Sep 26, 2022  
2017-2018 
    
2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Electronic Media Broadcasting

  
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    EMB 151 - Media Production I

    Credits: 3
    Introduces basic video production methods and equipment, including non-linear editors, video cameras and supporting hardware. Emphasizes developing comprehension of communication using visual and aural mediums, and the variety of media types and formats available. Introduces the basic production skills necessary for developing media projects. Uses Television Labs, Studios and equipment to instruct students in basic elements of video and audio acquisition and production.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 40 Lab Hours: 20
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Acquire basic understanding of video and audio media acquisition and become familiar with basic methods and terminology of editing video multimedia.
      1. Demonstrate basics of visual composition and acquisition utilizing digital video cameras, microphones and other recording devices.
      2. Identify a variety of media files and formats and describe differences, uses, and application within the context of media productions.
    2. Comprehend and demonstrate ability in basic video production techniques and visual literacy.
      1. Demonstrate basic video camera operation and media production methods.
      2. Comprehend visual literacy through proper shot composition and framing.
      3. Apply techniques to successfully complete video lab and project works.
    3. Acquire knowledge of basic producing skills, including production planning methods and scripting.
      1. Use scripting techniques in a variety of formats.
      2. Apply production-planning techniques, incorporating outlines, scripts, storyboards & timeliness.
  
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    EMB 152 - Studio Productions

    Credits: 2
    Introduces basic television studio production methods and equipment, video cameras, switchers, audio boards, lighting and related hardware. Emphasizes developing comprehension of communication using visual and aural mediums through hands-on learning in professional studio environments. Introduces the basic production skills necessary for developing media projects. Uses television labs and studios to instruct students in basic elements in video and audio acquisition and studio production.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 20 Lab Hours: 40
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Acquire basic understanding of television studio operations and become familiar with basic methods and terminology of productions created within the controlled environments of television studios.
      1. Demonstrate basics of visual composition and acquisition utilizing studio cameras, microphones, and recording devices.
      2. Identify the various personnel positions and comprehend the responsibilities of those positions, which comprise a studio production crew.
    2. Comprehend and demonstrate ability in basic studio based audio and video production techniques.
      1. Demonstrate standard 3-camera, studio based television production methods.
      2. Operate standard equipment located and utilized within audio and video studios.
      3. Demonstrate basic positions, responsiblities, and terminology to function as crew team members in audio/video productions.
    3. Acquire knowledge of basic producing skills, including production planning methods and scripting.
      1. Use scripting techniques in a variety of formats.
      2. Apply production planning techniques, incorporating outlines, scripts, storyboards and timeliness.
    4. Acquire knowledge of basic television lighting techniques and set design.
      1. Design sets and lighting plots for various in-studio television productions.
      2. Create workable sets for use in laboratory studio productions.
      3. Apply principles of 3-point and other advanced lighting techniques to properly illuminate sets and talent for laboratory studio productions.
  
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    EMB 153 - Broadcast Performance

    Credits: 3
    Introduces students to broadcast performance. Emphasizes presentations before microphones and cameras. Examines dress, movement, make-up, lighting, and delivery in such major performance situations as interviews, discussions, newscasts, commercials, and product demonstrations.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate evidence of proficiency in the following skills through a variety of on air situations to match their talents with appropriate production.
      1. Explain the profession of broadcast entertaining.
      2. Apply professional voice usage.
      3. Practice script reading, i.e., commercial announcement, newscast, etc.
      4. Give examples of nonverbal communication (body language).
      5. Employ television and radio equipment as it relates to performing.
      6. Select television costuming (dress) and make-up.
      7. Experiment with the effectiveness of studio lighting with on-air personalities.
      8. Evaluate on-camera movement.
      9. Rate program timing and queuing.
      10. List interviewing and demonstrating skills.
      11. Demonstrate the use of memorization, cue cards and telecues.
      12. Judge talent both self and others.
  
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    EMB 154 - Peripheral Multimedia Applications

    Credits: 2
    Introduces and familiarizes student with operational elements of digital media, computer operating systems/platforms and peripheral multimedia applications which support and enhance digital non-linear video editing. Concentrates primarily on audio soundtracks, animated text, graphic design and proper compression for delivery to a variety of digital mediums. Emphasizes specific programs within the Macintosh OSX system.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the history and development of computer operating systems, their purpose and functions.
      1. Comprehend and identify primary individuals and companies involved in the development of the major computer operating systems, non-linear editing and graphical applications.
      2. Identify significant benchmarks in the development of the major computer operating systems, non-linear editing and graphical applications.
    2. Comprehends uses, operation of, interface navigation and file structure hierarchies within the Macintosh OSX operating system.
      1. Experience through hands-on operation, the user interface of the Macintosh OSX operating system.
      2. Navigate the root level user interface and execute the movement, manipulation and assignment of assorted media files within the Macintosh OSX operating system.
    3. Comprehends integration of advanced electronic media applications within the Macintosh OSX operating system.
      1. Utilizes the Macintosh OSX operating system in the operation and configuration of advanced multimedia applications including non-linear editing, digital media creation and graphical design.
    4. Comprehend the various uses of secondary multimedia applications as they apply to non-linear digital video editing.
      1. Identify the different types of peripheral multimedia applications that may be used to enhance a non-linear digital video project.
      2. Examine the proper use of secondary multimedia applications and comprehend how they may be used to enhance a non-linear digital video production.
    5. Comprehend how, when properly used, peripheral multimedia applications can improve the aural and visual aesthetics of a non-linear digital video production.
      1. Examine digital video productions completed with and without peripheral multimedia applications.
      2. Identify the differences between digital video productions completed with and without peripheral multimedia applications.
  
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    EMB 155 - Media Production II

    Credits: 4
    Builds on the body of knowledge gained in EMB 151 . Expands the knowledge and skill in composition of images and media, and integration of that media into finished productions. Introduces digital multimedia production, specifically Macintosh Computer systems and Final Cut Pro non-linear editors. Uses both studio and computer editing facilities to refine both audio and video production skills to develop and execute productions. Uses Television, Radio, and computer labs.

    Prerequisite(s): EMB 151  with minimum grade of "C" (2.0).
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Comprehend and apply basic digital video camera operation and non-linear video and audio editing techniques.
      1. Perform video and audio editing nonlinear systems, specifically Apple computers and Final Cut Pro software.
      2. Build upon basic aesthetic editing techniques and styles developed in EMB 151 .
      3. Utilize digital video cameras in media acquisition for non-linear editing projects.
    2. Combine technique and technology to integrate various media elements in productions and determine appropriate use of those elements in producing finished projects.
      1. Identify audience needs and creative means of using audio and video production to communicate.
      2. Demonstrate practical differences and uses of various media formats.
    3. Increase proficiency, comprehension, and ability in producing media projects.
      1. Produce numerous digital projects utilizing multiple media sources.
  
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    EMB 161 - Podcasting, Online, and Mobile Media

    Credits: 2
    Introduces and familiarizes student with basic elements and theories of alternative/online forms of multimedia delivery, including audio and video podcasting, mobile media devices, media enhanced blogging and media delivery through video sharing and social networking sites such as YouTube and Facebook.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Acquire basic understanding of audio/video podcasting and other alternative multimedia delivery systems.
      1. Identify professional quality podcasts and the production methods used in creating them.
      2. Comprehend the role podcasting and other multimedia delivery systems play in presenting digital content to users.
    2. Comprehend uses and operation of podcast creation software and media compression applications.
      1. Identify various applications used to create and enhance audio and video podcast media.
    3. Demonstrate ability to creat audio and video podcasts, mobile media, and related content for specific purposes.
      1. Demonstrate ability to prepare audio, video and multimedia files for use in podcasts and other forms of alternative, mobile and online delivery systems.
      2. Experience through hands-on operation, creation of audio and video podcasts using various software tools.
  
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    EMB 164 - Digital Imaging for Video Editors

    Credits: 2
    Promotes fundamental digital imaging techniques and concepts in the preparation and development of computer graphic images specifically for video editing purposes. Concentrates on an understanding of the components of digital images, nondestructive editing tools, text and graphic preparation, image repair, color correction, and background creation to support completed video projects. Course will primarily utilize most current professional digital imaging applications.

    Prerequisite(s): EMB 154  with a minimum grade of "C".
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify the basic composition of computer graphic images and their relationship with nonlinear video editing programs.
      1. Examine the elemental characteristics of computer graphic images including the distinction between raster and vector images, pixel aspect ratios, image modes, display and image resolutions, and export formats for compatible integration with video editing applications.
    2. Identify nondestructive editing tools and techniques when preparing graphic images for a video editing application.
      1. Modify and extract images utilizing masks, mattes, paths, and channels for optimal results in video editing programs.
    3. Produce text and graphics to complement the subject matter and ambience of specific video footage.
      1. Examine edited video projects and determine appropriate font styles and graphics using effects and filters to creatively enhance the overall production.
    4. Identify digital imaging tools and methods to repair and color correct images for use in video editing applications.
      1. Analyze a variety of damaged images, determine the appropriate correction technique(s), and utilize the necessary tools to repair the images for optimal presentation in video editing applications.
    5. Employ digital imaging tools and techniques to produce creative backgrounds for professional video projects.
      1. Assess the needs of specific video projects and design backgrounds to support the edited work using gradients, patterns, tiles, filters and effects.
  
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    EMB 175W - Genres in Film History

    Credits: 3
    Examines major film styles and genres prevalent through the history of American cinema. Discusses groundbreaking works and popular film styles and analyzes their production values, editing techniques and influences on later films and other media. Researches individual directors and films and presents written critical analysis of technical and influential contributions to filmmaking.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the history and development of early film styles, shooting and editing techniques by influential individuals in the medium.
      1. Examine historical and influential films, cinematographers and directors.
      2. Identify groundbreaking techniques in shooting, editing and presentation.
    2. Comprehend how early cinema, techniques, styles and individuals influence modern and popular filmmaking, television and the internet.
      1. Examine modern and popular films, cinematographers and directors and identify any influences from historical cinema.
      2. Identify any new or groundbreaking styles or techniques developed through new technologies.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to critically examine major film genres, director styles and production techniques through in class discussions and written essays.
      1. Present and discuss critical analysis of early films, style, technique and directors.
      2. Present and discuss critical analysis of modern and popular films, style, technique and directors.
  
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    EMB 211W - Writing for Broadcast & New Media

    Credits: 3
    Introduces and familiarizes the specialized writing styles in radio, TV, cable, new media and corporate/non-profit production. Includes, but is not limited to, news, promotional announcements, sports and advertisements. Emphasizes and analyzes various writing styles employed in the commercial, non-profit and corporate world and demonstrates that style through frequent writing.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and ENG 111  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand specialized writing styles for Radio, TV, Cable, New Media and Corporate/Non-Profit production.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of writing styles appropriate for Radio, TV, Cable, New Media and Corporate/Non-Profit
      2. Apply writing style for Radio, TV, Cable, New Media and Corporate/Non-Profit production.
    2. Understand specialized writing styles for journalism, advertising, promotions and public relations.
      1. Write news scripts for broadcast based on examples and discussions in class.
      2. Write advertising scripts for broadcast based on examples and discussions in class.
      3. Write public service announcement scripts for broadcast based on examples and discussions in class.
      4. Write press releases that would be submitted to broadcast journalists.
      5. Write speech scripts that theoretically would be used during a media event such as a press conference. This would include use of the "sound bite."
    3. Comprehend real-world expectations of Radio, TV, Cable, New Media and Corporate/Non-Profit writer.
      1. Participate in a discussion with a real-world professional in the mass media business.
      2. Write about the experience and detail the expectations of a 'writer' in that organization.
  
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    EMB 227 - Broadcast Sales

    Credits: 3
    Explores basic marketing concepts in broadcast time and spot sales. Analyzes the psychological, sociological, economic, and communicative aspects of salesmanship as they apply to the broadcast industry. Prepares actual sales presentations for hypothetical clients. Brings practicing professionals in the broadcast sales field to share their experiences with the class.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and ENG 111  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and successfully perform the selling process specifically in areas unique to broadcasting and cable.
      1. Repeat sales theory.
      2. Define how sales fits into overall marketing.
      3. List the advantages and disadvantages of selling the various mediums, i.e., newspapers, radio, television, cable, etc.
      4. Label the types of selling, i.e., stimulus response selling, formula selling, needs satisfaction, etc.
      5. Recognize the tactics and strategies of selling.
      6. Suggest positioning.
      7. Summarizing prospecting, qualifying (listening and analyzing the potential customer), researching and targeting.
      8. Compare presenting and servicing.
      9. Interpret ratings, i.e., share, gross rating points, gross impressions, cume, frequency, reach, etc.
      10. Identify the similarities and differences of predominate ratings companies, i.e., ARB, Willhight, Nielsen, etc.
      11. Prepare examples of rate card structure, contract conditions, maximizing revenue (pricing, packaging and inventory control).
      12. Construct individual sales efforts from goal setting and planning through evaluation.
      13. Examine the factors that motivate a media buyer to purchase broadcast airtime.
  
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    EMB 229W - Women, Minorities, and the Media

    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: Any College Composition I course or higher with a grade of "C" or higher. Examines the depiction of women and minorities in the mass media in contexts including television, film, print, and the Web. Studies media portrayal, employment, ownership, and access. Explores the individual and societal consequences of media representation. (45-0)

    Prerequisite(s): Any approved Composition I course or higher with a grade of "C" or higher.
    Corequisite(s): N/A
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Develop an understanding of gender and ethnic issues impacting media coverage and representations.
      1. Identify stereotypes of women and minorities which are present in our society.
      2. Comtemplate the individual and societal consequences of media representations.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to recognize gender and ethnic misrepresentations in the media.
      1. Critically examine the mass media for evidence of women and minority misrepresentation.
      2. Utilize a semiotic approach to deconstructing the utilization of women and minorities in mass media messages.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to critique media coverage and representations.
      1. Contribute to analysis of the mass media by seeking out and presenting materials to the class which depict gender and/or minority stereotypes.
      2. Synthesize ideologies, regarding women and minorities, which are present in local mass media messages.
    4. Utilize writing to promote learning of all of the above outcomes and objectives.
  
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    EMB 252 - Studio Productions II

    Credits: 2
    Promotes advanced level skills in professional television studio production method operations and equipment, switchers, lighting and related hardware with emphasis on communication utilizing visual and aural mediums. Concentrates primarily upon accelerated lighting and switching techniques, producer procedures and practices, director techniques and responsibilities, and the live broadcast of a scheduled production.

    Prerequisite(s): EMB 152  with a grade of "C" or better.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 20 Lab Hours: 40
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate advanced lighting techniques as it relates to a variety of studio environments and situations.
      1. Design and construct creative lighting environments for optimal visual appeal for studio and related broadcasts.
    2. Employ digital media elements into broadcast switcher to enhance television studio productions.
      1. Arrange and assemble digital and graphic components for generation during live and related studio productions.
    3. As a producer, organize a live television production incorporating professional industry standards.
      1. Evaluate the necessary medium requirements for a live production and execute a professional calendar and schedule.
    4. As a director, prepare and employ advanced switching techniques associated with a studio television broadcast.
      1. Design a plan to generate a live television production utilizing progressive switching proficiency and creativity.
  
