Sep 26, 2022  
2017-2018 
    
2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Lifelong Wellness Theory

  
  •  

    LWT 212 - Introduction to Meditation

    Credits: 1
    Provides an overview of the history and purpose of meditation. Introduces students to the practice of various meditation techniques. Emphasizes the role of meditation for concentration, relaxation, stress relief, and personal and spiritual growth.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand the elements of meditation.
      1. Read relevant material such as introductory meditation texts, articles, and Internet postings.
      2. Demonstrate understanding of the elements of meditation through discussion of relevant issues, e.g., questions regarding concentration, mental self-control, the diverse definitions and practices of meditation, etc.
      3. Write competently about the elements of meditation.
    2. Apply meditation techniques in various ways and situations.
      1. Read relevant materials about meditation techniques.
      2. Demonstrate understanding, through discussion, of meditation practices and techniques.
      3. Practice several meditation techniques, including one technique in some depth.
      4. Write competent reports, reflections, and questions regarding the practice of meditation.
    3. Synthesize an intellectual understanding of meditation with practice.
      1. Read critically and write clearly about meditation.
      2. Learn to choose wisely among various approaches to meditation.
      3. Develop a meditation practice that is personally relevant.
  
  •  

    LWT 213W - Vitamins Minerals and Health

    Credits: 3


    Studies the various rating systems for the daily intake of vitamins; functions and uses of specific vitamins, minerals and other key supplements; signs of deficiency for specific nutrients; and recommends amounts of specific nutrients for average people and individuals with specific needs.

    Prerequisite(s): LWT 210  or LW 222  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Explain the difference between vitamins and minerals and the various rating systems for the daily intake.

         A.          Define vitamins and minerals and explain how they work in the body.

         B.          Discuss the differences among RDAs, RDIs, and ODIs.

         C.          Explain how vitamins work synergistically.

         D.          Define oil- and water-soluble vitamins and micro- and macro minerals.

         E.          Discuss the inability of reference daily intakes (RDIs) to meet modern dietary and lifestyle health requirements.

         F.          State both the common and scientific names of many vitamins.

    2.    Discuss the relationship between nutritional deficiencies and illnesses as well as the foods and supplements that may be used to
           prevent these 
    deficiencies.

         A.          Provide an example of a supplement that has been proven to be safer than prescription pharmaceuticals for specific complaints.

         B.          Explain why processed and enriched flour is not necessarily a healthy choice.

         C.          Explain why taking large quantities of "safe" over-the-counter pharmaceuticals may deplete necessary nutrients.

         D.          Describe different deficiencies that may result from taking prescription pharmaceuticals.

         E.          Identify a number of available supplements that have been proven to prevent the loss of eyesight.

         F.          Correlate certain health conditions with a supplement plan.

         G.         Select an appropriate intake of each supplement to meet the severity of a health condition.

         H.         Discuss the current recommendations on the best times to take supplements.

         I.           Discuss which prescription and over-the-counter medications may cause certain vitamin and  mineral deficiencies.

    3.    Identify the qualities of and the differences between the fat-soluble

         A.          Identify the different forms of beta-carotene.

         B.          Describe some of the differences between natural and synthetic vitamin E.

         C.          Discuss the possible danger of vitamin K toxicity.

         D.          Discuss the importance of Vitamin D.

    4.    Identify the qualities of and the differences between the water-soluble vitamins.

         A.          Explain why cyanocobalamin is necessary for the proper functioning of the nervous system.

         B.          Discuss the connection between vitamin B12 deficiency and folic acid deficiency.

         C.          Describe the differences and similarities between choline, inositol and PABA.

         D.          Discuss the scientific studies that show a link between supplementation with vitamin C and a lower rate of certain types of cancer.

         E.          Describe the role of B vitamins in healthy brain and nerve function.

    5.    Discuss the importance of balance minerals and state the best sources of minerals.

         A.          Describe how the body works to balance minerals such as calcium.

         B.          Explain how manganese is needed for dozens of enzyme systems that affect multiple bodily systems.

         C.          Identify the different types of fatty acids and the products that contain them.

         D.          Describe some common indications of mineral deficiencies and toxicities.

         E.          Identify the prescription pharmaceuticals that may affect mineral absorption.

         F.           Explain why the modern diet is more deficient in minerals than indigenous diets.

         G.          Discuss the effects of iron deficiencies and excesses on the body.

         H.          Explain why it is necessary to keep a balance of minerals, such as sodium to potassium and zinc to copper.

         I.            Identify some of the reasons that selenium is implicated in many chronic and serious conditions.

         J.           Discuss the importance of chromium for people with type II diabetes.

         K.          Describe the importance of boron for postmenopausal women.

         L.          Describe other minerals such as phosphorus, magnesium, zinc, iron, copper and iodine.

    6.    Describe some of the derivatives that are needed for optimum health including: coenzymes of vitamins, nutraceuticals found in nature
           and 
    synthesized chemicals.

         A.          Describe how CoQ10, D-ribose, and L-carnitine work synergistically.

         B.          Explain why the average modern diet has an unbalanced intake of essential fatty acids.

         C.          Discuss how some supplements work in the hormonal systems.

         D.          Identify a few of the flavinoids.

         E.          Discuss the importance of other nutrients such as alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), garlic, glutathione, n-acetylcysteine (NAC), melatonin, and
                       DHEA.

     7.    Research various studies related to nutritional supplementation to assist in determining one's individual need for vitamins and
            minerals.

         A.          Find and examine scientific journals.

         B.          Discuss similar studies and their correlations.

         C.          Use clinical trial information to teach others and nutritional supplements.

         D.          Correlate certain health conditions with a supplement plan.

         E.          Select an appropriate intake of each supplement to meet the severity of a health condition.

         F.          Choose between supplements that may overlap in the plan.

         G.         Implement a personal supplement plan.

  
  •  

    LWT 214 - Techniques and Applications of Health Fitness Equipment

    Credits: 2
    Explores a variety of Health Fitness equipment and apparatus through practical application and experience, including but not limited to dumbbells, medicine balls, stability ball, BOSU ball, resistance tubes, body bars, foam rollers, heavy ropes, body weight, selectorized machines, free weights, and plyometric boxes, Discusses specific anatomy, safe technique, modifications as well as exercise guidelines in preparation for personal training.

    Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in Health Fitness Specialst program
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Explain the concepts and components of health fitness equipment.
      1. List and Describe exercises that can be done for each muscle group utilizing a variety of small fitness equipment.
      2. Identify factors that affect confidence, balance, and performance in exercise
      3. Understand the physical benefits associated with weight training.
      4. Compare and contrast the benefits of body weight and small equipment fitness exercises VS weight training machines
      5. Describe how small equipment resistance training can enhance Activities of Daily Living
      6. Discuss the factors affecting exercise selection.
      7. Describe and explain concentric and eccentric muscle contractions
      8. Describe and explain the difference between muscular strength, muscular endurance, hypertrophy, atrophy, and muscle tone
      9. Know the proper order of exercises to maximize each training session.
      10. Understand the number of sets, repetitions, and intensity of exercises for different types of populations
      11. Know the proper rest needed between sets, exercises, and days of training.
      12. Describe and explain muscle soreness and Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness
      13. Understand the importance of receiving medical clearance from a physician before participating in any exercise program.
      14. Identify appropriate storage, cleaning, and safety check of health fitness equipment
      15. Understand the importance and proper procedures of spotting and modifications of exercises
      16. Describe the importance of the warm-up, stretching, and cool-down phases of an exercise program.
      17. Describe and explain the following weight training terms: set, rep, load, overload, agonist, antagonist, flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, DOMS, rotation, circumduction, isometric, isotonic, isokinetic, eccentric and concentric contractions.
      18. List a variety of resistance exercises for the upper and lower body utilizing portable health fitness equipment
      19. Identify the major muscle groups involved in the performance of exercises.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts and components of Health Fitness equipment
      1. Apply knowledge of resistance training principles to develop exercise programs for a variety of populations.
      2. Develop and lead a total body training session utilizing small health fitness equipment
      3. Demonstrate a variety portable health fitness equipment exercises for both the upper and lower body using safe and effective techniques.
      4. Demonstrate ability to monitor heart rates and educate participants in monitoring theirs.
      5. Perform warm-up stretching, and cool-down exercises.
      6. Demonstrate static stretching exercises for each major muscle group.
      7. Perform the proper procedures of spotting.
      8. Demonstrate effective communication while leading exercise
  
  •  

    LWT 230 - Theory of Strength and Conditioning

    Credits: 3
    Explores a variety of strength training principles and theories through the study of multiple exercise modes including free and machine weights, plyometrics, speed and agility, and cardiovascular training. Discusses specific anatomy and physiology, as well as exercise guidelines, in preparation for program development.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 101W , BIO 140W  or BIO 152W  with a “C” (2.0) minimum grade
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of strength training and conditioning.
      1. Describe the origins of weight training and understand how it has progressed.
        1. Identify internal and external factors that affect performance.
      2. Understand the physical benefits associated with weight training.
        1. Understand the benefits and drawbacks of using free weights and machines.
      3. Understand how weight training can increase the wellness of life.
        1. Discuss the factors affecting exercise selection.
      4. Resolve common misconceptions regarding weight training.
        1. Describe and explain the characteristics of effective goals.
      5. List the various types of weight training principles.
        1. Understand the difference between muscle strength, muscle endurance, muscle power, muscle size, and muscle tone.
      6. List and describe the five components of fitness and list the effects that weight training has on them.
        1. Determine the number of days per week needed to weight train to accomplish goals.
      7. Understand the physical and functional differences between skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscles.
        1. Know the difference between core and auxiliary exercises.
      8. Have a general knowledge of the components that make up skeletal muscles.
        1. Know the proper order of exercises to maximize each training session.
      9. Know how the different energy systems are used by the body during exercise.
        1. Discuss the importance of applied sport psychology to performance enhancement.
      10. Understand the general mechanics of how skeletal muscle contraction occurs as well as the different types of contractions that may occur.
        1. Know the proper number of sets, repetitions, and intensity for different types of weight training programs.
      11. Differentiate between muscle fiber types.
        1. Know the proper rest needed between sets, exercises, and days of training.
      12. Understand how muscles work together to produce force and movement.
        1. Know the positive and negative side effects of pharmacological agents.
      13. Understand the general theories regarding the cause of how muscle soreness is produced.
        1. Know the effects of anabolic steroids on the body.
      14. Understand the importance of receiving medical clearance from a physician before participating in a weight-training program.
        1. Understand the role of human growth hormone in the development of muscle and bone.
      15. Recognize the proper attire for weight training.
        1. Know the dangers associated with blood doping.
      16. Identify the equipment including safety devices used in weight training.
        1. Understand the proper use of nutritional supplements.
      17. Identify appropriate etiquette included in weight training.
        1. Describe the claimed benefits of popular supplements.
      18. Understand the importance and proper procedures of spotting.
        1. Describe and explain the essential nutrients and recommended levels needed for specific weight training programs.
      19. Describe the importance of the warm-up, stretching, and cool-down phases of an exercise program.
        1. Discuss some of the misconceptions of weight training for prepubescent children, pregnant women, elderly persons, and individuals that are physically or mentally disabled.
      20. Understand the differences between a general and specific warm-up.
        1. Identify the distinct requirements of individuals from the above groups.
      21. Identify the factors that affect muscle flexibility.
      22. Understand the term proprioreceptive neuromuscular facilitation.
      23. Describe and explain the following weight training terms: set, rep, load, overload, periodization, macrocycle, microcycle, visualization, mental rehearsal, stress, human growth hormone, acromegaly, blood doping, chromium, vanadium, amino acids, proteins, ergogenic aids, anabolic steroids, amphetamines, pharmacological agents, agonist, antagonist, flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, DOMS, rotation, circumduction, isometric, isotonic, isokinetic, eccentric and concentric contractions.
      24. List a
  
  •  

    LWT 231W - Introduction to Athletic Training

    Credits: 3


    Introduces students to the roles, responsibilities, and qualifications of a Certified Athletic Trainer (A.T.C.). Provides an overview of the basic knowledge and skills possessed by an A.T.C. including their role in the sports medicine team, nutrition, injury prevention, assessment, and treatment, as well as learning to identify emergency situations and provide direction for their management.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     The student will be able to define the roles, responsibilities, and qualifications of a Certified Athletic Trainer.

         A.          Understand the evolution of the sports medicine discipline.

         B.          Understand and define the terms sports medicine and athletic trainer, and identify potential job opportunities in the career field.

         C.          Identify the academic and clinical requirements necessary to obtain the ATC certification from the NATABOC.

         D.          Identify the roles and responsibilities of the athletic trainer as a member of the sports medicine team.

         E.          Define the terms liability and negligence and explain their relevance to the athletic trainer.

         F.          Understand the psychology of the injured athlete and explain the relationship between the athlete and trainer.

         G.         Recognize and accept the importance of good public relations with the media, the general public, other medical and allied health care
                      personnel, and legislators.

     2.    The student will be able to explain the principles used in developing a thorough comprehensive athletic injury/illness prevention
             program 
    including the roles of both coaches and athletes.

         A.          Explain the underlying need for a pre-participation physical evaluation, and describe the technique involved in their measure.

         B.          Identify conditions that could exclude an athlete from participating in physical activity or sport.

         C.          Identify areas that athletic personnel or supervisors must be familiar with in order to avoid or reduce the possibility of injury or illness
                       occurring to athletes or others engaged in physical activity.

         D.          Describe the principles of effective heat loss and heat illness prevention programs.

         E.          Evaluate the accepted guidelines, recommendations, and policy position statements relating to practice during extreme weather conditions.

     3.    The student will be able to recognize emergency situations and determine appropriate actions for their management.

         A.          Understand proper protocol in dealing with emergency situations including roles of the team members, the emergency medical plan, and
                       transportation of the injured athlete.

         B.          Describes the signs and symptoms of deep and superficial vein thromboses, pulmonary embolism and other emboli, and myocardial
                       infarction.

         C.          Describe the signs and symptoms associated with shock.

         D.          Explain the initial treatment of shock while arranging for transportation to an emergency facility.

         E.          Describe the process of the evaluation for face and neck injuries and identifies with proper treatment and care of those injured areas.

         F.           Identify anatomy, injury assessment, and rehabilitation specific to the spine.

         G.          Recognize various spinal injuries and determines if emergency care is appropriate.

         H.          Identify the signs and symptoms of traumatic injuries to the throat, thorax, and visceral areas.

         I.           Identifies with the signs and symptoms associated with internal injuries to the abdomen and explain how to care for these injuries.

