity in a global world. Credit may be earned in only one of the following: SSI 288W , SSI 289W , EDU 388W , EDU 389W , IHU 280W or IHU 281W .

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities, Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Expand the definition of diversity beyond traditional views.
      1. Define diversity and identify variables of diversity.
      2. Identify discrimination through self-reflection and exposure to a variety of voices and perspectives.
      3. Develop a scale or continuum of diversity perspectives and reflect on one’s personal growth along that continuum.
    2. Explore how variables of diversity influence society.
      1. Explore biological, sociological, psychological, and anthropological theories associated with diversity.
      2. Identify individual and societal losses due to intolerance.
      3. Describe how diversity impacts the classroom, community or workplace.
    3. Practice communication techniques that foster a safe and inclusive environment.
      1. Practice communication techniques that foster an atmosphere that values all members.
      2. Recognize and demonstrate sensitivity to the variety of influences that shape an individual’s perspective on diversity.
      3. Reflect upon a variety of learning activities that promote diversity awareness and challenge intolerance and discrimination.
    4. Demonstrate personal and social responsibility as a global citizen.
      1. Evaluate one’s cultural assumptions and biases.
      2. Analyze and evaluate issues, positions, viewpoints and ideas when exploring diversity.
      3. Identify behaviors that foster global citizenship.
      4. Demonstrate intercultural knowledge in developing a global worldview.
  
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    IHU 281W - Exploring Diversity/With Project

    Credits: 4
    Explores themes, issues, perspectives and experiences related to diversity. Provides an opportunity to reflect and practice an interdisciplinary approach to the study of diversity in a global world. Credit may be earned in only one of the following: IHU 280W , IHU 281W, EDU 388W , EDU 389W , SSI 288W , SSI 289W , SSI 289HW.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITNG LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities, Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Expand the definition of diversity beyond traditional views.
      1. Define diversity and identify variables of diversity.
      2. Identify discrimination through self-reflection and exposure to a variety of voices and perspectives.
      3. Develop a scale or continuum of diversity perspectives and reflect on one’s personal growth along that continuum.
    2. Explore how variables of diversity influence society.
      1. Explore biological, sociological, psychological, and anthropological theories associated with diversity
      2. Identify individual and societal losses due to intolerance.
      3. Describe how diversity impacts the classroom, community, or workplace.
    3. Practice communication techniques that foster a safe and inclusive environment.
      1. Practice communication techniques that foster an atmosphere that values all members.
      2. Recognize and demonstrate sensitivity to the variety of influences that shape an individual’s perspective on diversity.
      3. Reflect upon a variety of learning activities that promote diversity awareness and challenge intolerance and discrimination.
    4. Reflect one’s own personal and social responsibility as a global citizen.
      1. Evaluate one’s cultural assumptions and biases.
      2. Analyze and evaluate issues, positions, viewpoints and ideas when exploring diversity
      3. Identify behaviors that foster global citizenship
      4. Demonstrate intercultural knowledge in developing a global worldview.
    5. Demonstrate the impact of engaging in a diverse world by participating in service learning
      1. Choose a personally relevant project
      2. Provide meaningful service to the community or immersion in an alternate culture.
      3. Document the service learning experience by examining the differences and similarities encountered and reflect on insights gained.
      4. Connect relevance of the experience to the diversity concepts addressed in Outcomes 1-4.
  
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    IHU 282HW - Seminar in Social Issues - Honors

    Credits: 3
    An integrated study involving exploration and development of critical thinking, analysis and problem- solving skills with an interdisciplinary approach focusing on a selected social issue. Provides opportunities to engage in independent intellectual inquiry to foster deeper learning. Credit may be earned in IHU282HW or SOC 282HW , but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4 and WRITING LEVEL 4 or permission of Honors Office
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities, Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze a specific social issue from both a sociological and an interdisciplinary perspective.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the major aspects of an important contemporary social issue. (The issue may change with each offering of the course. The specific disciplines represented will vary with the issue.)
      2. Apply the sociological perspective to enhance understanding of the issue.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of the utility of social scientific theories and methods to the analysis of a social issue.
      4. Apply the methods and perspectives of other disciplines, depending upon the issue under consideration.
    2. Increase his or her skills in research and the presentation of findings.
      1. Conduct a brief research project (such as a library paper or book report) related to the issue under consideration.
      2. Use acceptable form in the written presentation of the project.
      3. Engage in appropriate oral discourse concerning the social issue in a seminar environment.
    3. Gain an appreciation for a rational and critical study of the specific issue as well as other such issues.
      1. Distinguish between a social scientific analysis of social issues and popular approaches such as those found in the media.
      2. Understand the role of empirical evidence in the analysis of social issues.
      3. Apply rational and critical thinking to the analysis of social issues and problem solving.
      4. Appreciate the utility of studying issues from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.
    4. Use writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Practice critical writing skills within the subject.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of subject matter.
    5. Practice intellectual curiosity and apply it in independent ways to deepen their understanding of course material.
      1. Complete at least one significant project, either individually or as a group depending on the instructor’s discretion, and work with the instructor to assure that the project demonstrates intellectual curiosity and academic rigor.
      2. Actively engage with their peers in conversations, seminars, or in other formats at the instructor’s discretion to enhance the depth of knowledge of the relevant material.
  
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    IHU 290-299 - Special Projects in Interdisciplinary Humanities


    Meets MTA Requirement: None
  
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    IHU 294W - Special Projects: The Great Lakes Indians and European Experience

    Credits: 3
    Examines American Indian history and culture in the Great Lakes from pre-contact to 1934. Considers and explores the approaches of studying Native Americans from a historical and sociological perspective; including the political, cultural, and social consequences of contact with Europeans. Provides a thorough historical and cultural background of the Great Lakes Indians, specifically the “People of the Three Fires,” known as the “Anishnaabeg” and “People of the Calumet” of the Great Lakes. Credit may be earned in IHU 294W or SSI 294W  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 or WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities, Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Trace the pre-contact period of Great Lakes Indians history and culture.
      1. Explain the origins of the American Indian people
      2. Describe daily and seasonal activities and customs
      3. Examine the belief systems of specific Great Lakes Indian peoples.
      4. Compare the belief systems to Judo-Christian beliefs
      5. Explore the proto and historic contact with Europeans
      6. Explore and compare American Indian Tribes using an anthropological and Native perspective
      7. Compare and contrast geography, religion, economics, politics, language, social organization and history of semi-nomadic vs. sedentary, and horticultural vs. agricultural based societies.
    2. Examine the role and impact of the European peoples on social, political, economic, and military components of native Sovereignty.
      1. Analyze and apply the following political and social concepts as they relate to the Great Lakes Tribes.
        1. Sovereignty (including its political, economic, social and military components)
        2. Changing Spheres of geographic and political influfence
        3. Changing Balance of Power in the Great Lakes among the Tribes and European powers and their causes and impact.
      2. Examine the period of the United States and its influence on Native peoples.
      3. Evaluate the relationships between the United States government and Native peoples regarding specifically: treaties, annuities, removal, reservations, assimilation, and termination.
    3. Critically examine treaties, documents, videos, on-line resources, lectures, discussions to analyze the Tribal Sovereignty of the Saginaw Chippewa Tribe as an in-depth micro-study of concepts presented.
    4. Use writing tasks to promote learning, to analyze course content and to explain course content in a coherent syle for a specific audience and purpose.
  
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    IHU 295W - Special Projects in Interdisciplinary Humanities - The Sixties

    Credits: 3
    Examines, through an interdisciplinary approach, the literature, film, music and other types of media of 1960s America and explores their interrelationships with history, psychology, sociology and philosophy to discover the causes and effects of the upheaval of the era. Discusses the social movements of the era and the changes in the way democracy has been perceived. Credit may be earned in IHU 295W or SSI 295W  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of “C” in a college level composition I course and WRITING LEVEL 2 or permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities, Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the understanding of the historical context of the era.
      1. Describe the complexities of the sixties and the interrelatedness of the various focused studies.
      2. Discuss the perspectives and historical implications of the era.
    2. Analyze the relationships between the various perspectives of the era.
      1. Discuss the various cultural, historical and interdisciplinary perspectives of the era.
      2. Relate specific events to the various cultural and historical elements that comprise the era.
    3. Analyze music, literature and art.
      1. Discuss various art forms of the period.
      2. Critique various art forms as they relate to specific events of the period.
    4. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing and access information by a variety of means for written presentations appropriate to the audience and purpose that includes appropriate academic documentation of sources.
      1. Evaluate information for relevancy to the planned purpose, reliability and credibility.
      2. Categorize and organize the information accessed.
      3. Interpret graphical, numerical and statistical data.
      4. Interpret litarary, philosophical, political and other ideas.
      5. Synthesize information from a variety of sources.
    5. Develop and deliver a formal presentation about the era.
      1. Choose an appropriate topic for the assignment such as: current event, social issue, or personal interest.
      2. Research a variety of materials and choose effective supporting material for topic.
      3. Develop the main points into an effective organizational pattern.
      4. Develop an outline for the presentation that includes an introduction, body, and conclusion.
      5. Develop appropriate visual aids for the presentations.
  
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    IHU 296 - Introduction to the Humanities

    Credits: 2
    Introduces students to a variety of humanities disciplines and analyzes the way the humanities impact public and private life across America and in our local communities.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Explain how the humanities impact public and private life in America.
    2. Analyze the ways in which different disciplines within the humanities approach the same topic for their distinctive disciplinary perspectives.
    3. Evaluate the effectiveness of local humanities programming in impacting the life of our community.
    4. Create a recommendation for the Humanities Learning Center Advisory Board for future humanities programming in our community.

Interdisciplinary Science

  
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    SCI 099 - Foundation For Science

    Credits: 4
    Develops competency in content and skills in college science classes and intended for students unsure of adequacy of preparation for college science. Includes use of scientific method, measurement practices in metrics, communicating and presenting scientific data, classification techniques, spatial relationships, and maps. Presents methods for improving science study skills, note taking, data recording and analysis. (Cannot be counted toward Natural Science or lab credit.) Does not earn credit toward graduation. Credit may be earned in SCI 099 or in SCI 100 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 75 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Recognize symptoms of science anxiety and employ appropriate methods to reduce\remove anxiety.
    2. Make observations, collect appropriate data, and classify data (information) given a specific situation.
    3. Frame hypothesis, design experiment to test hypothesis, and test the validity of the hypothesis, when given an appropriate problem and associated observations.
    4. Problem solve, using standard techniques.
    5. Read science materials and judging the appropriateness of journal articles for the general public on scientific issues.
    6. Understand of scientific inquiry methods.
      1. Explain the terms hypothesis, theory, and law, and to differentiate between the common meaning of these terms and their meaning within the scientific community.
      2. List logical steps of scientific methodology used to investigate a problem.
      3. Differentiate between an experimental group and control group.
      4. Identify the components of a well designed experiment.
    7. Participate in the process of science.
      1. Make observations.
      2. Design experiments.
      3. Conduct experiments.
      4. Formulate and test hypotheses.
      5. Collect data.
      6. Analyze data.
      7. Draw conclusions.
      8. Report results.
    8. Demonstrate the competent use of common instruments and technology used in scientific investigation.
      1. Use computers for simulation and tutorials.
      2. Use common instruments of measure to determine mass, length, volume, and temperature.
      3. Correctly use various kinds of scientific equipment and metering devices.
    9. Demonstrate an understanding of how scientists communicate and competently communicate about scientific topics.
      1. Explain the rationale for clear concise communication within the science disciplines.
      2. Cite, in an appropriate format, the source of a scientific article.
      3. Determine the audience for which a scientific article is written.
      4. Utilize the library as an appropriate choice for science literary research.
      5. Critically read material from a general science textbook.
      6. Critically read a scientific article.
      7. Effectively write a laboratory report using correct scientific format.
      8. Clearly record observations and results.
      9. Listen actively about scientific material.
      10. Speak effectively about scientific material.
      11. Make a presentation of experimental results.
      12. Develop and interpret graphs and flow charts.
    10. Demonstrate the ability to think critically.
      1. Integrate concepts.
      2. Draw logical conclusions.
      3. Make predictions based on evidence.
      4. Identify trends and patterns.
      5. Distinguish between simple correlation and cause-and-effect.
      6. Use a matrix or other problem solving techniques to solve logic problems.
      7. Identify properties by which sets of objects can be serially ordered and construct a serial order for each property.
    11. Demonstrate competency in using the metric system.
      1. Explain the value of using the metric system in scientific investigations
      2. Explain the relationships between the units of the metric system.
      3. Make conversions between units within the metric system.
      4. Accurately measure volume, mass and length using Sl units.
      5. Solve word problems using the metric system.
      6. Estimate metric quantities.
      7. Convert english units to metric units and vice versa.
    12. Demonstrate an ability to visualize three dimensional objects.
      1. Cite instances when scientists use three dimensional visualizations.
      2. Visualize two dimensional drawings as three dimensional objects.
      3. Create three dimensional models from two dimensional visuals.
    13. Demonstrate an understanding of how to study scientific material.
      1. Recognize their predominant learning style.
      2. Use coping strategies to facilitate learning when the style of delivery does not match their learning style.
      3. Practice note taking skills.
      4. Practice study skills.
      5. Develop test taking strategies.
      6. Work in a collaborative learning environment.
  
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    SCI 107 - Introduction to Technical Programs in Science

    Credits: 1
    Provides an overview of technical programs in science (including chemical technology (CT), chemical process technology (CPI), environmental technology (ENV), and water environmental technology (WET)) and associated responsibilities. Focuses on the role and responsibilities of the chemical technician, chemical process operator, environmental technician and water-wastewater technician in the workforce. Introduces concepts of work requirements, identifies industry and process types, and provides an overview of laws affecting the job and the industry. Discusses aptitudes and attitudes necessary for success in science curricula as well as means of continuing professional and personal growth. Credit may be earned in SCI 107 or  CT 101 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe the roles and responsibilities of different technical positions.
      1. Identify the skills for working as a chemical technician, chemical process operator, environmental technician and water-wastewater technician.
      2. Identify the industry types of chemical technology (CT), chemical process technology (CPI), environmental technology (ENV), and water environmental technology (WET).
      3. Demonstrate understanding of the roles of the chemical technician, chemical process operator, environmental technician and water-wastewater technician within a business or industry.
    2. Demonstrate skills necessary for success in science or technology courses.
      1. Demonstrate understanding of the methods and skills needed to be successful in science and technology courses.
      2. Perform writing tasks and demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      3. Demonstrate collaborative learning.
      4. Demonstrate critical thinking.
    3. Demonstrate understanding of how to promote oneself to the technical community.
      1. Prepare an effective technical resume.
      2. Write effectively for a scientific audience and purpose.
      3. Produce a technical research paper.
      4. Summarize the content of scientific and technical reports.
      5. Deliver an oral presentation on a technical topic.
      6. Demonstrate understanding of the components of a successful technical interview.
  
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    SCI 150 - Foundations of Scientific Research

    Credits: 2
    Provides the opportunity to carry out scientific research, integrating critical thinking with scientific principles, application of mathematics and professional skills. Explores academic skills and strategies needed for learning and success in science, technology, engineering and mathematics courses. Encourages writing, use of algebraic expression and computation to enhance learning. Requires completion of a final research report to include problem identification, procedure documentation, data analysis, and conclusions.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 2 and Instructor permission.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate competency in the skills and technology used in scientific research
      1. Develop experiments and conduct them.
      2. Analyze collected data, draw conclusions and communicate findings.
      3. Use common scientific instrumentation, equipment and computers to measure a variety of chemical and biological parameters.
      4. Explain the integral components of scientific enquiry.
      5. Demonstrate cooperation and collaboration in teamwork settings.
    2. Demonstrate problem-solving skills and practice habits for enhancing academic skills.
      1. Interpret scientific documents.
      2. Formulate a scientific hypothesis and or algebraic equation.
      3. Evaluate and assess scientific results and draw logical conclusions.
      4. Identify basic writing and algebraic skills.
      5. Identify important time management and organizational skills.
      6. Identify common expectations of college courses and appropriate behavior.
    3. Write a research/technical paper that effectively communicates scientific results.
      1. Present data in graphs, tables, figures and interpret scientific results.
      2. Compare scientific results to literature information and controls.
      3. Conclude appropriately from scientific observations and results.
      4. Assess the work and if it should be extended or provide reason for the lack of recommendations.
      5. Acknowledge specific people, including their title, who contributed significantly to the project.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of laboratory safety and maintenance.
      1. Complete the agreement provided after reading the safety protocols and regulations of the science laboratory.
      2. Conduct safe lab procedures and recognize common laboratory hazards.
      3. Identify and locate all safety features within the laboratory (eye wash fountains, fire extinguishers, fire alarms fire blankets, etc.).
      4. Complete the agreement provided after reading the procedures of safe and ethical use of equipment and instrumentation used in the laboratory.
      5. Dispose of all waste materials properly (chemicals, sharps, broken glassware), if necessary review Safety Data Sheets.
      6. Use personal protection (e.g. goggles, gloves, lab coat) properly.
      7. Clean up all work areas and return all equipment to designated areas before leaving the laboratory.
      8. Report any accidents, incidents or breakages immediately.
    5. Record experimental work to promote learning of good laboratory practices
      1. Locate Safety Data Sheets as needed.
      2. Use a laboratory notebook to communicate experimental concepts and results.
      3. Record and analyze the data and results of an experiment.
      4. Produce reports to inform others of your progress in the laboratory.
  
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    SCI 249 - Scientific Research Development

    Credits: 1
    Exposure to the process of developing and refining a scientific question as the basis for scientific experimentation. Identification of an area of scientific interest, background knowledge in the field and research methods. Development of a research proposal that involves research and rationale, models of data that will be produced, budgetary evaluation, materials needed, time required and equipment to be used. Beneficial to all science majors in Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Engineering.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 2 and Faculty permission based on the student’s science background and knowledge
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science Lab
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify a viable scientific project in an area of scientific interest
      1. Identify a college and/or community professional to facilitate the research project.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of problem solving and scientific research.
      3. Develop techniques and principles on how the research will be executed.
      4. Present (written and oral) clear explanations of the scientific work to be performed.
    2. Understand how to develop and complete a research project
      1. Demonstrate skills in using scientific literature.
      2. Perform effective literature searches using current technologies and professional publications.
      3. Write a research proposal that addresses relevant questions and scientific issues.
      4. Develop a proposal that contains clear scientific rationale and methods to investigate the problem.
      5. Develop a proposal with clear measurable outcomes, statistics and data analysis.
  
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    SCI 249A - Developing a Laboratory Based Research Project

    Credits: 1
    Exposure to the process of developing and refining a scientific question as the basis for scientific experimentation. Identification of an area of scientific interest, background knowledge in the field and research methods. Development of a research proposal that involves research and rationale, models of data that will be produced, budgetary evaluation, materials needed, time required and equipment to be used. Additional emphasis on the importance of laboratory safety, regulations, procedures and personal protection equipment. Beneficial to all science majors in Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Engineering.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 2 and Instructor permission based on the student’s science background and knowledge
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify a viable scientific project in an area of scientific interest
      1. Identify a college and/or community professional to facilitate the research project.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of problem solving and scientific research.
      3. Develop techniques and principles on how the research will be executed.
      4. Present (written and oral) clear explanations of the scientific work to be performed.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of how to develop and complete a research project
      1. Demonstrate skills in using scientific literature.
      2. Perform effective literature searches using current technologies and professional publications.
      3. Produce a research proposal that addresses relevant questions and scientific issues.
      4. Produce a proposal that contains clear scientific rationale and methods to investigate the problem.
      5. Produce a proposal with clear measurable outcomes, statistics and data analysis.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of laboratory safety and maintenance.
      1. Complete the agreement provided after reading the safety protocols and regulations of the science laboratory.
      2. Conduct safe lab procedures and recognize common laboratory hazards.
      3. Identify and locate all safety features within the laboratory (eye wash fountains, fire extinguishers, fire alarms fire blankets, etc.).
      4. Complete the agreement provided after reading the procedures of safe and ethical use of equipment and instrumentation used in the laboratory.
      5. Dispose of all waste materials properly (chemicals, sharps, broken glassware), if necessary review Safety Data Sheets.
      6. Use personal protection (e.g. goggles, gloves, lab coat) properly.
      7. Clean up all work areas and return all equipment to designated areas before leaving the laboratory.
      8. Report any accidents, incidents or breakages immediately.
  
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    SCI 250 - Research Project In Science

    Credits: 2-6
    Provides the opportunity to carry out original scientific research, integrating critical thinking with scientific principles and professional skills. Requires completion of a final research report which includes problem identification, procedure documentation, data analysis, and conclusions. Evaluation will be handled by the faculty and/or a team of experts. The minimum requirement is two credits. Beneficial to all science majors in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Engineering.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 2 and SCI 249  or SCI 249A  and instructor permission.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30-90
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science Lab
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of how to complete a suitable scientific research project.
      1. Perform scientific research with well-defined goals and objectives
      2. Design a project that applies and develops an understanding of in-depth scientific concepts.
      3. Produce research that integrates a variety of methods and instrumentation that reinforces scientific skills and knowledge.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of laboratory safety and maintenance.
      1. Complete the agreement provided after reading the safety pr otocols and regulations of the science laboratory.
      2. Conduct safe lab procedures and recognize common laboratory hazards.
      3. Identify and locate all safety features within the laboratory (eye wash fountains, fire extinguishers, fire alarms fire blankets, etc.).
      4. Read procedures on a safe and ethical use of equipment and instrumentation used in the laboratory acknowledge your agreement by filling up the form provided.
      5. Dispose of all waste materials properly (chemicals, sharps, broken glassware), if necessary review Safety Data Sheets.
      6. Use personal protection (e.g. goggles, gloves, lab coat) properly.
      7. Clean up all work areas and return all equipment to designated areas before leaving the laboratory.
      8. Report any accidents, incidents or breakages immediately.
    3. Record experimental work to promote learning of good laboratory
      1. Locate Safety Data Sheets as needed.
      2. Use a laboratory notebook to communicate experimental concepts and results.
      3. Record and analyze the data and results of an experiment.
      4. Produce reports to inform others of your progress in the laboratory.
    4. Write a research/technical paper that effectively communicates scientific results.
      1. Present data in graphs, tables, figures and interpret scientific results.
      2. Compare scientific results to literature information and controls.
      3. Conclude appropriately from scientific observations and results.
      4. Assess the work and if it should be extended or provide reason for the lack of recommendations.
      5. Acknowledge specific people, including their title, who contributed significantly to the project.
  