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    EMB 255W - Media Production III

    Credits: 4
    Prerequisites: EMB 152  and EMB 153 . Also EMB 155  with "C" (2.0) minimum grade. Refines and utilizes skills gained in Media Production I and II with further instruction to produce and direct finished multimedia productions. Emphasizes producing and directing skills to maximize effectiveness. Produces and directs multimedia productions, including audio and video components, with specific outcomes for specific uses and audiences. Uses Television Studio and Computer labs. (60-30)

    Prerequisite(s): EMB 152  and EMB 153 . Also EMB 155  with "C" (2.0) minimum grade.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Expand upon knowledge gained in EMB 151  and EMB 155  and apply producing and broadcast news writing skills to achieve specific results.
      1. Utilize research and pre-production skills to determine subject matter for specific field productions.
      2. Write and execute assigned field production projects for specific purpose.
    2. Demonstrate comprehension of advanced television studio production techniques.
      1. Design and layout television show studio set and lighting scheme.
      2. Operate successfully all components of a television studio production including camera operations, floor directing, audio controls, VTR operation, technical directing and on-screen talent for specific productions.
      3. Present and discuss written critical self analysis of studio production process and performance.
    3. Demonstrate comprehension of advanced television field production techniques.
      1. Initiate contact with outside interview subjects, schedule field video shoots for specific field productions.
      2. Operate successfully field camera and related equipment to gather video and audio for specific purpose.
      3. Present and discuss written critical self analysis of field production process and performance.
    4. Demonstrate comprehension of advanced non-linear video editing and post production techniques.
      1. Operate successfully computer based non-linear video editors, including Apple Final Cut Pro, for production of multimedia projects for specific purposes.
      2. Present and discuss written critical self analysis of non-linear postproduction editing process and performance.
  
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    EMB 277 - EMB Portfolio

    Credits: 2
    Prerequisite: EMB 155  with a grade of "C" or higher. Creates digital media portfolios of original work and traditional resume materials for delivery via DVD, Web, and social media. (10-20)

    Prerequisite(s): EMB 155  with a grade of "C" or higher.
    Corequisite(s): N/A
    Lecture Hours: 10 Lab Hours: 20
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Comprehend the basic composition of effective resume materials.
      1. Identify relevant employment experiences, education, and skills.
      2. Summarize and arrange professional qualities into a meaningful order.
    2. Analyze the requirements of various job positions or employment opportunities.
      1. Outline pertinent experiences as they pertain to positions being sought.
      2. Determine the best approach for summarizing and relaying professional skills.
    3. Organize resume materials and present a finished product to a variety of mediums.
      1. Prepare traditional resume and interactive DVD for employment seeking purposes.
      2. Demonstrate proficiency in effective interviewing techniques.
  
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    EMB 279 - Advanced Post Production

    Credits: 3
    Builds on the body of knowledge gained in EMB 155 . Expands the student's knowledge and skill in non-linear video editing. Introduces advanced digital multimedia compositing and editing techniques and industry standard technologies, such as Apple's Final Cut Pro, Motion, and Adobe After Effects, while providing an overview of the artistic nature of digital compositing. Students will complete a variety of advanced, individual digital video and compositing projects.

    Prerequisite(s): EMB 155  with minimum grade of "C" (2.0) or EMB Program Coordinator approval
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Comprehend advanced video and effect compositing techniques and workflows utilizing tools such as Adobe After Effects and Apple Motion to create special effects, graphics and animated text for inclusion of various multimedia productions.
      1. Identify advanced applications used to create multi-layered composites, special effects and video productions.
      2. Critically examine professional production examples to identify effective techniques and compositing workflows.
    2. Demonstrate ability in advanced non-linear editing techniques, special effect video compositing and multi-layered and animated text creation.
      1. Experience through hands-on operation, the creation of advanced video productions, special effects composites and animated text applications.
      2. Utilize advanced digital post production tools such as Adobe After Effects and Apple Motion to create enhanced multimedia productions.
    3. Develop advanced understanding of the visual aesthetics associated with professional quality video and multimedia productions and basic workflow principles of compositing digital media.
      1. Demonstrate visual literacy through completion of advanced media projects.
      2. Apply techniques to successfully demonstrate proper digital compositing workflow of advanced media projects.
  
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    EMB 281 - Electronic Media Broadcasting Internship I

    Credits: 1
    Provides advanced hands-on experience through internship with approved off-site electronic media company or organization. Requires 5 hours per week under direct supervision of onsite internship coordinator.

    Prerequisite(s): EMB 151  with a minimum grade of "C" (2.0) and instructor approval
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 75
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate advanced skills directly related to the individual internship in the selected field of multimedia production or radio or television broadcasting and/or production.
      1. Operate advanced audio and/or video equipment as directed by on-site internship facilitator.
      2. Perform related tasks as needed at the direction of on-site internship facilitator.
    2. Successfully complete a total of 75 hours of internship work within the scheduled semester.
      1. Provide weekly progress reports to EMB program coordinator.
      2. Provide reflective self-examination of performance at conclusion of internship.
  
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    EMB 282 - Electronic Media Broadcasting Internship II

    Credits: 2
    Provides advanced hands-on experience through internship with approved off-site electronic media company or organization. Requires 10 hours per week under direct supervision of onsite internship coordinator.

    Prerequisite(s): EMB 151  with a minimum grade of "C" (2.0)  and instructor approval
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 150
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate advanced skills directly related to the individual internship in the selected field of multimedia production or radio or television broadcasting and/or production.
      1. Operate advanced audio and/or video equipment as directed by on-site internship facilitator.
      2. Perform related tasks as needed at the direction of on-site internship facilitator.
    2. Successfully complete a total of 150 hours of intership work within the scheduled semester.
      1. Provide weekly progress reports to EMB program coordinator.
      2. Provide reflective self-examination of performance at conclusion of internship
  
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    EMB 283 - Electronic Media Broadcasting Internship III

    Credits: 3
    Provides advanced hands-on experience through internship with approved off-site electronic media company or organization. Requires 15 hours per week under direct supervision of onsite internship coordinator.

    Prerequisite(s): EMB 151  with a minimum grade of "C" (2.0) and instructor approval
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 225
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate advanced skills directly related to the individual internship in the selected field of multimedia production or radio or television broadcasting and/or production.
      1. Operate advanced audio and/or video equipment as directed by on-site internship.
      2. Perform related tasks as needed at the direction of on-site internship facilitator.
    2. Successfully complete a total of 225 hours of internship work within the scheduled semester.
      1. Provide weekly progress reports to EMB program coordinator.
      2. Provide reflective self-examination of performance at conclusion of internship.
  
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    EMB 284 - Producing for Public Broadcasting TV

    Credits: 2
    Provides advanced, practical experience through Delta College's Public Broadcasting facilities. Gives opportunities to produce and assist with productions of on-air broadcast programs.

    Prerequisite(s): EMB 151  with a minimum grade of “C” (2.0) and instructor approval
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate advanced audio and video production techniques.
      1. Act as production assistant for locally produced programs on WDCQ/WDCP.
      2. Operate studio and filed video production cameras and equipment.
      3. Assist with non-linear post production editing for locally produced programs.
      4. Assist in producing and/or studio crew positions for live local programming.
    2. Demonstrate advanced production and pre-production skill sets with relation to the daily operation of a public broadcast station.
      1. Assist as producer for locally produced programs on WDCQ/WDCP.
      2. Examine programming procedures and practices of WDCQ/WDCP.
      3. Assist as needed with master control operations of WDCQ/WDCP.
      4. Perform other related tasks as needed at the direction of the instructor.
      5. Provide weekly progress reports to EMB program coordinator.
      6. Provide reflective self examination of performance at conclusion of course.
  
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    EMB 285 - Directing for Public Broadcasting TV

    Credits: 2
    Provides advanced, practical experience through Delta College’s Public Broadcasting facilities. Gives opportunities to direct and assist with productions of on-air broadcast programs.

    Prerequisite(s): EMB 151 , EMB 284  both with a minimum grade of “C” (2.0) and instructor approval
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate advanced audio and video production techniques with emphasis on independent performance of related tasks.
      1. Act as production assistant for locally produced programs on WDCQ/WDCP.
      2. Operate studio and field video production cameras and equipment.
      3. Perform non-linear post production editing for locally produced programs.
      4. Assist in directing and/or studio crew positions for live local programming.
    2. Demonstrate advanced directing, pre-production, and programming skill sets with relation to the daily operation of a public broadcast station with emphasis on independent performance of related tasks.
      1. Act as director for locally produced programs on WDCQ/WDCP.
      2. Examine programming procedures and practices of WDCQ/WDCP.
      3. Assist as needed with master control operations of WDCQ/WDCP.
      4. Perform other related tasks as needed at the direction of the practicum facilitator.
      5. Provide weekly progress reports to EMB program coordinator.
      6. Provide reflective self-examination of performance at conclusion of course.
  
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    EMB 290 - Production of Informational Videos

    Credits: 3


    Refines and utilizes skills gained in Media Production I, II, and III with further instruction to produce, direct and post-produce specific, finished multimedia productions in the form of informational videos for specific clients or organizations. Emphasizes producing and directing and production skills to maximize effectiveness. Produces, directs and post-produces multimedia productions in the form of informational videos, including audio and video components, with specific outcomes for specific uses and audiences.

    Prerequisite(s): EMB 155   with a minimum grade of “C”
    Corequisite(s): ENG 290  
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: none
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.   Examine production techniques of the informational video genre.

        A.       Analyze existing professional informational videos to better understand the technical

                   production techniques of the genre.

        B.        Recognize techniques used in professional information videos and comprehend how those

                    techniques could be used to enhance coursework productions.

        C.        Demonstrate an understanding of how to best utilize professional techniques in the

                    production of specified informational video production coursework.

    2.   Production and presentation of  advanced digital video using field production techniques.

        A.        Initiate contact with outside talent, schedule field video shoots for specific field productions.

        B.        Successfully operate field cameras and related equipment to gather video and audio for the

                    production of informational videos.

        C.        Present and discuss critical self-analysis of field production process and performance prior

                    to the post-production element of informational video production.

    3.   Demonstrate comprehension of advanced non-linear video editing, special effects and post-production techniques.

        A.       Operate successfully computer based non-linear video editors, including Adobe’s video

                   production applications for the post-production process of informational videos.

        B.        Present finished informational video production product to client or organization for critical review.

        C.        Prepare informational video segments and related materials for final delivery in the required

                    formats.

  
  •  

    EMB 290-299 - Special Projects in Electronic Media Broadcasting


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Emergency Medical Service

  
  •  

    EMS 110 - Basic Emergency Medical Technician I

    Credits: 4
    First in a sequence of four courses to prepare a student as a Basic EMT. Emphasis is placed on Emergency Medical Care, Medical/Legal/Ethical issues, didactic material including airway management, Patient Assessment, and general pharmacology. To successfully pass this course, the student will be required to successfully complete the national registry exam and obtain a state license. Fees for this exam and license are the responsibility of the student.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and instructor permission
    Corequisite(s): EMS 111 , EMS 112 , and EMS 113  
    Lecture Hours: 65 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate knowledge in anatomy and physiology.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge in anatomy and physiology as defined in the Bureau of Health Services of Michigan Department of Consumer and Industry Services requirements in effect for the year of study.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge and skills of basic patient assessment.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge and skills of patient assessment and patient management as defined in the Bureau of Health Services requirements in effect for the year of study.
    3. Demonstrate basic knowledge related to the roles and responsibilities of emergency services personnel.
      1. Demonstrate basic knowledge related to the roles and responsibilities of emergency services personnel as defined in the Bureau of Health Services requirements in effect for the year of study.
    4. Demonstrate basic knowledge and skill in patient respiratory assessment and airway management.
      1. Demonstrate basic knowledge and skill in patient respiratory assessment and airway management as required and defined in the Bureau of Health Services requirements in effect for the year of study.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge by successfully completing the National Registry Exam.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge in anatomy and physiology; basic patient assessment; roles and responosibilities of emergency services personnel; and patient assessment and airway management by successfully completing the National Registry Exam.
  
  •  

    EMS 111 - Basic Emergency Medical Technician II

    Credits: 4
    Second in a sequence of four courses to a prepare student as a Basic EMT. Emphasis is placed on recognition and management of environmental and medical emergencies; verbal, written and radio communications; triage, emergency childbirth; and pediatric emergencies. To successfully pass this course, the student will be required to successfully complete the national registry exam and obtain a state license. Fees for this exam and license are the responsibility of the student.

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission
    Corequisite(s): EMS 110 , EMS 112  and EMS 113  
    Lecture Hours: 65 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate knowledge and skills related to medical emergencies and trauma management.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge and skills related to medical emergencies and trauma management as defined in the Bureau of Health Services of Michigan Department of Consumer and Industry Services requirements in effect for the year of study.
    2. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills related to cardiovascular disease and patient management.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge and skills related to cardiovascular disease and patient management as defined in the Bureau of Health Services requirements n effect for the year of study.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge and skills related to pharmacology.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge and skills related to pharmacology as defined in the Bureau of Health Services requirements in effect for the year of study.
    4. Demonstrate knowledge and skills related to obstetrics.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge and skills related to obstetrics as required and defined in the Bureau of Health Services requirements in effect for the year of study.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge by successfully completing the National Registry Exam.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge in medical emergencies and trauma management; cardiovascular disease and patient management; pharmacology; and obstetrics by successfully completing the National Registry Exam.
  
  •  

    EMS 112 - Basic Emergency Medical Technician III

    Credits: 2
    Third in a sequence of four courses to prepare a student as a Basic EMT. Emphasizes bandaging, splinting, backboarding concerning injuries to the head & spine as well as musculoskeletal systems. To successfully pass this course, the student will be required to successfully complete the national registry exam and obtain a state license. Fees for this exam and license are the responsibility of the student.

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission
    Corequisite(s): EMS 110 , EMS 111  and EMS 113  
    Lecture Hours: 32 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate knowledge and skills related to medical emergencies and trauma management.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge and skills related to medical emergencies and trauma management as defined in the Bureau of Health Services of Michigan Department of Consumer and Industry Services requirements in effect for the year of study.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge and skills related to injuries to the head and spine.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge and skills related to injuries to the head and spine as defined in the Bureau of Health Services requirements in effect for the year of study.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge and skills related to injuries to the musculoskeletal system.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge and skills related to injuries to the musculoskeletal system as defined in the Bureau of Health Services requirements in effect for the year of study.
    4. Demonstrate knowledge and skills related to rescue and extrication.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge and skills related to rescue and extrication as required and defined in the Bureau of Health Services requirements in effect for the year of study.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge by successfully completing the National Registry Exam.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge related to injuries to the musculoskeletal system; the head and spine; the musculoskeletal system; and related to rescue and extrication by successfully completing the National Registry Exam.
  
  •  

    EMS 113 - Basic Emergency Medical Technician Field Experience

    Credits: 2
    Fourth in a sequence of four courses to prepare a student as a Basic EMT. Requires Clinical rotation for EMT (hospital & ambulance). Successful completion of this course and EMS 110 , EMS 111  and EMS 112  enables the student to apply for and take the National Registry exam to qualify for state licensing as a Basic EMT. To successfully pass this course, the student will be required to successfully complete the National Registry exam and obtain a state license. Fees for this exam and license are the responsibility of the student.