    4.    The student will be able to identify common signs, symptoms, and treatment protocols of common athletic injuries.

         A.          Explain how force plays a role in the biomechanical basis of musculoskeletal injuries.

         B.          Identifies common tissues that are frequently injured in sports related trauma and explains the process by which they heal.

         C.          Identify common conditions affecting the skin, bones, joints, and muscles, e.g., staph infections, epiphysitis, and myositis.

         D.         Understand the process involved in the evaluation of the injured athlete including on-site and secondary assessment.

         E.          Identify basic anatomy for major regions of the body including the shoulder, the arm/elbow/wrist/hand, the pelvis, the hip and thigh, the
                       knee, the leg, the ankle, the foot, and the skin.

         F.           Recognize the signs and symptoms of common musculoskeletal injuries specific to the shoulder, the arm/elbow/wrist/hand, the pelvis, the
                       hip and thigh, the knee, the leg, the ankle, the foot, and the skin.

         G.         Understand the application of basic modalities and therapeutic exercise to common athletic injuries.

    5.    The student will be able to record information using standard nomenclature of athletic injuries and communcation using commonly accepted medical terminology.

         A.          List and define directional terms and cardinal planes used to describe the body and the relationship of its parts.

         B.          List and define the terms associated with body movement, joint biomechanics, and range of motion.

         C.          Understand the importance of record keeping in athletic training.

         D.          Describe how to record HOPS and SOAP notes appropriately as they pertain to  musculoskeletal injuries.

     6.    The student will be able to explain the principles of nutrition and dietary supplementation including ergogenic aids.

         A.          Understand how proper nutrition plays a role in appropriate weight gain and loss.

         B.          Understand the importance of proper nutrition on pre- and post-event meals.

         C.          Recognizes prevailing misconceptions regarding the proper use of food, fluids, and nutritional supplements.

         D.          Describes the principles, advantages, and disadvantages of the ergogenic aid and dietary supplements used by athletes and others
                       involved in physical activity, in an effort to improve performance.

         E.          Identify the consequences of improper fluid replacement.

         F.          Describe signs, symptoms, and physical consequences of disordered eating and explain the referral system for those individuals.

    7.    The student will be able to apply basic athletic training skills and utilize appropriate equipment pertaining to athletic injuries.

         A.          Determine what emergency care supplies and equipment are necessary for event coverage.

         B.          Understand the role of taping and bracing in injury prevention and management.

         C.          Understand the role of protective equipment in sports.

         D.          Identify the proper selection, fit, and use of crutches.

  
  •  

    LWT 240 - Health Fitness Instructor/Personal Trainer

    Credits: 4


    Introduces the skills and knowledge needed to become a certified personal trainer. Covers how to screen and evaluate prospective clients, design safe and effective exercise programs, identify physiological and psychological response to exercise, promote lifestyle behavior modification, quantify the energy cost of work (physical activity), and communicate effectively. Includes self-employment issues as well as legal issues.

    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites: BIO 101W  or BIO 152W ; and LWT 251  or BIO 251; and LWT 230  with a “C” (2.0) minimum grade.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives   Outcome 1:    Explain the specific components of physical fitness and the health value of

                               each.

         Objective

         A.          Describe the elements of total fitness.

         B.          Demonstrate the role of physical activity in affecting quality of life.

         C.          Describe the goals and behaviors of a healthy lifestyle.

         D.         Describe the link between physical activity and lowered risk of premature health problems.

      Outcome 2:    Explain the guidelines for medical screening and safety as applied to

                               individual and group exercise program.

         Objective

         A.          Understand the pathophysiology of arteriosclerosis and other cardiovascular problems.

         B.          Identify risk factors for coronary heart disease and designate those that may be favorable to

                      modify by regular and appropriate physical activity habits.

         C.          Differentiate between the amount and type of exercise required for various health benefits

                      and that required for fitness development.

         D.         Identify short- and long-term benefits associated with fitness participation.

         E.          Be aware of the risks associated with exercise participation.

      Outcome 3:    Explain and demonstrate basic knowledge of exercise physiology.

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         Objective

         A.          Indicate the methods by which muscle produces energy aerobically and anaerobically and

                      evaluate the importance of each type of energy production in fitness and sport activities.

         B.          Describe the structure of skeletal muscle and the sliding filament theory of muscle contraction.

         C.          Describe tension development in terms of twitch, summation, and tetanus, and describe the

                      role of recruitment of muscle fiber types in exercise of increasing intensities.

         D.         Describe the various fuels for muscle work and the effect of exercise intensity and duration

                      on the respiratory exchange ratio.

         E.          Describe the effect of types of exercise tests, training, heredity, gender, age, altitude, carbon

                       monoxide, and cardiovascular and pulmonary disease on VO2 max.

         F.          Describe how the ventilatory threshold and the lactate threshold are indicators of fitness as

                      well as predictors of performance in endurance events.

         G.         Explain the changes in heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, and oxygen extraction

                      during a graded exercise test and the effect of training on those responses.

         H.         Link the variation in VO2 max in the population to differences in maximal cardiac output and

                      oxygen extraction.

         I.          Describe the changes in systolic blood pressure and the double product during a graded

                      exercise test and how they differ for arm and leg work.

         J.          Summarize the effects of endurance training on muscle, metabolic, and cardiovascular

                      responses to submaximal work, and VO2 max.

         K.          Describe the effect of reduced training or cessation of training on VO2 max, and the degree

                      to which endurance training effects are specific to the muscles involved in the training.

         L.          Describe how men and women differ in their cardiovascular responses to graded exercise.

         M.         Contrast the cardiovascular responses measured during dynamic exercise with those

                      measured during isometric exercise or heavy resistance training exercise.

         N.         Contrast the importance of the different mechanisms for heat loss during heavy exercise and

                       during submaximal exercise in a hot environment, and describe the effect of training in a hot

                      and humid environment with no heat tolerance.

      Outcome 4:    Explain and demonstrate basic knowledge of kinesiology.

         Objective

         A.          Distinguish between synarthrodial, amphiathrodial, and diathrodial joints, both structurally and

                      functionally, and identify the structure of a diathrodial joint.

         B.          List the factors that determine range and direction of motion at the joints.

         C.          Name and demonstrate the movements possible at each joint.

         D.         Describe forces that can cause joint movement and that can resist movement caused by

                      another force.

         E.          Describe the gross structure of a muscle.

         F.          Explain how muscle tension can be increased.

         G.         Describe the phases of a ballistic movement including the type of muscle contraction.

         H.         Explain the differences between concentric, eccentric, and isometric muscle contractions.

         I.          Describe the role of muscles.

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         J.          List the major muscles in each muscle group, and identify the major actions and joint(s) of

                      involvement of the following muscles: trapezius, serratus anterior, deltoid, pectoralis major,

                      latissimus dorsi, biceps

         K.          Cite specific errors that occur during exercise for the vertebral column, lumbosacral joints,

                      and knee joint.

      Outcome 5:    Explain and demonstrate basic knowledge of biomechanics.

         Objective

         A.          Analyze locomotion, throwing, cycling, jumping, and swimming for the movements and muscle

                       involvement.

         B.          Describe good lifting techniques.

         C.          Describe torque and its relationship to muscle contractions.

         D.         Describe how an exerciser can change body segment positions to alter the resistive torque.

      Outcome 6:    Determine the energy cost of all types of physical activity.

         Objective

         A.          Describe how oxygen consumption measurements can be used to estimate energy

                      production and list the number of calories derived per liter of oxygen and per gram of

                      carbohydrate, fat, and protein.

         B.          Express energy expenditure as L · min-1, kcal · min-1, ml · kg-1, min-1, METs, and kcal . kg-1 .

                       hr-1.

         C.          Estimate the oxygen cost of walking, jogging, and running, including the cost of walking and

                      running one mile.

         D.         Estimate the oxygen cost of cycle ergometry exercise for both arm and leg work.

         E.          Estimate the oxygen cost of bench stepping.

         F.          Identify the approximate energy cost of recreational, sport, and other activities; and describe

                      the effect of environmental factors on the heart rate response to a fixed work rate.

      Outcome 7:    Explain and demonstrate knowledge of basic nutrition.

         Objective

         A.          List the six essential nutrients, describing their role in the proper functioning of the body, and

                      list the recommended percentages of calories from fats, proteins, and carbohydrates.

         B.          Discuss the appropriate assessment of dietary intake.

         C.          Describe the role of the USDA Food Guide Pyramid and the U.S. Dietary Guidelines in making

                      healthy nutritional choices.

         D.         Explain the relationship between the blood lipid profile and cardiovascular disease and the

                      role of diet and exercise in modifying blood lipids.

         E.          Describe appropriate methods for maintaining hydration during exercise.

         F.          Discuss the protein, vitamin, and mineral needs of a physically active person.

         G.         Describe an appropriate means for maximizing glycogen storage prior to competition.

         H.         List the three components of the female athlete triad.

      Outcome 8:    Explain and demonstrate the techniques for assessment of body

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         Objective

         A.          Discuss the impact of weight and body composition on health and physical fitness and

                      describe the health implications for different types of body fat distribution patterns.

         B.          Discuss the importance of body composition analysis in assessing physical fitness.

         C.          Identify common measurement sites for skinfolds.

         D.         Identify common measurement sites for girths.

         E.          Assess body compositions using a variety of techniques and describe the advantages and

                      disadvantages of these techniques.

      Outcome 9:    Describe the guidelines for safe and successful weight control and the role of

                                exercise in the maintenance of desirable body fat levels.

         Objective

         A.          Describe the typical changes in body composition that occur with aging.

         B.          Describe the role that energy balance plays in weight loss/weight maintenance.

         C.          Identify the factors that contribute to obesity.

         D.         Prescribe guidelines for caloric intake to facilitate weight loss or weight gain.

         E.          Describe appropriate and inappropriate weight loss goals, discuss the role of exercise in

                      weight loss and weight maintenance, and prescribe safe and effective exercise programs

                      for obese individuals.

         F.          Describe appropriate behavioral change strategies for modifying and/or maintaining body

                      composition.

         G.         State the efficacy of quick-fix weight loss methods.

         H.         Discuss the link between body weight and self-esteem.

         I.          Recognize signs of eating disorders.

         J.          Prescribe health guidelines for gaining weight.

      Outcome 10: Explain and demonstrate the techniques for assessment of

                               cardiorespiratory endurance and blood pressure.

         Objective

         A.          Describe the relationship of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) to health and list reasons for

                      doing CRF testing as well as risks associated with CRF testing.

         B.          Present a logical sequence of testing.

         C.          Describe procedures for conducting walking and jogging/running field tests to estimate CRF.

         D.         Contrast the treadmill, cycle ergometer, and bench step as instruments to use in doing graded

                       exercise tests (GXTs).

         E.          List variables measured during a GXT.

         F.          Describe procedures used prior to, during, and following testing.

         G.         Contrast submaximal and maximal GXTs.

         H.         Describe the heart rate extrapolation procedures to estimate VO2 max using submaximal

                      treadmill, cycle, and bench step GXTs.

      Outcome 11: Explain and demonstrate the techniques for assessment of muscular

                               strength and endurance.

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         Objective

         A.          Define muscular strength and endurance and list the factors related to muscle strength.

         B.          List the physiological adaptations associated with strength training in males and females and

                      describe maturational changes in bone and muscle as people age.

         C.          Describe the common theories related to the cause of delayed-onset muscle soreness

                      (DOMS).

         D.         List the factors related to muscle fatigue and contrast fast-twitch muscle fibers in terms of

                      fatigue.

         E.          Describe isometric, dynamic (isotonic), and isokinetic test to assess muscular strength.

         F.          Describe field tests to evaluate muscular endurance.

      Outcome 12: Explain and demonstrate the techniques for assessment of flexibility and the

                                relationship with range of motion.

         Objective

         A.          Describe the relationship between flexibility/range of motion (ROM) and low-back function.

         B.          List five factors that can affect the degree of an individual’s flexibility/ROM.

         C.          Describe the amount of flexion that can occur between the rib cage and the sacrum and

                      state a rule of thumb to follow in performing lumbar extension exercises.

         D.         Explain why having good ROM at the hip joint is important to having a healthy back.

         E.          Describe the advantages and disadvantages of the sit-and-reach tests.

         F.          Characterize the “dose” of exercise in an exercise prescription and identify means by which

                      a health-related effect might occur.

         G.         Explain the concepts of overload and specificity as they relate to training programs.

         H.         Describe general guidelines related to cardiorespiratory fitness programs, including those

                      related to warm-up and cool-down.

         I.          Develop an exercise prescription for correct exercise intensity, duration, and frequency to

                      achieve and maintain cardiorespiratory fitness goals.

         J.          Express exercise intensity in terms of energy production, heart rate, and rating of perceived

                      exertion.

         K.          Contrast the approaches used for developing exercise prescriptions for the general public,

                      the fit population, and for people whose complete GXT results are available; and describe the

                       differences between a supervised and an unsupervised program.

         L.          Describe the effects of temperature and humidity, altitude, and pollution on the exercise

                      prescription.

      Outcome 13: Explain and demonstrate the techniques for improvement of muscular

                               strength and endurance.

         Objective

         A.          Explain the principles of overload, specificity, and progression and how they relate to

                      resistance training.

         B.          Describe the adaptations of muscle to aerobic and anaerobic training.

         C.          Describe the following methods of resistance training: isometric, dynamic (constant

                      resistance, variable resistance, and circuit training), isokinetic, and plyometric.

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         D.         Compare the effectiveness of the different methods of resistance training.

         E.          Describe the following systems of resistance training: super set, pyramid set, and split

                      routine.

         F.          Describe a resistance training program for increasing or maintaining bone mass.

         G.         Contrast the training program used for strength gains versus maintenance of strength and

                      describe the symptoms of over-training.

         H.         Identify the physiological principles related to warm-up and cool-down exercises.

         I.          Describe the basic precautions to take in a weight room to ensure participant safety.

         J.          Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship among number of repetitions, intensity,

                      number of sets, and rest with regard to resistance training programs for strength and

                      endurance.

      Outcome 14: Explain and demonstrate knowledge of injury prevention.

         Objective

         A.          Describe a motion segment, the shock absorbers of the spine, and the role of the facet joints.

         B.          Differentiate between functional and structural spinal curves and describe limitations that

                      either may impose on exercise programs for the afflicted individual.