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    SCI 290-299 - Special Projects in Interdisciplinary Science


    Meets MTA Requirement: None
  
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    SCI 299 - Food Science and Nutrition

    Credits: 3
    Introduces the fundamental concepts in digestion and metabolism at the cellular, organ system and organismal levels (seeds, yeast, gold fish, and plants). Reviews and implements laboratory research techniques involved in quantitative analysis of food ingredients. Explores the following topics: Enzyme kinetics, balanced/healthy diet, physical fitness, popular weight loss programs, and food diversity and society. Includes a field trip to local restaurants.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 2. Recommended prerequisites are BIO 111W  and CHM 111 
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Conduct scientific experimentations.
      1. Make careful observations.
      2. Access and evaluate information resources.
      3. Design and perform experiments
      4. Collect and analyze data.
      5. Draw conclusions.
      6. Communicate findings.
    2. Conduct quantitative analysis of food ingredients.
      1. Discuss laboratory safety and rules.
      2. Design and carry out a food based preparation project using known methods and equipment.
      3. Use a variety of apparatus, glassware, equipment, and instrumentation.
      4. Become familiar with a variety of analytical techniques and procedures, necessary in any laboratory environment.
      5. Use simple extraction techniques to isolate a variety of foods and ingredients from natural sources.
      6. Apply various methods and approaches to synthesize baked goods and prepare a variety of foods.
      7. Prepare standard solutions and reagents for analysis and preparation of numerous foods.
      8. Discuss the interrelationships of quantities, types of ingredients, and recipes used in baking and cooking.
    3. Explore major concepts in food science and nutrition.
      1. Explain the role and properties of enzymes in the digestion and metabolism of macromolecules.
      2. Conduct laboratory experimentations in enzyme kinetics.
      3. Discuss the structure of the digestive system and its specialized parts.
      4. Describe how to determine one’s daily energy requirements and calorie intake.
      5. Discuss the principle of energy in and energy out.
      6. Explain the role of exercise and proper diet in reaching physical fitness.
    4. Conduct debates on popular diet/weight loss programs.
      1. Discuss the elements of the debate process.
      2. Explain the relevance of research to the debate process.
      3. Explain the importance of teaming up and shared responsibilities in research.
      4. Discuss the importance of teamwork and learning from each other.
      5. Assess information for validity and reliability.
      6. Develop respects for others points of view.
      7. Perform successful debates.
    5. Communicate learning experiences and research findings with Delta community.
      1. Prepare and present posters as student-research group.
      2. Communicate and share research experience and results with the community.
      3. Prepare a portfolio to document learning experiences.
    6. Demonstrate critical thinking abilities.
      1. Develop and connect interdisciplinary concepts in food science and nutrition.
      2. Synthesize reasoning and assess solutions to problems.
      3. Identify relevant trend and patterns in food science and nutrition.
      4. Emphasize that honesty is an integral part of scientific investigations.

Legal Support Professional

  
  •  

    LSP 105W - Law Office Management

    Credits: 1
    Provides an overview of the day to day operations in a legal environment. Addresses various roles, responsibilities, and problems found in the management of a law office or other legal environment. Uses a hands-on approach to address an industry-level working knowledge of a legal business or organization.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  with a minimum grade of “C”
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate a cursory knowledge of the various principles connected to the management of a law office.
      1. Apply real world applications appropriate to a legal environment.
      2. Demonstrate the basic conceptes of the technologies found in legal environments.
      3. Utilize a file management system for optimal legal records maintenance.
      4. Select creative solutions to day-to-day management problems in a legal environment.
      5. Demonstrate a basic understanding of a legal environments accounting concerns.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively in a variety of formats.
      1. Communicate ideas clearly through either formal or informal written assignments, formal presentations, or group discussions and debates.
      2. Develop skills to effectively communicate with a diverse group of people.
    3. Use writing tasks that involve both reading and writing.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to derive meaning from a piece of writing.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to distinguish between the meaning one makes of a text and the author’s intended meaning.
      3. Interpret reading and writing tasks in such a way as to invest them with personal significance, thereby creating ways to make reading and writing vital activities in a lifetime of learning.
      4. Demonstrate critical thinking skills.
      5. Understand the relationship among language, knowledge, and power.
  
  •  

    LSP 110W - Legal Ethics and Responsibilities of the Legal Assistant

    Credits: 3


    Provides an overview of the various roles, responsibilities, and problems found in Legal Support Professional careers, and the legal ethics, legal terminology, and basic skills needed. Introduces legal forms and procedures, as well as computer skills and computer programs. Places substantial emphasis on the importance of legal ethics for the Legal Support Professional through study of the State Bar of Michigan Rules of Professional Conduct, the Michigan Code of Judicial Conduct, and the National Association of Legal Assistants Code of Ethics and Professional Responsibility. Addresses preparation for the CLA examination, the importance of communication skills, keeping track of deadlines, calendars, and mailing procedures. Credit may be earned in LAS 110W or LSP 110W but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  with a minimum grade of “C”
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Demonstrate an understanding of the role the legal assistant.

         A.          Differentiate between the types of legal assistant activities and the types of activities required to be done only by a licensed attorney.

         B.          Discuss the definition of the unauthorized practice of law (UPL) and legal ethics for the legal assistant.

         C.          Demonstrate basic skills utilized by a legal assistant, including computer skills, communication, knowledge of ethical guidelines, and legal
                       terminology, research and writing skills.

         D.         Summarize the Certified Legal Assistant (CLA) exam, including the topics covered by the examination, recommended areas of study in
                      preparation for the examination, and the requirements for renewal of the CLA designation following successful completion of the      
                      examination.

         E.          Demonstrate knowledge of the general operation of a law office, including knowledge of docket control and calendar systems.

         F.          Demonstrate the basic skills utilized by a legal assistant.

         G.         Demonstrate understanding of the limitations placed on a legal assistant pertaining to the unauthorized practice of law.

    2.    Demonstrate an understanding of communication skills utilized by legal assistants.

         A.          Recognize various types of communication skills; including written, verbal, and non-verbal.

         B.          Demonstrate communication skills through classroom discussions and written assignments.

         C.          Demonstrate communication skills utilized by legal assistants in gathering information and assisting the attorney in providing legal
                       services.

         D.          Describe the difference between ethical and unethical communication in the law office.

    3.    Demonstrate an understanding of ethical guidelines governing attorneys and the legal support staff.

         A.          Describe the ethical guidelines contained in the State Bar of Michigan Rules of Professional Conduct, the Michigan Code of Judicial
                      Conduct, and the National Association of Legal Assistants (NALA) Code of Ethics and Professional Responsibility.

         B.          Identify violations of ethical conduct in given situations and discuss appropriate action to be taken.

         C.          Identify the consequences of unethical conduct to the attorney and legal support staff.

         D.          Identify procedures which could be utilized by the legal assistant to avoid ethical violations in the workplace.

         E.          Perform writing assignments to promote learning of legal ethics, write assignments for the specific purpose of identifying ethical
                      misconduct, and demonstrate the learning of legal ethics concepts through writing assignments.

         F.          Identify potential ethical problems and methods to avoid these problems.

         G.         Demonstrate the learning of legal ethics through writing assignments.

     4.    Demonstrate an understanding of entry level court system procedures.

         A.          Demonstrate a working knowledge of basic legal terms, procedures, and forms, including the commencement of a civil lawsuit and
                       procedure to be followed from the filing of the initial pleading through entry of judgment.

         B.          Demonstrate a working knowledge of the federal and state court system, including the roles of trial courts, appeals courts, and specialty
                       courts.

         C.          Describe the jurisdiction and venue of various courts.

         D.          Develop a basic legal vocabulary.

         E.          Prepare basic legal documents through writing assignments.

         F.          Demonstrate the learning of basic legal forms and procedures through writing assignments.

    5.    Demonstrate problem solving skills involving the use of good judgment.

         A.          Describe the importance of developing good judgment through awareness of proper ethical conduct in communications with all persons.

         B.          Differentiate between proper and improper use of judgment and ethical conduct in a given situation and be able to identify situations
                       involving poor judgment.

         C.          Develop basic interview techniques, with emphasis placed on effective use of communication skills.

         D.          Demonstrate an understanding of the need for proper interview techniques.

    6.    Perform writing tasks to promote the learning of all specific points of law herein.

         A.          Practice critical writing skills within the subject.

         B.          Demonstrate knowledge of subject through extensive writings.

     7.    Use writing skills for a specific audience.

         A.          Practice writing legal documents designed for a particular audience.

         B.          Evaluate need and level of legal knowledge of audience and write accordingly.

  
  •  

    LSP 115 - Principles of Substantive Law

    Credits: 3
    Introduces the dynamics of the law and legal process, including the origin and development of the law, types of law and the judicial system. Examines substantive legal subjects including contracts, torts, property, criminal and business related subjects. Emphasizes recognition of legal issues and the understanding of legal terminology. Credit may be earned in LAS 115 or LSP 115 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  with a minimum grade of “C”
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe the American judicial system.
      1. Describe the federal and state court systems.
      2. Identify the jurisdiction of various Michigan courts.
      3. Explain the role of attorneys, judges, and other court personnel.
      4. Describe the steps in a criminal and civil trial.
      5. Describe the elements of criminal and civil infractions.
    2. Identify important legal issues.
      1. Discuss contemporary legal situations in popular magazines and newspapers.
      2. Discuss legal issues, potential implications of same in court, and evaluate likelihood of prevailing.
      3. Identify potential causes of action in a given situation.
      4. Discuss, develop, and defend possible theories of recovery.
    3. Demonstrate a working legal vocabulary.
      1. Define terms in a contemporary legal practice and use them orally and in writing.
      2. Describe the subtleties of legal terms used in case reports.
      3. Explain terms of art appropriately in legal context.
    4. Evaluate issue in the law.
      1. Identify important aspects of a legal fact pattern.
      2. Discuss similarities and differences between legal situations.
      3. Prioritize issues.
      4. Discuss issues in a thoughtful, objective manner reflecting sound legal reasoning.
      5. Identify ramifications of one issue on the broader society.
      6. Apply legal principles to real-life situations.
    5. Explain ideas using legal language.
      1. Identify legal terms correctly and in context.
      2. Spell terms correctly.
      3. Respond to a variety of written legal scenarios using terms properly.
      4. Participate in written and spoken discussions taking positions and defending them with sound legal reasoning.
      5. Apply logic and legal reasoning in written work and class discussions.
    6. Demonstrate general knowledge of criminal and civil processes.
      1. Demonstrate understanding of how the legal system operates at the federal and state level.
      2. Distinguish between criminal and civil matters.
      3. Identify the source of laws.
      4. Develop working knowledge and vocabulary of criminal law, torts, family law, contracts, property, wills and trusts, and civil procedure.
      5. Describe the steps in both civil and criminal trials in proper sequence.
  
  •  

    LSP 120 - Legal Research

    Credits: 1.5
    Develops legal research techniques for both state and federal case law, statutes and administrative regulations. Emphasizes basic legal reasoning and writing skills for logical, organized problem solving. Familiarizes students with the most frequently used reference materials as well as online, commercially available legal databases including development of search queries. Credit may be earned in LAS 120 or LSP 120 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  with a “C” or better , and LSP 115  with a minimum grade of “C”
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 22.5 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Produce an academic research composition.
      1. Locate information using a variety of search tools and methods including library sources.
      2. Select source material appropriate to the writing context.
      3. Integrate his/her own opinions with various source points of view.
      4. Quote, paraphrase, and summarize accurately.
      5. Document sources in conventional style with parenthetical references in text.
    2. Evaluate information to reach a conclusion.
      1. Access and utilize a variety of information resources.
      2. Develop search strategies.
      3. Identify information needs, evaluate information resources and content, and determine if the information source is suitable for needs.
      4. Properly cite the most common sources used in legal research.
      5. Begin research for reports or other projects in a discipline.
      6. Understand the ethics of acting upon information (i.e., plagiarism, copyright).
    3. Practice researching basic legal issues using the law library.
      1. Be familiar with the resources available in the typical law library.
      2. Practice researching.
      3. Practice case analysis.
      4. Practice comparing and contrasting cases to resolve issues.
  
  •  

    LSP 150 - Real Estate Law

    Credits: 2
    Introduces the principles of real estate law. Describes the process and procedures involved in the buying and selling of real estate, mortgage loans and leasing. Examines the legal support professional’s role in assisting the lawyer with preparing or evaluating surveys and legal descriptions, deeds of conveyance, title search reports, agreements, closing and leases. Credit may be earned in LAS 150 or LSP 150 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  with a “C” or better and LSP 120  and enrollment in Legal Support Professional program or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate a cursory knowledge of the various principles connected to real estate law.
      1. Apply these principles to the business world of real estate.
      2. Compare and contrast appropriate statutes to reach the best solution for a hypothetical client.
      3. Interpret current case law and suggested legislative reform when applicable.
      4. Select creative solutions to solve legal problems.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively in a variety of formats.
      1. Communicate ideas clearly through either formal or informal written assignments, formal presentations, or group discussions and debates.
      2. Develop skills to effectively communicate with a diverse group of people.
    3. Use writing tasks that involve both reading and writing.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to derive meaning from a piece of writing.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to distinguish between the meaning one makes of a text and the author’s intended meaning.
      3. Interpret reading and writing tasks in such a way as to invest them with personal significance; thereby creating ways to make reading and writing vital activities in a lifetime of learning.
      4. Demonstrate critical thinking skills.
      5. Understand the relationship among language, knowledge, and power.
  
  •  

    LSP 210W - Estate and Trust Administration

    Credits: 2
    Studies the administration of a decedent’s estate from initial conference through the closing of an estate and the distribution of assets. Emphasizes preparation of proper probate documentation, preparation of proper tax returns including federal estate tax returns and fiduciary returns, and explanation of Michigan inheritance tax. Credit may be earned in LAS 210 or LSP 210W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  with a “C” or better and enrollment in Legal Support Professional program or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Explain the probate process.
      1. Discuss the Michigan Revised Probate Code.
      2. Discuss the definitions of key words.
      3. Explain how, and to whom, probate assets pass when a decedent dies without a will.
      4. Discuss wills and codicils, their contents, and how they are to be executed.
      5. Identify what types of property must be probated.
    2. Explain trusts.
      1. Discuss trusts, who are the parties thereto, how trusts are created, and how they work.
      2. Identify the meaning of words in the context of trusts.
      3. Identify the types of trusts that can be created.
      4. Discuss the Michigan Principal and Income Act.
    3. Prepare the papers necessary to take a decedent’s final affairs through the probate process.
      1. Identify the information that must be acquired in order to “wind up” decedent’s final affairs.
      2. Discuss the two major methods of probating an estate, to-wit: supervised and independent and to determine which method best fits the decedent’s situation.
      3. Discuss the forms used in the probate process and what information should be included in each of the forms.
      4. Identify due dates, interested parties, priorities, and when filings in the Court are necessary.
      5. Describe the process involving creditors.
      6. Explain the surviving spouse’s elections and the surviving spouse’s and minor children’s allowances.
      7. Describe alternate methods of probating an estate, such as: The estate under $15,000, and the estate identified by statute as a “small estate”.
    4. Demonstrate knowledge of “death taxes.”
      1. Identify that both the Federal Government and the State of Michigan levy death taxes on a decedent’s estate (called estate taxes).
      2. Identify that “estate” for estate tax purposes may encompass more assets than “estate” as used for probate purposes.
      3. Define the terms “unified credit” and “exemption equivalent”.
      4. Identify the properties that constitute the gross estate and on what date or dates they are valued.
      5. Discuss the Federal Estate Tax Return and its many schedules.
      6. Discuss deductions from the gross estate, particularly the marital deduction.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of fiduciary income tax returns.
      1. Identify the requirement that fiduciaries file income returns.
      2. Describe the terms “calendar year” and “years”.
      3. Differentiate between fiduciary tax returns and individual’s tax return.
      4. Discuss how beneficiaries are taxed on the income of a trust or estate.
      5. Explain and compute income tax progressive tax rates.
  
  •  

    LSP 220 - Environmental Law

    Credits: 2


    Surveys issues pertaining to environmental law. Emphasizes the process of integrating environmental policies into the social system, implementing environmental policies through the legal system, and accommodating environmental values with economic realities, traditional property rights, and national energy policy. Credit may be earned in LAS 220 or LSP 220 but not  both.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  with a “C” or better and enrollment in Legal Support Professional program or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives  1.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of the application of The Clean Air Act.

         A.          Learn the terminology associated with the Clean Air Act (CAA).

         B.          Learn the concepts and ideas that underlie the CAA law regulatory program.

         C.          Learn about specific sections and provisions of the CAA law and regulations.

         D.          Learn about the processes and procedures used by the government and other parties to comply with and to enforce the law under the
                      CAA.

         E.          Learn about the particular jobs and functions that are performed by paralegals working attorneys in CAA cases.

    2.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of the application of The Clean Water Act.

         A.          Learn the terminology associated with the Clean Water Act (CWA).

         B.          Learn the concepts and ideas that underlie the CWA law and regulatory program.

         C.          Learn about specific sections and provisions of the CWA law and regulations.

         D.         Learn about the processes and procedures used by the government and other parties to comply with and to enforce the law under the                           CWA.

         E.         Learn about the particular jobs and functions that are performed by paralegals working for attorneys in CWA cases.

     3:    Demonstrate and introductory knowledge of The Resource Conservations and Recovery Act.

         A.          Learn the terminology associated with the RCRA.

         B.          Learn the concepts and ideas that underlie the RCRA law and regulatory program.

         C.          Learn about specific sections and provisions of the RCRA law and regulations.

         D.          Learn about the processes and procedures used by the government and other parties to comply with and to enforce the law under the
                       RCRA.

         E.          Learn about the particular jobs and functions that are performed by paralegals working for attorneys in RCRA cases.

     4.   Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of The Toxic Substances Control

         A.          Learn the terminology associated with the TSCA.

         B.          Learn the concepts and ideas that underlie the TSCA law and regulatory program.

         C.          Learn about specific sections and provisions of the TSCA law and regulations.

         D.          Learn about the processes and procedures used by the government and other parties to comply with and to enforce the law under the
                       TSCA.

         E.          Learn about the particular jobs and functions that are performed by paralegals working for attorneys in TSCA cases.

     5.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act.

         A.          Learn the terminology associated with the CERCLA.

         B.          Learn the conceptes and ideas that underlie the CERCLA law and regulatory program.

         C.          Learn about specific sections and provisions of the CERCLA law and regualtions.

         D.          Learn about the processes and procedures used by the government and other parties to comply with and to enforce the law under the
                      CERCLA.

         E.          Learn about the particular jobs and functions that are performed by paralegals working for attorneys in CERCLA cases.

     6.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act.

         A.          Learn the terminology associated with the EPCRA.

         B.          Learn the concepts and ideas that underlie the EPCRA law and regulatory program.

         C.          Learn about specific sections and provisions of the EPCRA law and regulations.

         D.          Learn about the processes and procedures used by the government and other parties to comply with and to enforce the law under the
                       EPCRA.

         E.          Learn about the particular jobs and functions that are performed by paralegals working for attorneys in EPCRA cases.

    7:    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of The Endangered Species Act.

         A.          Learn the terminology associated with the ESA.

         B.          Learn the concepts and ideas that underlie the ESA law and regulatory program.

         C.          Learn about specific sections and provisions of the ESA law and regulations.

         D.          Learn about the processes and procedures used by the government and other parties to comply with and to enforce the law udner the
                       ESA.

         E.          Learn about the particular jobs and functions that are performed by paralegals working for attorneys in ESA cases.

    8.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of The National Environmental Policy Act.

         A.          Learn the terminology associated with the NEPA.

         B.          Learn the concepts and ideas that underlie the NEPA law and regulatory program.

         C.          Learn about specific sections and provisions of the NEPA law and regulations.

         D.          Learn about the processes and procedures used by the government and other parties to comply with and to enforce the law under the
                       NEPA.

         E.          Learn about the particular jobs and functions that are performed by paralegals working for attorneys in NEPA cases.

    9.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of Administrative Law and Procedure.

         A.          Learn the terminology associated with the FAPA.

         B.          Learn the concepts and ides that underlie the FAPA law and regulatory program.

         C.          Learn about specific sections and provisions of the FAPA law and regulations.

         D.          Learn about the processes and procedures used by the government and other parties to comply with and to enforce the law under the
                       FAPA.

         E.          Learn about the particular jobs and functions that are performed by paralegals working for attorneys in FAPA cases.

    10. Perform writing tasks to promote the learning of points of law.

         A.          Practice critical writing skills within the subject.

         B.          Demonstrate knowledge of subject through extensive writings.

    11. Use writing skills for a specific audience.

         A.          Practice writing legal documents designed for a particular audience.

         B.          Evaluate need and level of legal knowledge of audience and write accordingly.

  
  •  

    LSP 230 - Civil Litigation

    Credits: 3


    Studies the analysis, evaluation, and preparation of the various stages of a civil matter for litigation and trial using Michigan Rules of Civil Procedure and Rules of Evidence. Includes an efficient and systematic approach to fact investigation, drafting pleadings, discovery, and file control. Studies the pretrial stages of a lawsuit with emphasis upon trial preparation including motions in limine, witness preparation, and jury voir dire, concluding with trial and post-trial motions.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151 , LSP 110W , LSP 115 , LSP 120 , MGT 251W , each with a minimum grade of “C”.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Compare the different forms of jurisdiction.

         A.          Define subject matter jurisdiction.

         B.          Define in rem jurisdiction.

         C.          Define personal jurisdiction.

         D.          Define limited personal jurisdiction.

         E.          Discuss “long arm statutes”.

         F.          Give examples of application of theories both general and particular.

     2.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of the concept of venue.

         A.          Describe and discuss venue.

         B.          Discuss the general rule of venue.

         C.          Discuss venue in particular actions.

         D.          Explain procedures relative to motions for change of venue and basis thereof.

     3.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of statute of limitations.

         A.          Explain the statute of limitations.

         B.          Describe computation of statutory period.

         C.          Distinguish the statute of limitations from latches.

         D.          Describe various statutes of limitations.

         E.          Compare and analyze basis for revival of barred claims.

      Outcome 4:    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of basic procedures for commencement of actions and service of process.

         A.          Explain the commencement of action and issuance of summons procedures.

         B.          Explain the time within which summons must be served.

         C.          Discuss and explain who may serve process, where process may be served, and the manner of service.

         D.         Distinguish and explain the restrictions on service of procedures for verification of service of process.

    5.    Describe the drafting of a simple complaint.

         A.          Discuss the general form of complaint.

         B.          Identify the particular parts of a complaint such as caption, body, demand for relief, signature, verification, and exhibits.

         C.          Discuss and explain consequences of defects of form, both substantive and procedural.

         D.          Define verification by oath.

         E.          Explain the motion for more definite statement, to strike the complaint, and summary disposition for failure to state a claim.

    6.    Describe the formal requirements of a simple answer.

         A.          Explain formal requirements and list formal requirements for answer.

         B.          Describe the differences between admissions, denials, and pleas of no contest.

         C.          Discuss impact of failure to include defenses and requirements of pleading special matters.

         D.          Discuss time for filing and serving answer or motion to extend time.

         E.          Describe counter-claims and cross-claims.

    7.    Demonstrate the rules pertaining to alterations of pleadings.

         A.          Discuss alteration of pleadings in general.

         B.          Distinguish between amended by right and amendment by leave.

         C.          Discuss and explain examples for response to amendments, amendments after trial, and impact upon statute of limitations.