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission
    Corequisite(s): EMS 110 , EMS 111  and EMS 112  
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 32
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Observe and assist with basic emergency treatment techniques in emergency service facilities.
      1. Observe and assist with basic emergency treatment techniques in emergency service facilities as required and defined in the Bureau of Health Services of Michigan Department of Consumer and Industry Services requirements in effect for the year of study.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge by successfully completing the National Registry exam and obtaining a state license.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge by successfully completing the National Registry exam and obtaining a state license.
  
  •  

    EMS 290-299 - Special Projects in Emergency Medical Service


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Engineering

  
  •  

    EGR 100 - Careers in Engineering

    Credits: 1
    Studies Engineering as a profession as well as a career. Surveys the various fields such as Mechanical, Electrical, Civil, etc. Compares an engineer with a technologist. Reviews work responsibilities, ethics, the work environment, challenges, salaries. (15-0)

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 4
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Discuss the history, the present status, and future challenges of the field of engineering.
      1. List 6 great structures or inventions produced by engineers in the past.
      2. List 5 dilemmas or challenges facing engineers today.
      3. List 4 long-range challenges facing the engineering profession in the future.
    2. Differentiate between the engineering profession and other professions.
      1. Describe the conceptual framework of the code of ethics of the engineering profession.
      2. List the advantages of belonging to a professional society.
      3. Compare engineering with science.
      4. Compare engineering with the law profession.
      5. Compare engineering with the medical profession.
    3. Demonstrate basic skill in retrieving information and organizing it for a research report.
      1. Develop a bibliography for the report using the Delta College Library computers
      2. Develop a bibliography for the report using the Internet World Wide Web
    4. Differentiate among the various engineering disciplines.
      1. Compare the education of Mechanical, Electrical, Civil, Chemical, and other engineering disciplines.
      2. Compare the types of jobs performed by Mechanical, Electrical, Civil, Chemical, and other engineering disciplines.
    5. Explain the engineering career spectrum.
      1. Distinguish between:
        1. Scientist and engineer
        2. Engineer and technologist
        3. Technologist and technician
        4. Technician and skilled trades
      2. Explain how all members work together as a professional team.
    6. Compare and contrast the different kids of job titles engineers may hold as to:
      1. Education needed
      2. Work environment
      3. Output and accomplishments
        1. Research
        2. Testing
        3. Facilities
        4. Management
        5. Development
        6. Production/Mfg.- Examples: injection molding, robotics, automation, CNC, etc.
        7. Sales
        8. Consulting
        9. Design
        10. Construction
        11. Education
    7. Identify the current demands in engineering job placement.
      1. List 8 of the personal traits of engineers most in demand by employers.
      2. Identify which engineering disciplines are currently most in demand.
      3. Cite trends in engineering job placements.
      4. Quote current engineering job salaries.
    8. Interpret written statements, question the assumptions or data the point of view is based on, and evaluate the reasoning behind it.
      1. Identify important questions of a written or spoken text.
      2. Clarify and analyze the meanings of words, phrases, and statements.
      3. Clarify issues, value judgments and conclusions.
      4. Write and speak critically: create, develop, and convey in written or spoken form clear and supported viewpoints based on critical questioning.
      5. Develop and question alternative formulations of a problem.
      6. Identify, analyze and evaluate assumptions.
      7. Recognize bias, narrowness, and contradictions in a point of view.
      8. Generate and assess solutions to problems.
      9. Analyze and evaluate arguments or reasoning.
      10. Distinguish strong from weak reasons.
      11. Evaluate the credibility of sources of information.
  
  •  

    EGR 101 - Engineering Design and Analysis

    Credits: 1
    Applies critical thinking concepts to engineering problem solving strategies. Uses student work teams to solve a problem or develop a design on paper using the engineering design process. Uses research techniques on the Web or library, brainstorming for idea generation, criterion selection, and presents information in an oral and written format.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 4
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the procedures used in conducting and engineering design.
      1. Define (and redefine) the problem statement so all understand it
      2. Gather information pertinent to the design using the Web, library, magazines, trade journals, personal interviews, books
      3. Participate effectively in a team setting, maintaining a productive atmosphere, committing to assignments out of class time
      4. Brainstorm new ideas as a team. Generate a multiple of ideas
      5. Use a criterion matrix to compare the 3 or 4 best ideas
      6. Select the one best idea and develop its concept sufficiently for presentation
      7. Team members communicate with each other via email or phone
    2. Develop skill in presentation.
      1. Develop CAD drawings or PowerPoint demonstration for the oral presentation
      2. Write a concise report outlining the pros and cons of the final 3 or 4 ideas, and detail the selected design. The written report is embellished with sketches, drawings, and analyses using math relations
    3. Demonstrate familiarity with engineering software used in design and analysis.
      1. Become familiar with Design for Assembly by Boothroyd-Dewhurst
      2. Become familiar with other software such as HydCalc, r Beam2D, and Finite Element Analysis
  
  •  

    EGR 165 - Introduction to Engineering Graphics

    Credits: 4
    Studies the graphic language applied to mechanical and civil engineering design. Develops skills in orthographic projection, multi-view drawings, isometric drafting, sectioning, auxiliary views, revolutions, developments, ANSI dimensioning, and tolerancing, annotation and descriptive geometry. Uses computer-aided drafting and analysis. Credit can be earned in EGR 165 or EGR 166  but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 4
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 60
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Letter and construct multi-views of single mechanical components using orthographic projection using standard drafting instruments, pencils, and CAD.
      1. Make measurements with inch and metric scales throughout the course
      2. Draw geometric constructions as used on engineering drawings
      3. Draw technical sketches using the principles of orthographic projection to construct multi-view and isometric drawings of objects with normal, inclined, oblique, cylindrical, and other types of surfaces
    2. Construct sectional, auxiliary, and revolution, views of single mechanical components using standard drafting instruments, pencils, and CAD.
      1. Select and apply conventional practices of projection, sectional views, intersections of surfaces and solid geometric shapes
      2. Perform white printing and make copies of student executed original plots
      3. Make large format plots of drawings on a plotter
    3. Dimension and calculate tolerances for assembled mechanical components.
      1. Draw dimensioned, toleranced and annotated, drawings of parts using the latest ANSI standards
      2. Calculate limit dimensions for various classes of ANSI fit by using the appropriate ANSI tables
    4. Draw and dimension multi-views of an assembly of mechanical components using orthographic projection.
      1. Make measurements with inch and metric scales
      2. Draw geometric constructions as used on engineering drawings
      3. Draw technical sketches using the principles of orthographic projection to construct multi-view drawings of objects with normal, inclined, oblique, cylindrical, and other types of surfaces
      4. Draw a set of project working drawings of an assembly of parts and the detailed individual parts. Examples may include tools, jigs, fixturing, injection molds, etc.
    5. Construct views and projections of elements using principles of descriptive geometry.
      1. Draw solutions to spatial relationships between points, lines, and planes by applying methods of descriptive geometry
      2. Construct graphical analysis to determine displacements, velocities, and/or accelerations, of mechanical parts
      3. Draw primary auxiliary projections
      4. Construct graphic revolution of views about principle axes of projection
  
  •  

    EGR 166 - Engineering Graphics

    Credits: 4
    Studies the engineering graphic language applied to mechanical design, review of multiview and isometric drafting, and the geometry of drawing. Develops skills in using orthographic projections, sectional views, auxiliary views and revolutions. Applies dimensioning to gears, bearings, fasteners, cams, etc. Uses computer-aided methods in drafting and analysis for all topics studied. Credit can be earning in EGR 166 or EGR 165  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 4 and one year of high school mechanical drafting with final grade of C (2.0) or higher
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 60
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Create, record, and communicate design ideas using American National Standards Institute (ANSI) practices.
      1. Identify and demonstrate correct use of the drafting standards as they apply to sketches and drawings.
      2. Create one view, multiview, and pictorial sketches.
      3. Identify and correctly draw conventional line symbols to make sketches and drawings.
      4. Neatly place hand-made standard letters and numbers on sketches and drawings.
      5. Make free-hand well proportioned sketches of simple machine part shapes to include circle, arc, and polygon plane figures, and polyhedral solids.
    2. Read and describe with standard dimensioning practices the size of objects by using decimal inch and metric scales to place and specify conventional numeric dimensions and notes.
      1. Correctly demonstrate the ANSI concepts of contour dimensioning and geometric breakdown for giving size and location of various geometric shapes.
      2. Identify the features and parts of dimension information.
      3. Distinguish between size and location dimensions.
      4. Create and read technical drawings at any specified scale.
      5. Use ANSI standard practices to place text information to drawings.
    3. Demonstrate and apply industry standards and best practices applied in engineering graphics.
      1. Interpret, read, and draw any or all of the six standard orthographic views using conventional practices.
      2. Correctly transfer height, width, and depth distances between views.
      3. Display correct conventional representations of standard geometric features.
      4. Identify and correctly display hidden, center, and visible lines in all views.
      5. Draw and identify normal, inclined, and oblique lines and surfaces in all views.
      6. Plan drawing views to fit properly within the sheet area at the intended scale.
    4. Follow ANSI practices to make technical drawings with conventional sectional views.
      1. Demonstrate understanding of cutting-plane theory by correctly placing the cutting-plane line within technical drawings.
      2. List the names and identify the seven standard types of section views.
      3. Demonstrate understanding of standard practices for conventional features.
      4. Consistently draw correctly sectioned views when provided two orthographic views.
      5. Demonstrate correct hidden line practices for sectioned views.
      6. Correctly represent and place conventional break symbols, section-lining and view identification where necessary.
    5. Make primary auxiliary views to correctly display inclined and oblique orthographic geometric features.
      1. Explain and demonstrate the method for placing fold lines to project:
        1. Point view of a true-length line.
        2. True-length of an oblique line.
        3. True-shape of an inclined surface.
        4. Edge-view of an oblique surface.
      2. Define width, height, and depth auxiliary views.
    6. Demonstrate and apply industry standards applied to mechanical components.
      1. Demonstrate proper design and modeling of gears, bearings, fasteners, cams, fit tolerances, welds, housings, seals and/or additional mechanical components.
      2. Demonstrate proper design and modeling of sub-assemblies and/or assemblies of mechanical components.
      3. Demonstrate understanding of standard practices for conventional features.
      4. Consistently draw correctly sectioned views when provided two orthographic views.
      5. Demonstrate correct hidden line practices for sectioned views.
      6. Correctly represent and place conventional break symbols, section-lining, and view identification where necessary.
  
  •  

    EGR 215 - Engineering Mechanics, Statics

    Credits: 3


    Develops skill in analyzing machine elements and structures, which are in static equilibrium. Solves forces and moments in 2D and 3D problems using vector calculus, integration, and algebra/trigonometry techniques. Includes concepts of centroids and moments of inertia and applies to mechanical linkages, disks and shafts, beams in bending, screw threads, trusses, frames, and vehicles.

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 161  and PHY 211  both with a minimum grade of “C”
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Demonstrate logic reasoning and the efficient use of tools to solve statics problems.

         A.          Formulate a step-by-step approach to the complete understanding of the problem and its final solution.

         B.          Develop a Free Body Diagram (FBD) of the component studied such as robotics and automation.

         C.          Identify all pertinent variable son the FBD, or on sketches.

         D.          Extract from the engineering mechanics body of knowledge the theory and formulas relating the variables of the problem in question.

         E.          Make assumptions about variables not specified.

         F.          Solve the problem, obtaining a single answer or a range of acceptable answers, using a hand calculator or a computer.

     2.    Manipulate vectors in 2D and 3D space as methodology for setting up a problem for ultimate solution.

         A.          Differentiate between scalars and vectors.

         B.          Calculate the components of a vector with respect to Cartesian Coordinates in 2D or 3D space.

         C.          Find the resultant vector from given components with respect to Cartesian Coordinates in 2D or 3D space.

         D.          Calculate the dot product of 2 vectors in space.

         E.          Calculate the cross product of 2 vectors in space.

         F.           Calculate the mixed triple product of 3 vectors in space.

    3.    Analyze a system of forces applied at a point on an object in 2D or 3D space.

         A.          Develop a FBD of a system of forces, showing all forces as vectors.

         B.          Solve for an unknown force using the conditions of equilibrium.

         C.          Calculate unknown forces of a 2D system using components.

         D.          Calculate unknown forces of a 3D system using vector manipulation.

    4.    Analyze moments or couples applied on an object.

         A.          Describe the moment vector in 3D space.

         B.          Calculate the moment of a force applied at a distance from the point in question.

         C.          Determine the moment of a force about a line in 3D space.

         D.          Calculate the moment of a couple.

         E.          Develop equivalent systems of forces and couples.

    5.    Analyze an object known to be in equilibrium.

         A.          Calculate unknown forces of an object in equilibrium.

         B.          Identify redundant supports in a statically-indeterminate object.

         C.          Identify improper supports in a statically-indeterminate object.

         D.          Identify 2-Force or 3-Force members in a system of objects to simplify the solution.

    6.    Analyze structures or a system of members in equilibrium.

         A.          Calculate the force and its sense (compression or tension) of a specified member of a 2D truss by the method of joints.

         B.          Calculate the force and its sense of a specified member of a 2D truss by the method of sections.

         C.          Calculate the force in the members of a 3D truss.

         D.          Calculate unknown forces or dimensions of a frame or machine known to be n equilibrium.

     7.    Find the centroid or center of mass of an object.

         A.          Calculate the centroid of a system of line segments.

         B.          Calculate the centroid of an area by considering it as a composite of simple geometric shapes.

         C.          Calculate the centroid of an area using the integration method.

         D.          Calculate the center of mass of a 3D object using the composite method.

         E.          Calculate the center of mass of a 3D object using the integration method.

         F.           Calculate the surface area of a body of revolution using the Pappus Theorem.

     8.    Find the moment of inertia of an object.

         A.          Find the moment of inertia of an area bout its principle axes.

         B.          Find the moment of inertia of an area about any axis in space using the parallel-axis theorem.

         C.          Find the moment of inertia or mass moment of inertia by the method of integration.

         D.          Identify what kind of engineering problems make use of the moment of inertia or the mass moment of inertia.

     9.    Analyze systems, which have applied distributed forces.

         A.          Calculate the internal moment at some point in a beam in bending.

         B.          Calculate the internal shear forces in a beam in bending.

         C.          Develop the Shear Force Diagram of a beam in bending.

         D.          Develop the Bending Moment Diagram of a beam in bending.

         E.          Determine the force on a body exposed to liquid static pressure.

      10. Analyze friction problems.

         A.          Differentiate between coefficient of friction and angle of friction.

         B.          Calculate forces in wedge problems.

         C.          Calculate forces or dimensions in screw thread problems.

         D.          Analyze friction in journal bearings.

         E.          Analyze friction in thrust bearings.

         F.          Calculate forces in belt drives.

  
  •  

    EGR 216 - Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics

    Credits: 3
    Aims at students needing a second course in mechanics for engineers. Covers kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies in 2D and 3D. Uses force/acceleration, energy and momentum methods and applications to machine elements and structures in mechanical engineering.