         C.          Explain why it is important that the muscles of the trunk should be able to control pelvic

                      positioning.

         D.         Differentiate between the low-back problems typically seen in adults and those seen in youth.

         E.          Explain why full sit-ups should not be done.

         F.          Describe how the anatomical limitations of range of motion (ROM) should be a factor as you

                      prescribe ROM exercises for your clients.

      Outcome 15: Identify risk factors for both apparently healthy individuals and those with

                               controlled disease.

         Objective

         A.          Modify the exercise prescription for the following populations and controlled diseases and

                      disabilities:

                      1.    Children

                      2.    Elderly

                      3.    Pregnant women

                      4.    Orthopedic limitation

                      5.    Type I diabetes

                      6.    Type II diabetes

                      7.    Asthma

                      8.    Hypertension

                      9.    Seizure disorder

                      10.  Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

                      11.  Cardiac disease

      Outcome 16: Effectively demonstrate counseling individuals concerning lifestyle stress

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         Objective

         A.          Describe how the HFI deals with different personalities in an exercise setting.

         B.          Explain how to enhance motivation to begin and continue exercise.

         C.          List techniques to communicate with individuals in group programs.

         D.         Describe the components of stress.

         E.          Explain how physical activity may affect stress.

         F.          List ways to minimize unhealthy stress levels.

         G.         Identify techniques that can be used in an exercise program to facilitate skill development in

                      muscular relaxation.

         H.         Describe the trans-theoretical model and stages involved in health behavior change.

         I.          Discuss the role of motivation in exercise adoption and adherence and identify six specific

                      behavior change strategies for facilitating and adoption and maintenance of exercise.

         J.          Describe strategy health fitness instructors (HFIs) and personal fitness trainers (PFTs) can

                      use to monitor and support behavior change.

         K.          Describe ways that relapse prevention can be applied to exercise behavior.

         L.          Identify effective communication skills useful in motivating and fostering health behavior

                      change.

      Outcome 17: Demonstrate abilities and qualities of the HFI.

         Objective

         A.          Demonstrate the qualities of an effective Health Fitness Instructor

                      1.    Access to material resources and services

                      2.    Knowledge and experience

                      3.    Legitimate authority

                      4.    Ability to generate expectations of success

                      5.    Believable instructions and plans

                      6.    Model of healthy behavior

                      7.    Patience to help the participant build small changes upon one another

                      8.    Ability to enhance the problem-solving skills of the participant

                      9.    Flexibility

                      10.  Support

                      11.  Trustworthiness

                      12.  Self-awareness

                      13.  Commitment to providing timely, specific feedback

      Outcome 18: Explain and demonstrate knowledge of injury prevention.

         Objective

         A.          Describe ways to minimize injury risk and prevent the transmission of blood borne pathogens.

         B.          Describe the signs and symptoms of soft-tissue injuries (sprains, strains, contusions, and

                      heel bruise), how to provide initial treatment of injuries, and when to use heat in long-term

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                      treatment.

         C.          Identify signs, symptoms, and proper treatment measure for bone injuries, wounds, and

                      common skin irritations.

         D.         Describe the causes of heat-related disorders, how to prevent heat illness, and how to treat

                      a heat-related emergency when it occurs and provide guidelines for fluid replacement before

                      and after exercise.

         E.          Explain the causes of cold-related disorders and how to prevent frosting, superficial and

                      deep frostbite, and hypothermia, and how to treat a cold-related emergency when it occurs.

         F.          Distinguish between the signs and symptoms of a diabetic coma and those of insulin shock;

                      describe the proper treatment for each.

         G.         Identify common cardiovascular and pulmonary complications resulting from participation in

                      exercise.

         H.         Identify the signs, symptoms, and management of common orthopedic problems; classify

                      injuries into mild, moderate, and severe; and recommend appropriate modification of exercise

                      programs when injury occurs.

         I.          Describe procedures to check vital signs.

         J.          Describe artificial respiration and cardiopulmonary techniques for adults.

      Outcome 19: Explain and demonstrate basic knowledge of the heart’s anatomy and

                               function.

         Objective

         A.          Describe the basic anatomy of the heart.

         B.          Describe the basic electrophysiology of the heart.

         C.          Define the electrocardiogram and identify the standard settings for paper speed and

                      amplitude.

         D.         Identify the basic electrocardiogram complexes and calculate heart rate from

                      electrocardiograph rhythm strips.

         E.          Describe the various types of atrioventricular conduction defects and their probable impact

                      on a subject’s exercise response.

         F.          Identify the normal and abnormal cardiac rhythms and their significance, and predict the

                      probable impact of the abnormal rhythms on exercise performance.

         G.         Describe electrocardiographic signs and biochemical markers of a heart attack.

         H.         List the common categories of prescription medications used to treat cardiovascular and

                      related disease, some of the members of each category, and the probable impact of these

                      medications on exercise performance.

      Outcome 20: Explain the guidelines for medical screening and safety as applied to

                               individual and group exercise programs.

         Objective

         A.          Describe the importance of long-range planning.

         B.          Describe the personnel and working environment recommended for a fitness program.

         C.          Identify the elements of a comprehensive fitness program.

         D.          Explain the elements of the budget.

         E.          Describe the equipment recommended for a fitness program.

         F.           Explain the importance of communication with staff, participants, and the public.

         G.          Describe the importance of keeping records of all aspects of a fitness program.

         H.          Describe the importance of evaluation.

  
  •  

    LWT 242 - Group Fitness Instructor

    Credits: 4


    Introduces the skills and knowledge needed to become a certified Group Fitness Instructor. Includes how to screen and evaluate prospective clients, design safe and effective exercise programs, instruct clients in correct exercise techniques to avoid injury, and respond to the typical questions and problems that arise in a group exercise setting.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 101W  or BIO 140W  or BIO 152W ; and LW 222  or LWT 210  
    Corequisite(s): LWA 151 , LWA 153 ,  or LWA 157  
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Explain the concepts and components of aerobic instruction.

         A.          Identify and describe cardio respiratory physiology terms as they apply to endurance training, e.g., cardiac output, stroke volume, oxygen
                      consumption ventilation, respiration, and aerobic capacity.

         B.          Identify and describe the principles of training endurance, e.g., overload, specificity, reversibility, progression, frequency, training effect, and
                      adaptation.

         C.          Identify the benefits of endurance training, e.g., improvement in aerobic capacity, weight control, and reduced stress levels, body fat, and
                       risk of heart disease.

         D.         Identify the risk factors for coronary artery disease and their impact on normal cardio respiratory function.

         E.          Describe the relationship between heart rate, exercise intensity, and oxygen requirement.

         F.           Identify and describe the five components of physical fitness.

         G.          Identify training principles for improving the five components of fitness.

         H.          Identify and describe the following terms pertaining to muscular fitness training effect, resistance, overload, specificity, repetitions, sets,
                       frequency, rest periods, progression, and muscle atrophy, and hypertrophy.

         I.            Identify and describe the various methods of using resistance during muscular fitness training: body weight, gravity, bands, hand weights,
                       and leverage.

         J.           Identify the risks associated with performing the Valsalva maneuver during resistance training.

         K.          Identify static and dynamic stretches and the risks and benefits of each method.

         L.           Identify the terms hypermobility, flexibility, and tightness and their relationship of joint mobility and muscular flexibility.

         M.          Identify the risks associated with muscular strength training: improper body mechanics and

                       lifting techniques that may result in acute and chronic overuse injuries.

         N.          Identify and describe the different muscle fiber types and their individual characteristics.

         O.          Identify how osteoporosis and osteoarthritis affect the skeletal system.

         P.           Identify and describe the key terms in neuromuscular physiology: motor neurons, motor unit, and neuromuscular junction.

         Q.          Explain the roles of Golgi tendon organ and muscle spindles in the regulation of muscle contraction.

         R.          Explain motor skills with respect to agility, balance, and coordination.

         S.          Identify the fundamentals of metabolic physiology, including anaerobic metabolism (ATP-CP system and glycolysis), oxidative metabolism,
                       and fatty acid oxidation.

         T.           Explain aerobic and anaerobic metabolism and the roles of each during various physical activities.

         U.          Explain the roles of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins as fuel for aerobic and anaerobic exercise.

         V.           Identify and describe the following definitions: kilocalorie, caloric expenditure, caloric deficit, caloric intake, and energy balance.

         W.         Describe the basic components of and the general pathway of blood through the cardiorespiratory system, e.g., heart, vessels, lungs.

         X.          Identify and describe the general anatomy of the heart, cardiovascular system, and cardiorespiratory system.

         Y.          Identify the major components of the musculoskeletal system, e.g., bones, muscles, ligaments, tendons.

         Z.          Explain the function of the different joints of the body.

         AA.       Identify and describe the following anatomical and directional terms: anterior, posterior, medial, lateral, dorsal, ventral, plantar, superior,
                      inferior, prone, and supine.

         BB.       Identify the anatomical planes: sagittal, frontal, and transverse.

         CC.       Explain the fundamental movements from the anatomical position, e.g., abduction, adduction, elevation, depression, flexion, dorsiflexion,
                       plantar flexion, and rotation.

         DD.       Explain the types of muscular contractions: isokinetic, isometric, isotonic (eccentric and  concentric).

         EE.       Explain normal postural alignment and normal curvature of the back: kyphosis and ordosis.

         FF.        Explain the abnormal curvatures of the back: excessive kyphosis, excessive lordosis, and scoliosis.

         GG.       Identify the different agonist, antagonist, and synergist, and pair opposing muscles.

         HH.       Explain the principle of muscle balance.

         II.          Explain the potential risks associated with certain exercises, e.g., double leg raises, full neck circles, trunk hyperextension, and so on.

         JJ.         Explain the factors that affect movement: neurological, proprioceptive, biomechanical, and kinesthetic awareness.

         KK.       Identify and describe the various components of an aerobic class, e.g., warm-up, pre/post

         LL.        Identify the components of an exercise program, including frequency, intensity, duration, mode of activity, and progression.

         MM.      Explain the various methods of determining and monitoring exercise intensity, including target heart rate, Borg’s rating of perceived
                      exertion, and the talk test.

         NN.       Explain the current American College of Sports Medicine guidelines for imp[roving and maintaining good fitness levels.

         OO.      Explain the various methods of fitness assessments including submaximal and maximal aerobic capacity tests, muscular strength and
                      endurance tests, flexibility, and body composition tests.

         PP.        Explain the benefits of regular exercise for specific conditions such as coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus,
                      musculoskeletal disorders, obesity, and asthma.

         QQ.      Identify the modifications necessary for a participant with a medical condition who has been cleared by a physician or appropriate medical
                      personnel.

         RR.       Explain physiological processes and exercise implications for older adults, including musculoskeletal, cardiorespiratory, metabolic, and
                      psychosocial systems.

         SS.        Identify appropriate motivational reinforcement techniques for special populations and how to optimize adherence and other healthy
                       lifestyle behaviors.

         TT.        Identify and describe the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommendations for exercise during pregnancy and the
                      postpartum period, as well as contraindications and warning signs to cease exercise.

         UU.       Identify special concerns of working with children including thermoregulation, anaerobic capacity, intensity monitoring and safety.

         VV.       Identify and describe youth fitness testing methods.

         WW.     Explain the importance of program design, including: gradual increase in exercise intensity, improvement in adequate muscular strength
                      and flexibility, proper body mechanics, and appropriate clothing and equipment.

         XX.       Explain issues related to body image.

         YY.       Explain the issues related to self-efficacy and obsessive/compulsive behavior in a group exercise setting.

         ZZ.        Identify the principles of the learning theory with respect to effective teaching in a group exercise setting.

         AAA.     Identify the six categories of nutrients, their functions, and current dietary guidelines according to the U.S.R.D.A.

         BBB.      Explain special nutritional needs as they apply to osteoporosis and anemia.

         CCC.     Identify nutritional misinformation and misconceptions, e.g., salt tablets and protein powders.

         DDD.     Identify and describe cholesterol, lipoproteins, and triglycerides.

         EEE.     Identify and describe supplements and ergogenic aids, e.g., bee pollen and caffeine.

         FFF.      Identify the toxic effects of over-supplementation of vitamins.

         GGG.    Explain hydration with water versus “sports drinks.”

         HHH.     Identify special dietary needs with respect to referral to a registered dietician.

         III.          Explain the signs and symptoms of atypical eating behaviors.

         JJJ.        Explain concepts from environmental physiology that may affect exercise performance

         KKK.      Identify and describe safe and effective weight loss methods.

         LLL.       Identify and describe the methods of determining ideal body weight, e.g., height/weight charts, scale, body composition.

         MMM.   Identify and describe extreme approaches to weight loss, e.g., fasting, spot reduction, diet pills, drugs.

         NNN.    Identify and describe music and basic musical terms: beat, upbeat, downbeat, accent, meter measure, phrasing, rhythm, tempo,
                      syncopation, and dynamics.

         OOO.    Identify the basic elements of movement variations: spatial, e.g., planes, lines, direction, floor pattern; and temporal, e.g., rhythmic, tempo,
                       phrasing.

         PPP.      Identify the techniques, precautions, and limitations for monitoring heart rate of the radial, carotid, temporal, and apical sites.

         QQQ.    Identify and describe choreography with respect to: variation, repetition, and transition.

         RRR.     Identify the three types of statements used when giving knowledge of results (KR): corrective, value, and neutral.

         SSS.      Identify and describe the various types and appropriate usage of cues.

         TTT.       Identify and describe voice projection and vocal control.

         UUU.      Identify the principles of rhythm necessary for timing cues to ensure safe and effective instruction.

                      1.    Identify and describe common chronic and acute exercise injuries.

         VVV.     Identify the features and operation of sound equipment.

         WWW.  Identify the appropriate volume levels and sound quality needed to ensure safe and effective instruction.

         XXX.     Identify and describe basic CPR and first aid procedures.

         YYY.     Identify and describe the principles of exercise instruction.

         ZZZ.     Identify the principles of evaluating performance.

    2.    Explain the concepts and components of aerobic instruction. Identify the assumptions of risk, including waiver, warning, and informed
           consent. 
    Identify and describe liability including facilities, equipment, supervision, instruction, exercise recommendations, and health
           screening. Identify and 
    describe the ACE code of ethics. Describe accurate record keeping and incident/accident reports. Identify and
           describe professional liability
    insurance. Identify and describe general liability insurance. Identify and describe the available continuing
           education programs offered through 
    individuals, conferences, colleges/universities, seminars, workshops, etc.