    8.    Demonstrate various types of parties to action.

         A.          Explain real party in interest concept.

         B.          Explain capacity to sue and be sued.

         C.          Recognize particulars of suits by minors, incompetent persons, unborn persons, and issues of consent.

         D.         Distinguish substitution of parties.

         E.          Discuss necessary joiner, permissive joiner, and explanation of misjoiner.

         F.          Identify and explain third party practice procedures.

         G.         Identify and explain intervention procedures.

         H.         Identify and explain interpleader procedures.

    9.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of motion practice.

         A.          Explain overview of motion practice.

         B.          Compare contested versus uncontested motions.

         C.          Describe and explain the general requirements of motions.

         D.          Discuss procedural requirements relative to contested motion practice and relative to uncontested motions.

         E.          Identify general principles relative to motions for re-hearing.

    10. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of elements and procedures of motions for summary disposition.

         A.          Discuss and explain summary disposition in general.

         B.          Discuss and describe specifics of the form and content of motion for summary disposition.

         C.          Explain necessity for affidavits or other supporting evidence, and form and content of affidavits.

         D.          Discuss timing of the motion.

         E.          Describe procedures regarding hearing, disposition, practice, and moving and opposing parties’ burdens for summary disposition motions.

    11. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of deposition discovery practice.

         A.          Discuss discovery under modern discovery procedures and rules.

         B.          Explain the scope of discovery.

         C.          Discuss work product, privilege and discovery from experts and problems arising therefrom.

         D.          Explain protective orders and the time limits on discovery.

         E.          Discuss filing and service of discovery materials, place of examination.

         F.          Discuss depositions on oral examination, conducting thereof, and procedures pertaining thereto including transciption requirements.

     12. Use document discovery devices.

         A.          Discuss interrogatories and scope and use thereof.

         B.          Discuss discovery of documents and entry on land and consequences of noncompliance.

         C.          Describe procedures and issues for physical and mental examinations.

         D.         Explain and distinguish between requests to admit and effects of noncompliance.

    13. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of purpose and scope of pretrial practice.

         A.          Discuss pretrial conferences and policies and procedures pertaining thereto.

         B.          Discuss timing and attendance of pretrial conferences.

         C.          Identify the typical pretrial conference summary report items.

         D.          Explain and distinguish between mediation and mediation procedures.

         E.          Explain and distinguish offers to stipulate to judgment.

         F.          Discuss settlements involving minors.

    14. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of case evaluation and offers of judgment.

         A.          Discuss litigation strategy.

         B.          Discuss case evaluation cases, panels, dates, and summaries.

         C.          Discuss case evaluation hearings, awards, and proceedings.

         D.          Discuss sanctions.

         E.          Describe offers of judgment.

    15. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of trial preparation for a pending trial.

         A.          Discuss pretrial practice and procedures typically arising immediately prior to trial.

         B.          Discuss pretrial settlement conference.

    16. Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of procedures for trial by jury.

         A.          Discuss the right to trial by jury.

         B.          Explain the requirements of demand for jury trial and potential waiver.

         C.          Explain the form and sequence of a trial.

         D.          Explain challenging the array.

         E.          Identify and explain qualification requirements of jurors.

         F.          Explain procedure for selection of the petite jury.

         G.         Explain voir dire examination, challenges for cause, pre-emtory challenges, and objections to the constituency of the jury.

    17. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of trial practice procedures and motions.

         A.          Discuss appearances, effective apearances, and duration of an appearance, whether by party or attorney.

         B.          Discuss transfer and removal of actions from Circuit Court or District Court and recent statutory amendments.

         C.          Discuss adjournments and motion of adjournments.

         D.          Explain scheduling of trial and court concerns.

         E.          Discuss and explain no progress dismissals, motions to disqualify judge, and dismissals of actions.

         F.          Discuss consolidation of trials, separate trials, and impact of stipulations.

         G.         Discuss subpoenas and compelling attendance of witnesses.

         H.         Explain preliminary trial procedures such as opening statements, presentation of evidence, objections, closing arguments, instructions to
                      the jury, return of the verdict, form of special or general verdicts, discharge of jury, and decisions in nonjury cases.

    19. Demonstrate a basic understanding of judgments and the form of

         A.          Discuss judgments in general and their content.

         B.          Discuss signing of judgments, interest on judgments, judgments as to less than all parties, and declaratory judgments.

         C.          Identify and distinguish between default judgments and procedure for entry of default.

         D.          Discuss and explain reasons which form a basis for amendment of judgment.

         E.          Discuss and identify taxation of cost issues and stay of proceedings on judgment.

    20. Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of enforcement judgments.

         A.          Explain new trials in general and grounds for new trial.

         B.          Explain remittiturs and additurs.

         C.          Discuss procedures for motion for new trial.

         D.         Discuss newly discovered evidence and other grounds.

         E.          Distinguish between relief from judgment and granting of new trial.

    21. Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of method and procedures for enforcement of judgments.

         A.          Explain concepts and procedures of execution against property, levy, and return of execution.

         B.          Identify distinguishing characteristics of execution and sale of personal property versus real estate.

         C.          Explain and discuss proceedings supplementary to judgment and discovery.

         D.          Describe additional enforcement methods such as appointment of receiver and successive proceedings.

  
  •  

    LSP 235 - Criminal Law and Procedure

    Credits: 3
    Studies formal legal processes involved in criminal practice from arrest through post-trial motions, sentencing, and appeal. Describes constitutional rights of the accused and the definitions of various criminal offenses. Credit may be earned in LAS 235 or LSP 235 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  with a minimum grade of “C” and enrollment in Legal Support Professional program or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate introductory knowledge and understanding of our constitutional form of government.
      1. Explain and distinguish between the three branches of our constitutional form of government.
      2. Define The Bill of Rights and the 14th Amendment as they relate to the Criminal Justice System.
      3. Discuss the primary goals of the criminal justice system.
      4. Define the legal doctrines associated with common law, statutes, and case decision making.
    2. Demonstrate a basic understanding of criminal law and the general offense groups.
      1. Explain the definition of a crime, Corpus Delicti, Mens and Actus Rea.
      2. Cite examples of legal authority and its precedential nature.
      3. Define the basic defenses and elements of crimes.
      4. Define and discuss common law crimes.
      5. Define and differentiate between crimes against persons including assault, robbery, criminal sexual conduct, homicide, domestic violence, and stalking.
      6. Define and differentiate between property crimes including arson, auto theft, burglary, fraud, larceny, and malicious destruction of property.
      7. Define and differentiate between contraband and regulatory crimes, including controlled substances, firearms and explosives, and alcohol regulations.
      8. Identify general offense groups.
      9. Identify and explain the Michigan drunk driving laws and special procedures applicable to driving offenses.
    3. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the criminal justice process.
      1. Explain the basic pretrial process including the initiation of a criminal complaint, police investigation, discovery, victim rights, and issuance of an arrest warrant.
      2. Identify and explain the law of arrests including investigatory stops, warrantless arrests, arrests pursuant to a warrant, the definition of an arrest, and who can make an arrest and under what conditions.
      3. Identify and explain the law of search and seizure including the 4th Amendment, the Reasonable Expectation of Privacy doctrine, the Exclusionary Rule, the requirements for a search warrant, and the exceptions to the warrant requirements.
      4. Identify and explain the law of confessions including the requirement of voluntariness and for Walker Hearings, the Miranda decision and 5th and 6th Amendments right to counsel, custodial interrogation, and the exceptions to the Miranda requirements.
      5. Identify and explain the basic rules of evidence including the types of evidence, the requirements for authentication and admissibility, hearsay and hearsay exceptions, presumptions, and the burdens of proof.
      6. Identify and differentiate the various state and federal courts, the jurisdiction of each, and the stages of the criminal process in each court including the arraignment, pretrial, preliminary examination, motions, trial, sentencing, and appeal.
      7. Identify and explain the law of entrapment including the objective, subjective, and hybrid tests; the defendant’s burden of proof; and the court’s review as a question of law.
      8. Identify and explain the law of identification including the right to counsel, corporeal versus photo lineups, show up identifications, independent basis for identification, and the standard of review.
    4. Perform writing tasks to promote the learning of points of law.
      1. Practice critical writing skills within the subject.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of subject through extensive writings.
    5. Use writing skills for a specific audience.
      1. Practice writing legal documents designed for a particular audience.
      2. Evaluate need and level of legal knowledge of audience and write accordingly.
  
  •  

    LSP 240 - Domestic Relations

    Credits: 2


    Studies the theoretical and practical aspects of family law with an emphasis on Michigan family law including dissolution of marriage, child custody, support, property settlements, judgments and the role of the Friend of the Court. Presents basic techniques in obtaining facts from clients in order to prepare and draft complaints, answers, financial affidavits and verified statements.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  with a minimum grade of “C” and enrollment in Legal Support Professional program or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.      Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of the historical development of Domestic Relations law.

         A.          Identify major changes in Domestic Relations law.

         B.          Identify societal shifts that drive the changes.

         C.          Explain pros and cons of changes in Domestic Relations law.

     2.    Demonstrate a working knowledge of the responsibilities of a legal support professional in a Domestic Relations practice.

         A.          Discuss the diversity of knowledge required of a DR practitioner.

         B.          Identify the limits of the duties and responsibilities of the legal support professional.

         C.          Define the concept of the Domestic Relations “team”.

         D.          Identify “who is the client?”

         E.          Discuss and describe possible conflicts of interest in domestic situations.

         F.          Differentiate between professional listening and personal sympathy.

         G.         Identify problem clients.

         H.         Describe and define proper boundaries between client and legal support professional.

     3.    Demonstrate an ability to identify the requirements of a valid antenuptial agreement.

         A.          Identify marriage as a contract.

         B.          Differentiate between express and implied contracts.

         C.          Explain the primacy of full financial disclosure.

         D.          Describe the concept of “palimony”.

         E.          Identify the requirements of an enforceable antenuptial agreement in Michigan.

         F.           Describe circumstances that would invalidate an otherwise valid contract.

     4.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of the law of marriage.

         A.          Identify marriage as a contract.

         B.          Explain the requirements of a basic, enforceable contract.

         C.          Identify the parties involved in a marriage.

         D.          Explain the concepts of consent and capacity to marry.

         E.          Discuss the State’s interest in regulating marriage.

         F.           Differentiate between cohabitation and marriage and explain the rights and responsibilities of the parties in both relationships.

         G.          Define consanguinity and affinity.

         H.           Identify who one may not marry under law.

         I.            Define annulment and “void vs. voidable” marriages.

         J.           Discuss and describe concepts of full faith and credit, state’s police power, and common law marriage.

    5.    Demonstrate the ability to identify domestic relations issues.

         A.          Describe equitable doctrines and maxims.

         B.          Differentiate between equal distribution and equitable distribution.

         C.          Differentiate between a community property system and a common law system.

         D.          Identify that fault is a factor considered in property division.

         E.          Describe behavior that would impact property division.

         F.          Discuss and define marital property and separate property.

         G.         Explain when separate property is most likely to be distributed to a spouse.

         H.         Describe factors commonly used in making distributions.

         I.          Explain the significance of prenuptial agreements in divorce distribution.

         J.          Define a Qualified Domestic Relations Order.

         K.          Explain if and when professional degrees become marital property.

         L.          Explain the significance of debt distribution.

     6.    Demonstrate a working knowledge of the law and circumstances of spousal support (alimony).

         A.          Explain the factors considered by a court in determining the appropriateness of spousal support.

         B.          Define and differentiate between traditional alimony and rehabilitative alimony.

         C.          Define alimony in gross.

         D.          Explain the societal changes which have affected the awarding of alimony.

         E.          Discuss the significance of case law in the area of alimony.

         F.           Describe the circumstances under which the obligation of alimony is discharged.

         G.          Describe the circumstances supporting the modification of alimony.

    7.    Explain the factors considered by Michigan courts in awarding and enforcing custody and visitation.

         A.          Define and describe the factors required by law for consideration of custody.

         B.          Define legal custody and physical custody.

         C.          Differentiate between legal custody and physical custody.

         D.          Explain joint legal custody.

         E.          Explain the impact of the UCCJA on custody determinations.

         F.          Differentiate between the standards for awarding and modifying custody.

         G.         Explain the concept of parental kidnapping.

         H.         Explain the concept to third party standing to assert custody and grandparent visitation.

         I.           Define “best interests of the child”.

         J.          Define “established custodial environment”.

    8.    Calculate a child support figure from information provided by clients.

         A.          Identify what assets may be considered in determining child support.

         B.          Discuss the  Michigan Child Support Formula Manual to determine child support.

         C.          Explain the basis for modification of child support obligations.

         D.          Explain the mechanisms for child support enforcement.

         E.          Describe the interaction between the federal government and local jurisdictions in the area of public assistance and child support.

         F.          List the requirements of any child support order.

         G.         Define imputation of income.

         H.         Define Income Withholding Order (IWO).

         I.          Demonstrate understanding of what is and is not income for purposes of the child support calculation.

    9.    Demonstrate a working knowledge of Michigan Law regarding issues of legitimacy.

         A.          Explain the marital presumption of paternity.

         B.          Explain the historical background of bastardy.

         C.          Define “child born out of wedlock”.

         D.          Explain the standing of putative fathers in establishing paternity.

         E.          Explain the use of forensic testing to establish or disestablish paternity.

         F.           Define “equitable parenthood”.

     10.  Demonstrate a working knowledge of the jurisdiction of the Michigan Probate Court/Family Court in regards to neglected and abused  
            children.

         A.          Define “neglect”.

         B.          Differentiate between “culpable neglect” and “non-culpable neglect”.

         C.          Explain the 365-day time line in neglect proceedings.

         D.          Explain “termination of parental rights”.

         E.          Discuss and describe circumstances which justify a court terminating a person’s parental rights.

         F.          Recognize the special circumstance of parent/clients.

         G.         Recognize the special circumstance of child/clients.

         H.         Explain the relationship between this subject and other topics covered.

    11.  Demonstrate a working knowledge of Michigan’s Domestic Violence laws.

         A.          Define “domestic violence”.

         B.          Explain how domestic violence impacts a client’s interests.

         C.          Explain the need for client referral to specialists.

         D.          Explain the procedure for obtaining Personal Protection Orders.

  
  •  

    LSP 250 - Corporate Law

    Credits: 2
    Describes the nature of corporations, partnerships, and proprietorships with an emphasis on the corporate structure including formation and dissolution, amending Articles of Incorporation and by-laws, shareholders’ and directors’ meetings, corporate equity and debt securities, as well as employment and shareholders agreements.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  with a minimum grade of “C” and enrollment in Legal Support Professional program or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe the characteristics of sole proprietorship.
      1. Identify the essential elements for formation of sole proprietorship.
      2. Describe tax liabilities of the sole proprietorship.
      3. Describe the duties of the sole proprietorship.
      4. Describe the liabilities of the sole proprietorship.
      5. Identify the essential element for termination of sole properietorship.
    2. Describe the characteristics of limited partnerships and limited liability companies.
      1. Identify the essential elements for formation of limited partnership and limited liability companies.
      2. Describe the tax liabilities of limited partnership and limited liability companies.
      3. Describe the duties of the limited partnership and limited liability companies.
      4. Describe the liabilities of the limited partnership and limited liability companies.
      5. Identify the essential element for termination of limited partnership and limited liability companies.
    3. Describe the procedure for corporate changes.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of the procedure for mergers.
      2. Identify the requirements for a plan merger, director and shareholders approval, and filing requirements.
      3. Demonstrate knowledge of the procedure for consolidation.
      4. Identify the requirements for plan of consolidation.
      5. Explain the effect of sale and purchase of assets.
    4. Describe the requirements for corporate meetings.
      1. Discuss when directors meetings are needed or required.
      2. Discuss when shareholders meetings are needed or required.
      3. Discuss how to organize a corporate minute book for corporate meetings.
      4. Demonstrate knowledge of voting requirements.
      5. Demonstrate understanding of voting rights of shareholders.
    5. Describe the procedure for distributing corporate profits and dissolution of corporations.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of the procedure for the authorization and distribution of dividends.
      2. Distinguish between cash, property, and share dividends.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of common stock and preferred stock.
      4. Demonstrate knowledge of articles of dissolution.
      5. Explain the difference between winding up and liquidating.
      6. Identify the forms of involuntary dissolution.
  
  •  

    LSP 253 - Bankruptcy Law

    Credits: 3


    Illustrates the legal aspects of the bankruptcy law and demonstrates the practical approach to working in this area. Reviews Federal Bankruptcy Law including different types of bankruptcy chapters, exemptions, dischargeable and nondischargeable debts, preferences, the role of the Bankruptcy Trustee, and preparation of petitions and schedules in bankruptcy. Emphasizes the effective use of the Legal Support Professional.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  with a minimum grade of “C” and LSP 110W  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Demonstrate an elementary knowledge of the history of development of debtor and creditor rights.

         A.          Discuss the history of development of principles of debtor and creditor rights from pre-Roman law through Elizabethan statute and through 
                       modern complex economies.

         B.          Modify the initial introduction of basic concepts of discharge, debtor relief, fresh start, liquidation, and automatic stay.

         C.          Identify historical developments within different economic and social contexts.

     2.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of various state law post-judgment procedures and debtor/creditor rights.

         A.          Explain typical post-judgment collection processes and proceedings supplementary to judgment.

         B.          Discuss installment judgments, garnishments, and receiverships.

         C.          Explain concepts of assignment for benefit and composition of creditors.

         D.          Explain and discuss Bulk Sales Act provisions.

    3.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of  Bankruptcy Code chapters and provisions.

         A.          Discuss the history of Bankruptcy Act of 1978, its development, and its organizational structure.

          B.         Discuss and explain Chapters 1, 3 and 5 of the Act.

         C.          Discuss and explain Chapters 7, 9, 11, 12 and 13 of the Act.

    4.    Demonstrate an introductory understanding of Bankruptcy Code.

         A.          Discuss and explain definitions and rules of construction under Bankruptcy Code.

         B.          Explain basic definitions such as debt, debtor, claim, notice, and opportunity for hearing.

         C.          Discuss voluntary cases versus involuntary cases.

     5.    Demonstrate a  knowledge of the various petitions.

         A.          Define lien.

         B.          Define person.

         C.          Define security agreement.

         D.          Describe the concept of single asset real estate.

         E.          Describe the concept and definition of custodian.

         F.          Describe the concept and definition of claim, creditor, and equity security holder.

         G.         Describe the concept of insider and insolvency.

     6.    Demonstrate an elementary knowledge of Chapter 7 processes.

         A.          Discuss explanation of Chapter 7 process.

         B.          Explain the Rule 2004 examinations.

         C.          Discuss concepts of discharge, reaffirmation, and exemptions.

         D.          Discuss and explain conversion and dismissal concepts and procedures.

         E.          Explain lien avoidance and exemption amounts.

     7.    Demonstrate an elementary understanding of preparing a trustee’s proceeding.

         A.          Define and discuss the concepts of trustee.

         B.          Distinguish between trustees from United States Trustee and trustees from state law trustees.

         C.          Discuss and explain the concept of debtor-in-possession and its duties and obligations.

         D.          Define examiners.

         E.          Discuss pre-filing and post-filing actions to prepare a proceeding for a trustee.

     8.    Demonstrate an elementary knowledge of stays and dischargeability.

         A.          Explain bankruptcy litigation process and procedure.

         B.          Discuss automatic stay and its extent.

         C.          Discuss methods and procedure for obtaining relief from stay, whether by motion or by operation of law.

         D.          Distinguish between objection to discharge and objection to discharge of debt.

         E.          Identify and discuss debts which are non-dischargeable and procedure for objections to discharge.

         F.          Discuss debts automatically non-dischargeable and procedure for objections to discharge.

         G.         Discuss property of the estate and turnover complaints.

    9.    Demonstrate an understanding of principles pertaining to the trustee’s avoidance powers and to graduate transfers.

         A.          Discuss trustee’s various forms of avoidance powers.

         B.          Explain concept and principals behind strong arm clauses.

         C.          Identify limitations and extent of avoidance powers.

         D.          Define elements of preferences and affirmative defenses thereto.

         E.          Discuss fraudulent transfers, the elements thereof, and post-petition transfers.

     11.  Demonstrate an elementary knowledge of procedures pertaining to estate property and executory contracts.

         A.          Discuss the concept of cash collateral.

         B.          Discuss the concept of limitations upon use, sale, or lease of property.

         C.          Identify potential use powers.

         D.          Define and explain the concept of executory contract and time limits for assumption or rejection.

         E.          Explain the concept of abandonment, obtaining credit, and preservation of cash.

     11. Demonstrate elementary knowledge of the processes of claims determination.

         A.          Discuss the claim determination process and procedure.

         B.          Discuss claims objections and procedure and identify various types of claims and their property.

         C.          Discuss redemption, order, and method of distribution.

    12. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic concepts underlying Chapter 11 Bankruptcy.

         A.          Discuss basic concepts in Chapter 11 and basic procedures.

         B.          Discuss insider composition, operating reports, and court guideline requirements.

         C.          Discuss plan characteristics and mandatory and permissive plan provisions.

         D.          Discuss and identify elements of disclosure statement, plan, and voting rules.

         E.          Discuss Chapter 11 cramdown.

     13: Demonstrate understanding of reorganization proceedings.

         A.          Discuss Chapter 13 eligibility requirements.

         B.          Discuss Chapter 13 plan provisions, confirmation hearing conditions and procedure, and time line.

         C.          Discuss Chapter 12 reorganization, eligibility requirements, and purposes of Chapter 12.

         D.         Discuss and compare Chapter 11 and 13 proceedings vis-a-vie Chapter 12 proceedings.

         E.          Discuss Chapter 12 and 13 discharge provisions vis-a-vie Chapter 7 and 11.

  
  •  

    LSP 260 - Legal Support Internship I

    Credits: 1
    Completion of all Legal Support Professional required courses prior to this course is highly recommended. Requires forty (40) hours of work experience in a law or law-related office.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151 , LSP 110W , LSP 115 , LSP 120  all with a minimum grade of “C” (2.0) and permission of LSP Coordinator
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Practice procedures to assist in a legal setting.
      1. Draft and answer complaints, interrogatories, and requests for production of documents.
      2. Perform investigation and fact-gathering.
      3. Perform data organization, control, and recovery.
      4. Draft motions, requests for admission, mediation summaries, and judgments.
      5. Prepare for and assist at trial.
      6. Prepare for appeal.
      7. Arrange for transfer of asset ownership in accordance with estate plans.
      8. Use the law library for legal research including computer-assisted legal research.
      9. Locate and interpret applicable statutory and case law.
      10. Organize research and write a legal memorandum summarizing findings.
      11. Schedule appointments and depositions.
      12. Handle general office correspondence including telephone usage.
      13. Maintain follow-up systems including due dates for documents to be filed.
  