    Prerequisite(s): EGR 215  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate logic reasoning and the efficient use of tools to solve dynamics problems.
      1. Formulate a step-by-step approach to the complete understanding of the problem and its final solution.
      2. Develop a Free Body Diagram (FBD) of the component studied such as robotics and automation.
      3. Identify all pertinent variables on the FBD, or on sketches.
      4. Extract from the engineering mechanics body of knowledge the theory and formulas relating the variables of the problem in question.
      5. Make assumptions about variables not specified.
      6. Solve the problem, obtaining a single answer or a range of acceptable answers, using a hand calculator or a computer.
    2. Analyze the motion of a point.
      1. Calculate straight-line motion problems.
      2. Calculate curvilinear motion problems.
      3. Calculate relative motion problems.
    3. Analyze a non-rotating object, treating it as a point in space, calculating the force or acceleration when given the mass (FMA).
      1. Calculate straight-line motion FMA problems in Cartesian Coordinates.
      2. Calculate curvilinear motion FMA problems using Normal/Tangential Coordinates.
      3. Calculate curvilinear motion FMA problems using Polar Coordinates.
    4. Analyze a non-rotating object as a point in space using energy methods.
      1. Evaluate the work done on or by an object.
      2. Calculate the power consumed.
      3. Calculate the kinetic energy or potential energy of an object or system of objects.
      4. Calculate displacement or force in a system of objects using energy methods.
      5. Define conservation of energy.
    5. Analyze a non-rotating object as a point in space using momentum methods.
      1. Define conservation of momentum, and distinguish between systems exhibiting this and those exhibiting conservation of energy.
      2. Calculate problems using linear impulse and momentum relations.
      3. Calculate problems using angular impulse and momentum relations.
      4. Calculate direct central impact problems.
      5. Calculate mass flow problems, either fluid or granular, using impulse and momentum methods.
    6. Analyze the 2D motion of a non-deformable object, called a rigid body (RB), rotating and translating through space (General Motion).
      1. Calculate problems of disks, wheels, or other bodies rotating about a fixed axis.
      2. Calculate velocities and accelerations of a RB in general motion.
      3. Calculate absolute and relative velocities and accelerations of 2 bodies in sliding contact with each other.
      4. Analyze the kinematics of mechanical power systems such as an internal combustion engine, a 4-bar linkage, a Geneva wheel, a gear transmission, or a slide bar.
    7. Analyze the force/mass/acceleration relations of a RB, or a system of bodies, undergoing 2D general motion.
      1. Calculate the moment of inertia of a body.
      2. Calculate a force or torque of a RB undergoing 2D general motion.
    8. Analyze a RB, or a system of bodies, undergoing 2D general motion, using energy methods.
      1. Evaluate the work done on or by the body(s).
      2. Calculate the kinetic energy or potential energy of the body(s).
      3. Calculate displacement, force, or velocity of a body(s).
    9. Analyze a RB, or a system of bodies, undergoing 2D general motion, using momentum methods
      1. Calculate problems using linear impulse and momentum relations.
      2. Calculate problems using angular impulse and momentum relations.
      3. Calculate the coefficient of restitution of 2 bodies during impact.
    10. Define the important relations in the kinematics of rigid bodies in 3D motion
    11. Analyze the motion of mechanical vibrating systems
      1. Calculate the natural frequency of a system.
      2. Calculate the damping effect of a damped vibrating system.
      3. Calculate the forcing frequency/natural frequency relation of a forced vibration system.
  
  •  

    EGR 221 - Engineering Materials

    Credits: 3
    Introduces material classification based on their structure, properties and performance in various applications. Examines the micro and macro structures of metals, polymers, glasses, ceramics and composites and their structural relationship to their properties and performance in various applications Focuses on phase diagrams, microstructural changes caused by solid-state transformations, elastic and plastic behavior, the effects of the environment, and application selection criteria.

    Prerequisite(s): CHM 111 , MTH 161  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe the structure and atomic bonding of crystalline and amorphous solids.
      1. Identify the ionic, covalent, metallic, hydrogen and van der Waals bonds and relate them to material structures.
      2. Identify the differences in atomic/molecular structure between crystalline and noncrystalline materials.
      3. Compare the various unit cell configurations and relate them to material structure and properties.
      4. Distinguish between single crystal and polycrystalline materials.
    2. Describe imperfections in solid materials.
      1. Identify both vacancy and interstitial crystalline defects.
      2. Relate crystalline imperfections to material properties.
    3. Describe mechanical, physical and chemical properties of materials.
      1. Identify the mechanical, physical and chemical properties of materials.
      2. Relate the mechanical, physical and chemical properties of materials to material behavior.
      3. Describe mechanical testing of material properties.
      4. Relate ductility, working stress and hardness to manufacturing and performance criteria.
    4. Describe strengthening mechanisms in materials.
      1. Identify mechanisms of strengthening including solid solution strengthening, strain hardening and grain size reduction.
      2. Discuss diffusion strengthening and relate it to material properties.
    5. Describe phase diagrams.
      1. List the various components of phase diagrams.
      2. Relate the binary phase diagram to phase compositions.
      3. Use the iron-carbon phase diagram to identify phase transformations and critical temperatures.
    6. Describe the forms, mechanisms and environments of material failure.
      1. Identify corrosion mechanisms in various materials.
      2. Characterize ductile and brittle fractures, fatigue, creep and electrochemical corrosion cells.
      3. List the corrosion mechanisms for metals, polymers, glasses, ceramics and composites.
    7. Develop an ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing.
      1. Analyze the information within an appropriate context.
      2. Organize written information into tables, charts and graphs to facilitate interpretation.
      3. Correctly interpret the information contained in charts and graphs.
      4. Draw conclusions from the information contained in charts and graphs.
      5. Project trends from charts and graphs.
      6. Use writing tasks to promote learning.
    8. Think critically.
      1. Compare analogous cases, issues, principles, theories, and contexts.
      2. Generate and collect relevant observable or measurable information or data.
      3. Organize and present information or data in tables, charts and graphs.
      4. Recognize bias, narrowness, and contradictions in a point of view.
      5. Evaluate the significance and quality of questions and their formulations.
      6. Identify criteria or standards appropriate for evaluating ideas, theories and models.
  
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    EGR 235 - Circuit Analysis

    Credits: 4
    Studies simple electrical components, rules, theorems and laws applicable to AC and DC circuits. Applies Kirchoff’s laws, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems, superposition, current and voltage divider rules, etc., Introduces circuit design techniques further study in transient circuits and three-phase power systems.

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 161  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Explain basic electrical concepts.
      1. Define and use units for current, voltage, power, and energy.
      2. Draw schematic diagrams for circuits containing passive components.
      3. Write expressions for v,i relationships and energy stored by capacitors and inductors.
      4. Describe capacitance and inductance, and analyze basic R/L and R/C transient circuit effects.
      5. Describe dependent sources, and analyze basic R/L and R/C transient circuit effects.
    2. Apply basic theorems and analysis techniques to solve electric circuits.
      1. Recognize and analyze series and parallel circuits.
      2. Use analysis techniques to determine the current, voltage, and power values in dc and ac circuits.
      3. Represent sinusoidal waveforms with phasors.
      4. Calculate ac impedance and steady-state ac circuit response, and construct phasor diagrams for simple series and parallel circuits.
      5. Use Ohm’s law, voltage and current divider relationships, superposition, and Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems to analyze passive circuits.
      6. Use Mesh and Nodal Analysis techniques to analyze passive circuits.
      7. Calculate and sketch the voltages and currents in R/L and R/C transient circuits.
      8. Define and calculate ac power factor, as well as real, reactive, and apparent power.
    3. Use basic electronic instrumentation to measure circuit properties.
      1. Wire basic series and parallel circuits.
      2. Use a digital multimeter to measure voltage, current, resistance, and frequency.
      3. Set a signal generator to provide a desired voltage and frequency signal.
      4. Use an oscilloscope to obtain voltage signals, and measure voltage, frequency, and phase.
    4. Use computational and electronics simulation tools.
      1. Perform ac phasor computations in polar or rectangular form using calculators and MathCAD or similar software.
      2. Interpret PSpice or similar simulations of dc, transient, and ac circuits.
      3. Record data in electronic spreadsheets to generate graphs and tables.
  
  •  

    EGR 290-299 - Special Projects in Engineering


    Meets MTA Requirement: None
  
  •  

    EGR 320 - Mechanics of Materials

    Credits: 3
    Considers effects of tension and compression, shear, torsion, bending and buckling loads on structures and machine members and their consequent effects on stress distributions and deformations. Emphasizes design as well as analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): EGR 215  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Calculate internal stresses of a structure/machine component under an external load.
      1. Determine normal stress under axial load.
      2. Determine shear stress under shear load.
      3. Determine shear stress under torsion load.
      4. Determine normal and shear stresses under bending load.
      5. Determine normal stress due to temperature effects.
    2. Calculate deformations of a structure/machine component under an external load.
      1. Determine deformation under axial load.
      2. Determine angle of twist of a shaft in torsion.
      3. Determine deflection of a beam in bending.
      4. Determine deformation due to temperature effects.
    3. Develop graphical, math, and computer skills in solving engineering problems.
      1. Apply Algebra, Trig, or Calculus to all problems.
      2. Draw Shear and Bending Moment Diagrams.
      3. Draw the Mohr’s Circle of a generalized stress element under load.
    4. Design a structure/machine component to withstand a given external load.
      1. Design the diameter of a transmission shaft in torsion and bending.
      2. Design the cross-section of a beam in bending.
      3. Design a bolted joint under tension.
    5. Calculate the critical load to induce buckling in a column.
    6. Calculate the tensile/compressive or shear stresses of the elements in a loaded joint.
      1. Demonstrations of theretical principles will utilize tension/compression load frame, torsion machine, and impact tester.
    7. Apply the superposition principle to calculate reactions of statically indeterminate members such as bars in tension, shafts in torsion, or beams in bending.

English

  
  •  

    ENG 104W - Applied Spelling Techniques

    Credits: 2
    Emphasizes English spelling patterns and sequences as well as techniques for approaching spelling for adult learners. Shows students how to apply critical thinking strategies to identify and meet their individual spelling needs.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Discover the organizing principles of the English spelling system.
      1. Recognize that the system in English spelling is based on a combination of sound, syntax, meaning, and tradition.
      2. Identify principles of English phonics.
      3. Discover the usefulness and the limitations of spelling rules.
      4. Define the problems associated with homophones and develop strategies to solve them.
    2. Demonstrate awareness of self as speller.
      1. Analyze individual spelling habits and performance.
      2. Select concepts and strategies that will strengthen individual spelling habits and performance.
      3. Deliberately and regular apply concepts and strategies that will strengthen individual spelling.
    3. Build repertoire of words that are useful in academic and workplace writing.
      1. Master words frequently used by most writers.
      2. Identify and master words frequently used in courses and workplaces for which individual will be writing.
    4. Participate in “writing to learn” activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
  
  •  

    ENG 105W - English as a Second Language

    Credits: 5
    Aids the speaker of English as a second language with intermediate and advanced English language skills to communicate in academic and social settings. Includes speaking, listening, reading, composition, non-verbal communication and American culture.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 75 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use English orally and in writing to interact effectively in an academic setting.
      1. Follow oral and written directions, implicit and explicit.
      2. Request and provide clarification
      3. Participate in whole-class and small-group discussions
      4. Ask and answer questions
      5. Explain actions 1F. Respond to other people’s ideas and opinions
      6. Express likes, dislikes and needs
    2. Use English to obtain and process information in spoken and written form
      1. Compare and contrast information
      2. Gather information orally and in writing
      3. Select, connect and explain information
      4. Analyze, synthesize and infer from information
      5. Respond to the work of peers and others
      6. Hypothesize and predict
      7. Formulate and ask questions
      8. Explain and produce vocabulary in context
    3. Use appropriate reading and oral strategies to construct and apply academic knowledge
      1. Connect new information to that previously learned
      2. Seek assistance appropriately
      3. Scan resources to determine appropriateness to topic
      4. Skim texts to determine key points
      5. Take notes to summarize main points of oral or written information
      6. Rephrase and summarize to check comprehension
    4. Use English in socially and culturally appropriate ways in speaking and writing
      1. Use formality appropriate to audience and setting
      2. Recognize and use standard English and slang appropriately
      3. Respond to and use idioms appropriately
      4. Respond to and use humor appropriately
      5. Determine appropriate topics for interaction
      6. Make polite requests
      7. Give and receive compliments, show gratitude, apologize, express anger or impatience, and interrupt politely
      8. Interpret and respond appropriately to nonverbal cues and body language
      9. Use acceptable tone, volume, stress and intonation in various settings
      10. Recognize and adjust behavior in response to nonverbal cues
    5. Participate in “writing to learn” activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
  
  •  

    ENG 107W - Elements of Grammar

    Credits: 2
    Acquaints or refreshes students with useful, basic grammatical concepts and options in written language. Includes illustration and practice of sentence structure, usage, and punctuation. Strengthens writing skill and language awareness in college or in the work force.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Recognize distinctions between spoken and written English.
      1. Recognize the value of oral patterns of communication.
      2. Recognize the inappropriateness of certain oral patterns for written texts.
    2. Apply the design of the fundamental building blocks of language: clauses, phrases, and sentences.
      1. Define the make-up of clauses, phrases, and sentences
      2. Explain the nature and usefulness of these building blocks.
      3. Apply normal order of words in these building blocks and recognize possible variations in design, as well as the functions of variations.
    3. Demonstrate relationships among clauses, phrases, and sentences and recognize options in using them.
      1. Expand the use of coordination from informal stringing together of ideas to crafting well-formed series of ideas.
      2. Discover the resources of subordination to connect, focus, and develop ideas.
      3. Discover the power of modification in detailed, precise description and development of ideas.
    4. Apply punctuation as a reader-oriented system.
      1. Explain why and how the comma is used to meet readers’ expectations for clearly readable sentence structure.
      2. Recognize common misuses of the comma or period as breeches in sentence structure.
      3. Explain how transitional words, phrases, and clauses are punctuated for readers.
      4. Describe the role of apostrophes in contractions and of apostrophes and hyphens in creating adjectives.
      5. Recognize subtle options in punctuating:
        1. Dashes, parentheses, the colon, and brackets
        2. Distinctions in the function of the semicolon and the colon.
  
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    ENG 111 - College Composition I

    Credits: 3
    Develops fluent, effective, and confident writers. Practices the process of composing; generating ideas; shaping and evaluating writing. Uses reading and language awareness to further the development of writing. Credit may be earned in only one of: ENG 111, ENG 111A , ENG 111B , ENG 111C  or ENG 111H .

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4 and WRITING LEVEL 4
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Write effectively for appropriate rhetorical situations.
      1. Use the writing process: pre-write, write, and revise.
      2. Write with clarity.
      3. Select, organize, and present details to support a main idea.
      4. Use generalizations and details effectively.
    2. Use writing tasks that involve both reading and writing.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to derive meaning from a piece of reading.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to distinguish between the meaning one makes of a text and the author’s intended meaning.
      3. Paraphrase and summarize accurately.
    3. Develop critical thinking skills
      1. Explore the relationships among language, knowledge, and power.
      2. Assess the progress revealed in a body of work.
      3. Develop critical thinking skills and apply them to reading texts.
  