    3.    Demonstrate the concepts and components of aerobic instruction.

         A.          Develop exercises that promote pelvic and scapular stability.

         B.          Educate participants on proper body mechanics.

         C.          Design and perform safe and effective exercises for all major muscle groups.

         D.          Apply the results of the fitness assessments to the development or modification of an exercise.

         E.          Identify age characteristics and exercise implications for the older adult.

         F.           Monitor exercise levels during pregnancy using hr, rpe, and respiration.

         G.          Develop safe and effective exercise programs for different populations, e.g., pregnant, elderly, children.

         H.          Design a safe and effective exercise class by applying knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and kinesiology.

         I.            Demonstrate safe and effective exercises for commonly used exercise equipment and their applications: handheld weights, resistance
                       bands, and step/bench.

         J.           Apply different modes of activity and associated exercises to the design of an exercise class.

         K.          Select appropriate music to motivate class participants and encourage adherence to exercise.

         L.          Select music with appropriate tempo for safe and effective exercise participation.

         M.         Select a safe and effective environment in order to maximize safety for class participants.

         N.         Choreograph movement for an aerobic class.

         O.         Simplify and break down movements into modes and components of a class.

         P.          Combine all movements in all modes and components of a class.

         Q.         Demonstrate palpating heart rates at the radial, carotid, temporal, and apical sites correctly.

         R.          Evaluate intensity monitoring methods and making appropriate adaptations for a group or an individual.

         S.          Recognize incorrect posture and improper execution of exercises.

         T.          Incorporate appropriate adaptations for musculoskeletal conditions associated with arthritis, back problems, and osteoporosis.

         U.         Incorporate adaptations for respiratory conditions associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease including asthma, bronchitis, and 
                      emphysema.

         V.          Incorporate appropriate adaptations for metabolic concerns associated with hypoglycemia,diabetes, and obesity.

         W.         Select and use appropriate cues.

         X.          Project the voice safely and effectively.

         Y.          Apply basic principles of nonverbal cueing for hearing impaired participants or participants who no not speak the language of the instructor.

         Z.          Use effective methods to count music, e.g., organize beats into metered groups, tracking measures, and phrases.

         AA.       Move rhythmically to the music, e.g., to the beat, synchronization with musical phrases.

         BB.       Effectively operate sound equipment and determine appropriate volume levels.

         CC.       Select appropriate instructional strategies to motivate participants to excel.

         DD.       Select alternatives to contraindicated exercises.

         EE.        Demonstrate appropriate First Aid and CPR procedures.

         FF.        Select appropriate field test protocols for group exercise.

         GG.       Administer basic fitness assessments.

         HH.       Interpret the results of basic fitness assessments.

         II.          Complete an accident/incident report.

  
  •  

    LWT 251 - Exercise Physiology

    Credits: 4
    Emphasizes the physiological responses of the human body to acute and chronic bouts of exercise. Presents the study of health/fitness appraisal, exercise prescription, quantifying the energy cost of work (physical activity), identifying physiological and psychological responses to exercise, and the administration of exercise programs to diverse populations. Credit may be earned in BIO 251 or LWT 185 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 101W  or BIO 140W  or BIO 152W  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and explain the concepts and components of Exercise Physiology.
      1. Define the terms homeostasis and steady state.
        1. Describe and explain the structure and function of the autonomic nervous system. AAA. Contrast the role of neural adaptations to that of hypertrophy in the increase in strength that occurs with resistance training.
      2. Explain the term negative feedback
        1. Define the terms isotonic and isometric. BBB. Describe health-related fitness using the wellness model.
      3. Define what is meant by the gain of a control system
        1. Describe and explain the following terms: CC-1. Simple twitch CC-2. Summation CC-3. Tetanus. CCC. Identify the three major categories of risk factors and list examples of specific risk factors in each.
      4. Describe factors influencing physical fitness in the United States over the past century.
        1. Discuss the relationship between skeletal muscle fiber types and performance. DDD. Describe the role of “personal responsibility” as a determinant of our well-being.
      5. Discuss the function of the cell membrane, nucleus, and mitochondria.
        1. Discuss the structure and function of a muscle group. EEE. Describe and explain the difference between primary and secondary risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD).
      6. Define the following terms: endergonic reactions, exergonic reactions, coupled reactions, first and second law of thermodynamics, and bioenergetics.
        1. Describe and explain the function of Golgi tendon organ. FFF. Identify the major risk factors associated CHD.
      7. Describe the role of enzymes as catalysts in cellular chemical reactions.
        1. Describe and explain the design and function of the circulatory system. GGG. Identify the U.S. Dietary Goals relative to (a) carbohydrate and fats as a percent of energy intake, (b) salt and cholesterol, and (c) saturated and unsaturated fats.
      8. Discuss the aerobic production of ATP.
        1. Describe and explain the cardiac cycle and the associated electrical activity recorded via the electrocardiogram. HHH. List the classes of nutrients.
      9. Describe and explain general scheme used to regulate metabolic pathways involved in bioenergetics.
        1. Discuss the pattern of redistribution of blood flow during exercise. III. Identify the primary role of carbohydrates, the two major classes, and the recommended changes in the American diet to improve health status.
      10. Discuss the interaction between aerobic and anaerobic ATP production during exercise.
        1. List and discuss those factors responsible for the regulation of stroke volume during exercise. JJJ. Explain how a sum of skinfolds can be “converted” to a percent body fatness value.
      11. Identify the enzymes that are considered rate limiting in glycolysis and the Krebs cycle.
        1. Discuss the regulation of cardiac output during exercise. KKK. List the recommended percent body fatness values for health and fitness for males and females, and explain the concern for both high and low values.
      12. Discuss the relationship between exercise intensity/duration and the bioenergetics pathways that are most responsible for production of ATP during various types of exercise.
        1. Explain the circulatory response to various types of exercise. LLL. Distinguish between obesity due to hyperplasia of fat cells and that due to hypertrophy of fat cells.
      13. Define the terms oxygen deficit, lactate threshold, and oxygen debt.
        1. Identify the factors that regulate local blood flow during exercise. MMM. Summarize the evidence on the order of recruitment of muscle fibers with increasing intensities of activity, and the type of metabolism upon which each is dependent.
      14. Discuss several possible explanations for the sudden rise in blood-lactate concentration during incremental exercise.
        1. Explain the principal physiological function of the pulmonary system. NNN. Describe the factors limiting performance in all-out activities lasting less than ten seconds.
      15. Explain why fat metabolism is
  
  •  

    LWT 252 - Environmental Physiology - The Limits of Human Performance

    Credits: 3


    Emphasizes the physiological responses of the human body to acute and chronic bouts of varying environmental conditions. Presents the study of physiological responses to hot and cold environments, altitude, underwater and microgravity environments, and the effect of air quality on human performance.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 101W  or BIO 153W  or BIO 241  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Describe the physiological response to both acute and chronic exposure to hot and humid environments.

         A.          Explain behavioral temperature regulation and physiological temperature regulation.

         B.          Define core temperature and procedures to determine core temperature.

         C.          Describe impact of acute exposure to hot and humid environments on core temperature, metabolism, evaporative heat loss, skin
                       circulation, electrolytes, cardiovascular parameters, hormonal response.

         D.          Define heat acclimation and acclimatization.

         E.          Describe the thermoregulatory changes that occur with chronic exposure to a hot and humid environment.

         F.          Describe the circulatory, endocrine, and metabolic changes that occur with chronic exposure to a hot and humid environment.

         G.         Define heat disorders.

         H.         Explain how to decrease a person’s risk for heat disorders.

         I.           Describe treatment for heat disorders.

         J.          Explain how exercise is a form of heat acclimation.

     2.    Describe the physiological response to both acute and chronic exposure to cold environments.

         A.          Explain the metabolic and thermal adjustment to cold water submersion.

         B.          Explain the metabolic and thermal adjustments to cold air.

         C.          Describe sources of heat loss and heat gain in cold air.

         D.          Describe the role of body fat, body surface area, clothing, redistribution of blood flow, and non-exercise metabolism in cold air
                      environments.

         E.          Explain the wind chill index.

         F.          List the metabolic, hypothermic, and insulative adaptations to chronic exposure to cold environments.

         G.         Explain the effects of cold acclimation on body fluid regulation and cardiorespiratory responses.

         H.         Discuss the effects of temperature, precipitation, and wind on cold injuries.

         I.           List variables that increase and decrease risk for cold injuries.

         J.          Provide examples of cold/wet injuries and cold/dry injuries.

         K.          Define hypothermia.

         L.          Describe the hypothermic effect on the cardiovascular system, respiratory system, central nervous system, and blood sugar.

         M.         Explain how to treat cold injuries.

         N.         Explain how to decrease a person’s risk for cold injuries.

    3.    Describe the physiological response to both acute and chronic exposure to altitude.

         A.          Define hypoxia.

         B.          Explain Dalton’s law of partial pressures and its relationship to altitude.

         C.          Explain the impact acute altitude exposure has on resting ventilation, gas exchange and transport, metabolism, cardiorespiratory exercise,
                       and strength and endurance.

         D.          Explain the impact chronic altitude exposure has on ventilation, gas exchange, work capacity, oxygen transport and delivery, body
                       composition, and metabolism.

         E.          Define problems associated with acute hypoxia (acute mountain sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, high altitude pulmonary edema,
                      high altitude retinal hemorrhages, disorders of coagulation).

         F.          Define problems associated with chronic hypoxia (reentry pulmonary edema, chronic mountain sickness).

         G.         Discuss problems that are not associated with hypoxia, but occur at high altitude (cold injuries, dehydration, solar radiation injuries, and
                      nutrition).

    4.    Describe the physiological response to both acute and chronic exposure to an underwater environment.

         A.          Define hyperbaric.

         B.          Explain Dalton’s law of partial pressures and its relationship to hyperbaric environments.

         C.          Explain Boyle’s law and Charlie’s law.

         D.          Describe pressure, alveolar gas exchange, cardiovascular responses, and acclimation to breath-holding divan.

         E.          Define the “diving response” physiologically.

         F.          Discuss the issues associated with deep and long dives (SCUBA diving), such as oxygen poisoning, inert gas necrosis, high pressure
                      nervous syndrome, and decompression

                      sickness.

     5.    Describe the physiological response to both acute and chronic exposure to an environment of microgravity.

         A.          Discuss the redistribution of body fluids, and its impact on plasma volume, stroke volume, cardiac output, and blood pressure.

         B.          Define orthostatic intolerance.

         C.          Define muscle atrophy and explain why it occurs in a microgravity environment.

         D.          Define osteoporosis and explain the acceleration of this process in a microgravity environment.

         E.          Explain the potential consequences of radiation exposure that occurs in space.

         F.          Discuss the motion sickness that most astronauts experience upon arrival in space.

         G.         Discuss the physiological problems that astronauts encounter upon returning to Earth.

         H.         Describe the countermeasures that are done while an astronaut is in orbit in an effort to help decrease the effects of microgravity on a
                      person’s physiology.

    6.   Describe the physiological response to both acute and chronic exposure to air of poor quality.

         A.          Identify the pollutants that impact human performance (carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, ozone and primary particulates -
                      dust, smoke and soot.

         B.          Discuss how each of the pollutants impact cardiovascular function, ventilation and blood chemistry.

    7.    Discuss the human impact on extreme environmental conditions.

         A.          Define sustainability.

         B.          Discuss the positive impact sustainable practices can have on various environmental conditions (air pollution, clean up on Everest,
                      oceans).

  
  •  

    LWT 253 - Ergogenic Aids in Sport

    Credits: 2
    Explores substances and phenomenon that claim to improve sport performance. Discusses the purported effects, proven benefits, and risks of various ergogenic aids.Debates and discusses the ethical questions that surround using performance enhancing substances.

    Prerequisite(s): LWT 210  or LW 222 ; and LWT 251  or Instructor Permission
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Discuss the research done and available on ergogenic aids.
      1. Define ergogenic aid.
      2. Define placebo effect.
      3. Explain research bias, conflict of interest, double-blind studies, study limitations.
      4. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of cross-sectional research study design, longitudinal research study design, case studies, observational studies.
    2. Discuss pharmacological agents’ roles in sport performance.
      1. Discuss the proposed ergogenic effects, proven benefits, and risks of particular pharmacological agents (beta-blockers, caffeine, diuretics, amphetamines, ephedrine).
    3. Discuss hormonal agents’ roles in sport performance.
      1. Discuss the proposed ergogenic effects, proven benefits, and risks of particular hormonal agents (anabolic steroids, human growth hormone, erythropoietin).
    4. Discuss physiological agents’ roles in sport performance.
      1. Discuss the proposed ergogenic effects, proven benefits, and risks of partiular physiological agents (blood doping, oxygen supplementation, bicarbonate loading, altitiude training).
    5. Discuss nutritional agents’ roles in sport performance.
      1. Discuss the proposed ergogenic effects, proven benefits, and risks of particular nutritional agents (creatine, amino acids, protein, carbohydrate loading).
    6. Discuss the ethical consideration for ergogenic aids.
      1. List banned substances for various sport organizations.
      2. Discuss criteria for what is banned and what is legal.
      3. Discuss equipment improvements, nutritional practices as ergogenic aids.
  
  •  

    LWT 255 - Health Fitness Management and Promotion

    Credits: 3


    Introduces and explores the different and interesting settings in which health and fitness educators practice and the job responsibilities and opportunities within each of those settings. Emphasizes application, skill development, and professional identity and direction in health promotion occupations.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Describe and explain the concepts and components of Health Management and Promotion.

         A.          Discuss the difference between health education and health promotion

         B.          Discuss the scope of health promotion activities.

         C.          Identify why opportunities for health promotion activities exist in the business venue.

         D.          Describe the qualifications needed for a health promotion professional working in the business/corporate setting.

         E.          Discuss benefits of corporate/business health promotion programs.

         F.          Describe potential activities in health promotion that can specifically meet the needs of the business/corporate sector.