  •  

    LSP 261 - Legal Support Internship II

    Credits: 2
    Completion of all Legal Support Professional required courses prior to this course is highly recommended. Requires eighty (80) hours of work experience in a law or law-related office.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151 , LSP 110W , LSP 115 , LSP 120  all with a minimum grade of “C” (2.0) and permission of LSP Coordinator
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Practice procedures to assist in a legal setting.
      1. Draft and answer complaints, interrogatories, and requests for production of documents.
      2. Perform investigation and fact-gathering.
      3. Perform data organization, control, and recovery.
      4. Draft motions, requests for admission, mediation summaries, and judgments.
      5. Prepare for and assist at trial.
      6. Prepare for appeal.
      7. Arrange for transfer of asset ownership in accordance with estate plans.
      8. Use the law library for legal research including computer-assisted legal research.
      9. Locate and interpret applicable statutory and case law.
      10. Organize research and write a legal memorandum summarizing findings.
      11. Schedule appointments and depositions.
      12. Handle general office correspondence including telephone usage.
      13. Maintain follow-up systems including due dates for documents to be filed.
  
  •  

    LSP 262 - Legal Support Internship III

    Credits: 3
    Completion of all Legal Support Professional required courses is highly recommended. Requires one hundred twenty (120) hours of work experience in a law or law-related office.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151 , LSP 110W , LSP 115 , LSP 120  all with a minimum grade of “C” (2.0) and permission of LSP Coordinator
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Practice legal procedures and apply substantive knowledge of the law to assist the attorney, or other mentor, in the operation of a law office, business, bank, government agency, court, or other legal setting. Objectives may include but are not limited to the following:
      1. Draft and answer complaints, interrogatories, and requests for production of documents.
      2. Perform investigation and fact-gathering.
      3. Perform data organization, control, and recovery.
      4. Draft motions, requests for admission, mediation summaries, and judgments.
      5. Prepare for and assist at trial.
      6. Prepare for appeal.
      7. Arrange for transfer of asset ownership in accordance with estate plans.
      8. Use the law library for legal research including computer-assisted legal research.
      9. Locate and interpret applicable statutory and case law.
      10. Organize research and write a legal memorandum summarizing findings.
      11. Schedule appointments and depositions.
      12. Handle general office correspondence including telephone usage.
      13. Maintain follow-up systems including due dates for documents to be filed.
  
  •  

    LSP 280W - Legal Writing

    Credits: 1.5
    Develops techniques for presentation of technical material in formal and informal written reports, letters, or other current forms of business communication in a legal context.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151 , and LSP 110W , LSP 115 , LSP 120 ; all with a minimum grade of “C” (2.0)
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 22.5 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Produce legal compositions.
      1. Consider audience and purpose.
      2. Plan writing processes, using effective strategies and techniques.
      3. Include a clear articulation of the important ideas.
      4. Select, organize, and present details to support a main idea.
      5. Demonstrate the ability to move between generalization and detail.
      6. Write effective introductions and conclusions.
      7. Employ the appropriate writing conventions.
    2. Demonstrate interpersonal skills.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to derive meaning from a piece of writing.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to distinguish between the meaning one makes of a text and the author’s intended meaning.
      3. Interpret reading and writing tasks in such a way as to invest them with personal significance, thereby creating ways to make reading and writing vital activities in a lifetime of learning.
      4. Demonstrate critical thinking skills.
      5. Understand the relationship among language, knowledge, and power.
    3. Work with others, both in and out of the classroom.
      1. Reflect upon and assess one’s own work as well as the work of others.
      2. Show willingness to work with others, seeking help where necessary and offering help where it is sought.
  
  •  

    LSP 290-299 - Special Projects in Legal Support Professional


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Library Skills

  
  •  

    LIB 195W - Library Research Skills

    Credits: 2
    Develops information literacy for success with college-level academic research. Credit may be earned in LIB 195W or ENG 195W  but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Access information effectively to help solve a particular problem, make a decision, or answer a specific question.
      1. Access and utilize a variety of print and electronic resources.
      2. Develop search strategies for a range of information sources.
    2. Analyze and evaluate information effectively using appropriate means.
      1. Identify information needs and determine if the information source is appropriate for meeting information needs.
      2. Analyze information for use in solving problems, making decisions, answering questions, and writing for an academic audience.
      3. Evaluate information resources for credibility and bias.
    3. Learn to use information in a variety of settings.
      1. Begin research for reports or other projects in a discipline.
      2. Understand the ethics of acting upon information (i.e., plagiarism, copyright).
      3. Write bibliographic citations using a consistent standard reference style.
    4. Participate in “writing to learn” activities
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
  
  •  

    LIB 290-299 - Special Projects in Library Skills


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Lifelong Wellness

  
  •  

    LW 206A - Occupational Wellness 1

    Credits: 1
    Introduces wellness concepts, behavioral patterns, and activities that can be incorporated into the lifestyles of those working in a wide variety of occupational settings.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to restricted enrollment programs.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Develop an understanding of the benefits of fitness.
      1. List and describe the benefits and significance of participation in a lifetime fitness and developed occupational wellness program.
      2. List and describe the five components of physical fitness as well as assessment tests and exercises that can be done to measure and improve all five components.
      3. Define and describe the importance and role of warm-up and cool-down as they relate to activity.
      4. Describe and apply the FIT principle.
      5. Demonstrate how to take, monitor, and calculate personal target heart rates to attain a cardiovascular training effect.
      6. Define and discuss the relationship between stroke volume, cardiac output, and heart rate as they relate to cardiorespiratory benefits and exercise activities.
      7. Define and differentiate between aerobic and anaerobic activities.
      8. Define heart disease and describe risk factors associated with it.
      9. Describe how flexibility serves to prevent muscular and joint problems.
      10. Demonstrate and describe various movements/exercises that health professionals can incorporate into their occupation to prevent injuries as well as muscle and joint overuse conditions.
      11. Define and differentiate between static and ballistic stretching.
    2. Relate good nutrition and stress reduction to a healthy lifestyle.
      1. Analyze nutritional data and calculate percentage values based on serving sizes and recommended daily values.
      2. List recommended nutritional requirements based on Food Guide Pyramid.
      3. Define and describe all fats (saturated, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, trans-fats); list sources of each.
      4. Describe the role activity plays in successful weight management.
      5. Define cancer and diabetes. Describe risk factors associated with various types of these diseases.
      6. Define stress, list symptoms of it, and describe various methods of stress reduction.
      7. Recognize various wellness myths as they relate to us, “the consumer.”
      8. Demonstrate and incoporate various physical activities and exercises into his/her clinical experience.
      9. Identify and define occupational wellness terminology.
  
  •  

    LW 220W - Lifelong Wellness

    Credits: 1
    Promotes student understanding and experience of the direct correlation between positive lifestyle habits and well being through a series of classroom lectures that cover a variety of wellness topics and disease prevention. Credit may be earned in only one of the following: LW 220W or LW 206A .

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the ability to access, analyze, and use information learned in Lifelong Wellness.
      1. Identify the appropriate mode, frequency, intensity, and duration for enhancing all five health-related components of fitness.
      2. Calculate estimated maximum heart rates, heart rate reserve, target heart rates, and estimated maximum oxygen consumption.
      3. Evaluate current diet and recommend changes to improve overall health and nutrition.
      4. Calculate energy in foods and complete diets.
      5. Calculate energy needs for positive, negative, and energy balance.
      6. Access information using a variety of technology and library resources.
    2. Respond appropriately and effectively through speaking and listening skills.
      1. Identify and present specific muscles and their locations. List strengthening exercises as well as flexibility exercises for each muscle.
      2. Respond appropriately to feedback and questions.
    3. Process information through interpretation, questioning, reasoning, and evaluation.
      1. Differentiate between injuries caused by overuse and those caused by accidents.
      2. Identify the people who can safely begin an exercise program and those who should consult their doctor and be tested first.
      3. Identify the specific factors and conditions that may increase a person’s risk of injury during exercise.
      4. Outline the unique contributions of exercise in a fat reduction program.
    4. Practice values and civic principles related to wellness, and understand and apply the principles of diversity in health and wellness.
      1. Identify the populations at the highest risk for bacterially and virally caused STD’s.
      2. Identify and explain population prevalence for cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, and osteoporosis.
      3. Compare and contrast various chronic diseases in the U.S., and in other countries and states.
    5. Successfully read, analyze, and organize information by articulating in writing effective responses that promote learning.
      1. Identify, summarize, and derive meaning from a reading.
      2. Organize, interpret, and draw conclusions from a reading.
      3. Write effective introductions and conclusions.
      4. Identify risk factors for cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and osteoporosis.
      5. Define cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and osteoporosis.
      6. Describe the prevalence of cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and osteoporosis.
      7. Define and describe process addiction.
      8. Define and explain the concept of addiction.
      9. Explain the physiological and behavioral effects of alcohol, tobacco, caffeine, marijuana, cocaine, and methamphetamine.
      10. Define health and wellness and explain how they differ.
      11. Identify, define, reflect upon the six dimensions of wellness.
      12. Discuss the importance of warm-up and cool-down.
      13. Outline benefits of training for muscular fitness.
      14. Define the functions of nutrients in our foods.
      15. Describe the Food Guide Pyramid plan for a balanced diet.
      16. Define and distinguish between self-concept, self-esteem, self-efficacy, and locus of control, indicating the importance of each individual psychosocial health.
      17. Discuss the basic physiological changes caused by the stress response.
      18. Describe eustress and its impact on health and well-being.
      19. Identify and explain the role of selected stress buffers in reducing risk for stress and/or controlling potential harmful effects of chronic stress.
  
  •  

    LW 221W - Fitness and Wellness

    Credits: 2
    Promotes understanding and experience of the direct correlation between positive lifestyle habits and wellbeing through a series of classroom lectures that cover a wide variety of wellness topics and disease prevention with application of these concepts through participation in aerobic conditioning, resistance training, diet analysis, and health assessments. Successful completion of LW 221W meets the Wellness graduation requirement.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the ability to access, analyze, and use information learned in Lifelong Wellness
      1. Identify the appropriate mode, frequency, intensity, and duration for enhancing all five health-related components of fitness.
      2. Evaluate current diet and recommend changes to improve overall health and nutrition.
      3. Calculate energy in foods and complete diets.
      4. Calculate energy needs for positive, negative, and energy balance.
      5. Access information using a variety of technology and library resources.
      6. List and describe the physiological benefits of a fitness program.
      7. Identify and present specific muscles and their locations. List strengthening exercises as well as flexibility exercises for each muscle.
    2. Process information through interpretation, questioning, reasoning, and evaluation.
      1. Differentiate between injuries caused by overuse and those caused by accidents.
      2. Identify the people who can safely begin an exercise program and those who should consult their doctor and be tested first.
      3. Identify the specific factors and conditions that may increase a person’s risk of injury during exercise.
      4. Outline the unique contributions of exercise in a fat reduction program.
      5. Recognize various myths associated with fitness products and information.
    3. Practice values and civic principles related to wellness, and understand and apply the principles of diversity in health and wellness.
      1. Identify and explain population prevalence for cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, and osteoporosis.
      2. Compare and contrast various chronic diseases in the U.S., and in other countries and states.
    4. Successfully read, analyze, and organize information by articulating in writing effective responses that promote learning.
      1. Identify, summarize, and derive meaning from a reading.
      2. Organize, interpret, and draw conclusions from a reading.
      3. Write effective introductions and conclusions.
      4. Define and identify risk factors for cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and osteoporosis.
      5. Define and explain the concept of addiction.
      6. Explain the physiological and behavioral effects of alcohol, tobacco, and caffeine.
      7. Define health and wellness and explain how they differ.
      8. Identify, define, and reflect upon the six dimensions of wellness.
      9. Discuss the importance of warm-up and cool-down.
      10. Outline benefits of training for muscular fitness.
      11. Define the functions of nutrients in our foods.
      12. Describe the Food Guide Pyramid plan for a balanced diet.
      13. Define and distinguish between self-concept, self-esteem, self-efficacy, and locus of control, indicating the importance of each individual psychosocial health.
      14. Discuss the basic physiological changes caused by the stress response
      15. Describe eustress and its impact on health and wellbeing.
      16. Identify and explain the role of selected stress buffers in reducing risk for stress and/or controlling potential harmful effects of chronic stress.
    5. Demonstrate the concepts and components of physical fitness.
      1. Demonstrate how to take, monitor, and calculate personal heart rates and estimated oxygen consumption.
      2. Demonstrate various fitness exercises using safe and proper technique.
      3. Maintain daily class records of the developing fitness program.
      4. Demonstrate fitness assessment tests that are used to measure the components of fitness.
  
  •  

    LW 222 - The Science of Nutrition and Exercise

    Credits: 3


    Presents nutrition science as a key element for optimal living and health. Plans and reviews diets, principles, food nutrients, metabolism, and diet analysis. Evaluates health effects of nutrition. Introduces fitness and wellness principles and integrates with nutrition through various conditioning exercises.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives  1:    Describe, explain, and apply nutritional concepts for optimal health, weight management, and the prevention of disease.

         A.          Advise proper eating plans by utilizing diet planning principles, the Food Pyramid, MyPlate, and  other food guide plans that
                       incorporate personal food preferences.

         B.          List and describe the four energy sources.

         C.          List and describe the six classes of nutrients.

         D.          Explain the primary difference between energy and non-energy-yielding nutrients.

         E.          Distinguish between simple and complex carbohydrates in form and function, and the health effects associated with carbohydrate
                       intake, including fiber and sugar intake.

         F.           List and describe the 20 common amino acids; the 9 essential and 11 non-essential.

         G.          Differentiate between members of the lipid family; triglycerides, phospholipids, and sterols, in form and function and the health
                       effects associated with lipid intake, especially triglyceride and cholesterol intake.

         H.          Describe the factors associates with weight control, including causes of obesity, methods of assessing body weight and
                       composition, and the good and poor treatments for obesity.

         I.            Describe free radicals and explain the impact diet and exercise have on them.

         J.           Describe the function of water in the body and explain how electrolytes/fluids are balanced and maintained in the body.

         K.          Explain the impact of nutrition and lifestyle choices on the immune system and on diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer,
                      diabetes, AIDS, osteoporosis.

         L.          Describe factors that affect food choices.

         M.         Define the science of nutrition.

         N.         Cite the 10 leading causes of illness and death in the Unites States.

         O.         Identify and describe serving sizes of various food groups.

         P.          Describe the components of a food label.

         Q.         Describe how the development of nutrition as a science has influenced what people eat.

         R.         Define simple and complex carbohydrates and provide examples.

         S.         Describe the health effects of simple and complex carbohydrates intake and cite the recommended intake of each.

         T.          Define fiber, including the characteristics of the different types of fiber, how fiber differs from starch, and how fibers are classified.

         U.         Identify the members of the lipid family.

         V.          Explain the basic function of lipids in the body and in foods.

         W.         Describe the process and controversy surrounding hydrogenation.

         X.          List and explain the differences between saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, and trans fatty acids, and provide examples
                      of food sources for each.

         Y.          Cite the recommended intakes of total dietary fat, saturated, fat, and dietary cholesterol.

         Z.          Suggest practical ways to reduce total dietary fat, saturated fat, and dietary cholesterol.

         AA.       Compare and contrast how a traditional American-based diet and diets from other countries can affect health.

         BB.       Explain the health risks associated with a high fat diet for people suffering from the following conditions: heart disease, Type II
                      diabetes, and cancer.

         CC.       Describe the role of Macronutrients.

         DD.       Define health body weights and body composition levels.

         EE.       Describe the methods of determining body weight and body composition.

         FF.        State health risk factors associated with being over or underweight.

         GG.      Describe causes of obesity.

         HH.       Explain good treatment choices for weight loss.

         II.          Analyze dietary intakes and advise according to the DRI’s, valid nutritional research, and optimal health and disease prevention.

         JJ.        Calculate daily caloric intakes and the macro-nutrient percent ranges and advise meal planning according to current dietary guidelines.

         KK.       Demonstrate the use of various dietary analysis software.

         LL.        Discuss how biotechnology is changing characteristics and types of foods available.

         MM.      Describe diets strongly associated with low rates of chronic heart disease and cancer; those containing vegetables, fruits, and whole
                      grains.

         NN.       List the functions of water: maintenance of the body hydration and temperature; removal of waste products; participation in energy  
                      formation; major source of fluoride.

         OO.      List and describe various methods of assessing body fat.

      2.    Describe, explain, and apply metabolism, digestion, absorption, and nutritional bioavailability concepts as they relate to
             nutritional research and
    health.

         A.          Describe the digestive system, including problems that it encounters and solves during the digestive process.

         B.          Explain the steps involved in metabolism and the ways energy is derived from carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, including the
                      consequences of consuming too much or too little energy.

         C.         Identify and describe the basic route of food followed through the GI tract.

         D.         Describe the muscular action of digestion.

         E.         List the digestive organs/enzymes and their secretions that promote the breakdown of food.

         F.          Briefly describe the anatomy of the absorptive system.

         G.         Describe the basic transportation routes absorbed nutrients take in order to be delivered to and used by the body.

         H.         Explain how the body regulates digestion and absorption.

         I.          Describe the basic steps involved in the metabolism of the absorbed starch.

         J.          Summarize the basic steps of blood glucose regulation.

         K.         Explain how fiber is digested and absorbed.

         L.          Describe the basic steps involved in the digestion, absorption, and transport of macro nutrients.

         M.         Briefly explain how fat is metabolized.

         N.         Describe the origin, function, and health implications of fat substitutes/fake fats.

         O.         Describe digestion and absorption of macronutrients.

         P.          Define metabolism and energy metabolism.

         Q.         Describe the process of glycolysis.

         R.         Describe what happens to metabolism during fasting/starvation.

         S.         Describe energy balance.

         T.          Define and describe thermogenesis.

         U.         Explain the function of coenzymes.

         V.          Describe the factors that enhance or inhibit absorption of nutrients.

         W.         Explain how trace minerals interact with each other during the digestion and absorption process.

         X.          Describe how medications, diseases, and biological processes influence adults’ requirements for essential nutrients.

         Y.          List and describe digestive disorders and explain their relationship to dietary intake.

    3.    Describe, explain, and apply nutritional needs for special populations and those with chronic disease.

         A.          Explain the health effects of protein intake.

         B.          Describe protein energy malnutrition.

         C.          Explain how vegetarians and non-vegetarians obtain adequate protein.

         D.          Describe how nutrition and lifestyle choices impact the life-cycle before and during pregnancy, during lactation and infancy, during
                       childhood and adolescence, and through adulthood and aging.

         E.          Explain the composition, function, and fat of the lipoproteins - VLDL, LDL, and HDL.

         F.          Describe the purpose of a blood lipid profile.

         G.         List the recommended protein intake for specific groups of people.

         H.         Differentiate the health effects of vegetarian vs. non-vegetarian eating plans.

         I.           Explain the differences between anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

         J.          Explain why the fetus is not considered a parasite.

         K.          Discuss how adult risk of chronic diseases is affected by maternal and infant nutrition.

         L.          List reasons why breastfeeding is the best method for nourishing an infant.

         M.         Describe growth and development during infancy as faster than any other time.

         N.         Recognize that children are not born knowing what to eat.

         O.         Discuss a child’s ability to regulate how much he or she eats.

         P.          Explain how diet and behavior will affect later health.

         Q.         Identify and explain the differences in infant, toddler, child, and adolescent nutritional needs and dietary recommendations.

         R.          Describe how dietary intake, body weight, and physical activity influence health status with age.

         S.          List chronic disorders associated with unhealthful intakes of certain minerals; osteoporosis, iron deficiency, and hypertension.

     4.    Discuss and apply nutrition strategies for enhancing athletic performance.

         A.          Provide accurate information regarding vitamin/mineral supplementation and the use of ergogenic aids in athletic performance.

         B.          List and describe the fuels necessary for physical performance and to sustain daily activity.

         C.          State how protein quality is determined.

         D.          Describe the effects of protein and amino acid supplements.

         E.          Define ATP and explain how the body uses ATP.

         F.          Describe how foods affect daily activity and athletic performance.

         G.         List and discuss the currently proven ergogenic aids.

         H.         Define and describe glycogen loading and its effect on athletic performance.

         I.           Calculate appropriate hydration rates for various athletic events.

         J.           Identify and explain the importance of pre and post workout nutrition.

         K.           Explain why and how glucose is utilized for intense physical activity.

         L.           Explain why and how fates are utilized for low-to-moderate intensity exercise.

         M.          Discuss how physical activity performance, strength, and endurance is affected by genetics, training, and nutrition.

         N.          Detail the causes of abnormal menstrual cycles in female athletes and suggest how these should be corrected.

     5.    Describe, explain, and apply the health related components of an exercise program and their relationship to the prevention of disease.

         A.          List and describe the benefits associated with physical activity.

         B.          List and describe the five health related components of fitness; cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility,
                       and body composition.

         C.          State the guidelines for developing and maintaining fitness.

         D.          Identify the function of the following major muscle groups and list exercises that can be done to strengthen each; tricep, bicep, deltoid,
                       latissimus dorsi, glute, quadriceps, hamstring, pectoral, gastrocnemius, and rectus adfominus.

         E.          Calculate caloric expenditure through physical activities.

         F.          Calculate heart rate zones for achieving optimal cardiorespiratory benefits.

         G.         Demonstrate safe and effective fitness activity exercises.

         H.         Develop personalized fitness programs that achieve optimal enhancement of the five health related components of fitness.

         I.          Describe the physical and mental health benefits that usually come with physical fitness and good nutrition.

    6.    Describe and explain vitamin and mineral DRI’s, dietary supplements, phytochemicals, antioxidants, and ergogenic aids.

         A.          Explain the differences between water and fat soluble vitamins, including the ways each one functions in the body, the deficiency/toxicity
                       symptoms, and the major food sources.

         B.          State which vitamins have antioxidant effects and what those effects are.

         C.          Describe the impact of artificial sweeteners.

         D.          Explain the health effects that a high protein fad diet will have on individuals.

         E.          Identify the fat and water soluble vitamins.

         F.          Define antioxidants and explain the effects of them on the body.

         G.         Describe the primary functions of the following vitamins, list deficiency/toxicity symptoms, and identify major food sources for each:
                      Vitamins A, C, E, B’s, D, and K.