  •  

    ENG 111A - Writing Methods/College Composition I

    Credits: 3
    Develops fluent, effective, and confident writers. Practices the process of composing; generating ideas; shaping and evaluating writing. Uses reading and language awareness to further the development of their writing. This course will transfer to universities and partially fulfill the college’s English composition requirement. Credit may be earned in onlyone of ENG 111 , ENG 111A, ENG 111B , ENG 111C  or ENG 111H .

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Write effectively for appropriate rhetorical situations.
      1. Use the writing process: pre-write, write, and revise.
      2. Write with clarity.
      3. Select, organize, and present details to support a main idea.
      4. Use generalizations and details effectively.
    2. Read effectively.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to derive meaning of text from multiple perspectives.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to distinguish between the meaning one makes of a text and the author’s intended purpose.
      3. Show comprehension by accurately paraphrasing and summarizing a wide variety of texts.
    3. Develop critical thinking skills.
      1. Explore the relationships among language, knowledge, and power.
      2. Develop critical thinking skills and apply them to reading texts.
      3. Demonstrate intermediate skills for information literacy, including accessing, analyzing, and using resources.
  
  •  

    ENG 111B - College Composition I

    Credits: 3
    Develops fluent, effective, and confident writers. Practices the process of composing; generating ideas; shaping and evaluating writing. Uses reading and language awareness to further the development of writing. ENG 111B is intended to only be taken in a learning community combination. Credit may be earned in only one of: ENG 111 , ENG 111A , ENG 111B, ENG 111C  or ENG 111H .

    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites will be set by the corequisite courses
    Corequisite(s): As designated in relevant Learning Community.
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Write effectively for appropriate rhetorical situations.
      1. Use the writing process: pre-write, write, and revise.
      2. Write with clarity.
      3. Select, organize, and present details to support a main idea.
      4. Use generalizations and details effectively.
    2. Read effectively.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to derive meaning of text from multiple perspectives.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to distinguish between the meaning one makes of a text and the author’s intended purpose.
      3. Show comprehension by accurately paraphrasing and summarizing a wide variety of texts.
    3. Develop critical thinking skills.
      1. Explore the relationships among language, knowledge, and power.
      2. Develop critical thinking skills and apply them to reading texts.
      3. Demonstrate intermediate skills for information literacy, including accessing, analyzing, and using resources.
  
  •  

    ENG 111C - Writing Methods/College Composition I

    Credits: 3
    Develops fluent, effective, and confident writers. Practices the process of composing; generating ideas; shaping and evaluating writing. Uses reading and language awareness to further the development of writing. This course will transfer to universities and partially fulfill the college’s English composition requirement. ENG 111C is intended to only be taken in a learning community combination. Credit may be earned in only one of: ENG 111 , ENG 111A , ENG 111B , ENG 111C or ENG 111H . (45-30)

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): As designated in relevant Learning Community.
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Write effectively for appropriate rhetorical situations.
      1. Use the writing process: pre-write, write, and revise.
      2. Write with clarity.
      3. Select, organize, and present details to support a main idea.
      4. Use generalizations and details effectively.
    2. Read effectively.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to derive meaning of text from multiple perspectives.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to distinguish between the meaning one makes of a text and the author’s intended purpose.
      3. Show comprehension by accurately paraphrasing and summarizing a wide variety of texts.
    3. Develop critical thinking skills.
      1. Explore the relationships among language, knowledge, and power.
      2. Develop critical thinking skills and apply them to reading texts.
      3. Demonstrate intermediate skills for information literacy, including accessing, analyzing, and using resources.
  
  •  

    ENG 111H - College Composition I - Honors

    Credits: 3
    Develops fluent, effective, and confident writers. Practices the process of composing; generating ideas; shaping and evaluating writing. Uses reading and language awareness to further the development of writing. Provides opportunities to engage in independent intellectual inquiry to foster deeper learning. Credit may be earned in only ENG 111  or ENG 111A  or ENG 111B  or ENG 111C  or ENG 111H.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL4 and WRITING LEVEL 4 or permission of the Honors Office
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Write effectively for appropriate rhetorical situations.
      1. Use the writing process: pre-write, write, and revise.
      2. Write with clarity.
      3. Select, organize, and present details to support a main idea.
      4. Use generalizations and details effectively.
    2. Read effectively.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to derive meaning of text from multiple perspectives.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to distinguish between the meaning one makes of a text and the author’s intended purpose.
      3. Show comprehension by accurately paraphrasing and summarizing a wide variety of texts.
    3. Develop critical thinking skills.
      1. Explore the relationships among language, knowledge, and power.
      2. Develop critical thinking skills and apply them to reading texts.
      3. Demonstrate intermediate skills for information literacy, including accessing, analyzing, and using resources.
    4. Practice intellectual curiosity and apply it in independent ways to deepen their understanding of course material.
      1. Complete at least one significant project, either individually or as a group depending on the instructor’s discretion, and work with the instructor to assure that the project demonstrates intellectual curiosity and academic rigor
      2. Actively engage with their peers in conversations, seminars, or in other formats at the instructor’s discretion to enhance the depth of knowledge of the relevant material
  
  •  

    ENG 112 - College Composition II

    Credits: 3
    Expands abilities and versatility in reading, language awareness, and composing for a range of purposes, audiences, and situations, including academic research writing. Credit may be earned in only one of ENG 112 or ENG 112A  or ENG 112H .

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and a minimum grade of “C” in any approved college level composition I course
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Write effective college compositions.
      1. Consider audience and purpose.
      2. Plan writing processes, using effective strategies and techniques.
      3. Include a clear articulation of the important ideas.
      4. Select organize, and present details to support a main idea.
      5. Demonstrate the ability to move between generalization and detail.
      6. Write effective introductions and conclusions.
      7. Employ the appropriate writing conventions.
    2. Use writing tasks that involve both reading and writing.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to derive meaning from a piece of writing.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to distinguish between the meaning one makes of a text and the author’s intended meaning.
      3. Interpret reading and writing task in such a way as to invest them with personal significance, thereby creating ways to make reading and writing vital activities in a lifetime of learning.
      4. Demonstrate critical thinking skills.
      5. Understand the relationship among language, knowledge, and power.
    3. Work with others, both in and out of the classroom.
      1. Reflect upon and assess one’s own work as well as the work of others.
      2. Show willingness to work with others, seeking help where necessary and offering help where it is sought.
    4. Write an academic research composition.
      1. Locate information using a variety of search tools and methods, including library sources.
      2. Select source material appropriate to the writing context.
      3. Integrate their own opinions with various source points of view.
      4. Quote, paraphrase, and summarize accurately.
      5. Document sources in conventional style with parenthetical references in text.
  
  •  

    ENG 112A - Writing Methods/College Composition II

    Credits: 3
    Expands abilities and versatility in reading, language awareness, and composing for a range of purposes, audiences, and situations, including academic research writing. This course will transfer to universities and partially fulfill the college’s English composition requirement. Credit may be earned in only one of ENG 112  or ENG 112A or ENG 112H .

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and a minimum grade of “C” in any approved college level composition I course
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Write effective college compositions.
      1. Consider audience and purpose.
      2. Plan writing processes, using effective strategies and techniques.
      3. Include a clear articulation of the important ideas.
      4. Select organize, and present details to support a main idea.
      5. Demonstrate the ability to move between generalization and detail.
      6. Write effective introductions and conclusions.
      7. Employ the appropriate writing conventions.
    2. Use writing tasks that involve both reading and writing.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to derive meaning from a piece of writing.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to distinguish between the meaning one makes of a text and the author’s intended meaning.
      3. Interpret reading and writing task in such a way as to invest them with personal significance, thereby creating ways to make reading and writing vital activities in a lifetime of learning.
      4. Demonstrate critical thinking skills.
      5. Understand the relationship among language, knowledge, and power.
    3. Work with others, both in and out of the classroom.
      1. Reflect upon and assess one’s own work as well as the work of others.
      2. Show willingness to work with others, seeking help where necessary and offering help where it is sought.
    4. Write an academic research composition.
      1. Locate information using a variety of search tools and methods, including library sources.
      2. Select source material appropriate to the writing context.
      3. Integrate their own opinions with various source points of view.
      4. Quote, paraphrase, and summarize accurately.
      5. Document sources in conventional style with parenthetical references in text.
  
  •  

    ENG 112H - College Composition II - Honors

    Credits: 3
    Expands students’ abilities and versatility in reading, language awareness, and composing for a range of purposes, audiences, and situations, including academic research writing. Provides opportunities to engage in independent intellectual inquiry to foster deeper learning. Credit may be earned in only one of ENG 112  or ENG 112A  or ENG 112H.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4, WRITING LEVEL 4 and a minimum grade of “C” grade in any approved college level composition I course or permission of the Honors Office.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Write effective college compositions.
      1. Consider audience and purpose.
      2. Plan writing processes, using effective strategies and techniques.
      3. Include a clear articulation of the important ideas.
      4. Select organize, and present details to support a main idea.
      5. Demonstrate the ability to move between generalization and detail.
      6. Write effective introductions and conclusions.
      7. Employ the appropriate writing conventions.
    2. Use writing tasks that involve both reading and writing.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to derive meaning from a piece of writing.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to distinguish between the meaning one makes of a text and the author’s intended meaning.
      3. Interpret reading and writing task in such a way as to invest them with personal significance, thereby creating ways to make reading and writing vital activities in a lifetime of learning.
      4. Demonstrate critical thinking skills.
      5. Understand the relationship among language, knowledge, and power.
    3. Work with others, both in and out of the classroom.
      1. Reflect upon and assess one’s own work as well as they work of others.
      2. Show willingness to work with others, seeking help where necessary and offering help where it is sought.
    4. Write an academic research composition.
      1. Locate information using a variety of search tools and methods, including library sources.
      2. Select source material appropriate to the writing context.
      3. Integrate their own opinions with various source points of view.
      4. Quote, paraphrase, and summarize accurately.
      5. Document sources in conventional style with parenthetical references in text.
    5. Practice intellectual curiosity and apply it in independent ways to deepen their understanding of course material.
      1. Complete at least one significant project, either individually or as a group depending on the instructor’s discretion, and work with the instructor to assure that the project demonstrates intellectual curiosity and academic rigor.
      2. Actively engage with their peers in conversations, seminars, or in other formats at the instructor’s discretion to enhance the depth of knowledge of the relevant material.
  
  •  

    ENG 113 - Technical Communication

    Credits: 3
    Covers techniques for presentation of technical material in formal and informal written reports, letters and other current forms of business and technical communication. Emphasizes general principles used for successful written communication experiences in the professional world and the development of thinking and organizational skills, with specific applications to technical courses or professional case studies. Credit may be earned in only one of: ENG 113, ENG 113A or ENG 113B.

    Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of “C” in a college level composition I course.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the ability to produce professional correspondence and documents appropriate for a professional setting.
      1. Construct a business letter.
      2. Construct a memo.
      3. Construct a professional researched technical report.
      4. Construct electronic messages.
      5. Incorporate graphic aids appropriately.
    2. Compose effectively for a professional audience and setting.
      1. Use the writing process: pre-write, write, revise, edit.
      2. Write with clarity.
      3. Write with efficiency.
      4. Select, organize and present necessary details to support a main idea.
    3. Produce an employment portfolio.
      1. Construct a resume and other employment correspondence.
      2. Prepare for a professional interview process.
    4. Demonstrate the critical thinking skills required of a professional.
    5. Demonstrate the basic speaking skills required of a professional.
      1. Prepare and deliver an oral presentation.
      2. Give extended oral explanations of work done.
    6. Demonstrate professional conduct.
      1. Exemplify appropriate ethical behavior.
      2. Identify professional liability concerns.
  
  •  

    ENG 115 - Mass Media

    Credits: 3
    Surveys books, newspapers, magazines, recordings, film, radio, television, advertising, public relations and electronics. Includes media history operations, products, current issues and criticisms

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Define basic information about print and electronic media.
      1. Identify the functions of each
      2. Describe the operations of each.
      3. Outline the history of each.
    2. Analyze and research media issues.
      1. Explain the media’s role in society both orally and in writing.
      2. Identify major media issues and write about one in-depth.
    3. Investigate media opportunities.
      1. Describe visits to media sites.
      2. Interview media professionals and write a job description.
    4. Interpret the effectiveness of the media in today’s society.
      1. Evaluate and write about the print and electronic media’s coverage of major news events.
      2. Distinguish between strengths and weaknesses of the media.
  
  •  

    ENG 116 - News Writing

    Credits: 3
    Studies fundamental principles of gathering information and writing basic news stories. Emphasizes the elements of news, the lead, Associated Press style, news sources and structures of news stories.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 115  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand the basic principles of gathering news.
      1. Apply observation skills at a news event.
      2. Apply interviewing skills with a news source.
      3. Apply research skills in the library and on-line.
    2. Understand basic journalistic formats.
      1. Distinguish between fact and opinion.
      2. Recognize elements of news including importance, timeliness, consequence, conflict, humor, the unusual, prominence, proximity and human interest.
      3. Evaluate accuracy of reporting and writing.
    3. Apply concepts and principles of news writing.
      1. Explain parts of a news story: lead, body.
      2. Explain the inverted pyramid format.
      3. Report information with balanced and objective treatment.
    4. Write in journalistic style.
      1. Organize information according to priority.
      2. Compose basic news stories including: single incident story, coming event, accident, fire disaster, speech, obituary, and feature profile.
      3. Edit stories in Associated Press style.
    5. Evaluate written work.
      1. Critique own writing.
      2. Critique writing of classmates, both orally and in writing.
  
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    ENG 120 - Introduction to Creative Writing

    Credits: 3
    Begins the exploration of personal writing, fiction, drama, and poetry. Focuses on understanding the basics of each genre and practicing them. Includes peer critique, instructor comments, and extensive revisions.

    Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of “C” in a college level composition I course
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Generate original work in several genres.
      1. Write personal essays, fiction, drama and poetry.
      2. Develop skills with the basics of each genre.
    2. Revise and edit original work.
      1. Rewrite work in an effort to improve it.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of revision.
    3. Interact productively with instructor and peers for the purpose of developing writing skills.
      1. Give and receive verbal and written responses to student work.
      2. Demonstrate an open attitude toward feedback.
    4. Learn by reading contemporary or classic writers
      1. Demonstrate ability to understand a contemporary or classic writer’s craft and style in each genre.
  
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    ENG 195W - Library Research Skills

    Credits: 2
    Develops information literacy for success with college-level academic research. Credit may be earned in LIB 195W  or ENG 195W but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Access information effectively to help solve a particular problem, make a decision, or answer a specific question.
      1. Access and utilize a variety of print and electronic resources.
      2. Develop search strategies for a range of information sources.
    2. Analyze and evaluate information effectively using appropriate means.
      1. Identify information needs and determine if the information source is appropriate for meeting information needs.
      2. Analyze information for use in solving problems, making decisions, answering questions, and writing for an academic audience.
      3. Evaluate information resources for credibility and bias.
    3. Learn to use information in a variety of settings.
      1. Begin research for reports or other projects in a discipline.
      2. Understand the ethics of acting upon information (i.e., plagiarism, copyright).
      3. Write bibliographic citations using a consistent standard reference style.
    4. Participate in “writing to learn” activities
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
  
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    ENG 201HW - Honors Colloquy

    Credits: 3
    Required of all Honors students. Explores the elements of critical and creative thinking. Emphasizes relationships among thinking, writing, and productive interaction with others, as well as the interdisciplinary nature of truth and knowledge. Includes project and/or research writing at instructor’s discretion. Provides opportunities to engage in independent intellectual inquiry to foster deeper learning. Credit may be earned in only one of: ENG 201HW, ENG 201H, or IHU 201HW .