         G.         Discuss the cost savings of health promotion programs in the business/corporate sector.

         H.         Define the process of planning health promotion programs.

         I.           Identify the procedures for securing management support for the health promotion program.

         J.           Discuss the importance of understanding corporate culture.

         K.          Describe the procedures for developing and implementing needs assessments.

         L.          Define five major concepts of adult learning theory.

         M.          Understand that how people change behavior is not clearly understood.

         N.          Explain several prevalent theories as to how people change their behavior.

         O.          Select behavior change activities based on a specific population and how it functions.

         P.           Define and discuss needs assessment and its role and function in the development of health promotion programs.

         Q.          Distinguish between populations and program participants.

         R.          Describe and discuss the types of information collected for needs assessment.

         S.          Identify at least three different approaches to data collection for needs assessment.

         T.           Describe how needs assessment information is used in program development.

         U.          Discuss effective planning procedures

         V.          Describe the levels of intervention in health promotion.

         W.         Determine strategies for interventions.

         X.          Discuss potential legal considerations when conducting health promotion activities.

         Y.          Describe the management process.

         Z.          Understand the impact of leadership on successful programs.

         AA.       Identify administrative issues.

         BB.       Understand the budgetary process

         CC.       Determine criteria for hiring and training staff.

         DD.       Identify procedures for supervising health promotion staff.

         EE.        Differentiate between product marketing and social marketing.

         FF.        Describe methods to provide ongoing monitoring of marketing programs.

         GG.       List a variety of commonly used strategies to increase group involvement.

         HH.       Identify ways to increase participation and adherence in established programs.

         II.          Define validity, reliability, and usability of assessment instruments.

         JJ.         Distinguish between concurrent and predictive validity.

         KK.       Identify characteristics of instruments that enhance validity and reliability.

         LL.        Describe characteristics of assessment instruments used in work site health promotion programs.

         MM.      List considerations for selecting assessment instruments.

         NN.       Describe several action steps that can be taken to help one land one’s first job in health promotion.

         OO.       Define and describe small business

         PP.        Discuss the availability of entrepreneurial opportunities in health promotion

         QQ.       Identify advantages and disadvantages of entrepreneurial careers.

         RR.       Explain a business plan.

         SS.        Describe and explain business start-up ideas and sources.

         TT.        Describe causes of small business failures

    2.    Demonstrate the concepts and components of Health Management and Promotion

         A.          Present the cost savings of health promotion programs in the business/corporate sector.

         B.          Plan and present a health promotion activity or educational session.

         C.          Develop a mission statement, goals, priorities, and objectives for a health promotion program.

         D.          Develop a plan for specific interventions based on specific behavior change theories.

         E.          Demonstrate the process of goal and objective development.

         F.          Analyze equipment needs for a comprehensive health promotion effort.

         G.         Develop screening and enrollment procedures for a health promotion facility.

         H.         Develop criteria for hiring and training staff.

         I.           Develop an employee procedures manual for a specific health promotion program.

         J.          Develop marketing strategies appropriate for a variety of settings and social structures.

         K.          Write a persuasive copy to promote group involvement in activities.

         L.          Develop a physical activity adherence assessment tool and demonstrate how it will be used

         M.         Prepare a word-processed paper documenting the history of public health in the United States.

         N.         Formulate a statement that describes your personal philosophy of life and identify the influences that account for your philosophy.

         O.         Create and defend your own philosophy of health education.

         P.          Actively participate in a health promotion event or organization.

         Q.         Write an abstract or a summary of an article from a refereed journal.

         R.         Locate an article related to some aspect of health promotion, using.

  
  •  

    LWT 260 - Health Fitness Experience

    Credits: 5
    Introduces Health Fitness Education and Promotion students to “on the job” experiences within the Health Promotion field. Includes exercise prescription, health education, health promotion administration and program development in the 300-hour internship experience. Students must have current CPR certification.

    Prerequisite(s): LWT 210 , LWT 230 , LWT 240 , LWT 251 , LWT 255  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 9 Lab Hours: 300
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Be familiar with the internship facility cites and comply with ALL internship policies and procedures.
      1. Read policy and procedure manual.
      2. Follow policies and procedures.
      3. Practice time management skills
      4. Ask questions about any part of the manual that they do not understand.
    2. Communicate effectively with the supervising internship coordinator and internship cite supervisor
      1. Discuss experiences with cite supervisor and internship coordinator.
      2. Complete documentation as required regarding the client’s status, progress, or program with supervision.
      3. Pronounce and use health promotion terms correctly and professionally.
      4. Demonstrate good listening skills
      5. Write legible with correct spelling and terminology.
      6. Demonstrates organized and logical health promotion applications.
    3. Perform fitness assessment and exercise prescription on clients using modalities or techniques practiced in the health fitness curriculum prior to this internship affiliation.
      1. Prepare area for exercise
      2. Demonstrate proper placement and/or use of equipment
      3. Position client appropriately for specific exercise.
      4. Position equipment appropriately for client.
      5. Handle client with care.
      6. Seeks appropriate input from internship cite supervisor.
      7. Replace or organize area after assessment is given or exercises are completed.
      8. Read risk/goal form and find significant information necessary to develop program for client.
      9. Demonstrates awareness to indications and contraindications to exercise prescription procedures.
      10. Use logical sequence of exercise progression.
      11. Respond to changes in client’s status
      12. Utilize good body mechanics during exercise procedures and demonstrations.
      13. Terminates exercise sessions appropriately and when necessary.
      14. Select appropriate fitness assessment tests based on client’s risk factors.
      15. Demonstrate proper sequence of fitness assessment testing.
    4. Communicate effectively with client’s family, physicians, if necessary, and other support staff.
      1. Question the client about comfort level before, during and after exercise.
      2. Introduce self.
      3. Be a positive role-model in health promotion
      4. Ask questions of client or other health care professionals when appropriate.
      5. Adapt and modify activities to client’s disability, limitations, and medical conditions.
      6. Respond sensitively and courteously during ALL interactions with client and internship cite supervisor.
      7. Present developed health promotion educational lecture/workshop.
      8. Be courteous and respectful of other health promotion team members
      9. Be helpful and supportive of other health promotion organization members
      10. Actively participate in any meetings and workshops internship cite may host/offer.
    5. Participate in evaluation of clinical experience.
      1. Discuss performance accurately and openly with internship cite supervisor and internship coordinator.
      2. Respond to evaluation with constructive comments and suggestions.
      3. Acknowledges and responds to feedback received.
      4. Completes and submits required evaluation forms.
      5. Identify strengths and weaknesses
      6. Accept responsibility for learning and performance
      7. Complete internship cites evaluation form.
    6. Learn to provide continuity in client program development and applications.
      1. Recognize the need to progress client’s exercise prescription.
      2. Develop rapport with clients
      3. Assess improvements or regression in client’s status and report in the appropriate manner.
      4. Develop exercise progression for client.
      5. Document client assessment, program, and progression completely and as required by internship cite supervisor and Health Promotion Program guidelines.
  
  •  

    LWT 290-299 - Special Projects in Lifelong Wellness Theory


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Machine Tool Operations

  
  •  

    MS 113 - Introduction to Machining Processes

    Credits: 2


    Introduces the manufacturing facility. Utilizes safety, materials, hand tools, precision instruments, drill presses, lathes, mills, grinders, and saws. Credit may be earned in MS 113 or SKTR 113  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Practice safe working habits.

         A.          Identify proper work attire and personal protection items

         B.          Demonstrate safe work habits when operating equipment.

    2.    Demonstrate knowledge of semi-precision and precision measuring tools.

         A.          Demonstrate the proper use and care of measuring tools.

         B.          Measure accurately to a tolerance of .0001” given a set of mic’s.

         C.          Select and stack Gage blocks to a given dimension.

         D.          Select and use indicators for specific task.

     3.    Demonstrate understanding of and perform basic layout and benchwork techniques.

         A.          Select proper layout tool for a given task.

         B.          Demonstrate proper care and handling of layout tools.

         C.          Describe the purpose of layout and benchwork operations.

         D.          List common benchwork operations.

         E.          Describe the advantages of layout.

         F.           Match the type of layout tools with their descriptions.

         G.          Describe the procedures for the following bench operations for the sample part.

                      1.    Filing.

                      2.    Hand tap.

                      3.    Hand ream.

    4.    Identify various kinds and uses of sawing machines.

         A.          Select the proper blade for a particular material to be cut.

         B.          Cut various shapes using power band saws and hand hack saws.

         C.          Describe the basic sawing process.

         D.          Name the parts of a saw blade and a saw blade tooth.

         E.          Describe the properties needed for saw blade materials.

         F.           Demonstrate understanding of the factors that determine tooth spacing.

         G.          Explain the importance of blade break-in.

    5.    Identify various kinds of drilling machines.

         A.          Select the best machine for the job.

                      1.    Select best type of machine for a particular job.

                      2.    Select the proper blade for a particular material to be cut.

                      3.    Cut various shapes using power band saws and hand hack saws.

    6.    Identify and perform various drilling operations.

         A.          Drill holes with a center line tolerance of 1/64”.

         B.          Adjust the speed to the desired setting on belt drive, geared drive, and variable speed drive drill press.

         C.          Select proper tools for various drilling applications.

         D.          Describe hand tapping.

         E.           Explain the purpose of the sequence of hand taps.

         F.           Describe the steps necessary to perform the following operations on the sample workpiece.

                      1.    Drilling.

                      2.    Reaming.

                      3.    Counter boring.

                      4.    Counter sinking.

                      5.    Tapping.

    7.    Perform common operations on an engine lathe.

         A.          List four of the basic operations done on an engine lathe.

         B.          Identify proper types of lathe work holding devices.

         C.          Calculate the correct rpm, given the material, operation, and the diameter, using the cutting speed formula.

         D.          Demonstrate how to properly set a quick-change gear box for a particular feed or thread.

         E.          Set up and turn diameters, shoulders, undercuts and threads.

         F.           Describe the lathe using proper terminology. 

         G.          Identify the different types of lathes.

         H.          Describe the dimensions that determine the size of the lathe.

         I.           Describe the role of the various parts of the machine.

                      1.    Headstock.

                      2.    Spindle.

                      3.    Lathe bed.

                      4.    Carriage.

                      5.    Tailstock.

         J.           Describe common types of toolholders.

         K.           Describe common types of cutting tools.

         L.           Describe common types of workholding devices.

         M.          List common types of OD cutting operations.

         N.          List common types of ID cutting operations.

         O.          Describe the following common engine lathe operations.

                      1.    Facing.

                      2.    Center drilling.

                      3.    Drilling.

                      4.    Boring.

                      5.    Turning.

                      6.    Parting.

         P.          Describe common factors to consider when setting up stock in the lathe.

         Q.         List the steps necessary to drill the sample part with a 3/4 inch drill.

         R.         Describe how to establish tool location on the sample part during the boring operation.

    8.    Recognize a variety of milling machines.

         A.          Identify the different types of mills.

         B.          Describe the mill.

         C.          Identify the components of the vertical column and knee milling machine.

    9.    Identify various milling cutters

         A.          Identify types of milling cutters.

         B.          Select proper milling cutter for operation.

    10. Operate a milling machine correctly.

         A.          Demonstrate a variety of different machining skills by completing assigned projects to specifications.

         B.          Select proper speeds for specific machining operations.

         C.          Select proper work holding devices.

         D.          Use precision measuring instruments to measure to tolerances of .002”.

         E.          Describe the various components of the mill and their roles.

                      1.    Column.

                      2.    Knee.

                      3.    Speed controls.

                      4.    Mill table.

         F.          Identify different types of mills.

         G.         Identify the components of the vertical column and knee milling machine.

         H.         Describe the relationship of the speed controls on the mill head.

         I.           Describe the relationship of the feed controls on the mill head.

         J.          Describe the components used to adjust spindle depth.

         K.          Describe the components of the mill table.

         L.          Identify the different types of toolholders used on the mill.

  
  •  

    MS 120 - Machinery’s Handbook

    Credits: 3
    Focuses on learning how to use and understand the Machinery’s Handbook. Credit may be earned in either MS 120 or SKTR 183  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): MS 181W  or SKTR 181W  and MTH 103  or MT 110  or SKMA 103 
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use the machinist handbook to shorten calculations and determine manufacturing parameters.
      1. Calculate using proper formulas machining variables.
      2. Use tables and charts to determine machine set-ups and operations.
    2. Use formulas to calculate machining parameters.
      1. Use ratio, proportion and percentages, to solve simple problems
      2. Calculate, using the law of sines and cosines, machining sample problems.
      3. Solve, using the proper formulas, area and volume, cylindrical tanks, volume of solids, circles, squares, and hexagons.
      4. Use interpolation techniques from tables to solve sample problems.
      5. Convert and use common and natural logarithms to solve sample problems.
  
  •  

    MS 181W - Machine Tools I

    Credits: 4
    Introduces the manufacturing facility. Utilizes safety, materials, hand tools, precision instruments, drill presses, lathes, mills, pedestal grinders, and saws. Studies fundamentals and procedures to provide an understanding of manufacturing processes. Demonstrates greater knowledge of machine tool practices and applies that knowledge to educate others. Credit may be earned in MS 114, MS 181W or SKTR 181W  but not more than one.

    Prerequisite(s): MS 113   or SKTR 113   or instructor permission.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Practice safe working habits.
      1. Identify proper work attire and personal protection items.
      2. Demonstrate safe work habits when operating equipment.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of semi-precision and precision measuring tools.
      1. Demonstrate the proper use and care of measuring tools.
      2. Measure accurately to a tolerance of + .002” given a set of mic’s.
      3. Understand the basic layout techniques.
        1. Select proper layout tool for a given task.
        2. Demonstrate proper care and handling of layout tools.
    3. Identify various kinds of drilling machines.
      1. Match listed types of drilling machine with lettered illustrations of each.
      2. Identify various kinds of sawing machines.
        1. Select best type of machine for a particular job.
        2. Select the proper blade for a particular material to be cut.
        3. Cut various shapes using power band saws and hand hack saws.
    4. Perform various drilling operations.
      1. Drill holes with a center line tolerance of 1/64”.
      2. Adjust the speed to the desired setting on belt drive, geared drive, and variable speed drive drill press.
      3. Select proper tools for various drilling applications.
    5. Perform common operations on an engine lathe.
      1. List four of the basic operations done on an engine lathe.
      2. Identify, on a drawing or picture, three different types of lathe work holding devices.
      3. Calculate the correct rpm, given the fpm and the diameter, using the cutting speed formula.
      4. Demonstrate how to properly set a quick-change gear box for a particular feed or thread.
      5. Set up and turn diameters, shoulders, undercuts and threads.
    6. Recognize a variety of milling machines.
      1. Identify correctly the type of milling machine with an accuracy of 85% after being given a series of pictures.
    7. Identify various milling cutters.
      1. Name and give typical uses of milling cutters after being given illustrations of each.
    8. Operate a milling machine correctly.
      1. Demonstrate a variety of different machining skills by completing assigned projects to specifications.
      2. Select proper speeds for specific machining operations.
      3. Select proper work holding devices.
      4. Tram the head of the vertical mill.
      5. Indicate a vise within tolerance.
      6. Set up and operate a boring head.
      7. Use precision measuring instruments to measure to tolerances of .001”.
  