         H.         State the positive and negative effects of dietary supplementation.

         I.          Identify the major minerals according to the following criteria:

                      1.    Chief functions in the body.

                      2.    Deficiency symptons and/or disease.

                      3.    Toxicity symptioms and/or disease.

                      4.    Major food sources.

         J.           Identify the trace minerals according to the identical criteria listed above.

         K.          Recognize that dietary supplements do not have to be sown to be safe or effective.

         L.          Define vitamins and chemicals in food required for normal growth and health.

         M.         Discuss how intakes below and above range impair health.

         N.         Explain why food is the preferred source of vitamins and minerals.

  
  •  

    LW 223W - Wellness in Technical Trades

    Credits: 2
    Correlates positive lifestyle habits and wellbeing. Covers a wide variety of wellness topics and disease prevention. Applies concepts through participation in aerobic conditioning, resistance training, diet analysis, CPR, AED, & First Aid Training and health assessments. Successful completion of LW 223W meets the Wellness graduation requirement and is highly recommended for all Technical Trades programs.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 20 Lab Hours: 25
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the ability to access, analyze, and use information learned in Lifelong Wellness.
      1. Identify the appropriate mode, frequency, intensity, and duration for enhancing all five health-related components of fitness.
      2. Evaluate current diet and recommend changes to improve overall health and nutrition.
      3. Calculate energy in foods and complete diets.
      4. Calculate energy needs for positive, negative, and energy balance.
      5. Access information using a variety of technology and library resources.
      6. List and describe the physiological benefits of a fitness program.
      7. Identify and present specific muscles and their locations. List stengthening exercises as well as flexibility exerecises for each muscle.
    2. Assimilate information from various situations and interpret, question, reason and evaluate impact on outcomes.
      1. Differentiate between injuries cused by overuse and those caused by accidents.
      2. Identify the people who can safely begin an exercise program and those who should consult their doctor and be tested first.
      3. Identify the specific factors and conditions that may increase a person’s risk of injury during exercise.
      4. Outline the unique contributions of exercise in a fat reduction program.
      5. Recognize various myths associated with fitness products and information.
    3. Practice values and civic principles related to wellness, and understand and apply the principles of diversity in health and wellness.
      1. Identify and explain population prevalence for cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, and osteoporosis.
      2. Compare and contrast various chronic diseases in the U.S., and in other countries and states.
    4. Successfully read, analyze, and organize information by articulating in writing effective responses that promote learning.
      1. Identify, summarize, and derive meaning from a reading.
      2. Organize, interpret, and draw conclusions from a reading.
      3. Write effective introductions and conclusions.
      4. Define and identify risk factors for cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and osteoporosis.
      5. Define and explain the concept of addiction.
      6. Explain the physiological and behavioral effects of alcohol, tobacco, caffeine, marijuana, cocaine, and methamphetamine.
      7. Define health and wellness and explain how they differ.
      8. Identify, define, and reflect upon the six dimensions of wellness.
      9. Discuss the importance of warm-up and cool-down.
      10. Outline benefits of training for muscular fitness.
      11. Define the functions of nutrients in our foods.
      12. Describe the MyPyramid/MyPlate plan for a balanced diet
      13. Define and distinguish between self-concept, self-esteem, self-efficacy, and locus of control, indicating the importance of each individual psychosocial health.
      14. Discuss the basic physiological changes caused by the stress response.
      15. Describe eustress and its impact on health and well-being.
      16. Identify and explain the role of selected stress buffers in reducing risk for stress and/or controlling potential harmful effects of chronic stress.
    5. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Fitness and Wellness
      1. Demonstrate how to take, monitor and calculate personal heart rates and estimated oxygen consumption.
      2. Demonstrate various fitness exercises using safe and effective technique
      3. Maintain daily class records of the developing fitness program.
      4. Demonstrate fitness assessment tests that are used to measure the components of fitness.
      5. Demonstrate low-back strengthening and flexibility exercises applying safe techniques with modifications when appropriate.
      6. Demonstrate the correct techniques of CPR for adult
      7. Demonstrate mouth-to-mouth rescue breathing for an adult
      8. Demonstrate mouth-to-mask rescue breathing for adult 6I. Demonstrate the complete sequence for 1-rescuer CPR
      9. Demonstrate the complete sequence for 2-rescuer CPR
      10. Demonstrate the proper placement of the AED electrode pads
      11. Demonstrate how to relieve choking in the responsive person
  
  •  

    LW 290-299 - Special Projects in Lifelong Wellness


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Lifelong Wellness Activity

  
  •  

    LWA 101 - Fitness for Life

    Credits: 1
    Introduces basic concepts underlying fitness and wellness as they relate to optimal healthful living using a wide variety of aerobic conditioning and resistance training techniques. Credit may be earned in LW 101 or LWA 101 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Physical Fitness.
      1. List and describe the physiological benefits of a fitness program.
      2. List and describe the five components of physical fitness and fitness activities that will improve each component.
      3. List and describe muscular anatomy of the human body and identify exercises that can be done to isolate and strengthen each muscle group.
      4. Describe the purpose of a warm-up and cool-down and their importance to a fitness program.
      5. Recognize various myths associated with fitness products and information.
      6. List the fitness assessment tests that are used to measure the components of fitness.
      7. Describe the food guide pyramid; list the different energy sources and their caloric values.
      8. Define and describe fitness terminology.
      9. List and describe various fitness exercises and identify the muscles being used.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Physical Fitness.
      1. Demonstrate how to take, monitor, and calculate personal heart rates.
      2. Demonstrate various fitness exercises using safe and proper technique.
      3. Maintain daily class records of the developing fitness program.
  
  •  

    LWA 106 - Athletic Conditioning

    Credits: 1
    Designed to improve current level of fitness. Uses weight, circuit, plyometric, and endurance exercises to improve power, balance, and agility. Incorporates the five health-related components of fitness: cardiorespiratory endurance, muscle strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition. Credit may be earned in LW 106 or LWA 106 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of athletic conditioning.
      1. Define athletic conditioning and list benefits that result from participating in a conditioning program.
      2. Describe and explain the five health-related components of fitness and give examples of activities that, when performed, meet the criteria for improving each component.
      3. Identify large muscle groups and give examples of strengthening and stretching exercises for each.
      4. Explain the concept of a proper warm-up and cool-down and how they relate to athletic conditioning.
      5. Differentiate between aerobic and anaerobic energy systems.
      6. Recognize various myths associated with fitness products and athletic conditioning.
      7. List the factors that determine muscle strength and endurance.
      8. List the six essential nutrients, the caloric value of food sources, and the healthy percentages of the macronutrients in an athlete’s diet.
      9. Describe differences between an athlete’s diet and a sedentary person’s diet.
    2. Practice and demonstrate the concepts and components of athletic conditioning.
      1. Demonstrate how to determine, monitor, and calculate exercise heart rates and training zones.
      2. Demonstrate various sport conditioning and fitness exercises using safe and proper techniques.
  
  •  

    LWA 108 - Weight Training

    Credits: 1
    Introduces a systematic program of body conditioning and development through the use of weight exercises to improve individual wellness. Credit may earned in only one of the following: LWA 108, LW 107, LW 108, or LW 109.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the concepts and components of exercise and wellness principles.
      1. List and describe the five components of physical fitness and fitness activities that will improve each component.
      2. List and describe various weight training exercises and identify the muscle groups that are being used during that exercise.
      3. Identify and describe muscular anatomy of the human body and the function of the muscle group.
      4. Describe the purpose of a warm-up and cool-down and their importance to a weight training and/or fitness program.
      5. Define and describe muscular strength and muscular endurance. Differentiate between training principles for each.
      6. Define and describe the following weight training principles: overload, super set, drop set, pyramid, split training.
      7. Define and differentiate between isotonic, isometric, and isokinetic muscle contraction.
      8. Define and describe weight training terminology.
      9. Recognize various myths associated with weight training.
      10. Describe the food guide pyramid, list the energy sources and their caloric values.
      11. Recognize how muscle use and disuse influence atrophy and hypertrophy.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Weight Training.
      1. Demonstrate how to take, monitor, and calculate personal heart rates.
      2. Maintain daily class records showing the developing weight training program.
      3. Demonstrate various weight training exercises using safe and effective techniques.
    3. Demonstrate the concepts and components of exercise and wellness principles.
      1. Demonstrate how to determine, monitor, and calculate exercise heart rates and training zones.
    4. Know the following concepts and components of exercise and wellness principles.
      1. Describe and explain the five health-related components of fitness and give examples of activities that, when performed, meet the criteria for improving each component.
      2. Describe and explain the concept of warm-up and cool-down as they relate to physical activity.
      3. Identify the following large muscle groups and give examples of strengthening and stretching exercises for each: quadriceps, hamstrings, biceps, triceps, rectus abdominus, latissimus dorsi, gastrocnemius, gluteus maximus, pectorals, deltoids.
      4. Describe and explain the relationship of cardiac output and stroke volume to cardio respiratory endurance activities.
      5. List the six essential nutrients, the caloric value and food sources of each, and the relationship of each nutrient to the Food Guide Pyramid.
  
  •  

    LWA 110 - Jogging For Fitness

    Credits: 1
    Introduces jogging as a means to obtain or improve current levels of health or conditioning. Emphasizes jogging to impact cardiorespiratory health. Uses aerobic endurance activities involving training techniques, skilled pacing, weights, calisthenics, proper stretching, and nutritional information to provide a complete exercise program. Credit may be earned in LW 110 or LWA 110 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Discuss jogging as an activity mode to enhance the components of physical fitness.
      1. Discuss or explain the relationship between stroke volume and heart rate on improved cardiac output after participation in a progressive jogging program.
      2. Differentiate between jogging and running and list the benefits of participation in a jogging program.
      3. List and describe the five components of physical fitness and explain how a jogging regime can assist the improvement of each component.
      4. Describe the important purpose of warm-up and cool-down and its relationship to improved flexibility in a jogging for health or fitness program.
      5. Differentiate between the aerobic and anaerobic energy systems and explain the ratio of both when developing a jogging program.
      6. Classify the types of muscle contractions: isometric, isotonic, isokinetic, concentric, and eccentric that will improve jogging performance for health or fitness.
      7. Identify the factors in training that differentiate muscular strength from muscular endurance when developing a jogging program.
      8. Describe and explain the Food Guide Pyramid and list the caloric values of each energy source in relationship to improved body composition.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of a jogging program.
      1. Demonstrate how to palpate, monitor, and calculate heart rates using Karvonen’s heart rate reserve method.
      2. Demonstrate various fitness exercises using safe and appropriate techniques.
      3. Implement/complete a personal training program that can improve all the components of fitness for life.
      4. Maintain records of a jogging/training log notebook.
  
  •  

    LWA 111 - Circuit Training

    Credits: 1
    Maintains and improves physical fitness levels. Uses weights, calisthenics, and endurance exercises in different combinations to provide complete workouts in a limited amount of time.  Credit may be earned in LW 111 or LWA 111 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Circuit Training.
      1. Define Circuit Training and list benefits that result from participating in a Circuit Training program.
      2. List and describe the five components of physical fitness and explain how a Circuit Training program improves all five of them.
      3. List and describe muscular anatomy of the human body and identify exercises that can be done to isolate and strengthen each muscle group.
      4. Describe the purpose of a warm-up and cool-down and their importance to a fitness program.
      5. Define and differentiate between the aerobic and anaerobic energy systems and explain the ratio of both with regards to developing a Circuit Training program.
      6. Recognize various myths associated with fitness products and information.
      7. Classify the types of muscle contractions: isometric, isotonic, isokinetic, concentric, and eccentric.
      8. List the factors that determine muscular strength and muscular endurance.
      9. Describe the food guide pyramid; list the different energy sources and their caloric values.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Circuit Training.
      1. Demonstrate how to take, monitor, and calculate personal heart rates.
      2. Demonstrate various fitness exercises using safe and proper technique.
      3. Develop and submit a personal circuit that can be done at home to improve all the components of fitness.
      4. Maintain records of Circuit Training log book.
  
  •  

    LWA 113 - Tae Kwon Do I

    Credits: 1
    An introduction to non-contact martial arts stressing technique and qualities of respect, self-discipline, and skills of self-defense. Credit may be earned in LW 113 or LWA 113 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Explain the concepts and components of Tae Kwon Do I.
      1. Describe and explain the origin and different styles of the art of Tae Kwon Do.
      2. List the physical and mental benefits of learning Tae Kwon Do.
      3. List the flexibility and stretching exercises used as warm-up activities in Tae Kwon Do.
      4. Describe and explain the self-defense applications of Tae Kwon Do.
      5. Describe and explain the long term maintenance of mind and body developed through Tae Kwon Do techniques.
      6. Define the six Theories of Power of Tae Kwon Do.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Tae Kwon Do I.
      1. Perform personalized flexibility and stretching exercises.
      2. Perform the following technical motions:
        1. 2Proper postures of the body, head, hand, and feet.
        2. Stances, direction, levels, and turns.
        3. Preparations of punches, blocks, and kicks.
        4. Safe and effective executions of punches, blocks, and kicks.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to perform the art of Tae Kwon Do through execution of the following activities:
        1. A 17-motion routine.
        2. Combinations–offensive and defensive moves in a rhythmic sequence.
        3. Safe sparing including five counter attacks and with a partner.
        4. Bag work including actual contact.
        5. Basic Korean command terms.
  
  •  

    LWA 114 - Tae Kwon Do II

    Credits: 1
    Provides an opportunity to utilize advanced techniques in a non-contact martial art class at the intermediate level. This course is mainly designed for yellow stripe through sixth gup color belts. Credit may be earned in LW 114 or LWA 114 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): LWA 113  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Tae Kwon Do II.
      1. Describe and explain the relationship of Tae Kwon Do’s physical applications to their individual lifestyles.
      2. Describe and explain the art of Tae Kwon Do.
      3. Describe and explain the flexibility and stretching exercises used during the class and the relationship of these exercises to the art of Tae Kwon Do.
      4. Describe and explain the personal self-defense applications of the art of Tae Kwon Do.
      5. Describe and explain the six Theories of Power of Tae Kwon Do.
      6. Describe and explain the six Tenets of Tae Kwon Do.
      7. Describe and explain the tournament patterns and sparring techniques of Tae Kwon Do.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Tae Kwon Do II.
      1. Perform a set of personalized intermediate stretching and flexibility exercises.
      2. Perform at an intermediate level the following technical motions:
        1. Postures of the body, head, hand, and feet.
        2. Levels of stances, direction, levels, and turns.
        3. Natural preparations of punches, blocks, and kicks.
        4. Quick and powerful executions of punches, blocks, and kicks.
        5. Defensive motions.
      3. Demonstrate at an intermediate level a routine or pattern of Tae Kwon Do.
      4. Demonstrate combinations (offensive and defensive moves in a sequence) at an intermediate level on rhythm and balance.
      5. Demonstrate safe sparring to include:
        1. Four counter attacks.
        2. Intermediate levels of free sparring with a partner.
      6. Demonstrate intermediate skills (increased speed, power, and balance) during bag work.
      7. Perform intermediate levels of breaking techniques.
      8. Demonstrate the ability to pronounce and execute intermediate Korean Tae Kwon Do commands and technical terms.
      9. Demonstrate Tae Kwon Do tournament patterns and sparring techniques.
  
  •  

    LWA 115 - Aikido

    Credits: 1
    Provides an introduction to a non-aggressive martial art stressing use of spiritual energy, self-cultivation, mutual respect, and skills of self-defense. Credit may be earned in LW 115 or LWA 115 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Aikido I.
      1. Describe and explain the origins and disciplines associated with Aikido.
      2. Explain the physical and mental benefits of practicing Aikido.
      3. List and understand the reasons and benefits of flexibility, strengthening, and stretching activities in Aikido.
      4. Describe and explain throwing, grappling, and releasing techniques associated with Aikido.
      5. Describe and explain the physical and universal laws to safe, self-defensive use of weapons in Aikido.
      6. Study and explain the process of discipline used to link mind, body, and spirit in Aikido and everyday life.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Aikido I.
      1. Perform basic stretching, strengthening, and flexibility exercises.
      2. Perform the following basic practice techniques:
        1. Preparations of stances, postures, and body rotations.
        2. Preparations of throwing, arm/hand releases, and grappling techniques.
        3. Safe and effective execution of throws and releases.
      3. Perform basic techniques relating to:
        1. Distancing, timing, footwork, and blocking.
      4. Demonstrate the safe performance of weapons to include:
        1. Use of weapons for flexibility.
        2. A pattern with a (bo) staff.
        3. (Jo) stick movements with and without a partner
        4. Actual contact on a bag for realism and technique
  
  •  

    LWA 118 - Sports Judo

    Credits: 1
    Introduces the rules, skills, and courtesies in sports judo, as well as the special conditioning required. Credit may be earned in one of the following ONLY: LWA 118, LW 117, LW 118, or LW 119.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Sports Judo.
      1. Describe and explain the fitness/wellness, mental, and social benefits derived from participation in the sport of Judo.
      2. List at least three examples of possible situations where knowledge and ability in the sport of Judo can be used as a measure of self-defense.
      3. Explain the following four Judo penalties:
        1. Stepping out of bounds
        2. No combat
        3. Stiff arming
        4. Unsportsmanlike conduct
      4. Explain the following Judo point system:
        1. Koka - 1/10 of a point
        2. Yuko - 1/4 of a point
        3. Wazari - ? of a point
        4. Ippon - one point
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Sports Judo.
      1. Demonstrate how to properly wear the Judo gi.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to properly bow both on and off the Judo dojo (mat area).
      3. Demonstrate the ability to properly bow to Sensei (instructor) and fellow Judoka students).
      4. Demonstrate the following five methods of falling without getting hurt:
        1. Right side - migi yoko
        2. Left side - hidari yoko
        3. Back - koho
        4. Right forward roll - migi zempo kieton
        5. Left forward roll - hidari zempo kieton
      5. Demonstrate the following throwing skills:
        1. Hip techniques (major hip, hip wheel, and lifting pulling hip)
        2. Hand techniques (one arm shoulder, two arm shoulder, and body drop)
        3. Foot techniques (major outer reap, advanced foot sweep, major inner reap, and minor inner reap)
      6. Demonstrate the following submission holds:
        1. Chokes (naked strangle, sliding collar, and three cross chokes)
        2. Joint locks (wrist lock, thumb lock, and two arm bars)
      7. Demonstrate the following mat pins:
        1. Scarf hold
        2. Shoulder lock
        3. Side corner hold
        4. Upper corner hold
    3. Demonstrate the concepts and components of exercise and wellness principles.
      1. Demonstrate how to determine, monitor, and calculate exercise heart rates and training zones.
    4. now the following concepts and components of exercise and wellness principles.
      1. Describe and explain the five health-related components of fitness and give examples of activities that, when performed, meet the criteria for improving each component.
      2. Describe and explain the concept of warm-up and cool-down as they relate to physical activity.
      3. Identify the following large muscle groups and give examples of strengthening and stretching exercises for each: quadriceps, hamstrings, biceps, triceps, rectus abdominus, latissimus dorsi, gastrocnemius, gluteus maximus, pectorals, deltoids.
      4. Describe and explain the relationship of cardiac output and stroke volume to cardiorespiratory endurance activities.
      5. List the six essential nutrients, the caloric value and food sources of each, and the relationship of each nutrient to the Food Guide Pyramid.
  
  •  

    LWA 119 - Jiu-jitsu

    Credits: 1
    Introduces the fundamental movements of Jiu-jitsu. Provides opportunity in sport specific strength and conditioning. Pre- and post-fitness assessment testing will be administered.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Jujitsu.
      1. List and describe the five health-related components of fitness and explain how they apply to Jujitsu.
      2. List the six essential nutrients, the caloric value and food source of each, and the relationship of each nutrient to the current Food Guide Pyramid.
      3. Identify the location of the following large muscle groups and give examples of strengthening exercises for each:
        1. quadriceps
        2. hamstrings
        3. biceps
        4. triceps
        5. rectus abdominus
        6. latissimus dorsi
        7. gastrocnemius
        8. gluteus maximus
        9. pectoral
        10. deltoid
      4. 1D. Describe and explain the following Jujitsu body positions and their intent:
        1. guard
        2. half guard
        3. side control
        4. north/south
        5. butterfly guard
        6. back control
        7. full mount
      5. Describe and explain the following Jujitsu submissions and explain defenses for each:
        1. arm bar
        2. triangle choke
        3. kimura
        4. key lock
        5. ankle lock
        6. heel hook
        7. rear naked choke
        8. knee bar
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Jujitsu.
      1. Correctly perform the following body positions:
        1. guard
        2. half guard
        3. side control
        4. north/south
        5. butterfly guard
        6. back control
        7. full mount
      2. Correctly perform the following Jujitsu submissions:
        1. arm bar
        2. triangle choke
        3. kimura
        4. key lock
        5. ankle lock
        6. heel hook
        7. rear naked choke
        8. knee bar
      3. Demonstrate how to take, monitor, and calculate resting heart rates, maximum heart rates, exercise heart rates, and training zones.
  
  •  

    LWA 122 - Fencing I

    Credits: 1
    Introduces foil fencing, its basic fundamentals, techniques, rules, and safety measures. Credit may be earned in one of the following ONLY: LWA 122, LW 122, LW 201, or LEA 201.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Fencing I.
      1. Describe the history of the sport of fencing.
      2. Describe the fundamental purpose of the sport of fencing.
      3. Describe and explain the rules for the sport of fencing.
      4. Describe and explain the rules of etiquette for the sport of fencing.
      5. Describe and explain the safety rules for the sport of fencing.
      6. List the mental and social benefits of the sport of fencing.
      7. Describe and explain the fundamental differences between a Foil, Epee, and Saber and the scoring targets of each.
      8. Define the following fencing terms:
        1. Absence of blade
        2. Advance
        3. Attack
        4. Ballestra
        5. Beat
        6. Bird
        7. Change of Engagement
        8. Disengage
        9. Feint
        10. Feeble
        11. Fleche
        12. Forte
        13. Lunge
        14. Mash
        15. On Guard
        16. Parry
        17. Pommel
        18. Right of Way
        19. Riposte
        20. Salute
        21. Strip
        22. Thrust
        23. Touch
      9. Describe the fitness benefits of participating in the sport of fencing.
      10. Identify personal health risks through physical and written assessment.
      11. Develop a personal wellness plan to enhance current health or to decrease current health risks as they relate to chronic disease.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Fencing.
      1. Demonstrate the following basic skills of the sport of fencing:
        1. The ?On Guard? position
        2. Proper holding of the foil
        3. The Salute
        4. Advance and retreat footwork
        5. The Thrust
        6. The Lunge
        7. Parries (4,6, 7, & 8)
        8. A Ballestra
        9. A Fleche
      2. Demonstrate simple attacks.
      3. Demonstrate simple parries.
      4. Demonstrate the proper procedures necessary to begin and finish a fencing match.
      5. Demonstrate the proper care and handling of the fencing equipment.
      6. Demonstrate the proper application of fencing rules during a match.
      7. Demonstrate knowledge of fitness and wellness research and concepts as they directly relate to quality and quantity of life.
      8. Demonstrate and practice safe and effective techniques of fitness and wellness activities.
  