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4 and WRITING LEVEL 4 or permission of the Honors Office
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Explain and apply the elements of creative and critical thinking.
      1. Read materials related to the theory and practice of thinking, e.g. evaluating an argument, distinguishing fact from opinion, the stages of creative thinking.
      2. Apply the elements of thinking through writing and discussion of relevant issues, e.g. questions regarding truth, knowledge, fact, opinion, etc.
      3. Read and interpret assigned readings for the purpose of applying creative and critical thinking.
    2. Apply creative and critical thinking in varied situations
      1. Read material about thinking and other high level subject matter that requires range and depth of thought.
      2. Apply creative/critical thinking in writing, e.g. analyze an argument, narrate an incident related to elements of thinking.
      3. Use thinking skills in verbal discussions about reading, life situations, academic material and discourse.
    3. Interact productively with peers and instructor for the purpose of improving thinking skills.
      1. Write clearly about the elements of listening and speaking as these reflect creative and critical thinking.
      2. Listen effectively in varied situations.
      3. Articulate various points of view about particular subjects.
      4. Explain verbally and in writing how thinking is both an individual and collaborative activity.
    4. Participate in “writing to learn” activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
    5. Practice intellectual curiosity and apply it in independent ways to deepen their understanding of the course material.
      1. Complete at least one significant project, either individually or as a group depending on the instructor’s discretion, and work with the instructor to assure that the project demonstrates intellectual curiosity and academic rigor.
  
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    ENG 205 - English Internship I

    Credits: 1
    Provides advanced hands-on experience through internship with approved off-site employer or organization with multimedia opportunities. Requires 5 hours per week under direct supervision of on-site internship coordinator.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 116  with a minimum grade of “C” and instructor approval
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 75
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate advanced skills directly related to the individual internship in selected field of journalism and emerging media.
      1. Report, write and edit information for traditional and/or online media as directed by on-site internship facilitator.
      2. Perform related tasks as needed at the direction of on-site internship facilitator.
    2. Successfully complete at total of 75 hours of internship work within the scheduled semester.
      1. Provide weekly progress reports to Journalism and Emerging Media coordinator.
      2. Provide reflective self-examination of performance at the conclusion of the internship.
  
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    ENG 210 - English Internship II

    Credits: 2
    Provides advanced hands-on experience through internship with approved off-site employer or organization with multimedia opportunities. Requires 10 hours per week under direct supervision of on-site internship coordinator.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 116  with a minimum grade of “C” and instructor approval
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 150
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate advanced skills directly related to the individual internship in selected field of journalism and emerging media.
      1. Report, write and edit information for traditional and/or online media as directed by on-site internship facilitator.
      2. Perform related tasks as needed at the direction of on-site internship facilitator.
    2. Successfully complete at total of 150 hours of internship work within the scheduled semester.
      1. Provide weekly progress reports to Journalism and Emerging Media coordinator.
      2. Provide reflective self-examination of performance at the conclusion of the internship.
  
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    ENG 211 - Advanced Composition

    Credits: 3
    Continues to practice forms of academic writing such as the summary, report based upon research, and the analytical essay. Emphasizes writing process and examines the origins and purpose of academic discourse. Approaches may include workshops, conferencing, publication and word processing at the discretion of the instructor.

    Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of “C” in a college level composition II course or ENG 113  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Produce at least one research paper.
      1. Locate information.
      2. Select appropriate source material.
      3. Integrate and synthesize student’s opinion and source material
      4. Document sources in a conventional style.
    2. Produce at least one critical paper on several short stories, a novel, or movie
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of various elements of textual or visual techniques to develop a particular interpretation.
    3. Produce at least one critical paper on a non-fiction text or documentary film.
    4. Analyze a range of prose styles.
      1. Identify such elements as symbol, point of view, tone, and metaphor.
      2. Identify certain characteristics that make up “personal” “formal,” and “scientific” styles.
    5. Revise and edit research and critical papers.
      1. Identify where revisions are needed by considering relevance, focus, effective sequencing and logical development.
      2. Implement techniques for adding, deleting, combining, and substituting words, sentences and paragraphs.
  
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    ENG 211H - Advanced Composition

    Credits: 3
    Continues to practice forms of academic writing such as the summary, report based upon research, and the analytical essay. Emphasizes writing process and examines the origins and purpose of academic discourse. Approaches may include workshop, conferencing, publication and word processing at the discretion of the instructor.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4, WRITING LEVEL 4 and a minimum grade of “C” in a college level composition II course or permission of Honors Office
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Produce at least one research paper.
      1. Locate information.
      2. Select appropriate source material.
      3. Integrate and synthesize student’s opinion and source material
      4. Document sources in a conventional style.
    2. Produce at least one critical paper on several short stories, a novel, or movie
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of various elements of textual or visual techniques to develop a particular interpretation.
    3. Produce at least one critical paper on a non-fiction text or documentary film.
    4. Analyze a range of prose styles.
      1. Identify such elements as symbol, point of view, tone, and metaphor.
      2. Identify certain characteristics that make up “personal” “formal,” and “scientific” styles.
    5. Revise and edit research and critical papers.
      1. Identify where revisions are needed by considering relevance, focus, effective sequencing and logical development.
      2. Implement techniques for adding, deleting, combining, and substituting words, sentences and paragraphs.
  
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    ENG 213 - Advanced Technical Communication

    Credits: 3
    Provides experience in the written and oral presentation of technical material. Includes practice in professional formal and informal written reports, research in technical, scientific, or medical topics. Strengthens skills in professional level writing style and applications. Practices online research, document production, and technology application.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 112  or ENG 113  with a minimum grade of “C” (2.0)
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the ability to read and analyze the content of professional documents.
      1. Review the skills required to process professional correspondence.
      2. Analyze written and graphic content for professional applications.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to produce professional correspondence and documents.
      1. Review the guidelines which are specific to professional writing.
      2. Identify and resolve complex grammatical applications.
      3. Lay out and write complex reports specific to a profession.
    3. Analyze work related communication problems.
      1. Demonstrate the critical thinking skills required of a professional.
      2. Demonstrate the group process skills required of a professional.
    4. Demonstrate professional presentation skills.
      1. Develop and deliver an oral presentation of the work done.
      2. Demonstrate participation skills required for small (interpersonal) groups, particularly to solve problems.
    5. Select, design, and construct graphic aids accurately and appropriately.
      1. Identify purpose and audience for document graphics and presentation graphics.
    6. Produce and write a researched professional report.
      1. Demonstrate familiarity with professional journals.
      2. Demonstrate familiarity with professional and academic formats for long, formal written reports.
      3. Demonstrate familiarity with electronic applications.
    7. Create a professional portfolio.
      1. Compile a portfolio of previous communication documents based on professional work experience, internship experience, or in-service experience.
    8. Demonstrate professional conduct associated with team leadership and management.
      1. Identify appropriate ethical behavior.
      2. Identify professional liability concerns.
      3. Identify the importance of networking, teamwork, and workplace cooperation.
  
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    ENG 214 - Introduction to Professional Writing

    Credits: 3
    Introduces students to genres unique to professional writers, such as review writing, grant writing, freelance writing, and magazine writing, and will highlight issues of marketability.

    Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of “C” in a college level composition II course or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the ability to produce clear, effective writing.
      1. Identify the differences between general grammar rules and the guidelines specific to professional writing.
      2. Analyze an audience.
    2. Properly write a review.
      1. Identify and apply the difference between summary and critique.
      2. Analyze the audience.
    3. Properly write a grant proposal
      1. Identify and apply the skills and techniques needed for organizing and writing a full-scale, formal grant request and a follow-up grant report.
      2. Understand and apply writing in connection with preliminary proposal planning.
      3. Understand the philosophies and strategies in project idea development.
      4. Understand the methods for finding funding sources.
    4. Properly write a freelance piece.
      1. Demonstrate ability to research appropriate markets.
      2. Write a query letter with proposal.
      3. Understand ownership of publication rights.
    5. Work with other classmates in a group environment.
      1. Demonstrate the critical thinking skills required of a professional.
      2. Work at a mature level in small (interpersonal) groups, particularly to solve problems.
      3. Demonstrate the group process skills required of a professional.
    6. Understand the publishing of writing.
      1. Demonstrate general familiarity with a computer word processing system.
      2. Demonstrate publication editing in both copy editing and publication design.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding and application of design principles and skills.
      4. Understand basics of copyright and libel laws.
      5. Understand e-publication.
  
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    ENG 216W - New Media Writing

    Credits: 3
    Focuses on creating multimedia texts and creatively and appropriately remediating print texts for interactive electronic environments, identifying and selecting the most appropriate media for a given purpose, and writing critically and knowledgeably about issues and questions raised by digital culture.

    Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of “C” in a college level composition I course or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Create new media texts for electronic delivery
      1. Explore a variety of software to integrate multimedia elements into our texts.
      2. Select the most appropriate media for a given purpose.
      3. Identify and use the elements of effective multimedia storytelling.
      4. Structure content to attract and sustain an interactive audience.
      5. Blend multiple modes of communication: words, images, sound, movement.
    2. Conduct sustained research and reporting on a topic in an interactive environment.
      1. Apply ethical and legal standards to content.
      2. Develop and maintain a professional online presence using current and emerging technologies.
      3. Remediate print discourses creatively and appropriately into New Media environments.
    3. Develop critical digital literacy.
      1. Discuss your work in critically informed ways.
      2. Write critically and knowledgeably about issues and questions raised by the digital culture and the New Media, particularly the relationship of the online world to the social, civic, professional and political world.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of and utilize visual rhetoric.
      4. Analyze websites as rhetorical documents.
      5. Demonstrate an understanding of how modes and media shape interpretation and composition.
      6. Demonstrate an understanding of the difference between print and web logic (linear vs. nonlinear).
  
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    ENG 217 - Advanced Reporting

    Credits: 3
    Focuses on advanced journalistic techniques and news gathering methods, handling specialized assignments in government, crime, courts, sports, business and education plus editorial columns and entertainment reviews. Class members work on The Delta Collegiate.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 116  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand and apply the principles of gathering news.
      1. Apply observation skills at news events.
      2. Apply interviewing skills with news sources.
      3. Apply research skills in the library and on-line.
      4. Apply beat reporting on campus.
    2. Understand journalistic concepts.
      1. Distinguish between fact and opinion.
      2. Recognize elements of news including importance, timeliness, consequence, conflict, humor, the unusual, prominence, proximity and human interest.
      3. Defend accuracy of reporting and writing.
      4. Explain the importance of ethics on the job.
    3. Apply concepts and principles of news writing.
      1. Modify the inverted pyramid format to fit specialized situations.
      2. Attribute information through proper use of direct and indirect quotes.
      3. Treatment of reported issues with objectivity and balance.
    4. Write in journalistic style.
      1. Compose specialized stories including: editorial column, meeting story, crime, courts, sports, business, entertainment review, investigative story and follow up.
      2. Edit stories in Associated Press style.
    5. Evaluate written work, both orally and in writing.
      1. Critique own writing.
      2. Critique writing of classmates.
  
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    ENG 219W - Literary Analysis

    Credits: 3
    Surveys and practices methods of literary interpretation and appreciation, from the close reading strategies of New Criticism to the contemporary considerations of reader-response theory. Interpretive papers on particular works of fiction, poetry and drama are required. Credit may be earned in ENG 219W or LIT 219W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of literary devices such as plot, tone, character, setting, and theme.
      5. Demonstrate an understanding of the schools of literary criticism.
      6. Articulate an interpretative response to literature.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Write a literary analysis that includes a clear thesis statement and uses academic sources to support this thesis statement.
      2. Articulate an interpretative response to literature and explain the premises and assumptions that underlie these interpretative responses.
      3. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      4. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      5. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical context for this body of literature.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the life of the author and the society in which he or she lives.
      2. Discuss the relevancy of a literature to contemporary society.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of varying cultural identities.
  
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    ENG 220W - Readings in Poetry

    Credits: 3
    Studies the background, developments, and the current state of modern poetry. Emphasizes poetry by American and British authors. Credit may be earned in ENG 220W or LIT 220W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of various poetic devices and structures.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Articulate an interpretative response based on a close reading of a poem.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical context for this body of literature.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the life of the poet and the society in which he or she lives.
      2. Discuss the relevancy of poetry to contemporary society.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of various cultural identities.
  
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    ENG 221W - Readings in the Short Story

    Credits: 3
    Includes reading selected short stories of British, American, and other authors. Increases understanding of this relatively modern form, and explores ways in which the short story is personally meaningful in depicting our perception of ourselves and the world in which we live. Credit may be earned in ENG 221W or LIT 221W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Identify particular uses in stories of literary devices, such as metaphor and symbol.
      5. Assemble the various elements of the story to synthesize a particular interpretation.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Communicate their understanding of a story’s meaning in writing.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical context for this body of literature.
      1. Identify parallels between the fictional world as the story presents it and reality.
      2. Judge by applicability the “truths” of the story to their understanding of the world and themselves.
  
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    ENG 222W - Readings in the Novel

    Credits: 3
    Develops an understanding of the novel form by reading selected novels. Derives personal meaning and satisfaction from novels from different times, places, and cultures. Credit may be earned in ENG 222W or LIT 222W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and a college level Composisiton I course with a minimum grade of “C”
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Analyze novels through recognition of their literary techniques and common elements (“the craft of the novel”).
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Compose an analytical paper examining some aspect of a novel from the course (e.g., drawing on I. a, I. d, III. a, III. b, or III. c.).
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical context for this body of literature.
      1. Integrate the world of the novel with one’s own world as one perceives it.
      2. Identify parallels between the fictional world as the novel presents it and reality.
      3. Judge the applicability of the “truths” of the novel to one’s understanding of the world and one’s self.
  
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    ENG 223W - Readings in Drama

    Credits: 3
    Studies historical and popular American, British, and other plays. Examines the effects of drama on both American, British and other cultures. Credit may be earned in ENG 223W or LIT 223W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Explore close reading techniques for understanding dramatic texts.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Demonstrate the understanding of Dramatic conventions through writing.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical context for this body of literature.
      1. Cultivate a growing knowledge of the history of dramatic literature.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of formal and historical features of different kinds of theatrical texts
  
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    ENG 224HW - Thematic Approaches to Literature-Honors

    Credits: 3
    Examines a body of literature organized by the selection of material either from the works of one author, genre, or topic, or a combination thereof (e.g. science fiction, war novel, thrillers, horror, etc.). Course content to be announced each semester prior to registration. Provides opportunities to engage in independent intellectual inquiry to foster deeper learning. Credit may be earned in only one of ENG 224HW or ENG 224W , LIT 224HW, or LIT 224W.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4, WRITING LEVEL 4, and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C or permission of the Honors Office
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of multiple theoretical approaches.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the diverse nature of the cultural and historical context for this body literature.
      1. Objectives determined by course.
    4. Integrate the world of literary work with their own world as they perceive it.
      1. Complete at least one significant project, either individually or as a group depending on the instructor’s discretion, and work with the instructor to assure that the project demonstrates intellectual curiosity and academic rigor.
      2. Actively engage with their peers in conversations, seminars, or in other formats at the instructor’s discretion to enhance the depth of knowledge of the relevant material.
  