  •  

    MS 182 - Machine Tools II

    Credits: 4


    Trains in the set up and operation of  various metal working machines and construction of  projects from engineering drawings. Trains in use of a variety of measuring instruments to take measurements of one thousandth of an inch or closer.  Utilizes safety, mills, lathes, drill presses, saws, grinders, speeds and feeds to complete duty and task list. Credit can be earned in MS 130, MS 182 or SKTR 182 .

    Prerequisite(s): MS 181W  or SKTR 181W  or permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Practice safe working habits.

         A.          Identify proper work attire and personal protection items.

         B.          Demonstrate safe work habits when operating equipment.

         C.          Develop safe work habits using knowledge of safety of self, others, and equipment.

         D.          Locate MSDS for proper storage of materials.

         E.          Locate fire extinguishing equipment and know how to apply to fire.

    2.    Measurement & Inspection

         A.          Demonstrate the proper use and care of measuring tools.

         B.          Recognize various measuring tools.

         C.          Accurately measure to a tolerance of .001” or smaller.

         D.          Define, identify, and understand limitations and advantages of various measuring tools.

         E.          Make conversions from inch to metric.

         F.           Identify, define and properly use comparison measuring instruments such as telescoping gages, squares, spring calipers, small hole
                       gages, radius gage, etc.

         G.          Identify dial and test indicators, accessories, setup procedures and limitations.

         H.          Identify and correctly use vernier, dial, digital measuring tools such as calipers and height gages.

         I.           Identify components, calibrate and correctly use micrometers, outside, inside, pitch, depth, etc.      

         J.          Identify gage blocks series and sizes found in a standard gage block set.  Understand how to calculate gage block buildup for
                      measurement and sine bar use.

    3.    Understand basic layout techniques

         A.          Identify and select proper layout tool for a given task.

         B.          Demonstrate proper care and handling of layout tools.

         C.          Apply layout dye to identified surfaces.

         D.          Make semi precision layout lines to tolerances of +/- 1/64 inch.

         E.          Blend radius to line with minimum line run on.

    4.    Bench work and hand tools

         A.          Identify and develop a working knowledge of files, including basic shapes and cuts; a file card; both machinists’ and soft faced hammers;
                       prick punches; center punches; knockout pins; a hand hacksaw; and adjustable, box, and open end wrenches in general shop               
                       operations.

         B.          Identify common taps.

         C.          Select taps for specific applications.

         D.          Identify dies used for hand threading.

         E.          Understand procedures for using hand reamers.

    5.    Machine maintenance

         A.          Identify and demonstrate proper care of machinery.

         B.          Identify and use maintenance and operators manual to locate maintenance schedule for machinery.

         C.          Locate and fill machine lubricant reservoirs.

         D.          Identify possible unsafe machine conditions and proceed to lock-out tag-out procedures.

     6.    Pedestal Grinders

         A.          Develop and use safe work habits, guards, and other protective devices on the floor grinder.

         B.          Identify the types of floor grinders.

         C.          Dress and true the grinding wheel.

         D.          Position the tool rest and safety shield.

         E.          Hand grind proper clearance angles on cutting tools for drilling and turning.

     7.    Sawing Machines

         A.          Develop and use safe work habits, guards, and other protective devices on sawing machines.

         B.          Identify the major parts of the vertical and horizontal band cut off machines.

         C.          Know saw blade terminology.

         D.          Properly use the vertical and horizontal band cut off machines.

         E.          Perform the necessary maintenance to maintain the equipment including hub lubrication and necessary oil levels.

         F.          Interpret prints, follow operational steps and saw parts to print specifications.

         G.         Adjust blade speed for type of material being cut.

     8.    Drilling Machines

         A.          Develop and use safe work habits, guards and other protective devises on the drilling machine.

         B.          Identify the types and uses of the tool room drill presses.

         C.          Identify types of work holding devises.

         D.          Identify basic cutting tools to include: 1) straight and taper shank twist drills, 2) reamers, 3)counter-bores and counter-sinks.

         E.          Identify drill cutting tool materials and types to include high speed steel and solid tungsten carbide.

         F.           Know the nomenclature of the twist drill.

         G.          Identify and know the use of special drills.

         H.          Calculate and set the drill press for the correct speed and feed rate.

         I.            Properly sharpen a twist drill on a pedestal grinder.

         J.           Interpret prints, follow operational steps, and effectively utilize the drill press to machine parts to print specifications.

         K.           Perform basic drill press operations to include: 1) through hold drilling, 2) drilling to depth, 3)reaming, 4) spot facing and counter-boring, 5)
                       countersinking and chamfering, 6) tap drilling  for a specified percentage of thread.

    9.    Tool Room Lathe

         A.          Develop and use safe work habits, guards, and other protective devices on the lathe.

         B.          Identify the sizes, parts, accessories, and lubrication points of the tool room lathe.

         C.          Determine and use the proper lubricant as recommended by the lathe manufacturer.

         D.          Select and make correct set ups on the lathe, to include 3-jaw and 4-jaw chuck mounting, drive plate, collets, headstock sleeve and center,
                       tail stock center, drill chuck and tool holders.

         E.          Interpet prints, follow opeational steps, and effectively utilize the lathe to machine parts to print specifications.

         F.          Correctly grind and condition lathe cutting tools.

         G.         Make calculations and set the lathe for the correct speed, feed rate, and depth of cut.

         H.         Identify lathe cutting tool materials such as high speed steel, carbide, cutting tools, shapes, and tool geometry.

    10. Vertical/Horiztonal Milling Machines

         A.          Develop and use safe work habits, guards and other protective devices on the mill.

         B.          Correctly identify the types and uses of the vertical/horizontal milling machines.

         C.          Know how to use various tool holding devises to include: 1) collets, 2) quick change tool holders, 3) arbors, 4) drill chucks.

         D.          Know the nomenclature of the milling machine, including the axis identification.

         E.          Know all the lubrication points on the various vertical/horizontal milling machines in the shop.

         F.          Determine and use the proper lubricant as recommended by the manufacturer.

         G.         Make correct set ups on the vertical/horizontal mill to include: 1) tram in mill head, 2) mount and indicate vise parallel to ways, 3) mounting
                      and positioning work piece, 4) spindle roatation, 5) feeds, speed, and depth of cut.
    11. Jigs and Fixturing

         A.          Identify and decipher between a jig and fixture.

         B.          Understand the major components of a single and production type fixture or jig.

    12. Flat surface grinder

         A.          Develop and use safe work habits, guard and other protective devices commonly associated with surface grinders.

         B.          Identify the types and sizes of flat surface grinders.

         C.          Select and install proper grade of wheel for grinding material.

         D.          Dress grinding wheel flat and parallel.

         E.          Use a variety of work holding devices to include: 1) magnetic chuck, 2) angle plate, 3) sine  plate, 4) no twist clamps, 5) hold down blocks.

         F.          Grind a part to print specifications for tolerance and surface finish.

         G.         Recognize, trouble shoot and correct common difficulty associated with surface grinding.

  
  •  

    MS 185 - Precision Grinding-Flat Surface

    Credits: 3
    Instructs on proper selection and operation of precision flat surface grinding machines. Selects proper grinding wheels, grinding machine and work holding devises for a variety of grinding operations. Grinds previously machined and heat treated projects from prerequisite course.

    Prerequisite(s): MS 181W  or SKTR 181W  or instructor permission
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate proper care and safety during use of grinding machines.
      1. Identify various parts of grinding machine.
      2. Identify proper placement of guards on grinding machine.
      3. Use proper safety equipment while operating grinding machine.
      4. Identify the appropriate grinding operation necessary to hold tolerances.
      5. Select proper grinding wheel based on material to be ground.
      6. Select proper grinding wheel for machine to be used.
      7. Select proper coolant medium to be used for grinding operation.
      8. Evaluate grinding wheel for damage.
      9. Properly mount and balance grinding wheel on arbor.
      10. Properly true and dress grinding wheel for operation.
      11. Identify various abrasive types and their effect on work piece surface integrity.
      12. Select the correct abrasives for your specific grinding applications.
      13. Identify types of grinding machines.
    2. Demonstrate proper set up of grinding machines.
      1. Identify various abrasive types and their effect on work piece surface integrity.
      2. Select the correct abrasives for your specific grinding applications
      3. Properly mount and balance grinding wheel on arbor.
      4. Properly true and dress grinding wheel for operation
    3. Demonstrate proper use of grinding machines.
      1. Identify when a grinding operation is necessary.
      2. Identify the appropriate grinding operation necessary to hold tolerances.
      3. Select proper grinding wheel based on material to be ground.
      4. Select proper grinding wheel for machine to be used.
      5. Select proper coolant medium to be used for grinding operation.
      6. Inspect grinding wheel for damage
      7. Properly mount and balance grinding wheel on arbor.
      8. Properly true and dress grinding wheel for operation.
      9. Identify various abrasive types and their effect on work piece surface integrity.
      10. Select the correct abrasives for your specific grinding applications.
      11. Identify different methods of work holding.
      12. Select proper method of work holding.
      13. Run grinding machine through proper warm up cycles prior to operation.
      14. Safely operate grinding machine.
      15. Surface grind work piece to tolerance specified on engineering drawing ex: +/- .0005 of an inch.
  
  •  

    MS 190 - Precision Grinding-Cylindrical Surface

    Credits: 3
    Instructs on proper selection and operation of precision cylindrical surface grinding machines. Selects proper grinding wheels, grinding machine and work holding devises for a variety of OD/ID grinding operations. Grinds previously machined and heat treated projects from prerequisite course.

    Prerequisite(s): MS 182  or SKTR 182  or instructor permission
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate proper care and safety during use of grinding machines.
      1. Identify various parts of grinding machine.
      2. Identify proper placement of guards on grinding machine.
      3. Use proper safety equipment while operating grinding machine.
      4. Identify the appropriate grinding operation necessary to hold tolerances.
      5. Select proper grinding wheel based on material to be ground.
      6. Select proper grinding wheel for machine to be used.
      7. Select proper coolant medium to be used for grinding operation.
      8. Inspect grinding wheel for damage.
      9. Properly mount and balance grinding wheel on arbor.
      10. Properly true and dress grinding wheel for operation.
      11. Identify various abrasive types and their effect on work piece surface integrity.
      12. Select the correct abrasives for your specific grinding applications.
      13. Identify types of grinding machines.
    2. Demonstrate proper set up of grinding machines.
      1. Identify various abrasive types and their effect on work piece surface integrity.
      2. Select the correct abrasives for your specific grinding applications.
      3. Properly mount and balance grinding wheel on arbor.
      4. Properly true and dress grinding wheel for operation.
    3. Demonstrate proper use of grinding machines.
      1. Identify when a grinding operation is necessary.
      2. Identify the appropriate grinding operation necessary to hold tolerances.
      3. Select proper grinding wheel based on material to be ground.
      4. Select proper grinding wheel for machine to be used.
      5. Select proper coolant medium to be used for grinding operation.
      6. Evaluate grinding wheel for damage.
      7. Properly mount and balance grinding wheel on arbor.
      8. Properly true and dress grinding wheel for operation.
      9. Identify various abrasive types and their effect on work piece surface integrity.
      10. Select the correct abrasives for your specific grinding applications.
      11. Identify different methods of work holding.
      12. Select proper method of work holding.
      13. Run grinding machine through proper warm up cycles prior to operation.
      14. Safely operate grinding machine.
      15. Surface grind work piece to tolerance specified on engineering drawing ex: +/- .0005 of an inch.
    4. Demonstrate ability to grind cylindrical parts between centers.
      1. Demonstrate ability to properly secure work piece between centers.
      2. Select appropriate drive mechanism for operation to be completed.
      3. Align work table for straight cylindrical grinding using proper indicators.
      4. Surface grind work piece to tolerance specified on engineering drawing ex: +/- .0002 of an inch total variance.
      5. Demonstrate ability to grind OD taper to specified tolerances.
    5. Demonstrate ability to internal grind cylindrical parts held in chucking device.
      1. Demonstrate ability to properly secure work piece in 3 or 4 jaw chuck.
      2. Demonstrate ability to properly secure work piece using magnetic chuck.
      3. Select appropriate grinding wheel for internal grinding operation.
      4. Align work table for straight cylindrical grinding using proper indicators.
      5. Surface grind work piece to tolerance specified on engineering drawing ex: +/- .0002 of an inch total variance.
  
  •  

    MS 230 - Machine Tools III

    Credits: 4


    Trains in advanced set up and operation of various metal working machines to construct projects from engineering drawings. Trains in use of a variety of measuring instruments to take measurements of one ten thousandth of an inch or closer. Utilizes safety, materials, hand tools, precision measuring instruments, lathes, mills, flat surface grinders OD and ID surface grinders. Emphasizes jigs, fixturing, part location, speeds and feeds.

    Prerequisite(s): MS 182  or SKTR 182  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Practice safe working habits

         A.          Identify proper work attire and personal protection items.

         B.          Demonstrate safe work habits when operating equipment.

         C.          Develop safe work habits using knowledge of safety of self, other, and equipment.

         D.          Locate MSDS for proper storage of materials.

         E.          Locate fire extinguishing equipment and know how to apply to fire.

     2.    Measurement & Inspection

         A.          Demonstrate the proper use and care of measuring tools.

         B.          Recognize various measuring tools.

         C.          Accurately measure to a tolerance of .001” or smaller.

         D.          Define, identify, and understand limitations and advantages of various measuring tools.

         E.          Make conversions from inch to metric.

         F.           Identify, define and properly use comparison measuring instruments such as telescoping gages, squares, spring calipers, small hole
                       gages, radius gage, etc.