  •  

    LWA 124 - Basketball

    Credits: 1
    Introduces basic skills of passing, dribbling, shooting, positional play, rules, and strategy of the game. Includes special conditioning to improve individual wellness. Credit may be earned in one of the following ONLY: LWA 124, LW 123, LW 124, or LW 125.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of basketball.
      1. Describe and explain the following basic concepts of both offensive and defensive basketball: Half court man to man and zone offensive patterns of attack, half court man to man and zone defenses, full court offensive press breakers, full court defensive presses, fast break offensive strategies, and out-of-bounds plays against both man to man and zone defenses.
      2. Describe and explain some the fitness benefits of playing basketball.
      3. Describe and explain the basic rules of the game of basketball.
      4. Describe and explain the following basketball terms: assist, baseline, box-and-one, crossover dribble, defensive rebound, double-teamed, fast break, front court, goaltending, high post, post, reverse pivot, screen and roll, pass and cut, switch, three-second lane, tip-in, trailer, traveling, and zone defense.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of basketball.
      1. Demonstrate a basic proficiency in the following skills:
        1. Passing
        2. Dribbling
        3. Shooting
        4. Rebounding
      2. Demonstrate an ability to execute through full court play the following offensive and defensive team skills:
        1. Man-to-man offensive patterns
        2. Zone offensive patterns/strategies
        3. Fast break patterns/strategies
        4. Man-to-man defensive strategies
        5. Zone defensive strategies
        6. Full-court presses
        7. Full-court press breakers
        8. Out-of-bounds plays against both man-to-man and zone defenses
    3. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Weight Training
      1. Demonstrate how to take, monitor, and calculate personal heart rates.
      2. Maintain daily class records showing the developing weight training program.
      3. Demonstrate various weight training exercises using safe and effective techniques.
    4. Demonstrate the concepts and components of exercise and wellness principles.
      1. Demonstrate how to determine, monitor, and calculate exercise heart rates and training zones.
    5. Know the following concepts and components of exercise and wellness principles.
      1. Describe and explain the five health-related components of fitness and give examples of activities that, when performed, meet the criteria for improving each component.
      2. Describe and explain the concept of warm-up and cool-down as they relate to physical activity.
      3. Identify the following large muscle groups and give examples of strengthening and stretching exercises for each: quadriceps, hamstrings, biceps, triceps, rectus abdominus, latissimus dorsi, gastrocnemius, gluteus maximus, pectorals, deltoids.
      4. Describe and explain the relationship of cardiac output and stroke volume to cardio respiratory endurance activities.
      5. List the six essential nutrients, the caloric value and food sources of each, and the relationship of each nutrient to the Food Guide Pyramid.
  
  •  

    LWA 127 - Volleyball I

    Credits: 1
    Introduces basic skills of handling the ball, passing, setting, spiking, net-rebound play, and blocking. Includes rules and strategy. Credit may be earned in LW 127 or LWA 127 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of volleyball.
      1. Demonstrate that they have acquired knowledge of the rules of volleyball.
      2. Explain the strategies of basic volleyball.
        1. Receiving formations
        2. Offensive formations
      3. Explain the techniques of:
        1. Serving
        2. Forearm pass
        3. Setting pass
        4. Spike
        5. Blocking
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of volleyball.
      1. Use exercises to properly warm up and stretch before the activity begins.
      2. Demonstrate the basic serves of:
        1. Over head serve
        2. Underhand/side serve
      3. Demonstrate and execute successfully the forearm pass and dig.
      4. Demonstrate and execute successfully the overhead setting pass.
      5. Demonstrate and execute successfully the spike.
      6. Demonstrate and execute successfully the technique of the block.
  
  •  

    LWA 131 - Racquetball I

    Credits: 1
    Introduces basic skills and rules necessary to participate in racquetball which is a competitive game played in a four-walled court by two, three, or four players using stringed racquets to serve and return the ball. Credit may be earned in LW 131 or LWA 131 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Racquetball I.
      1. Describe and explain the racquetball court in terms of all designated lines and areas.
      2. Describe and explain the fundamental strategies used during the play of singles, doubles, and cut throat.
      3. Describe and explain the scoring systems used for racquetball play, the rules of the game for singles, doubles, and cut throat, as well as the proper etiquette during play.
      4. Describe and explain a minimum of four serves used during the play of racquetball.
      5. Describe and explain at least five offensive and/or defensive shots used in racquetball.
      6. Describe and explain proper court positioning during the play of racquetball.
      7. Explain some of the fitness benefits of playing the game of racquetball on a regular basis.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Racquetball I.
      1. Demonstrate both the proper forehand and backhand grips.
      2. Demonstrate the proper footwork required to execute both a forehand and backhand shot.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to move into the proper body position to execute the various racquetball shots.
      4. Demonstrate a basic proficiency in hitting the following racquetball shots.
        1. Forehand
        2. Backhand
        3. Back wall
        4. Ceiling
        5. Kill
        6. Pinch
      5. Demonstrate the appropriate use of the forehand, backhand, back wall, ceiling, kill, and pinch shots during the playing of a racquetball game.
      6. Demonstrate the following racquetball serves:
        1. Drive/Power
        2. Lob
        3. Z
        4. Garbage
  
  •  

    LWA 137 - Tennis I

    Credits: 1
    Introduces the basic strokes in tennis along with rules, strategies, and courtesies of the game. Credit may be earned in LW 137 or LWA 137 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of beginning tennis.
      1. Identify the personal equipment necessary to play tennis.
      2. Identify the lines and areas of a tennis court for both singles and doubles.
      3. Demonstrate knowledge of scoring.
      4. Explain strategies of play in singles and doubles and tennis ethics.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of beginning tennis.
      1. Demonstrate the proper grip of a tennis racquet for a:
        1. Forehand
        2. Volley
        3. One or two handed backhand
      2. Demonstrate a proficiency in the use of the following tennis strokes:
        1. The forehand
        2. The backhand
        3. The volley
        4. The serve
        5. The basic ready position
      3. Demonstrate a legally and successfully served beginners or flat serve.
      4. Demonstrate the proper foot and body position in executing different tennis strokes.
      5. Display knowledge and an understanding of the basic strategies for singles and doubles.
  
  •  

    LWA 150 - Kettlebell Training

    Credits: 1
    Introduces Kettlebell training concepts. Presents, develops, and practices Kettlebell training methods for muscular strength and endurance. Pre and post fitness assessment testing will be done and individual printouts will be made available.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Kettlebell Training.
      1. Describe and explain the five health-related components of fitness and give examples of activities that, when performed, meet the criteria for improving each component.
      2. Identify the following large muscle groups and give examples of strengthening and stretching exercises for each; Quadricep, Hamstring, Bicep, Tricep, Rectus Abdominus, Latissimus Dorsi, Gastrocnemius, Gluteus Maximus, Pectoral, Deltoid.
      3. Describe and explain the concept of warm-up and cool-down as they relate to physical activity.
      4. Define and describe muscular strength and muscular endurance; differentiate between training principles for each.
      5. Define and describe the following Kettlebell training exercises and terminology: swing, rack, horns, ball, ladders, snatch, front squat, clean and press, and Turkish get up.
      6. Identify various myths associated with Kettlebell training.
      7. List the six essential nutrients, the caloric value and food sources of each, and the relationship of each nutrient to the Food Guide Pyramid.
      8. Recognize how muscle use and disuse influence atrophy and hypertrophy.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Kettlebell Training.
      1. Demonstrate how to determine, monitor, and calculate exercise heart rates and training zones.
      2. Demonstrate the following Kettlebell training exercises using safe and effective techniques:
        1. The Swing
        2. The Front Squat
        3. The Clean and Press
        4. The Turkish Get Up
        5. The Snatch
        6. The Windmill
  
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    LWA 151 - Kick Boxing

    Credits: 1
    Presents Kick Boxing as a means of self-defense and conditioning. Provides maximum cardiorespiratory benefits, muscular endurance, speed, and agility in addition to balance, flexibility, and mind/body integration. Credit may be earned in LW 151 or LWA 151 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Kick Boxing.
      1. List and describe the components of physical fitness and how Kick Boxing can improve each one.
      2. Define and describe cardiac output and stroke volume as it relates to cardio respiratory conditioning.
      3. Define and describe a calorie, a carbohydrate, a fat, a protein, and list recommended daily allowances.
      4. Define and describe the aerobic and anaerobic energy systems and identify activities that use each of them.
      5. Describe and define basic muscular anatomy of the human body and identify various muscles being used while performing Kick Boxing movements.
      6. List the physical and mental benefits from regular participation in a Kick Boxing program.
      7. Define and describe maximum heart rate, resting heart rate, metabolism, and target heart rate.
      8. Describe the importance of a warm-up and cool-down to physical activity.
      9. Recognize and describe various myths related to health and fitness.
      10. List and describe the three basic punches used in Kick Boxing.
      11. List and describe the eight essential kicks used in Kick Boxing.
      12. Describe the five health-related components of fitness and give examples of activities that, when performed, meet criteria for improving each component.
      13. Define and explain the philosophy behind Pilates-based matwork, including the importance of visual imagery and breathing.
      14. Explain the nine principles of Pilates-based matwork.
      15. Explain the importance of a warm-up and cool-down to physical activity.
      16. Identify the following large muscle groups and give examples of strengthening and stretching exercises for: quadriceps, hamstrings, biceps, triceps, rectus abdominis, latissimus dorsi, gastrocnemius, gluteus maximus, pectoralis major, deltoids.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Kick Boxing.
      1. Demonstrate how to calculate percent of calories from protein, fat, and carbohydrates in a diet.
      2. Demonstrate how to take, monitor, and calculate personal heart rates.
      3. Execute the eight essential kicks used in Kick Boxing, using safe and correct techniques.
      4. Execute the three basic punches used in Kick Boxing, using safe and correct techniques. (*Jab, *Hook, *Upper Cut)
      5. Demonstrate various balance and agility movements used in Kick Boxing.
      6. Demonstrate how to determine, monitor, and calculate exercise heart rates and raining zones.
  
  •  

    LWA 152 - Astanga Yoga

    Credits: 1.5
    Introduces the basic tools used in learning Astange Yoga. Uses sequential postures, called asana, for linking together a vigorous flow of movements. Includes workout that is physically, spiritually, and mentally engaging. Credit may be earned in LW 152 or LWA 152 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the history, philosophy, concepts, and components of Astanga Yoga.
      1. Briefly explain the history of Astanga Yoga
      2. Describe and explain the fundamental tools of Astanga Yoga
      3. Identify and explain Ujjayi Breath, Bandhas, Vinyasa, and Dristi
      4. Identify the following large muscle groups and give examples of postures that stretch and strengthen each: Quadricep, Hamstring, Bicep, Tricep, Rectus Abdominus, Latissimus Dorsi, Gastrocnemeus, Gluteus Maximus, Pectoral, Deltoid
      5. Identify and explain the postures of Astanga Yoga
      6. Explain the health benefits of Astanga Yoga as it relates to the five health-related components of fitness.
      7. Explain how Astanga Yoga can improve the health of your mind, body, and spirit.
      8. Identify and explain the three posture sequences of the first series of Astanga Yoga: Standing Sequence, primary Sequence, and Finishing Sequence.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Astanga Yoga, Primary Series.
      1. Demonstrate Primary Series of Astanga Yoga
      2. Demonstrate the fundamental tools of Astanga Yoga: Ujjayi Breath, Bandhas, Vinyasa, and Dristi
      3. Demonstrate the posture sequences of the Primary Series of Astanga Yoga: Standing Posture Sequence, Primary Sequence, and Finishing Postures
      4. Demonstrate Surya Namaskara A, and Surya Namaskara B
  
  •  

    LWA 153 - Dance Aerobics

    Credits: 1
    Provides information and skills needed to assess and improve fitness through the use of aerobic dance, exercises to music, and analysis of personal nutrition habits. Credit may be earned in LW 153 or LWA 153 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Dance Aerobics.
      1. List and describe the components of Physical Fitness and how a Dance Aerobics class can improve each one.
      2. Define and describe cardiac output and stroke volume as it relates to cardio respiratory conditioning.
      3. Define and describe Calorie, Carbohydrate, Fat, Protein, and list recommended daily allowances.
      4. Define and describe the aerobic and anaerobic energy systems and identify activities that use each of them.
      5. Describe and define the basic muscular anatomy of the human body.
      6. List the benefits from regular participation in an aerobic program.
      7. Define and describe Maximum Heart Rate, Resting Heart Rate, Metabolism, and Target Heart Rate.
      8. Describe the importance of a warm-up and cool-down to physical activity.
      9. Recognize and describe various myths related to health and fitness.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Dance Aerobics.
      1. Demonstrate how to calculate percent of calories from Protein, Fat, and Carbohydrates in a diet.
      2. Demonstrate how to take, monitor, and calculate personal heart rates.
      3. Choreograph and instruct a segment of a Dance Aerobics class incorporating safe techniques.
  
  •  

    LWA 154W - BOSU Ball Training

    Credits: 1
    Introduces fitness training concepts utilizing a BOSU ball. Presents training methods for improving muscle strength, endurance, balance, agility, and flexibility. Presents, develops, and practices BOSU ball activities that provide cardiorespiratory benefits and improved body composition. Pre- and post-fitness assessments will also be performed and results will be explained.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of fitness and wellness.
      1. Describe and explain the five health-related components of fitness and give examples of activities that, when performed, meet the criteria for improving each component.
      2. Describe and explain the relationship of cardiac output and stroke volume to cardiorespiratory endurance activities.
      3. List the six essential nutrients, the caloric value and food sources of each, and the relationship of each nutrient to the Food Guide Pyramid.
      4. Recognize various myths associated with health and fitness.
      5. Identify the following large muscle groups and give examples of strengthening and stretching exercises for each: Quadricep, Hamstring, bicep, Tricep, Pectorals, latisimus dorsi, Rectus Abdominus, Gastrocnemius, Gluteus Maximus, and Deltoid.
      6. Recognize how muscle use and disuse influence atrophy and hypertrophy.
      7. Define and describe muscular strength and muscular endurance; differentiate between training principles for each.
      8. Describe and explain the concept of a warm-up and cool-down as they relate to physical activity.
      9. Define and describe BOSU ball training terminology.
      10. List and describe the skill related components of fitness and explain how BOSU ball training can enhance each.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of BOSU ball training.
      1. Demonstrate various BOSU ball training exercises using safe and effective techniques.
      2. Demonstrate how to determine, monitor, and calculate exercise heart rates and training zones.
      3. Select the appropriate size of a BOSU ball that will allow maximum versatility of exercises.
      4. Demonstrate a two-minute dynamic warm-up.
  
  •  

    LWA 156W - Stability Ball Training

    Credits: 1
    Introduces fitness training concepts utilizing a stability ball. Presents training methods fro improving muscle strength, endurance, and flexibility. Also presents, develops, and practices stability ball activities that provide cardiorespiratory benefits and improved body composition. Provides effective balance training through use of the stability ball as a tool. Pre- and post-fitness assessments will also be performed and results will be explained. Credit may be earned in LW 156W or LWA 156W but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Fitness and Wellness.
      1. Describe and explain the five health-related components of fitness and give examples of activities that, when performed, meet the criteria for improving each component.
      2. Describe and explain the relationship of cardiac output and stroke volume to cardiorespiratory endurance activities.
      3. List the six essential nutrients, the caloric value and food sources of each, and the relationship of each nutrient to the Food Guide Pyramid.
      4. Recgonize various myths associated with health and fitness.
      5. Identify the following large muscle groups and give examples of strengthening and stretching exercises for each: Quadricep, Hamstring, Bicep, Tricep, Pectorals, Latisimus Dorsi, Rectus Abdominus, Gastrocnemius, Gluteus Maximus, and Deltoid.
      6. Recognize how muscle use and disuse influence atrophy and hypertrophy.
      7. Define and describe muscular strength and muscular endurance; differentiate between training principles for each.
      8. Describe and explain the concept of a warm-up and cool-down as they relate to physical activity.
      9. Define and describe stability ball training terminology.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of stability ball training.
      1. Demonstrate various stability ball training exercises using safe and effective techniques.
      2. Demonstrate how to determine, monitor, and calculate exercise heart rates and training zones.
      3. Select the appropriate size of a stability ball that will allow maximum versatility of exercises.
  
  •  

    LWA 157 - Step Aerobics

    Credits: 1
    Incorporates bench stepping to enhance cardiorespiratory endurance and muscle tone using the aerobic principle. Emphasis on the importance of fitness and a healthy lifestyle is also applied. Credit may be earned in LW 157 or LWA 157 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Step Aerobics.
      1. List and describe the components of Physical Fitness and how a Step Aerobics class can improve each one.
      2. Define and describe cardiac output and stroke volume as it relates to cardio respiratory conditioning.
      3. Define and describe calories, carbohydrates, fat, protein, and list recommended daily allowances.
      4. Define and describe the aerobic and anaerobic energy systems and identify activities that use each of them.
      5. Describe and define the basic muscular anatomy of the human body.
      6. List the benefits from regular participation in an aerobic program.
      7. Define and describe Maximum Heart Rate, Resting Heart Rate, Metabolism, and Target Heart Rate.
      8. Describe the importance of a warm-up and cool-down to physical activity.
      9. Recognize and describe various myths related to health and fitness.
    2. Students can demonstrate the concepts and components of Step Aerobics.
      1. Demonstrate how to calculate percent of calories from protein, fat, and carbohydrates in a diet.
      2. Demonstrate how to take, monitor, and calculate personal heart rates.
      3. Choreograph and instruct a segment of a Step Aerobics classincorporating safe techniques.
  
  •  

    LWA 158 - Pilates

    Credits: 1
    Provides total body strengthening, stretching, and conditioning through Pilates-based mat work to achieve overall fitness and improved health. Focuses on the attainment of core strength in the abdomen and trunk. Includes specific exercises concentrating on the use of breathing patterns to help control movement, and visual imagery to engage the mind and body together. Credit may be earned in LW 158 or LWA 158 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Define and explain concepts and components of Pilate’s-based mat work exercise.
      1. Describe the five health-related components of fitness and give examples of activities that, when performed, meet criteria for improving each component.
      2. Define and explain the philosophy behind Pilate’s-based mat work, including the importance of visual imagery and breathing.
      3. Explain the nine principles of Pilate’s-based mat work.
      4. Explain the importance of a warm-up and cool-down to physical activity.
      5. Identify the following large muscle groups and give examples of strengthening and stretching exercises for: quadriceps, hamstrings, biceps, triceps, rectus abdominis, latissimus dorsi, gastrocnemius, gluteus maximus, pectoralis major, deltoids.
    2. Demonstrate key components and concepts of Pilate’s-based mat work and pre-Pilate’s warm-up exercises.
      1. Demonstrate how to take, monitor, and calculate personal heart rate.
      2. Demonstrate a minimum of 30 minutes of pre-Pilate’s warm-up activities.
      3. Demonstrate a minimum of 30 minutes of Pilate’s-based mat work exercises using proper form and safe technique.
  
  •  

    LWA 159 - Fitness Walking

    Credits: 1
    Introduces the concept of daily walking to contribute to one’s wellness, with emphasis on developing personal walking program. Credit may be earned in LW 159 or LWA 159 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Fitness Walking I.
      1. Describe the difference between everyday walking and fitness walking.
      2. List the techniques of fitness walking.
      3. List the principles of fitness walking.
      4. Compare the difference between exercise heart rate and recovery heart rate.
      5. Describe how the overload principle and an understanding of the exercise target zone are applied in fitness walking.
      6. Describe how to select a good pair of shoes for fitness walking.
      7. List appropriate exercises to use in a stretching program for warm up and cool down.
      8. Explain how to calculate minutes per mile, miles per hour, and calories burned from records on walking logs.
      9. List appropriate clothes to wear for different weather conditions.
      10. Describe what makes a safe walking route.
      11. Explain how to get a fitness rating from a timed walk.
      12. Describe how blood pressure readings, body measurements, and percent of body fat measures can help assess fitness programs.
    2. Students can demonstrate the concepts and components of Fitness Walking
      1. Design a schedule that includes time for fitness walking.
      2. Walk using fitness walking techniques.
      3. Walk incorporating the principles of fitness walking.
      4. Design a warm up and cool down stretch program.
      5. Take a resting, exercise, and recovery heart rate.
      6. Calculate their exercise target zone.
      7. Keep a walking log.
      8. Calculate their walking pace in miles per hour.
      9. Calculate their calorie burn for each walk.
      10. Design a safe walking route.
      11. Find a fitness rating based on results from a timed one mile walk and an exercise heart rate at the end of the walk.
      12. Evaluate their fitness programs by keeping records of assessments of blood pressure readings, body measurements, and percent of body fat measures.
  
  •  

    LWA 160 - Nordic Walking

    Credits: 1
    Introduces the concept of Nordic walking and instructs safe and effective techniques using the Nordic poles to enhance one’s wellness. Includes conducting pre and post fitness assessment and developing a personal Nordic walking program.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Nordic Walking.
      1. Describe the difference between everyday walking, fitness walking, and Nordic walking.
      2. List the techniques of Nordic walking.
      3. List the principles of Nordic walking.
      4. Describe the parts of Nordic walking poles and their benefits.
      5. Compare the difference between exercise heart rate and recovery heart rate.
      6. Describe how the overload principle and an understanding of the exercise target zone are applied in Nordic walking.
      7. Describe how to select a good pair of shoes for Nordic walking.
      8. List appropriate exercises to use in a stretching program for warm up and cool down.
      9. Explain how to calculate minutes per mile and miles per hour from records on walking logs.
      10. Explain how to get a fitness rating from a time walk.
      11. Describe how blood pressure readings, body measurements, and percent of body fat measures can help assess fitness programs.
    2. Student can demonstrate the concepts and components of Nordic Walking.
      1. Design a schedule that includes time for Nordic walking.
      2. Walk using Nordic walking techniques.
      3. Walk incorporating the principles of Nordic walking.
      4. Design a warm up and cool down stretch program.
      5. Take a resting, exercise and recovery heart rate.
      6. Calculate personal exercise target heart rate zone.
      7. Keep a walking log.
      8. Calculate their walking pace in miles per hour.
      9. Calculate their calorie burn for each walk.
      10. Design a safe walking route.
      11. Evaluate personal fitness program by keeping records of assessments of blood pressure readings, body measurements, and percent of body fat measures.
  
  •  

    LWA 165 - Jazz Dance I

    Credits: 1
    For the beginner, an introduction to basic jazz dance techniques (stretches, isolations, floor work, turn and locomotor patterns, etc.) and practice in combining them into dance phrases. There will be simple choreography problems and a survey of the history of jazz dance and of the contemporary jazz dance scene. Credit may be earned in LW 165 or LWA 165 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

  
  •  

    LWA 167 - Ballet I

    Credits: 1
    Introduces the basic movements of ballet coordinated with exercises for stretching, flexing, and toning. Includes postural alignment and correction, basic barre work, and beginning center adage and allegro movements.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Ballet I.
      1. Describe and explain ballet barre terms.
      2. Describe and explain center floor terms.
      3. List at least three of the combinations performed during the ballet class using the appropriate French terms.
      4. Describe and explain a brief history of the development of the art of ballet.
      5. Describe a few changes that haave had a major effect on the development of modern ballet.
      6. Describe the fitness/wellness benefits of participating in the art of ballet on a regular basis.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Ballet I.
      1. Demonstrate ballet barre exercises.
      2. Demonstrate center floor steps and combinations.
      3. Demonstrate proper ballet body placements using both appropriate discipline and mental awareness of the basic fundamental elements of the art of ballet.
      4. Compose a one-page critique of a live dance performance.
  