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    ENG 224W - Thematic Approaches to Literature

    Credits: 3
    Examines a body of literature organized by the selection of material either from the works of one author, genre, or topic, or a combination thereof (e.g. science fiction, war novel, thrillers, horror, etc.). Course content to be announced each semester prior to registration. Credit may be earned in only one of ENG 224W or ENG 224HW , LIT 224W or LIT 224HW.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of multiple theoretical approaches.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the diverse nature of the cultural and historical context for this body literature.
      1. Objectives determined by course.
  
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    ENG 226W - Introduction to Film

    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: READING LEVEL 3 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C. Follows the creation of a film from the original idea to final production. Examines film as a mode of popular entertainment and as an art form. Focuses on identifying the media’s components and developing the viewers’ standards of appreciation. Credit may be earned in only one of ENG 226W, IHU 226W  or LIT 226W.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Identify the common terms referring to film language (photography, mise en scene, editing, sound, acting, drama, story, and screenplay) within various films screened in and out of class.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Develop fluency in film criticism.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical context for this body of literature.
      1. Describe how films reflect the culture and the historical moments of their production.
      2. Contrast commercial vs. artistic value systems.
      3. Explain how close examination of film enriches formal and cultural interpretation.
  
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    ENG 227CW - The American Motion Picture

    Credits: 3
    Studies popular films, with major emphasis on American culture as reflected in the motion picture. Examines the effect of the mages portrayed I motion pictures on the perception of American society and history; topics vary from semester to semester. Credit may be earned in only one of: LIT 227CW, LIT 227W, ENG 227CW or ENG 227W .

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): ENG 111  or ENG 112  in a coordinated learning community.
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify the media’s components.
      1. Define the common terms referring to cameras.
      2. Identify movement of cameras or actors and assess their effect.
      3. Identify the effects of editing.
      4. Identify the effects of sound.
      5. List the sequence and effects of scene.
      6. Describe the variety of acting observed in a film.
    2. Develop an understanding of American culture as it relates to film
      1. View and assess American films from different periods of American history.
      2. Identify and discuss Western aesthetic value systems.
      3. Identify and discuss Commercial values.
    3. Examine the cross influence of film and culture.
      1. Apply the concepts and principles covered to a variety of American films.
      2. Assess the influences of various film techniques on culture.
      3. Assess the influence of cultural norms on film production
    4. Communicate an understanding of American Culture and Film.
      1. Write a well organized theme which applies to a film the components covered in the course.
      2. Discuss in class or other social group the components covered in the course.
    5. Participate in “writing to learn” activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
  
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    ENG 227W - The American Motion Picture

    Credits: 3
    Studies popular films, with major emphasis on American culture as reflected in the motion picture. Examines the effect of the images portrayed in motion pictures on the perception of American society and history; topics vary from semester to semester. Credit may be earned in only one of: ENG 227W. ENG 227CW , LIT 227W, LIT 227CW.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Identify thematic content, reading films as texts, reflecting the American identity.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Develop fluency in film criticism.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical context for this body of literature.
      1. Describe how American film reflects the American culture at various historical moments of film production.
      2. Contrast commercial vs. artistic value systems.
      3. Explain how close examination of film genres enriches formal and cultural interpretation.
  
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    ENG 228HW - Masterpieces of World Literature: Beginning through 1600s - Honors

    Credits: 3
    Surveys world literature through 1600 that includes, but is not necessarily limited to, the masterpieces of the Western tradition. Concentrates on recurring themes, such as a person’s relationship to God and nature, individual and social morality, liberty and responsibility, social and economic justice, and the search for a meaningful existence. Provides opportunities to engage in independent intellectual inquiry to foster deeper learning. Credit may be earned in only one of: ENG 228HW or ENG 228W , LIT 228HW or LIT 228W.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4, WRITING LEVEL 4 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C or permission of the Honors Office
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Identify qualities of literary works that distinguish them as masterpieces.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Describe in writing important recurring themes in world literature, including those from the Western tradition.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the diverse nature of the cultural and historical context for this body literature.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of how literary works can both reflect and transcend the time and culture in which they were written.
      2. Identify the limitations of translation in conveying the style and meaning of original works.
    4. Apply intellectual curiosity in independent ways to deepen the understanding of course material.
      1. Complete at least one significant project, either individually or as a group depending on the instructor’s discretion, and work with the instructor to assure that the project demonstrates intellectual curiosity and academic rigor.
      2. Actively engage with their peers in conversations, seminars, or in other formats at the instructor’s discretion to enhance the depth of knowledge of the relevant material.
  
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    ENG 228W - Masterpieces of World Literature: Beginning through 1600s

    Credits: 3
    Surveys world literature through 1600 that includes, but is not necessarily limited to, the masterpieces of the Western tradition. Concentrates on recurring themes, such as a person’s relationship to God and nature, individual and social morality, liberty and responsibility, social and economic justice, and the search for a meaningful existence. Credit may be earned in one of the following: ENG 228W, ENG 228HW , LIT 228W or LIT 228HW.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Identify qualities of literary works that distinguish them as masterpieces.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Describe in writing important recurring themes in world literature, including those from the Western tradition.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the diverse nature of the cultural and historical context for this body literature.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of how literary works can both reflect and transcend the time and culture in which they were written.
      2. Identify the limitations of translation in conveying the style and meaning of original works.
  
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    ENG 229HW - Masterpieces of World Literature: 1600s to the Present - Honors

    Credits: 3
    Surveys world literature from the 1600s to the present including but not necessarily limited to the masterpieces of the Western tradition. Concentrates on recurring themes, such as a person’s relationship to God and nature, individual and social morality, liberty and responsibility, social and economic justice, and the search for a meaningful existence. Provides opportunities to engage in independent intellectual inquiry to foster deeper learning. Credit may be earned in one of the following: ENG 229HW or ENG 229W , LIT 229HW or LIT 229W.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4, WRITING LEVEL 4 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C or permission of the Honors Office
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Identify qualities of literary works that distinguish them as masterpieces.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Describe in writing important recurring themes in world literature, including those from the Western tradition.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the diverse nature of the cultural and historical context for this body literature.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of how literary works can both reflect and transcend the time and culture in which they were written.
      2. Identify the limitations of translation in conveying the style and meaning of original works.
    4. Apply intellectual curiosity in independent ways to deepen the understanding of course material.
      1. Complete at least one significant project, either individually or as a group depending on the instructor’s discretion, and work with the instructor to assure that the project demonstrates intellectual curiosity and academic rigor.
      2. Actively engage with their peers in conversations, seminars, or in other formats at the instructor’s discretion to enhance the depth of knowledge of the relevant material.
  
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    ENG 229W - Masterpieces of World Literature: 1600s to the Present

    Credits: 3
    Surveys world literature from the 1600s to the present including but not necessarily limited to the masterpieces of the Western tradition. Concentrates on recurring themes, such as a person’s relationship to God and nature, individual and social morality, liberty and responsibility, social and economic justice, and the search for a meaningful existence. Credit may only be earned in one of the following: ENG 229W, ENG 229HW , LIT 229W or LIT 229HW.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Identify qualities of literary works that distinguish them as masterpieces.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Describe in writing important recurring themes in world literature, including those from the Western tradition.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the diverse nature of the cultural and historical context for this body literature.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of how literary works can both reflect and transcend the time and culture in which they were written.
      2. Identify the limitations of translation in conveying the style and meaning of original works.
  
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    ENG 230 - English Internship III

    Credits: 3
    Provides advanced hands-on experience through internship with approved off-site employer or organization with multimedia opportunities. Requires 15 hours per week under direct supervision of on-site internship coordinator.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 116  with a minimum grade of “C” and instructor permission
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 225
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate advanced skills directly related to the individual internship in selected field of journalism and emerging media.
      1. Report, write and edit information for traditional and/or online media as directed by on-site internship facilitator.
      2. Perform related tasks as needed at the direction of on-site internship facilitator.
    2. Successfully complete at total of 225 hours of internship work within the scheduled semester.
      1. Provide weekly progress reports to Journalism and Emerging Media coordinator.
      2. Provide reflective self-examination of performance at the conclusion of the internship.
  
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    ENG 232W - Readings in Modern Non-Fiction

    Credits: 3
    Studies selected modern (post-1945) and contemporary non-fiction works in order to understand the variety of forms and expression which are possible. Concentrates on themes and topics which are a recurring part of the human condition. Credit may be earned in ENG 232W or LIT 230W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): Any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Recognize conventions in different kinds of modern non-fiction including journalism; travel writing; criticism; biography; memoir; and the personal essay.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Compose original non-fiction.
      5. Write an analysis of modern non-fiction that develops a thesis and supports it with relevant sources.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical context for this body of literature.
      1. Determine how modern non-fiction contributes to American literature.
      2. Examine how modern non-fiction constructs a specific, narrating self on the page.
      3. Explore how modern non-fiction engages with questions of class, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality.
  
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    ENG 233 - Poetry in Performance

    Credits: 3
    Includes Spoken Word and Visual Poetry. Develops performance poetry writing skills and understanding. Includes discussions, writing assignments, and other classroom activities. Requires analysis of published performance poetry and criticism.

    Prerequisite(s): WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Generate original performance poetry
      1. Write performance poems about a range of subject matter.
      2. Write performance poems within the context of the contemporary moment.
      3. Write performance poems using a variety of poetic devices (e.g. metaphor/simile, imagery, rhyme and rhythm,etc).
    2. Employ the processes of revising and editing poetry
      1. Revise performance poems effectively.
      2. Edit performance poems effectively.
    3. Interact productively with instructor and classmates in Workshop
      1. Give and receive verbal and written responses to poetry.
      2. Demonstrate a receptive and invested attitude toward feedback, both given and received.
      3. Apply verbal and written feedback constructively.
    4. Perform poetry for an audience
      1. Identify target audience for original performance poetry.
      2. Stage or help stage performance of original poetry for target audience.
      3. Choose, practice and effectively deliver for performance of original poetry for a designated target audience.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of a range of performance poetry.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the historical and contemporary contexts of performance poetry.
      2. Analyze published performance poetry.
  
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    ENG 241W - Introduction to Mythology

    Credits: 3
    Provides an introduction to some of the concepts in art and literature in particular. Considers the functions of mythology, the universiality of the journey pattern in all myths, the nature of mythic imagery, the distinction between mythos and logos as patterns in thinking, the approaches available in examining particular myths and the application of all these dimensions in reading a given story. Credit may be earned in ENG 241W or LIT 241W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Identify patterns of mythological stories and apply one or more of these to any given myth.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Define significant terms and concepts in mythology.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical context for this body of literature.
      1. Read mythological stories from a variety of cultures around the globe.
      2. Identify cross-cultural and culturally specific patterns in mythological stories.
      3. Identify the impact of change in historical context on the genre and patterns of mythological stories.
  
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    ENG 242W - Introduction to British Literature

    Credits: 3
    Provides a sampling of the work of some of the major authors in British Literature. Requires works to be read and examined for an understanding of the material, an appreciation of the literary forms and for the awareness of understanding of the material, and appreciation of the literary forms and for the awareness of unifying themes that hold together a culture’s conceptual framework. Enhances reading skills and aesthetic appreciation through exposure, discussion, writing and critical thinking. Credit may be earned in ENG 242W or LIT 242W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Demonstrate relevance of British literature to contemporary culture.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical contexts for this body of literature.
      1. Identify major eras, trends, and authors in British Literature.
      2. Explain how texts reflect or challenge the culture from which they emerge.
  
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    ENG 245W - Biblical Literature: Old Testament

    Credits: 3
    Studies critically the literature of the Old Testament. Examines the Old Testament canon in its historical development. Also examines both the literary styles and changing theological and ethical ideas. Credit may be earned in one of the following: ENG 245W, LIT 245W or IHU 245W ,

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres (i.e. national history, poetry, narrative).
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Explain the elements which distinguish between works of the Old Testament.
      5. Identify details of dominant themes and motif gained from close reading of various books in the Old Testament.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Write an interpretation of a specific work from the Old Testament which explains dominant themes and motifs.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical context for this body of literature.
      1. Identify differences of place and time, and how those shape the writings of the Old Testament.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of the world of the Old Testament compared to the contemporary world.
      3. Identify and consider metaphysical issues based on an understanding of the Old Testament readings (such issues as the nature of God and God’s relationship with humanity).
  
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    ENG 246W - Biblical Literature: New Testament

    Credits: 3
    A critical study of the literature of the New Testament with some attention given to the Inter-Testamental literature. The literature will be studied in terms of its historical development. Some attention will be given to the canonization of the New Testament, to the different literary styles and to the theological and ethical ideas.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Distinguish between the four gospels and the letters in the New Testament
      1. Cite different examples and traits of these works.
      2. Explain the elements of these different types.
    2. Recognize some of the cultural/historical sources that affect New Testament literature
      1. Cite differences of place and time, and how those shaped the writings and ideas.
      2. Compare the world of the New Testament to the contemporary world.
    3. Identify the distinguishing features in the synoptic gospels from selected New Testament readings.
      1. Paraphrase narratives in class discussion.
      2. Identify and discuss purposes in the respective versions.
    4. Analyze the New Testament for dominant themes and motifs.
      1. Identify details gained from close reading of various sections in the New Testament, and present those in discussion.
      2. Compose an interpretation of a specific book in writing.
    5. Identify and define metaphysical issues based on their understanding of the New Testament.
      1. Discuss such issues as the nature of the Messiah.
      2. Address these issues in writing while incorporating and citing particular evidence from the New Testament literature.
    6. Participate in “writing to learn” activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
  
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    ENG 247 - Creative Writing: Young Adult Fiction

    Credits: 3
    Builds on previous writing experience to write original works of fiction aimed at the Children’s and Young Adult reading market. Reads and analyzes works in the YA genre. Uses peer workshop, peer comments, instructor critiques, and written feedback for revision of student writing.

    Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of “C” in a college level composition I course
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of Young Adult fiction from reading assigned works.
      1. Identify elements of fiction in YA stories.
      2. Demonstrate understanding of individual YA stories, verbally and in writing.
    2. Generate original work.
      1. Write fiction that meets the criteria for a YA audience.
      2. Demonstrate ability with elements of fiction (characterization, plot development, and tone) specific to the YA genre.
      3. Express relatable themes through a fictional work.
    3. Revise and edit original short stories.
      1. Rewrite stories effectively.
      2. Use the processes of revising and editing stories.
      3. Revise stories over the course of the semester with an effort to improve.
    4. Participate effectively in workshops and/or conferences with the instructor.
      1. Give and receive verbal and/or written responses to fiction.
      2. Demonstrate a receptive and invested attitude toward feedback, both given and received.
      3. Apply verbal and written feedback constructively.
  