         G.          Identify dial and test indicators, accessories, setup procedures and limitations.

         H.          Identify and correctly use vernier, dial, digital measuring tools such as calipers and height gages.

         I.            Identify components, calibrate and correctly use micrometers, outsdie, inside, pitch, depth, etc.

         J.           Identify gage blocks series and sizes found in a standard gage block set.  Understand how to calcualte gage block buildup for
                       measurement and sine bar use.

    3.    Understand basic layout techniques

         A.          Identify and select proper layout tool for a given task.

         B.          Demonstrate proper care and handling of layout tools.

         C.          Apply layout dye to identified surfaces.

         D.          Make semi precision layout lines to tolerances of +/- 1/64 inch.

         E.          Blend radius to line with minimum line run on.

    4.    Bench work and hand tools

         A.          Identify and develop a working knowledge of files, including basic shapes and cuts; a file card; both machinists’ and soft faced hammers;
                      prick punches; center punches; knockout pins; a hand hacksaw; and adjustable, box, and open end wrenches in general shop operations.

         B.          Identify common taps.

         C.          Select taps for specific applications.

         D.          Identify dies used for hand threading.

         E.          Understand procedures for using hand reamers.

    5.    Machine maintenance

         A.          Identify and demonstrate proper care of machinery.

         B.          Identify and use maintenance and operators manual to locate maintenance schedule for machinery.

         C.          Locate and fill machine lubricant reservoirs.

         D.          Identify possible unsafe machine conditions and proceed to lock-out tag-out procedures.

    6.    Pedestal Grinders

         A.          Develop and use safe work habits, guards, and other protective devices on the floor grinder.

         B.          Identify the types of floor grinders.

         C.          Dress and true the grinding wheel.

         D.          Position the tool rest and safety shield.

         E.          Hand grind proper clearance angles on cutting tools for drilling and turning.

    7.    Sawing Machines

         A.          Develop and use safe work habits, guards, and other protective devices on sawing  machines.

         B.          Identify the major parts of the vertical and horizontal band cut off machines.

         C.          Know saw blade terminology.

         D.          Properly use the vertical and horizontal band cut off machines.

         E.          Perform the necessary maintenance to maintain the quipment including hub lubrication and necessary oil levels.

         F.          Interpret prints, follow operational steps and saw parts to print specifications.

         G.         Adjust blade speed for type of material being cut.

    8.    Drilling Machines

         A.          Develop and use safe work habits, guards and other protective devises on the drilling machine.

         B.          Identify the types and uses of the tool room drill presses.

         C.          Identify types of work holding devises.

         D.          Identify basic cutting tools to include: 1) straight and taper shank twist drills, 2) reamers, 3) counter-bores and counter-sinks.

         E.          Identify drill cutting tool materials and types to include high speed steel and solid tungsten carbide.

         F.           Know the nomenclature of the twist drill.

         G.          Identify and know the use of special drills.

         H.          Calculate and set the drill press for the correct speed and feed rate.

         I.            Properly sharpen a twist drill on a pedestal grinder.

         J.           Interpret prints, follow operational steps, and effectively utilize the drill press to machine part to print specifications.

         K.          Perform basic drill press operations to include: 1) through hold drilling, 2) drilling to depth, 3) reaming, 4) spot facing and counter-boring, 5)
                      countersinking and chamfering, 6) tap drilling for a specified percentage of thread.

    9.    Tool Room Lathe

         A.          Develop and use safe work habits, guards, and other protective devices on the lathe.

         B.          Identify the sizes, parts, accessories, and lubrication points of the tool room lathe.

         C.          Determine and use the proper lubricant as recommended by the lathe manufacturer.

         D.          Select and make correct set ups on the lathe, to include 3-jaw and 4-jaw chuck mounting, drive plate, collets, headstock sleeve and center,
                       tail stock center, drill chuck and tool holders.

         E.          Intepret prints, follow operational steps, and effectively utilize the lathe to machine parts to print specifications.

         F.          Correctly grind and condition lathe cutting tools.

         G.         Make calculations and set the lathe for the correct speed, feed rate, and depth of cut.

         H.         Identify lathe cutting tool materials such as high speed steel, carbide, cutting tools, shapes, and tool geometry.

         I.          Cut a variety of geometric shapes to include 1) straight cuts, 2) taper cuts - Morse, Jacobs, etc., 3) under cuts, 4) shoulders, 5) thread- OD
                      and ID.

         J.          Set up and indicate work piece between centers, 3-jaw chuck, 4-jaw chuck, collet chuck, and face plate.

         K.         Hold tolerances to five ten thousandths of an inch between multiple parts.

    10. Vertical/Horizontal Milling Machines

         A.          Develop and use safe work habits, guards and other protective devices on the mill.

         B.          Correctly identify the types and uses of the vertical/horizontal miling machines.

         C.          Know how to use various tool holding devises to include: 1) collets, 2) quick change tool holders, 3) arbors, 4) drill chucks.

         D.          Know the nomenclature of the milling machine, including the axis identification.

         E.          Know all the lubrication points on the various vertical/horizontal milling machines in the shop.

         F.           Determine and use the proper lubricant as recommended by the manufacturer.

         G.          Make correct set ups on the vertical/horizontal mill to include: 1) tram in mill head, 2) mount and indicate vise parallel to ways, 3) mounting
                       and positioning work piece, 4) spindle rotation,5) feeds, speed, and depth of cut.

         H.          Indicate machine head to specific angle using sine bar.

         I.            Indicate vise to specified angle using sine bar.

         J.           Set up and indicate work piece using hold down clamps, mill vise, tool makers vise, angle plate, sine plate, and index able head.

         K.          Use 90 degree head.

    11. Jigs and Fixturing

         A.          Identify and decipher between a jig and fixture.

         B.          Understand the major components of a single and production type fixture or jig.

         C.          Design and construct fixture to hold work piece for machining.

         D.         Mount work piece in fixture for machining.

         E.          Reuse fixture for multiple work piece use.

    12. Flat surface grinder

         A.          Develop and use safe work habits, guard and other protective devices commonly associated with surface grinders.

         B.          Identify the types and sizes of flat surface grinders.

         C.          Select and install proper grade of wheel for grinding material.

         D.          Dress grinding wheel flat and parallel.

         E.          Use a variety of work holding devices to include: 1) magnetic chuck, 2) angle plate, 3) sine plate, 4) no twist clamps, 5) hold down blocks.

         F.          Grind a part to print specifications for tolerance and surface finish.

         G.         Recognize, trouble shoot and correct common difficulty associated with surface grinding.

         H.         Hold tolerances of two ten-thousandths on an inch between multiple parts.

         I.          Grind parts to geometric tolerances to include flatness, parallelness, and squareness.

    13. OD and ID surface grinder

         A.          Develop and use safe work habits, guard and other protective devices commonly associated with surface grinders.

         B.          Identify the types and sizes of OD/ID surface grinders.

         C.          Select and install proper grade of wheel for grinding material.

         D.          Dress grinding wheel flat and parallel.

         E.          Use a variety of work holding devices to include: 1) magnetic chuck, 2) 3-jaw chuck, 3) 4-jaw chuck, 4) between centers.

         F.          Grind a part to print specifications for tolerance and surface finish.

         G.         Recognize, trouble shoot and correct common difficulty associated with surface grinding.

         H.         Hold tolerances of two ten-thousandths on an inch between multiple parts.

         I.           Grind parts to geometric tolerances to include roundness, taper, concentricity and squareness.

  
  •  

    MS 290-299 - Special Projects in Machine Tool Operations


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Management

  
  •  

    MGT 110 - Business Mathematics

    Credits: 3
    Covers principles necessary for an understanding of math of the business world. Includes various methods of computing interest and bank discounts; installment buying; F.I.C.A. Federal Income Taxes and other payroll deductions; markup, cost and selling prices; various wage payment systems; sales and property taxes; insurance; measures of central tendency; and an introduction to the metric system.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 3 and READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of Basic Arithmetic.
      1. Add, subtract, multiply, and divide whole numbers.
      2. Add, subtract, multiply, and divide fractions.
      3. Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals.
      4. Describe basic rounding rules.
      5. Describe chain calculations.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of Formulas, Ratios, and Percent.
      1. Solve equation for one variable.
      2. Carry out fraction, decimal, and percent conversions.
      3. Set up and simplify ratios and proportions.
      4. Describe the meaning of percent.
      5. Solve percent equations.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of Trade, Quantity, and Sales discounts.
      1. Define the basic terminology relating to commercial discounts.
      2. Explain the purpose of commercial discounts.
      3. Solve problems using trade discounts.
      4. Solve problems using quantity discounts.
      5. Solve problems using sales discounts.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of Pricing.
      1. Define the basic terminology relating to pricing.
      2. Solve for markons based on cost and selling price.
      3. Solve for markdowns.
      4. Solve for pricing situations involving shrinkage, irregulars, and planned markdowns.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of simple interest.
      1. Describe simple interest.
      2. Solve problems involving simple interest computations.
      3. Differentiate between maturity and present value.
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of compound interest.
      1. Differentiate between simple interest and compound interest
      2. Solve compound interest problems using the compound interest formula.
      3. Solve compound interest problems using the compound interest tables.
      4. Solve present value problems using the present value tables.
      5. Solve problems involving daily and continuous compounding using the appropriate tables.
      6. Differentiate between the nominal and effective rate of interest.
    7. Demonstrate an understanding of annuities.
      1. Differentiate between an ordinary annuity and an annuity due.
      2. Solve problems involving ordinary annuities utilizing the appropriate table.
    8. Demonstrate an understanding of the median, mean, mode and range.
      1. Solve problems involving mean, median, mode and range.
    9. Demonstrate an understanding of the metric system.
      1. Describe the various metric units.
      2. Solve problems involving conversions between metric units of length, area, capacity, and weight.
      3. Solve problems converting between metric and English units.
      4. Solve problems involving conversions between Fahrenheit and Celsius temperature scales.
    10. Demonstrate an understanding of installment plans.
      1. Define an installment plan.
      2. Solve problems relating to installment purchases.
      3. Calculate the annual percentage rate using the appropriate table.
      4. Calculate rebates involving installment plans.
  
  •  

    MGT 143 - Principles of Advertising

    Credits: 3


    Provides a broad view of advertising from the marketing and consumer point of view. Historical background, economic and social aspects, roles of advertising, advertising stages, target marketing, media, using selected behavioral science information in advertising, and obtaining proper advertising appeal are included.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Demonstrate a familiarity with the history of advertising.

         A.          Describe the development of product promotion.

         B.          Describe advertising and the American industrial revolution.

         C.          Describe the emergence of responsible advertising.

     2.    Demonstrate an understanding of the roles of advertising.

         A.          Describe advertising as a marketing communication tool.

         B.          Define advertising and the marketing mix.

         C.          Discuss advertising as both consumer and trade communication.

     3.    Demonstrate an understanding of advertising planning.

         A.          Identify the elements of the advertising spiral.

         B.          Discuss the advertising spiral as a management tool.

         C.          Define brand equity.

    4.    Demonstrate an understanding of target marketing.

          A.          Define prime prospects.

         B.           Discuss trends to watch.

         C.           Define niche marketing and positioning.

         D.           Define demographics and psychographics.

     5.    Demonstrate a familiarity with the advertising agency and other media services.

         A.          Define an agency.

         B.          Describe how agencies were developed.

         C.          Describe a full-service agency.

         D.          Discuss other advertising services.

    6.    Demonstrate a familiarity with the advertiser’s operation.

         A.          Discuss how advertising budgets are set.

         B.          Describe the agency/client relationships.

    7.    Demonstrate an understanding of basic media strategy.

         A.          Define media planning.

         B.          Describe new technology and media options.

         C.          Discuss unique characteristics of each media.

         D.          Describe components of the media plan.

         E.          Discuss the balance between media effectiveness and efficiency.

    8.    Demonstrate an understanding of the use of television as a leading advertising medium.

         A.          Describe television rating services.

         B.          Discuss the various segments of the industry.

    9.    Demonstrate an understanding of the use of radio as the most fragmented of all major media.

         A.          Describe radio’s transition from a mass to selective medium.

         B.          Discuss the lack of visual element of radio.

         C.          Describe the rating system in radio.

    10. Demonstrate an understanding of the use of newspapers as the largest source of advertising revenue.

         A.          Discuss newspaper readership trends.

         B.          Describe newspaper marketing techniques.

         C.          Discuss options available to advertisers.

         D.          Discuss the significance of weeklies and ethnic publications.

    11. Demonstrate an understanding of the use of magazines and their dependence on narrowly defined audiences who have common
          interests.

         A.          Describe the evolution of magazines from a mass to class medium.

         B.          Discuss cost and selectivity considerations

         C.          Discuss magazine options available to advertisers.

         D.          Describe the differences between business and consumer magazines.

    12. Demonstrate an understanding of the use of out-of-home advertising as the oldest form of promotion, dating to prehistoric times.

         A.          Discuss outdoor as a supplement to other media

         B.          Describe the image of outdoor advertising.

         C.          Describe the formats of out-of-home and transit.

         D.          Describe the measurement of the outdoor audience.

    13. Demonstrate an understanding of the use of direct-response and direct-mail advertising as one of the fastest-growing segments of
          advertising and 
    promotion.

         A.          Discuss the direct marketing social factors.

         B.          Discuss the privacy issues and the future of direct response.

         C.          Describe computer technology and database marketing.

         D.          Describe telemarketing and home shopping.

         E.          Define specialized techniques of direct mail.

    14. Demonstrate an understanding of research in advertising as an informational tool.

         A.          Define account planning.

         B.          Discuss the need for marketing research.

         C.          Describe the research steps in advertising.

         D.          Discuss the types of advertising research.

    15. Demonstrate an understanding of creating advertising copy and why great advertising copy is essential to great advertising.

         A.          Describe the nature and use of appeals.

         B.          Define advertising elements.

         C.          Define copy style.

         D.          Define slogans.

         E.          Describe the structure of an advertisement.

         F.           Describe the creative work plan.

    16. Demonstrate a working knowledge of the complete advertising campaign that fits into the total integrated marketing communication
          program.

         A.          Conduct a situation analysis.

         B.          Create objectives and strategy.

         C.          Develop media objectives.

         D.          Develop the sales promotion plan.

  
  •  

    MGT 145 - Principles of Sales

    Credits: 3


    Emphasizes the marketing concept and the importance of personal selling for those engaged in the marketing of products, services or ideas. Includes an analysis of the steps in a sales proposal. Classroom presentations by students required.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Demonstrate an understanding of personal selling and the marketing concept.