  •  

    LWA 172 - Swimming I

    Credits: 1
    Develops fundamental swimming and safety skills. Credit may be earned in LW 172 or LWA 172 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Swimming I.
      1. Explain the following physical laws of swimming:
        1. Newton’s laws of motion
        2. Form drag, wave drag, and body surface drag
      2. Describe and explain the basic rules of water safety and the importance of following these rules.
      3. Describe and explain a minimum of five of the physical fitness benefits of swimming on a regular basis.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Swimming I.
      1. Demonstrate the following swimming skills:
        1. Front crawl with rhythmic breathing (25 yds.)
        2. Back crawl (25 yds.)
        3. Elementary backstroke (25 yds)
        4. Sidestroke (25 yds.)
        5. Breaststroke (25 yds.)
        6. Jump into water and swim 25 yards
        7. Basic short dive
      2. Demonstrate the following safety skills:
        1. Relieving a cramp
        2. Reaching assists
        3. Extension assists
        4. Throwing assists
        5. Treading water
        6. Proper use of a Personal Floatation Device (PFD)
      3. Demonstrate a proficiency in endurance by swimming 12 lengths of the pool.
      4. Demonstrate the ability to chart their progress through the use of a journal.
  
  •  

    LWA 173 - Swimming II

    Credits: 1
    Introduces theory and practice of the five basic swimming strokes (front crawl, side stroke, elementary back stroke, and breast stroke). Emphasizes water safety skills and knowledge. Credit may be earned in LW 173 or LWA 173 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): LWA 172  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Swimming II.
      1. Describe and explain Newton’s laws of motion and how these laws apply to swimming.
      2. Describe and explain how the form drag, wave drag and body drag affect swimming.
      3. Describe the benefits of developing a fitness-swimming plan.
      4. List the safety rules of swimming.
      5. Describe and explain a minimum of five of the physical fitness benefits of swimming on a regular basis.
      6. Describe and explain the benefits of keeping a journal of their swimming progress.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Swimming II.
      1. Demonstrate the following swimming strokes:
        1. Front crawl (50yds.)
        2. Back crawl (50yds.)
        3. Elementary backstroke (50yds.)
        4. Sidestroke (50yds.)
        5. Breaststroke (50yds)
        6. Butterfly stroke (50yds.)
        7. Open turns
      2. Demonstrate the following methods for entering the water.
        1. Front dive
        2. Stride jump
        3. Surface dive
      3. Demonstrate the following safety skills:
        1. Relieving a cramp
        2. Survival swim
        3. Extension assist
        4. Reaching assist
        5. Throwing assist
        6. Proper use of a Personal Floatation Device (PFD)
      4. Develop a personal fitness swim plan.
      5. Maintain a progress journal.
      6. Demonstrate an ability in endurance swimming by successfully completing an 18 lap swim.
  
  •  

    LWA 174 - Swimming III Conditioning

    Credits: 1
    Acquaints the student with the basic principles of cardiovascular fitness and strength in order to increase these components of fitness through swimming. Credit may be earned in LW 174 or LWA 174 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): LWA 173  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Swimming III.
      1. Describe and explain the hydrodynamics of efficient swimming.
      2. Describe and explain a minimum of five components of an effective swimming workout.
      3. List the safety rules of swimming.
      4. Describe and explain a minimum of five of the physical fitness benefits of swimming on a regular basis.
      5. Describe and explain the benefits of maintaining a journal of their swimming progress.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Swimming III.
      1. Demonstrate a proficiency in the following swimming strokes:
        1. Front crawl (100yds.)
        2. Back crawl ((100yds.)
        3. Sidestroke (100yds.)
        4. Breaststroke (100yds.)
        5. Butterfly stroke (100yds.)
      2. Demonstrate both open and flip turns.
      3. Develop a sound swimming workout and demonstrate the ability to complete the workout.
      4. Demonstrate the proper use of aqua fins and gloves.
      5. Swim a mile in 40 minutes.
      6. Demonstrate the following safety skills:
        1. Reaching assists
        2. Extension assists
        3. Throwing assists
        4. Releasing a cramp
        5. Surface dives in the pike, tuck, and feet first position.
        6. Proper use of a Personal Floatation Device (PFD)
  
  •  

    LWA 183 - Water Aerobics

    Credits: 1
    Introduces the basic concepts of water resistance and incorporates them into an individual fitness program that promotes strength, flexibility, and aerobic capacity. Swimming skills not required. Credit may be earned in LW 183 or LWA 183 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Water Aerobics.
      1. Describe and explain the positive elements of the relationship between nutritional habits and a regular fitness program.
      2. Describe and explain at least five of the benefits of water exercise in terms of reducing joint stress.
      3. Describe and explain a minimum of five benefits to the cardiovascular system that result from water aerobics.
      4. Describe and explain the four components of a water exercise program.
      5. Describe and explain the concept of target heart rates and recovery during exercise.
      6. Describe and explain the importance of recording eating habits in a journal on a daily basis.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Water Aerobics.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to find and take their pulse both before and after aerobic activity.
      2. Demonstrate the proper use of aqua bells for the purpose of increasing arm strength.
      3. Demonstrate the proper use of a water belt in deep water.
      4. Demonstrate the proper use of water fins and gloves for the purpose of increasing cardiovascular fitness/efficiency.
      5. Develop and perform a water aerobics routine of 60 minutes.
  
  •  

    LWA 204 - Outdoor Cycling

    Credits: 1


    Introduces outdoor cycling as a means to improve or maintain current levels of physical fitness through paced cycling. Provides a complete program employing aerobic endurance activities involving overload training techniques, skilled pacing, weights, calisthenics, and nutritional information. Involves individual assessment of the five components of physical fitness (cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength, endurance, flexibility, body composition) within the course.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe or explain the concepts of physical fitness using Cycling (Fitness riding) as the activity mode.

            A.      Discuss or explain the relationship between stroke volume and heart rate on improved cardiac - output after participation in a progressive cycling program.

            B.      Differentiate between a leisure cycling program vs. fitness cycling and list the benefits of participation in both types of programs.

            C.      Describe and explain the five health-related components of fitness and give example of a Cycling regime that when performed, meet the criteria of improving each component.

            D.      Describe the important purpose of warm-up and cool-down and its’ relationship to flexibility in a cycling for fitness or health program.

            E.       Identify the location of the following large muscle groups and give examples of strengthening exercises for each. – Quadriceps, Hamstring, Bicep, Triceps, Rectus Abdominus,

                     Latissimus Dorsi, Gastrocnemius, Gluteus Maximus, Pectoral, Deltoid to improve Cycling fitness.

            F.       Classify the types of muscle contractions: isometric, isotonic, isokinetic, concentric, and eccentric that will improve cycling performance for health or fitness.

            G.      Identify the factors in training that differentiate muscular strength from muscular endurance when developing a cycling program.

            H.      List the six essential nutrients, the caloric value and food source of each, and the relationship of each nutrient to choosemyplate.gov.

      2.  Demonstrate aspects associated with a Cycling Program.     

           A.        Demonstrate how to take, monitor, and calculate a resting heart rate, maximum heart rates, and exercise training zones using Karvonen’s heart-rate reserve method.

            B.      Demonstrate various fitness exercises using safe and appropriate technique.

            C.      Implement and complete a personal training program that can improve all the components of fitness for life.

            D.      Maintain records of a Cycling / Training log notebook.

      .

  
  •  

    LWA 205 - Indoor Cycling

    Credits: 1


    Introduces indoor cycling as a means to obtain or improve current levels of health or fitness.  Emphasizes proper cycling technique, simulating a variety of riding terrains to impact cardiorespiratory health or fitness. Includes proper warm-up, cool-down, strength exercises, and stretching. Addresses a variety of wellness topics including the 5 components of health related fitness and nutrition. Indoor cycling is a group exercise class performed on stationary bikes

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1. Describe or explain the concepts and components of indoor/outdoor cycling.

        A.        Define indoor cycling and list benefits that result from participating in an exercise program

        B.        Understand terminology as it applies to an indoor cycling program

        C.        Explain the concept of a proper warm-up and cool-down and how they relate to either type of cycling

        D.        Identify program elements of indoor cycling that are rooted in the principles, approach and science of real outdoor cycling

        E.        Learn how to ride with cadence rules in mind

        F.         Learn how to measure intensity using heart rate monitoring

        G.        Perform pre/post assessments to measure progression of fitness components

        H.        Describe and explain the five health-related components of fitness and give examples of cycling activities that, when performed, meet the criteria for improving each component

        I.         Identify the location of the following large muscle groups and give examples of strengthening

                   exercises for each

                   1.   Quadriceps

                   2.   Hamstring

                   3.   Bicep

                   4.   Triceps

                   5.   Rectus Abdominus

                   6.   Latissimus Dorsi

                   7.   Gastrocnemius

                   8.   Gluteus Maximus

                   9.   Pectoral

                   10. Deltoid to improve Cycling fitness

        J.         Differentiate between aerobic and anaerobic energy/training zones when cycling

        K.        List the factors that determine muscle strength and endurance when developing a cycling program

        L.         List the six essential nutrients, the caloric value and food source of each, and the relationship of each nutrient to choosemyplate

    2. Demonstrate the aspects of indoor/outdoor cycling.

        A.   Instruct an indoor cycling segment following guidelines that have been taught during the course semester

        B.        Demonstrate competency in setting up an indoor bicycle and using proper hand and feet techniques in order to achieve the greatest full range of motion

        C.        Demonstrate how to properly change hand positions with the different seated and climbing positions

        D.        Demonstrate how to determine, monitor, and calculate exercise heart rates at different energy/training zones

        E.        Demonstrate how to take, monitor, and calculate a resting heart rate, maximum heart rates, and exercise training zones using Karvonen’s heart-rate reserve method

  
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    LWA 206B - Occupational Wellness 2

    Credits: 0.5
    Continues wellness concepts, behavioral patterns, and activities that can be incorporated into the lifestyles of those working in a wide variety of occupation settings. Credit may be earned in LW 206B or LWA 206B but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to restricted enrollment programs.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Continue working toward fitness goals.
      1. List and describe the benefits and significance of participation in a lifetime fitness and developed occupational wellness program.
      2. List and describe the five components of physical fitness as well as assessment tests and exercises that can be done to measure and improve all five components.
      3. Define and describe the importance and role of warm-up and cool-down as they relate to activity.
      4. Describe and apply the FIT principle.
      5. Demonstrate how to take, monitor, and calculate personal target heart rates to attain a cardiovascular training effect.
      6. Define and discuss the relationship between stroke volume, cardiac output, and heart rate as they relate to cardio respiratory benefits and exercise activities.
      7. Define and differentiate between aerobic and anaerobic activities.
      8. Define heart disease and describe risk factors associated with it.
      9. Describe how flexibility serves to prevent muscular and joint problems.
      10. Demonstrate and describe various movements/exercises that health professionals can incorporate into their occupation to prevent injuries as well as muscle and joint overuse conditions.
      11. Define and differentiate between static and ballistic stretching.
    2. Continue good nutrition and stress reduction.
      1. Analyze nutritional data and calculate percentage values based on serving sizes and recommended daily values.
      2. List recommended nutritional requirements based on Food Guide Pyramid.
      3. Define and describe all fats (saturated, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, trans-fats); list sources of each.
      4. Describe the role activity plays in successful weight management.
      5. Define cancer and diabetes. Describe risk factor associated with various types of these diseases.
      6. Define stress, list symptoms of it, and describe various methods of stress reduction.
      7. Recognize various wellness myths as they relate to us ?the consumer.?
      8. Demonstrate and incorporate various physical activities and exercises into his/her clinical experience.
      9. Identify and define occupational wellness terminology.
  
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    LWA 206C - Occupational Wellness 3

    Credits: 0.5
    Continues wellness concepts, behavioral patterns, and activities that can be incorporated into the lifestyles of those working in a wide variety of occupation settings. Credit may be earned in LW 206C or LWA 206C but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to restricted enrollment programs.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Continue working toward fitness goals.
      1. List and describe the benefits and significance of participation in a lifetime fitness and developed occupational wellness program.
      2. List and describe the five components of physical fitness as well as assessment tests and exercises that can be done to measure and improve all five components.
      3. Define and describe the importance and role of warm-up and cool-down as they relate to activity.
      4. Describe and apply the FIT principle.
      5. Demonstrate how to take, monitor, and calculate personal target heart rates to attain a cardiovascular training effect.
      6. Define and discuss the relationship between stroke volume, cardiac output, and heart rate as they relate to cardio respiratory benefits and exercise activities.
      7. Define and differentiate between aerobic and anaerobic activities.
      8. Define heart disease and describe risk factors associated with it.
      9. Describe how flexibility serves to prevent muscular and joint problems.
      10. Demonstrate and describe various movements/exercises that health professionals can incorporate into their occupation to prevent injuries as well as muscle and joint overuse conditions.
      11. Define and differentiate between static and ballistic stretching.
    2. Continue good nutrition and stress reduction.
      1. Analyze nutritional data and calculate percentage values based on serving sizes and recommended daily values.
      2. List recommended nutritional requirements based on Food Guide Pyramid.
      3. Define and describe all fats (saturated, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, trans-fats); list sources of each.
      4. Describe the role activity plays in successful weight management.
      5. Define cancer and diabetes. Describe risk factor associated with various types of these diseases.
      6. Define stress, list symptoms of it, and describe various methods of stress reduction.
      7. Recognize various wellness myths as they relate to us ?the consumer.?
      8. Demonstrate and incorporate various physical activities and exercises into his/her clinical experience.
      9. Identify and define occupational wellness terminology.
  
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    LWA 210 - Tae Kwon Do III

    Credits: 1
    Provides an opportunity to utilize advanced techniques in a non-contact martial art class at an advanced intermediate level.

    Prerequisite(s): LWA 114  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Tae Kwon Do III.
      1. List and describe the five health-related components of fitness and explain how they apply to Tae Kwon Do.
      2. List the six essential nutrients, the caloric value and food source of each, and the relationship of each nutrient to the current Food Guide Pyramid.
      3. Describe and explain the relationship of Tae Kwon Do’s physical applications to their individual lifestyles.
      4. Describe and explain the art of Tae Kwon Do.
      5. Describe and explain the flexibility and stretching exercises used during the class and the relationship of these exercises to the art of Tae Kwon Do.
      6. Describe and explain the personal self-defense applications of the art of Tae Kwon Do.
      7. Describe and explain the six Theories of Power of Tae Kwon Do.
      8. Describe and explain the six Tenets of Tae Kwon Do.
      9. Describe and explain the tournament patterns and sparring techniques of Tae Kwon Do.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Tae Kwon Do III.
      1. Perform a set of personalized advanced intermediate stretching and flexibility exercises.
      2. Perform at an advanced intermediate level the following technical motions:
        1. Postures of the body, head, hand, and feet.
        2. Levels of stances, direction, levels, and turns.
        3. Natural preparations of punches, blocks, and kicks.
        4. Quick and powerful executions of punches, blocks, and kicks.
        5. Defensive motions.
      3. Demonstrate at an advanced intermediate level a routine or pattern of Tae Kwon Do.
      4. Demonstrate combinations (offensive and defensive moves in a sequence) at an advanced intermediate level on rhythm and balance.
      5. Demonstrate safe sparring to include:
        1. Four counter attacks.
        2. Intermediate levels of free sparring with a partner.
      6. Demonstrate advanced intermediate skills (increased speed, power, and balance) during bag work.
      7. Perform advanced intermediate levels of breaking techniques.
      8. Demonstrate the ability to pronounce and execute advanced intermediate Korean Tae Kwon Do commands and technical terms.
      9. Demonstrate Tae Kwon Do tournament patterns and sparring techniques.
  
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    LWA 279 - Defensive Tactics in Corrections

    Credits: 1
    Teaches methods of self-defense using pressure points and leverage for subject control. Emphasizes subduing dangerous or violent individuals for criminal justice purposes. Includes Pressure Points Control Tactics (PPCT), Ground Avoidance Ground Escape (GAGE) and Spontaneous Knife Defense.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor
    Corequisite(s): CJ 102  and LWT 170  for Jail Officer Academy (Local Corrections Officer Certification Academy)
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 40
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Meets the current Michigan Sheriff’s Coordinating and Training Council (MSCTC) Local Corrections Officer Certification objectives.
    2. Explain the methods of pressure point use to control a hostile individual through pain compliance.
      1. Explain how the body reacts to stress and the need to employ techniques that utilize gross motor skills when the sympathetic nervous system activates.
      2. Explain how to recognize and report on levels of resistance and levels of control as outlined on the resistance/control continuum.
      3. Explain how to recognize and control the most common types of resistance faced by officers.
    3. Physically demonstrate the methods of subduing hostile subjects using pressure points control tactics (PPCT).
      1. Tactical Handcuffing
      2. Joint Locks and Takedown
      3. Pressure Point Control Tactics utilizing touch pressure or striking techniques.
      4. Defensive Counterstrikes with the hands and legs
      5. The PPCT Impact Weapon Sytem
      6. The PPCT Shoulder Pin Restraint to control high levels of resistance.
      7. Weapon Retention and Disarming (Handgun and Long Gun)
    4. Physically demonstrate the use of ground avoidance ground escape (GAGE) methods of avoiding being taken to the ground, and how to escape if taken to the ground.
      1. Use of Force Human Factors
      2. Control Principles
      3. Palm Heel Strikes
      4. Front Thrust Kick
      5. Brachial Stuns
      6. Tactical Takedown
      7. Breakfalls
      8. Avoidance Techniques for High, Middle and Low Attacks
      9. Ground Escapes from Top and Rear Mount
      10. Cross Body and Headlock Positions
      11. Shoulder Pin Applications
    5. Explain the basic precepts of a spontaneous knife attack.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the PPCT philosophy that any type of knife assault is a deadly force encounter and should be responded to accordingly.
      2. Demonstrate and explain relative positioning.
      3. Explain aspects of distance, reaction time and response time needed to successfully defeat/survive such an attack.
    6. Physically demonstrate the use of spontaneous knife defense methods for reacting to unexpected deadly force knife attacks, where officer lethal force is not an option
      1. Use of Force Human Factors
      2. Survival Learning Research
      3. Control Principles
      4. Front Thrust Kick
      5. Knee Strikes
      6. Brachial Stuns
      7. Tactical Takedown
      8. Straight Armbar Takedown
      9. Lines of Attack
      10. Spontaneous Knife Defense
  
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    LWA 280 - Self-Defense/Fitness

    Credits: 2
    Teaches methods of self-defense using pressure points and leverage for subject control. Emphasizes subduing dangerous or violent individuals for criminal justice purposes. Fitness module emphasizes regular program of calisthenics, stretching, strength building, and conditioning through aerobic and non-aerobic activities. Grade of “C” (2.0) or better in this course in order to complete Basic Police Training Academy. Credit may be earned in LW 280 or LWA 280 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): CJ 101 , LWT 175 , and OAT 153  for Basic Police Training Academy
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 60
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. 1. Physically demonstrate the methods of subduing hostile subjects using the Officer-Subject force continuum.
      1. 1A. Explain the levels of force.
      2. 1B. Explain the Pressure Point Control Tactics method of self-defense.
      3. C. Demonstrate the methods of hard hand and soft hand control.
      4. 1D. Demonstrate the methods of baton use.
      5. 1E. Demonstrate blocking maneuvers.
      6. 1F. Demonstrate kicking maneuvers.
    2. Explain the methods of pressure point use to control a hostile individual through pain compliance.
      1. Demonstrate and explain the history of control principles.
      2. Explain PPCT management systems.
      3. Explain and demonstrate the variables affecting the use of force.
      4. Explain motor skills.
      5. Explain principles of controlling resistance.
      6. Demonstrate and explain relative positioning.
    3. Demonstrate subject control measures and subject securing methods.
      1. Traditional handcuffing.
      2. Speed handcuffing.
      3. Transporting subjects.
      4. Iron wristlock takedown.
      5. Joint locks.
      6. Straight-arm bar takedown.
      7. Infra orbital pressure point.
      8. Mandibular angle pressure point.
      9. Hypoglossal nerve method.
      10. Jugular notch methods.
      11. Brachial plexus origin.
      12. Superscapular nerve motor point.
      13. Radial nerve motor point.
      14. Femoral nerve motor point.
      15. Common peroneal nerve motor point.
      16. Tibial nerve motor point.
    4. Explain and demonstrate counter measures.
      1. The field interview stance.
      2. The high guard ready stance.
      3. The palm heel or closed fist jab.
      4. The straight punch.
      5. The front thrust kick.
      6. The angle kick.
      7. The knee strike.
      8. Impact weapon strikes.
      9. A forward fluid shock wave block.
      10. Other relevant blocks and strikes.
    5. Display knowledge and skills of weapon retention.
      1. Weapon retention for handguns.
      2. Weapon retention for long guns.
  
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    LWA 290-299 - Special Projects in Lifelong Wellness Activity

    Credits: N/A
    Prerequisite(s): N/a
    Corequisite(s): N/A
    Lecture Hours: 15-60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes


Lifelong Wellness Theory

  
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    LWT 165 - HeartSaver First Aid with CPR

    Credits: 1
    Introduces critical skills needed to respond to and manage an emergency from the first few minutes until arrival of emergency medical services (EMS). Practices adult Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Automated External Defibrillator (AED) use. Awards American Heart Association Heartsaver First Aid Course Completion Card, valid for two years with demonstrated competency as defined by the AHA. Course is intended for those with limited or no medical training who need a course completion card in first aid to meet job, regulatory or other requirements. Course is not intended for health care providers.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of life-threatening emergencies and first aid procedures.
      1. Describe the general principles of providing first aid.
      2. Identify ways to protect oneself and prevent disease transmission.
      3. List and describe the factors of disease transmission and steps to take to prevent infection.
      4. Recognize and describe the signs and symptoms of emergency action for the following injuries and illnesses: wounds, burns, bone and joint injuries, sudden illnesses (diabetic emergencies, fainting, seizures), poisoning, and illnesses related to heat and cold.
      5. Describe the function and use of an epinephrine pen.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of life-threatening emergencies and the steps to take in any emergency situation.
      1. Demonstrate the proper procedures for the following emergency situations:
        1. Respiratory distress and arrest for adult, child, and infant.
        2. Conscious and unconscious choking for adult, child, and infant.
        3. CPR for adult, child, and infant.
      2. Demonstrate how to use an AED safe and effectively.
      3. Demonstrate the proper emergency action for the following injuries and illnesses: wounds, burns, bone and joint injuries, sudden illnesses (diabetic emergencies, fainting, seizures), poisoning, and illnesses related to heat and cold.
  