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    ENG 250W - Literature for Preschool Children

    Credits: 3
    Surveys quality fiction and nonfiction trade books for preschool chilldren, with emphasis on top writers and illustrators of the best, most engaging literature. Increases awareness of how literature speaks to young children and engages them in language and learning experiences. Credit may be earned in ENG 250W or LIT 253W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of multiple theoretical approaches.
      5. Discuss the developmental tasks confronting preschool children and the role of literature in that process.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Research quality trade books, authors, and illustrators.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the diverse nature of the cultural and historical context for this body literature.
      1. Demonstrate how books for young children reflect and speak to their experience, common situations, and emotional, social, and educational needs.
      2. Evaluate the positive and appropriate depiction of diverse characters in terms of gender, religion, race, or ethnic origin as well as those with disabilities.
      3. Identify quality multicultural books for young children, traditional and contemporary.
      4. Demonstrate an ability to overcome stereotypes and common clichés about children’s literature.
  
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    ENG 251W - Children’s Literature

    Credits: 4
    Surveys literature for children in the elementary grades. Explores quality trade books for children; presents respected writers and illustrators in various genres. Dispels commonly misconceived and generic thinking about children’s literature, replacing with more perceptive criteria and reflective judgment of book selection. Results in greater knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of children’s literature.  Credit may be earned in ENG 251W or LIT 251W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of multiple theoretical approaches.
      5. Explain how text and illustration complement each other to engage young readers.
      6. Describe how a specific work speaks to children of various ages and meets their emotional, educational, social, intellectual needs, and fits their developing listening and reading skills.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Research quality trade books, authors and illustrators.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the diverse nature of the cultural and historical context for this body literature.
      1. Explain how literature for children reflects the understanding of “childhood” in its historical and cultural context.
      2. Evaluate the positive and appropriate depiction of diverse characters in terms of gender, religion, race, or ethnic origin as well as those with disabilities.
      3. Identify quality multicultural books for young children, traditional and contemporary.
      4. Demonstrate an ability to overcome stereotypes and common clichés about children’s literature.
  
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    ENG 252W - Young Adult Literature

    Credits: 3
    Explores literature written for and about young adults, defined as those students in middle or junior high and high school. Surveys quality trade books, with emphasis on top writers of the best, most engaging literature. Increases awareness of how literature speaks to young adults and engages them in language and learning experiences. Appropriate for general students of literature and those planning to enter careers in secondary education, sociology, psychology, and juvenile justice. Credit may be earned in ENG 252W or LIT 252W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of multiple theoretical approaches.
      5. Demonstrate knowledge of quality literature for and by young adults in traditional and emerging formats.
      6. Discuss the cognitive developmental tasks confronting adolescents and the role of literature in that process.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Research quality trade books and authors.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the diverse nature of the cultural and historical context for this body literature.
      1. Demonstrate familiarity with current and historical young adult literature.
      2. Discuss the evolution of young adult literature and its debt to earlier literary forms.
      3. Evaluate the positive and appropriate depiction of diverse characters in terms of gender, religion, race, or ethnic origin as well as those with disabilities.
      4. Describe strategies for addressing current issues (such as censorship) in selecting and using young adult literature.
  
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    ENG 253 - Creative Writing: Poetry

    Credits: 3
    A course in the writing of poetry. Students are encouraged to develop their own poetry writing skills and understanding. In addition to other classroom activities, there are discussions and writing assignments. The instructor may also choose to require analysis of published poetry and criticism.

    Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of “C” in a college level composition II course
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Generate original poetry
      1. Write poems about a range of subject matter.
      2. Write poems using a variety of traditional, modern, and contemporary forms, e.g. free verse, sonnets, haiku, etc.
      3. Write poems using a variety of devices, e.g. metaphor/simile, imagery, rhyme and rhythm, etc.
    2. Revise and edit original poems
      1. Rewrite poems effectively.
      2. Use the processes of revising and editing poetry.
      3. Revise a body of work.
    3. Participate effectively in workshops and/or conferences with the instructor.
      1. Give and receive verbal and written responses to poetry.
      2. Demonstrate a receptive and invested attitude toward feedback, both given and received.
      3. Apply verbal and written feedback constructively.
    4. Read and understand a range of poetry, especially by contemporary poets.
      1. Identify various elements in particular poems, e.g. metaphor, rhyme, sound qualities, etc.
      2. Think critically about individual poems, verbally and in writing.
  
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    ENG 254 - Creative Writing: Fiction

    Credits: 3
    Focuses on the writing of fiction–chiefly short stories. Develops understanding of fiction and personal fiction writing abilities. Completes other classroom activities, discussions and writing assignments, requiring analysis and criticisms of other students’ work.

    Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of “C” in a college level composition II course
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Plan and draft a work of fiction.
      1. Generate original works of fiction.
      2. Demonstrate ability with the elements of fiction (e.g. conflict, character development, handling of exposition, dialogue, interior landscape, authentic detail, etc).
    2. Revise and edit original short stories.
      1. Rewrite stories effectively.
      2. Use the processes of revising and editing stories.
      3. Revise stories over the course of the semester.
    3. Participate effectively in workshops and/or conferences with the instructor.
      1. Give and receive verbal and/or written responses to fiction.
      2. Demonstrate a receptive and invested attitude toward feedback, both given and received.
      3. Apply verbal and written feedback constructively.
    4. Read and comprehend a range of fiction.
      1. Identify elements of fiction in professional stories.
      2. Think critically about individual stories, verbally and in writing.
  
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    ENG 256 - Creative Non-Fiction

    Credits: 3
    Requires students to draw on personal experiences and viewpoints to produce a range of writing, and read and respond to published works of creative nonfiction. Includes reading memoirs, autobiographies, journals, essays, and other subjective literary forms. Emphasizes both generating and revising writing.

    Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of “C” in a college level composition II course or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Plan and draft works of creative nonfiction.
      1. Generate original works of creative non-fiction.
      2. Write creative non-fiction in a variety of forms.
      3. Demonstrate ability with the elements of creative non-fiction (e.g. truth related to memory, scene development, character development, handling of exposition, external and internal dialogue, authentic detail, etc).
    2. Revise and edit original creative non-fiction.?
      1. Rewrite essays effectively.
      2. Use the processes of revising and editing essays.
    3. Participate effectively in workshops and/or conferences with the instructor.?
      1. Give and receive verbal and written responses to creative non-fiction.
      2. Demonstrate a receptive and invested attitude toward feedback, both given and received.
      3. Apply verbal and written feedback constructively.
    4. Read and understand a range of creative non-fiction.
      1. Identify elements of creative nonfiction in professional essays.
      2. Think critically about individual essays, verbally and in writing.
  
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    ENG 257 - Advanced Creative Writing

    Credits: 3
    Uses previous background in creative non-fiction, fiction, poetry or screenwriting. Includes work on style, voice, tone, vision, and other nuances in chosen genre. Includes peer critique, instructor comments, and extensive revision.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 253 , ENG 254 , or ENG 256  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Generate original work in chosen genre.
      1. Write creative non-fiction, fiction, poetry, or script pages on a range of subject matter.
      2. Develop skills with style, voice, tone, and other nuances of the genre.
      3. Develop a vision of the world and express that vision in writing.
    2. Revise and edit original work.
      1. Rewrite work in an effort to improve it.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of revision for the chosen genre.
    3. Participate effectively in workshops and/or conferences with the instructor.
      1. Give and receive verbal and written responses to student work.
      2. Demonstrate a receptive, yet discerning, attitude towards feedback.
      3. Apply verbal and written feedback constructively.
  
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    ENG 258W - Introduction to Screenwriting

    Credits: 3
    Begins the exploration of screenwriting.  Focuses on understanding the basics of the genre, especially formatting and movie planning.  Includes peer critique, instructor comments, and extensive revision.

    Prerequisite(s): College level Composition I course with a minimum grade of “C” or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Develop original featuare-length screenplay.
      1. Write premises, ask major dramatic questions, construct movie maps, and compose up to twenty-five pages of an actual feature-length screenplay.
      2. Develop the craft of a screenwriter.
    2. Revise and edit original work.
      1. Rewrite work in an effort to improve it.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of revision.
    3. Develop interpersonal skills for the purpose of giving or receiving feedback.
      1. Give and receive verbal and written responses to student work.
      2. Demonstrate an open attitude towards feedback.
    4. Write original short film screenplay.
      1.  Develop an understanding of the short film genre.
      2.  Practice writing a work with a begining, middle, and end.
    5. Demonstrate understanding of professional screenplays.
  
  •  

    ENG 259W - Advanced Screenwriting

    Credits: 3
    Builds from skills learned in ENG 258W . Explores character, plot, and dialogue development as they relate to screenwriting. Focuses on the completion of a short film screenplay or first thirty pages of a longer work. Includes peer critique, instructor comments, and extensive revision.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 258W  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Complete original short film screenplay or first act of longer screenplay.
      1. Write premise, ask major dramatic question, construct movie map, and compose short film screenplay or first act of longer screenplay.
      2. Direct practice with plot point one, mid-point, plot point two, climax, and resolution.
      3. Practice the art of scene writing and action triggers as they relate to complete work.
      4. Develop the craft of a screen writer.
    2. Revise and edit original work.
      1. Rewrite work in an effort to improve it.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of revision.
    3. Interact productively with instructor and peers for the purpose of developing writing skills.
      1. Give and receive verbal and written responses to student work.
      2. Demonstrate an open attitude towards feedback.
    4. Learn by reading professional screenplays.
      1. Demonstrate ability to understand a professional screenplay and discuss its strengths.
  
  •  

    ENG 260W - Writing Center Practicum

    Credits: 1
    Presents the theory and principles behind being a peer writing tutor. Requires application of knowledge through tutoring actual students in the Writing Center.

    Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of “C” in a college level composition I course or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 12
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Learn by reading books and/or articles about the theories and principles behind the tutoring of writing.
      1. Demonstrate ability to understand and discuss key concepts in the reading.
    2. Tutor actual students effectively and ethically.
      1. Tutor students to help them improve their writing.
      2. Demonstrate an ability to help students without doing the work for them.
      3. Exhibit an understanding, while tutoring, of the unique ethics involved in such a setting.
    3. Learn by reflecting on tutoring experiences.
      1. Demonstrate an ability to critique the quality of a tutoring session through one-on-one conferences with instructor, class-wide discussion, and written self-reflection.
  
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    ENG 262W - Holocaust History and Literature

    Credits: 3
    Introduces Holocaust studies. Covers the years 1933 to 1945, focusing on the role of perpetrators, victims, bystanders, and those involved in resistance and rescue. Uses a variety of literature that assesses how did the Holocaust happen? Who is responsible? What can we learn from this catastrophe? Credit may be earned in ENG 262W or LIT 260W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Analyze Holocaust works for dominant themes and motifs.
      5. Connect symbols and metaphors with theme or main ideas.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical context for this body of literature.
      1. Apply significant historical terms/concepts as related to the Holocaust.
  
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    ENG 268W - International Studies in Literature

    Credits: 1-4
    The student will do an in-depth study in one or more aspects of the literature or film of a country other than the United States. Includes class lectures and individual consultation. Overseas study is an integral part of the course. Expenses for travel and overseas study must be borne by the student. Credit may be earned in ENG 268W or LIT 268 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15-60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Identify value of literary content for international travel.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Use both informal and formal writing to explore connections between personal travel experience and literary works.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical context for this body of literature.
      1. Identify ways that experiences of travel can enable a deeper understanding of literature.
      2. Identify ways that literature can enhance the experience of travel.
  
  •  

    ENG 269W - Native North American Literature

    Credits: 3
    Surveys the literature of Native North Americans: poetry, short stories, novels, and non-fiction, including biographies of important Indian leaders. Develops an understanding of the cultures which produced the literature. Credit may be earned in ENG 269W or LIT 269W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Develop an understanding of the cultural differences in American society and recognize the significance of cultural diversity.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Define transformative moments in the history and trajectory of Native North American literature and cultural expression.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical context for this body of literature.
      1. Recognize the primary elements of Native North American aesthetics as enacted in literature and, to some extent, film and visual arts.
      2. Identify patterns of expression and the expressive trajectories of Native North American literature.
      3. Read Native North American poems, stories, essays, and visual art.
      4. Explain the function and significance of the oral tradition, including storytelling, song, and dance.
      5. Explain the significance of Native North American creation, origin, and trickster stories.
  
  •  

    ENG 271HW - American Literature to 1865 - Honors

    Credits: 3
    Studies major movements and themes in American literature as they appear in the works of important authors from the Puritan period to and including the Age of Romanticism. Provides opportunities to engage in independent intellectual inquiry to foster deeper learning. Credit may be earned in one of the following: ENG 271HW, ENG 271W , LIT 271HW or LIT 271W.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4, WRITING LEVEL 4 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C or permission of the Honors Office
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of literary devices such as plot, tone, characters, setting, and theme.
      5. Articulate an interpretative response to literature.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Articulate an interpretative response to literature and explain the premises and assumptions that underlie this interpretative response.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical context for this body of literature.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the time period and/or the author and the society in which he/she lived.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of various cultural and historical identities and how those influence the literature.
    4. Apply intellectual curiosity in independent ways to deepen the understanding of course material.
      1. Complete at least one significant project, either individually or as a group depending on the instructor’s discretion, and work with the instructor to assure that the project demonstrates intellectual curiosity and academic rigor.
      2. Actively engage with their peers in conversations, seminars, or in other formats at the instructor’s discretion to enhance the depth of knowledge of the relevant material.
  
  •  

    ENG 271W - American Literature to 1865

    Credits: 3
    Studies major movements and themes in American literature as they appear in the works of important authors from the Puritan period to and including the Age of Romanticism. Credit may be earned in one of the following: ENG 271HW , ENG 271W, LIT 271HW or LIT 271W.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of literary devices such as plot, tone, characters, setting, and theme.
      5. Articulate an interpretative response to literature.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Articulate an interpretative response to literature and explain the premises and assumptions that underlie this interpretative response.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical context for this body of literature.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the time period and/or the author and the society in which he/she lived.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of various cultural and historical identities and how those influence the literature.
  
  •  

    ENG 272W - American Literature Since 1865

    Credits: 3
    Studies major movements and themes in American Literature after the age of Romanticism through the Age of Realism and New Directions. Credit may be earned in only one of: ENG 272W, LIT 272W or LIT 272AW.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and any approved College Composition I course with a minimum grade of C
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze literature in the subject area.
      1. Interpret the meanings of literary works using various theoretical approaches.
      2. Identify various literary genres.
      3. Demonstrate analytical understanding through writing.
      4. Demonstrate a mastery of literary devices such as plot, tone, character, setting, and theme.
      5. Demonstrate an understanding of major literary movements in American culture from 1865-present.
      6. Articulate an interpretative response to literature.
    2. Participate in writing to learn activities.
      1. Perform writing tasks to promote learning.
      2. Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.
      3. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      4. Articulate an interpretative response to American literature and explain the premises and assumptions that underlie these interpretative responses.
      5. Write a literary analysis that states a clear thesis statement and uses academic sources to support this thesis statement.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical context for this body of literature.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the life of the author and the society in which he or she lives.
      2. Discuss the relevancy of literature to contemporary society.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of how race, class, and gender influence the American literary sensibility.
 

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