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    LWT 170 - Basic Life Support for the Health Care Provider

    Credits: 1
    Develops cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and automated external defibrillator (AED) knowledge and skills to the level of a health care provider.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the concepts and components of CPR for the Health Care Provider.
      1. Demonstrate the correct techniques of CPR for the adult, child, and infant.
      2. Demonstrate mouth-to-mouth rescue breathing for the adult, child, and infant.
      3. Demonstrate mouth-to-mask rescue breathing for the adult, child, and infant.
      4. Demonstrate the complete sequence for 1-rescuer CPR.
      5. Demonstrate the complete sequence for 2-rescuer CPR.
      6. Demonstrate the proper placement of the AED electrode pads.
      7. Demonstrate the correct technique using a bag-valve-mask.
      8. Demonstrate the complete sequence for 2-rescuer infant CPR.
      9. Demonstrate how to relieve choking in the responsive and unresponsive victim over 1 year of age.
      10. Demonstrate how to relieve choking in the responsive and unresponsive infant.
    2. Describe and explain the concepts and components of CPR for the Health Care Provider.
      1. Name the links in the AHA pediatric Chain of Survival and state the importance of each link.
      2. Explain why no one should touch the victim while the AED is analyzing the heart rhythm or delivering a shock to the victim.
      3. Describe the proper actions to take when the AED gives a “no shock indicated” or “no shock advised” message.
      4. Explain the importance of early defibrillation.
      5. List the steps common to the operation of all AEDs.
      6. Name the links in the AHA adult Chain of Survival and state the importance of each link.
      7. Describe four life-threatening emergencies.
      8. Identify when to start CPR on a victim.
      9. Recall the differences between adult and child CPR.
  
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    LWT 175 - Advanced First Aid and Emergency Care

    Credits: 3


    Provides knowledge and practical skills necessary to assist victims of injury or sudden illness. Covers CPR, wounds, choking, poisoning, substance abuse, burns, exposure to heat and cold, emergency childbirth, fractures, stroke, convulsive disorders, diabetes, auto and pool extrication. Successful completion of course entitles student to American Red Cross CPR and Advanced First Aid Certifications. Grade of “C” (2.0) or better in this course in order to complete Basic Police Training Academy.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor
    Corequisite(s): CJ 101 , LWA 280  and OAT 153  
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1:    The student can describe and explain the concepts and components of advanced first aid and life threatening emergencies, and the
            steps to take in
    any emergency situation.

         A.          Identify the six parts of the EMS system.

         B.          Describe the function of each part of the EMS system.

         C.          Describe his/her role in the EMS system.

         D.          List the five common barriers to action that may prevent people from responding to emergencies.

         E.          Define the four conditions that have to be present for a disease to be transmitted in a first aid situation.

         F.          Identify the three emergency action steps and describe each.

         G.         Identify four important questions to be answered when checking the emergency scene.

         H.         List the three things the victim must be told to get permission to give care.

         I.           List the four conditions considered life threatening in an emergency situation.

         J.          Identify the eight body systems and the major structures in each system.

         K.          Describe the primary functions of each of the eight body systems.

         L.          Identify the four life-threatening conditions.

         M.         Describe how to perform the check for each life threatening condition.

         N.         List six guidelines for preventing disease transmission.

         O.         Explain what influences your decision whether to transport a victim to a medical facility.

         P.          Identify ten signs and symptoms of respiratory distress.

         Q.         Describe the care for a person experiencing respiratory distress.

         R.         Describe when and how to use breathing devices.

         S.         Describe special considerations for rescue breathing.

         T.          Identify the common causes of heart attack.

         U.         List the signs and symptoms of a heart attack.

         V.         Describe the care for a person suffering a heart attack.

         W.        Identify the primary sign of cardiac arrest.

         X.         Describe the purpose of CPR.

         Y.         Explain how to perform CPR on an adult, child, or infant.

         Z.         Identify the risk factors for cardiovascular disease that can be controlled.

         AA.      Explain why severe bleeding must be controlled immediately.

         BB.      List three major functions of the blood.

         CC.      Identify 12 signs and symptoms of internal bleeding.

         DD.      Describe care for severe bleeding and internal bleeding.

         EE.      List two conditions that can result in shock.

         FF.       Define and describe shock.

         GG.     Explain what care can be given to minimize shock.

         HH.     List two signs and symptoms.

         II.        Describe the best defense against infection of an open wound.

         JJ.       List two purposes of bandaging.

         KK.      Describe how to care for open and closed wounds and wounds with an impaled object.

         LL.       List four sources of burns.

         MM.     Describe two types of burns.

         NN.      Explain when to call EMS personnel for a burn.

         OO.      List the basic steps for burn care and describe them.

         PP.       Describe how to care for thermal, chemical, electrical, and radiation burns.

         QQ.      Identify the four main structures of the musculoskeletal system.

         RR.      List six common signs and symptoms of musculoskeletal injuries.

         SS.      List three signs and symptoms that would cause you to suspect a serious musculoskeletal injury.

         TT.       Describe the general care for musculoskeletal injuries.

         UU.      List the five purposes of immobilizing an injury.

         VV.       List four principles of splinting.

         WW.     Name the most common cause of head, neck, and back injuries.

         XX.       List at least 14 signs and symptoms of head, neck, and back injuries.

         YY.       Describe how to effectively minimize movement of the victim’s head and spine.

         ZZ.       Describe how to care for specific injuries to the head, face, neck, and lower back.

         AAA.     Explain why injuries to the chest, abdomen, and pelvis can be fatal.

         BBB.     List the five general steps of care for injuries to the chest, abdomen, and pelvis.

         CCC.     List the seven signs and symptoms of a chest injury.

         DDD.     Describe how to care for rib fractures.

         EEE.      Describe how to care for a sucking chest wound.

         FFF.       Describe the care for open and closed abdominal and pelvic injuries.

         GGG.     Describe how to care for injuries to the genitals.

         HHH.     Identify the signs and symptoms of four specific sudden illnesses.

         III.          List six general guidelines of care for someone who suddenly becomes ill.

         JJJ.        Describe the care for a person who faints.

         KKK.      Describe the care for a person who you suspect is having a stroke.

         LLL.       List six ways to reduce the risk of stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA).

         MMM.    List the four ways poisons enter the body.

         NNN.     Identify 15 signs and symptoms of poisoning.

         OOO.     List ways to prevent ingested, inhaled, and absorbed poisoning.

         PPP.       Identify five signs and symptoms of the most common types of bites and stings.

         QQQ.     Describe how to care for human bites.

         RRR.      Describe how to care for domestic and wild animal bites.

         SSS.       Identify the six main categories of commonly misused or abused substances.

         TTT.        Identify the signs and symptoms that may indicate substance misuse or abuse.

         UUU.      Describe how to care for someone who you suspect or know is misusing or abusing a substance.

         VVV.       Explain how you can help prevent unintentional drug misuse.

         WWW.    List six signs and symptoms that can result from over exposure to heat.

         XXX.       List the signs and symptoms of heat stroke.

         YYY.       Describe the care for heat-related illness.

         ZZZ.       List four signs and symptoms of frostbite.

    2.    The student can describe and explain the concepts and components of advanced first aid and life threatening emergencies, and the
           steps to take in
    any emergency situation.

         A.          Describe the care for hypothermia.

         B.          Describe five ways to help prevent heat- and coll- related illness.

         C.          List limitations you should be aware of before you attempt to move someone.

         D.          List situations in which an emergency move of a victim is necessary.

         E.          Describe the guidelines you should follow when moving someone.

         F.          Describe two out-of-water assists that you can use to help someone who is in trouble in the water.

         G.         List the general guidelines for caring for an injured person in the water who you suspect may have a spinal injury.

         H.         Describe two methods to support or stabilize a victim’s head and neck in water.

         I.          Describe considerations for checking an infant, a toddler, a preschooler, a school-ager, and an adolescent.

         J.          Explain how to observe an ill or injured child and how to communicate with the parents or caregiver.

         K.          Explain ways of communicating with victims who are hearing impaired.

         L.          Explain what you should do if you come across a crime scene or hostile victim.

         M.         Describe the four stages of labor.

         N.         Identify six factors you need to know to determine the mother’s condition before birth.

         O.         Describe how to assist with the delivery of a baby.

         P.          Identify the two priorities of care for a newborn.

         Q.         Describe three steps to take in caring for the mother after delivery.

         R.          Identify four possible complications of childbirth that require EMS care.

         S.          List three types of problems that could create a delayed-help situation.

         T.          Describe the information you should gather in a delayed-help situation before making a plan to get help.

         U.         List four ways to get help in a delayed-help situation.

         V.          List the steps to take before leaving a victim alone for an extended period of time.

         W.         Describe the types of shelter you can use or construct.

         X.          List four steps you can take to reduce your risk of personal injury.

         Y.          List four elements of a fire escape plan.

         Z.          List the three leading causes of accidental home death.

         AA.       Identify 15 ways to make our home a safer place.

         BB.       List, in order, the food groups shown on the Food Guide Pyramid.

         CC.       List six physical indicators of negative stress.

         DD.       List the risks of smoking.

     3.    The student can demonstrate the concepts and components of advanced first aid and life threatening emergencies.

         A.          Demonstrate how to check for life-threatening emergencies.

         B.          Demonstrate how to make appropriate decisions when given an example of an emergency situation requiring you to check a victim.

         C.          Demonstrate how to provide rescue breathing for adult, child, and infant victims.

         D.          Demonstrate how to care for conscious adult, child, and infant choking victims.

         E.          Demonstrate how to care for unconscous adult, child, and infant choking victims.

         F.           Demonstrate to give CPR to adult, child, and infant victims.

         G.          Demonstrate how to make appropraite decisions in an emergency situation in which a person has suffered a cardiac arrest.

         H.          Demonstrate how to control external bleeding.

         I.            Demonstrate how to make appropriate decision in an emergency situation in which a person is bleeding internally.

         J.           Demonstrate how to immobilize an injury.

         K.          Demonstrate proper splinting techniques.

         L.          Demonstrate proper care for a victim suffering from a head, neck, or back injury.

         M.         Demonstrate care for a victim with rib fractures.

         N.         Demonstrate proper care for a victim you suspect is suffering from a stroke.

         O.         Demonstrate good communication with a victim, the victims, parents, and any bystanders that may be present in an emergency situation.

  
  •  

    LWT 185 - Water Safety Instructor

    Credits: 1
    Provides theory and techniques in aquatics, practice teaching, water safety, survival swimming, swimming program development and pool and waterfront administration. Certification as a Water Safety Instructor may result upon satisfactory completion of the course. Credit may be earned in LW 185 or LWT 185 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): Current American Red Cross Emergency Water Safety or Lifeguard card and swimmer level skills
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Water Safety Instruction.
      1. Describe and explain the appropriate teaching methods to be implemented by a swimming instructor.
      2. Describe and explain the proper methods for developing lesson plans for level one through seven swimming classes.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Water Safety Instruction.
      1. Develop lesson plans for swimming classes, levels one - seven.
      2. Demonstrate a level six swimming skill proficiency, as well as teach the following swimming skills:
        1. Front dive
        2. Surface dives (feet first, pike, tuck)
        3. Front crawl
        4. Back crawl
        5. Side stroke
        6. Elementary backstroke
        7. Breaststroke
        8. Butterfly
        9. Inverted breaststroke
        10. Trudgeon
        11. Trudgeon crawl
        12. Open turns
        13. Flip turn
      3. Demonstrate, as well as teach, required fundamental rescue skills as established by the American Red Cross Community Water Safety Program.
      4. Demonstrate the teaching of infant and pre-school swimming classes.
  
  •  

    LWT 210 - Nutrition: The Science of Optimal Living

    Credits: 3


    Presents nutrition science as a key element for optimal living. Evaluates and applies diet plans and principles, food nutrients, metabolism, diet analysis, and the health effects of nutrition.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Describe, explain, and apply nutritional concepts for optimal health, weight management, and the prevention of disease.

         A.          Advise proper eating plans by utilizing diet planning principles, the Food Pyramid, MyPlate, and other food guide plans that incorporate
                      personal food preferences.

         B.          List and describe the four energy sources.

         C.          List and describe the six classes of nutrients.

         D.          Explain the primary difference between energy and non-energy-yielding nutrients.

         E.          Distinguish between simple and complex carbohydrates in form and function, and the health effects associated with carbohydrate intake,
                       including fiber and sugar intake.

         F.          List and describe the 20 common amino acids; the 9 essential and 11 non-essential.

         G.         Differentiate between members of the lipid family; triglycerides, phospholipids, and sterols, in form and function and the health effects
                      associated with lipid intake, especially triglyceride and cholesterol intake.

         H.         Describe the factors associated with weight control, including causes of obesity, methods of assessing body weight and composition, and
                      the good and poor treatments for obesity.

         I.           Describe free radicals and explain the impact diet and exercise have on them.

         J.          Describe the function of water in the body and explain how electrolytes/fluids are balanced and maintained in the body.

         K.          Explain the impact of nutrition and lifestyle choices on the immune system and on diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer,
                      diabetes, AIDS, osteoporosis.

         L.          Describe factors that affect food choices.

         M.         Define the science of nutrition.

         N.         Cite the 10 leading causes of illness and death in the Unites States.

         O.         Identify and describe serving sizes of various food groups.

         P.          Describe the components of a food label.

         Q.         Describe how the development of nutrition as a science has influenced what people eat.

         R.          Define simple and complex carbohydrates and provide examples.

         S.          Describe the health effects of simple and complex carbohydrates intake and cite the recommended intake of each.

         T.          Define fiber, including the characteristics of the different types of fiber, how fiber differs from starch, and how fibers are classified.

         U.         Identify the members of the lipid family.

         V.          Explain the basic function of lipids in the body and in foods.

         W.         Describe the process and controversy surrounding hydrogenation.

         X.          List and explain the differences between saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, and transfatty acids, and provide examples of food
                      sources for each.

         Y.          Cite the recommended intakes of total dietary fat, saturated, fat, and dietary cholesterol.

         Z.          Suggest practical ways to reduce total dietary fat, saturated fat, and dietary cholesterol.

         AA.       Compare and contrast how a traditional American-based diet and diets from other countries can affect health.

         BB.       Explain the health risks associated with a high fat diet for people suffering from the following conditions: heart disease, Type II diabetes,
                      and cancer.

         CC.       Describe the role of Macronutrients.

         DD.       Define health body weights and body composition levels.

         EE.       Describe the methods of determining body weight and body composition.

         FF.        State health risk factors associated with being over or underweight.

         GG.       Describe causes of obesity.

         HH.       Explain good treatment choices for weight loss.

         II.          Analyze dietary intakes and advise according to the DRI’s, valid nutritional research, and optimal health and disease prevention.

         JJ.        Calculate daily caloric intakes and the macro-nutrient percent ranges and advise meal planning according to current dietary guidelines.

         KK.       Demonstrate the use of various dietary analysis software.

         LL.        Discuss how biotechnology is changing characteristics and types of foods available.

         MM.      Describe diets strongly associated with low rates of chronic heart disease and cancer; those containing vegetables, fruits, and whole
                      grains.

         NN.       List the functions of water: maintenance of the body hydration and temperature; removal of waste products; participation in energy
                      formation; major source of fluoride.

         OO.      List and describe various methods of assessing body fat.

    2.    Describe, explain, and apply metabolism, digestion, absorption, and nutritional bioavailability concepts as they relate to nutritional research and health.

         A.          Describe the digestive system, including problems that it encounters and solves during the digestive process.

         B.          Explain the steps involved in metabolism and the ways energy is derived from carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, including the
                       consequences of consuming too much or too little energy.

         C.          Identify and describe the basic route of food followed through the GI tract.

         D.          Describe the muscular action of digestion.

         E.          List the digestive organs/enzymes and their secretions that promote the breakdown of food.

         F.           Briefly describe the anatomy of the absorptive system.

         G.          Describe the basic transportation routes absorbed nutrients take in order to be delivered to and used by the body.

         H.          Explain how the body regulates digestion and absorption.

         I.           Describe the basic steps involved in the metabolism of the absorbed starch.

         J.          Summarize the basic steps of blood glucose regulation.

         K.          Explain how fiber is digested and absorbed.

         L.          Describe the basic steps involved in the digestion, absorption, and transport of our macro nutrients.

         M.         Briefly explain how fat is metabolized.

         N.         Describe the origin, function, and health implications of fat substitutes/fake fats.

         O.         Describe digestion and absorption of macronutrients.

         P.          Define metabolism and energy metabolism.

         Q.         Describe the process of glycolysis.

         R.         Describe what happens to metabolism during fasting/starvation.

         S.         Describe energy balance.

         T.         Define and describe thermogenesis.

         U.        Explain the function of coenzymes.

         V.        Describe the factors that enhance or inhibit absorption of nutrients.

         W        Explain how trace minerals interact with each other during the digestion and absorption process.

         X.        Describe how medications, diseases, and biological processes influence adults’ requirements for essential nutrients.

         Y.         List and describe digestive disorders and explain their relationship to dietary intake.

    3.    Describe, explain, and apply nutritional needs for special populations and those with chronic disease.

         A.          Explain the health effects of protein intake.

         B.          Describe protein energy malnutrition.

         C.          Explain how vegetarians and non-vegetarians obtain adequate protein.

         D.          Describe how nutrition and lifestyle choices impact the life-cycle before and during pregnancy, during lactation and infancy, during
                       childhood and adolescence, and through adulthood and aging.

         E.          Explain the composition, function, and fat of the lipoproteins - VLDL, LDL, and HDL.

         F.           Describe the purpose of a blood lipid profile.

         G.          List the recommended protein intake for specific groups of people.

         H.          Differentiate the health effects of vegetarian vs. non-vegetarian eating plans.

         I.            Explain the differences between anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

         J.           Explain why the fetus is not considered a parasite.

         K.          Discuss how adult risk of chronic diseases is affected by maternal and infant nutrition.

         L.          List reasons why breastfeeding is the best method for nourishing an infant.

         M.         Describe growth and development during infancy as faster than any other time.

         N.         Recognize that children are not born knowing what to eat.

         O.         Discuss a child’s ability to regulate how much he or she eats.

         P.          Explain how diet and behavior will affect later health.

         Q.         Identify and explain the differences in infant, toddler, child, and adolescent nutritional needs and dietary recommendations.

         R.         Describe how dietary intake, body weight, and physical activity influence health status with age.

         S.          List chronic disorders associated with unhealthful intakes of certain minerals; osteoporosis, iron deficiency, and hypertension.

     4.    Discuss and apply nutrition strategies for enhancing athletic performance.

         A.          Provide accurate information regarding vitamin/mineral supplementation and the use of ergogenic aids in athletic performance.

         B.          List and describe the fuels necessary for physical performance and to sustain daily activity.

         C.          State how protein quality is determined.

         D.          Describe the effects of protein and amino acid supplements.

         E.          Define ATP and explain how the body uses ATP.

         F.           Describe how foods affect daily activity and athletic performance.

         G.          List and discuss the currently proven ergogenic aids.

         H.          Define and describe glycogen loading and its effect on athletic performance.

         I.           Calculate appropriate hydration rates for various athletic events.

         J.           Identify and explain the importance of pre and post workout nutrition.

         K.          Explain why and how glucose is utilized for intense physical activity.

         L.          Explain why and how fates are utilized for low-to-moderate intensity exercise.

         M.         Discuss how physical activity performance, strength, and endurance is affected by genetics, training, and nutrition.

         N.         Detail the causes of abnormal menstrual cycles in female athletes and suggest how these should be corrected.

    5.    Describe and explain vitamin and mineral DRI’s, dietary supplements, phytochemicals, antioxidants, and ergogenic aids.

         A.          Explain the differences between water and fat soluble vitamins, including the ways each one functions in the body, the deficiency/toxicity
                      symptoms, and the major food sources.

         B.          State which vitamins have antioxidant effects and what those effects are.

         C.          Describe the impact of artificial sweeteners.

         D.          Explain the health effects that a high protein fad diet will have on individuals.

         E.          Identify the fat and water soluble vitamins.

         F.          Define antioxidants and explain the effects of them on the body.

         G.         Describe the primary functions of the following vitamins, list deficiency/toxicity symptoms, and identify major food sources for each:
                      Vitamins A, C, E, B’s, D, and K.

         H.         State the positive and negative effects of dietary supplementation.

         I.          Identify the major minerals according to the following criteria:

                      1.    Chief functions in the body

                      2.    Deficiency symptoms and/or disease

                      3.    Toxicity symptoms and/or disease

                      4.    Major food sources

         J.          Identify the trace minerals according to the identical criteria listed above.

         K.          Recognize that dietary supplements do not have to be shown to be safe or effective.

         L.          Define vitamins and chemicals in food required for normal growth and health.

         M.         Discuss how intakes below and above range impair health.

         N.         Explain why food is the preferred source of vitamins and minerals.

  
  •  

    LWT 211W - Sports Nutrition

    Credits: 3
    Examines the metabolic and physiologic basis for macronutrient and micronutrient recommendations during general exercise, pre-season training, competition/performance, and recovery. Includes nutritional assessments of exercises varying in intensity and duration, training and recovery periods, and various sports demands.

    Prerequisite(s): LWT 210  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of nutrients and food in sports performance.
      1. Discuss the sport specific requirements for macronutrients and micronutrients based on energy expenditure and metabolic pathways.
      2. Discuss the role of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats as they relate to energy metabolism.
      3. Analyzes of the effects of specific nutrients on human behavior in general and the neural system specifically.
      4. Discuss how exercise alters the nutritional needs of an active person.
      5. Evaluate recent finding on the role of nutrition and physical activity in the prevention and treatment of certain chronic disorders.
    2. Design and evaluate nutrition plans and interventions for sport specific performance based on the efficacy and strength of scientific evidence.
      1. Utilize critical thinking skills in the interpretation and application of research methodologies.
      2. Use current and emerging technologies for information and communication to enhance the practice and delivery of nutrition information to athletes and active individuals.
      3. Integrate psychological, social, and economic aspects of the environment and examine how they individually and collectively affect food and nutrition for athletes.
      4. Estimate calorie expenditure for a specific sport and awareness of dietary intake adequacy of optimal exercise.
      5. Develop healthy nutrition guidelines for athletes during each training season of their sport.
      6. Discuss the requirement for water, carbohydrate and/or electrolytes during exercise in respect to an exercise program.
      7. Discuss the importance of hydration based on optimal sports performance.
      8. Evaluate rehydration fluids and carbohydrate beverages designed and marketed for the improvement of athletic performance.
      9. Determine the appropriate timing and loading amount for carbohydrates prior to an event.
    3. Evaluate body composition methods, ideal body weight, desirable body weight, and body mass index for individuals involved in sport.
      1. Discuss the differences between body composition methods and determine which methods are the most reliable.
      2. Practice different body composition methods prior to developing nutritional guidelines for a specific athlete.
      3. Determine the ideal body weight for specific sport performances.
      4. Discuss body image dissatisfaction and eating disorders concerns amongst different types of athletes.
      5. List the detrimental effects of rapid weight loss techniques.
    4. Evaluate the effects of supplements, vitamins and minerals, and ergogenic aids and their relation to sports performance.
      1. Evaluate the positive and negative effects of use of steroids, human growth hormone supplementation, and dietary protein aids to enhance muscle mass and strength.
      2. Discuss the biochemical role of proposed ergogenic aids.
      3. Identify the vitamins and minerals that are at greatest risk for depletion among athletes and serious exercisers.
      4. List the vitamins and minerals critical to energy metabolism during the stress of exercise and discuss their biochemical function.
 

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