         A.          Describe the contributions of personal selling to the global economy.

         B.          Define personal selling and discuss personal selling as an extension of the marketing concept.

         C.          Describe the evolution of consultative style selling from the marketing era to the present.

         D.          Define strategic selling.

         E.          Define partnering and discuss how it relates to the quality improvement process.

         F.           Describe the personal benefits that can be derived from developing the skill of selling.

         G.          Discuss why ethical considerations are important in personal selling.

    2.    Be aware of career opportunities in selling today.

         A.          Discuss the rewarding aspects of personal selling careers.

         B.          Describe the opportunities for women and minorities in the field of personal selling.

         C.          List the characteristics of selling positions in the areas of service, retailing, wholesaling, and manufacturing.

         D.          Describe the work environment of four persons employed in the field of personal selling.

         E.          Discuss personal selling as an auxiliary activity.

         F.           Identify the four major sources of sales training.

    3.    Demonstrate an understanding of the factors influencing the relationship- building process.

         A.          Explain the importance of developing a relationship strategy.

         B.          Define partnering and describe the partnering relationship.

         C.          List the four key groups with which the salesperson needs to develop relationship strategies.

         D.          Discuss how self image forms the foundation for building long-term selling relationships.

         E.          Describe the importance of a double-win relationship.

         F.          Identify and describe the major nonverbal factors that shape our sales image.

         G.         Define surface language and discuss three keys to appropriate dress.

         H.         Discuss how voice quality and good manners can affect relationships.

         I.           Describe conversational strategies that help us establish relationships.

         J.          Explain how to establish a self-improvement plan based on personal development strategies.

    4.    Demonstrate an understanding of how product information is acquired.

         A.          Explain the importance of developing a product strategy.

         B.          Identify reasons why salespeople and customers benefit from thorough product knowledge.

         C.          Discuss the most important kinds of product and company information that should be acquired by salespeople.

         D.          Describe how knowledge of competition improves personal selling.

         E.          List major sources of product information.

         F.           Explain the difference between product features and buyer benefits.

         G.          Demonstrate how to translate product features into buyer benefits.

    5.    Demonstrate an understanding of buyer behavior.

         A.          Discuss the meaning of a customer strategy.

         B.          Explain the complex nature of customer behavior.

         C.          Discuss the social and psychological influences that shape customer buying decisions.

         D.          Discuss the power of perception in shaping buying behavior.

         E.          Distinguish among different types of buying motives.

         F.          Distinguish between patronage and product buying motives.

    6.    Demonstrate an understanding of how to develop a prospect base.

         A.          Discuss the importance of developing a prospect base.

         B.          Identify and assess important sources of prospects.

         C.          List criteria for qualifying prospects.

         D.          Explain how to organize your prospect information.

         E.          Describe the steps in developing a prospecting and sales forecasting plan.

    7.    Demonstrate an understanding of how to approach the customer.

         A.          Discuss the basic steps of the preapproach.

         B.          Explain how to effectively approach the customer.

         C.          Name five ways to convert the prospect’s attention and arouse interest.

    8.    Demonstrate an understanding of how to create the consultative sales presentation.

         A.          Describe the characteristics of the consultative sales presentation.

         B.          Explain how to determine the prospects needs.

         C.          Discuss the use of questions to determine needs.

         D.          Select products that match customer needs.

         E.          Present general guidelines for developing effective presentations.

    9.    Demonstrate an understanding of how to custom fit the sales

         A.          Discuss the important advantages of the sales demonstration.

         B.          Explain the guidelines to be followed when planning a sales demonstration.

         C.          Be able to complete a demonstration worksheet.

         D.          Develop selling tools that can strengthen your sales presentation.

         E.          Discuss how to use audiovisual presentations effectively.

    10. Demonstrate an understanding of how to negotiate buyer resistance.

         A.          Describe common types of buyer resistance.

         B.          Outline general strategies for negotiating buyer resistance.

         C.          Discuss specific methods of negotiation buyer resistance.

    11. Demonstrate an understanding of how to close and confirm the sale.

         A.          Describe the proper attitude to display towards closing the sale.

         B.          List and discuss selected guidelines for closing the sale.

         C.          Explain how to recognize closing clues.

         D.          Discuss selected methods of closing the sale.

    12. Demonstrate an understanding of what is involved in servicing the sale.

         A.          Discuss the importance of servicing the sale.

         B.          Explain how customer service can stimulate repeat business and referrals.

  
  •  

    MGT 151 - Visual Merchandising

    Credits: 3


    Explores display as a major component of sales promotion. Studies color and basic design principles in terms of their application to display. Analyzes functions, types, and tools of display. Designs and coordinates windows and interior displays. Covers steps in planning and coordination sales promotions. Emphasizes planning, producing and evaluating effective visual displays.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Demonstrate an understanding of the overall issues in visual store design.

         A.          Discuss economic issues that relate to visual merchandising and design

         B.          Discuss the concept of flexibility as it relates to visual merchandising and design

         C.          Identify the various fixtures and cases that are used in visual merchandising and design

         D.          Explain the concept of visual communication

         E.          Describe the use of lighting and color in visual merchandising and design

    2.    Demonstrate an understanding of sales promotion goals.

         A.          Discuss the concept of increasing short-run sales

         B.          Explain the concept of novelty

         C.          Explain eye-catching appeal

         D.          Explain and describe the use of themes and how they can be distinctive

         E.          Discuss the relationship between store operations and promotional goals

    3.    Demonstrate an understanding of goals for the store exterior.

         A.          Discuss techniques used to design storefronts

         B.          Discuss techniques used to design store entrances

         C.          Discuss techniques used to design store exterior windows

         D.          Discuss the issues of parking and congestion and how they relate to exterior design

         E.          Explain the concept of uniqueness and how it relates to exterior design

    4.    Demonstrate an understanding of goals for store interior.

         A.          Discuss the use of various flooring, fixtures, lighting, textures, scents and sounds within store interiors.

         B.          Explain the concept of dead areas and how it relates to interior design

         C.          Describe the commonly used width of aisles and how it impacts interior design

         D.          Discuss the factor of temperature and how it impacts interior design

    5.    Demonstrate an understanding of store layout.

         A.          Discuss allocation of floor space for selling merchandise

         B.          Describe product groupings

         C.          Explain the concepts that relate to traffic flow

         D.          Discuss merchandise arrangement within departments

    6.    Demonstrate an understanding of interior point of purchase displays.

         A.          Discuss assortment

         B.          Describe theme setting

         C.          Define ensemble

         D.          Identify racks and cases

         E.          Explain the use of posters, signs, and cards

         F.          Describe wall decorations

    7.    Demonstrate an understanding of space planning.

         A.          Discuss the concept of productivity of space

         B.          Explain the rationale of location of departments

         C.          Describe the location of merchandise within departments

         D.          Explain the concept of productivity of space

         E.          Describe productivity input/output measures

    8.    Demonstrate an understanding of the purposes of fixtures.

         A.          Discuss the issue of store image

         B.          Determine the fixture budget

         C.          Discuss the issue of flexibility

         D.          Identify the optimal use of floor space

         E.          Discuss the concept of traffic flow

         F.           Select families of fixtures
    9:    Demonstrate an understanding of visual communications.

         A.          Describe the coordination of signs and graphic with the store image

         B.          Discuss the use of signs and graphic as props

         C.          Use signs and graphics as props

         D.          Use appropriate typefaces on signs

         E.          Create theatrical effects

    10. Demonstrate an understanding of lighting.

         A.          Explain highlighting merchandise

         B.          Define popping the merchandise

         C.          Discuss capturing the mood

         D.          Discuss the concept of downplaying features

    11. Demonstrate an understanding of merchandise presentation methods.

         A.          Discuss the concept of store image as it relates to merchandise display

         B.          Discuss the nature of the product and how it relates to merchandise display

         C.          Discuss the concept of packaging and how it relates to merchandise display

         D.          Explain the concept of vertical merchandising

         E.          Explain the concept of tonnage merchandising

         F.           Describe a frontal presentation

    12. Demonstrate an understanding of technical technique.

         A.          Construct a hard line visual display

         B.          Construct a soft line visual display

         C.          To “Fly” soft line merchandise within a visual display

         D.          Select merchandise for a visual display

         E.          Demonstrate the use of T-pins and other pins in visual display

         F.           Demonstrate the use of various tools in visual display

         G.          Demonstrate the technique of “stuffing” in visual display

    13. Demonstrate an understanding of the use of color.

         A.          Discuss the use of color and how it relates to aesthetics of interiors

         B.          Discuss the use of color and how it relates to interior spaciousness

         C.          Explain color harmony in interiors and visual merchandising

         D.          Establish visual merchandise themes

         E.          Discuss color energy relationships in interiors

         F.           Identify colors that influence taste

         G.          Identify colors that influence smell

         H.          Discuss the hidden meanings in colors

         I.            Describe color symbolism in signage

         J.           Discuss color trends in design

  
  •  

    MGT 152 - Textiles

    Credits: 3
    Studies natural and man-made fibers, their properties and unique characteristics. Identifies fabrics used in wearing apparel and interior design; fabric production, performance and use; final processes and finishes; the study of weaves, pattern and color.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of textile standards, information labels, and basic terminology of the textile industry.
      1. Describe the established textile standards and how they impact the consumer
      2. Illustrate examples of textile information labels and describe each
      3. Define basic textile terminology
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of textile fiber identification from which fashion fabrics are made.
      1. Discuss the different major fiber types
      2. Conduct fiber examination and discuss various methods of fiber examination
      3. List, explain and discuss fiber properties and characteristics for all major fibers
      4. Categorize the general characteristics of fiber families and list the unique characteristics of individual fibers
      5. Predict fabric performance in terms of fiber characteristics
      6. Identify commonly used fabrics by name
      7. Discuss the rapidly changing nature of textiles and the need for continual study to appraise new developments
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the process of converting fibers into yarn.
      1. Describe fiber arrangement
      2. Illustrate and explain yarn structure
      3. Discuss yarns and their characteristics
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of fabric structure.
      1. Discuss the various methods of fabrication, the converting of fibers to years
      2. Discuss the method of fabricating fabrics directly from fibers
      3. Discuss the methods of fabricating fabrics from yarns
      4. Describe the general characteristics of yarns and explain the contribution each type makes to fabric appearance and performance
      5. Describe the general characteristics of fabric structures and explain the contribution each type makes to fabric appearance and performance
      6. Predict fabric performance in terms of yarn structures and fabric structures
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of dyestuffs and color application
      1. Describe bleaching
      2. Discuss the various dye applications
      3. Explain the fabric printing process
      4. Describe the general characteristics of finishes and explain the contribution each type makes to fabric appearance and performance
      5. Discuss finishes that alter appearance
      6. Discuss functional finishes
  
  •  

    MGT 153W - Introduction to Business

    Credits: 3


    Clarifies the role of business in modern society both domestic and international. Includes an overview of the American business environment, forms of business ownership, obtaining and managing financial resources, management of organizations and human resources, and current issues in the free enterprise system.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of the foundations of business.

         A.          Define business and identify potential risks and rewards.

         B.          Describe the important reasons for studying business.

         C.          Describe the two types of economic systems, capitalism and planned economy.

         D.          Identify the ways to measure economic performance.

         E.          Outline the four types of competition.

         F.           Summarize the development of America’s business system.

         G.          Discuss the challenges that American businesses will encounter in the future.

    2.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of ethics and social responsibility.

         A.          Describe what is meant by business ethics.

         B.          Identify the types of ethical concerns that arise in the business world.

         C.          Discuss the factors that affect the level of ethical behavior in organizations.

         D.          Explain how ethical decision making can be encouraged.

         E.          Describe how our current views on the social responsibility of business have evolved.

         F.           Explain the two views on social responsibility of business and understand the arguments for and against increased social responsibility.

         G.          Discuss the factors that led to the consumer movement and list some of its results.

         H.           Analyze how present employment practices are being used to counteract past abuses.

         I.            Describe the major types of pollution, their causes and their cures.

         J.           Identify the steps a business must take to implement a program of social responsibility.

     3.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of the forms of business ownership.

         A.          Describe the basic differences among the three most common forms of business ownership: sole proprietorships, partnerships, and
                      corporations.

         B.          Explain the advantages and disadvantages of proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations.

         C.          Summarize how a corporation is formed, who owns it, and who is responsible for its operation.

         D.          Describe the basic structure of a corporation.

         E.          Name three types of corporations organized for special purposes, and explain how they differ from the more typical open or close            
                      corporation.

         F.          Identify how corporations grow.

         G.         Discuss three additional forms of ownership: cooperatives, joint ventures, and syndicates.

    4.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of small business, entrepreneurship, and franchises.

         A.          Define what a small business is and recognize the fields in which small businesses are concentrated.

         B.          Identify the people who start small businesses and the reasons why some succeed and many fail.

         C.          Assess the contributions of small businesses to our economy.

         D.         Judge the advantages and disadvantages of operating a small business.

         E.          Explain how the Small Business Administration helps small businesses.

         F.          Explain the concept and types of franchising.

         G.         Analyze the growth of franchising and its advantages and disadvantages.

    5.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of the management process.

         A.          Define what management is.

         B.          Describe the four basic management functions: planning, organizing, leading and motivating, and controlling.

         C.          Distinguish among the various kinds of managers, in terms of both level and area of management.

         D.          Identify the key management skills and the managerial roles.

         E.          Explain the different types of leadership.

         F.           Discuss the steps in the managerial decision-making process.

         G.          Describe how total quality management can improve customer satisfaction.

         H.          Summarize what it takes to become a successful manager today.

    6.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of creating an organization.

         A.          Identify five characteristics common to all organizations.

         B.          Explain why job specialization is important.

         C.          Identify the various bases for departmentalization.

         D.          Explain how decentralization follows from delegation.

         E.          Describe how the span of management describes an organization.

         F.           Distinguish between line and staff management.

         G.          Describe the three basic forms of organizational structure: bureaucratic, organic, and matrix.

         H.          Summarize how corporate culture, entrepreneurship, committees, coordination techniques, informal groups, and the grapevine affect an
                       organization.

      Outcome 7:    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of people and motivation in business.

         A.          Explain what motivation is.

         B.          Recognize some earlier perspectives on motivation: scientific management, Theory X, and Theory Y.

         C.          Outline Maslow’s hierarchy of needs.

         D.          Discuss Herzsberg’s motivation-hygiene theory.

         E.          Describe four contemporary views of motivation: equity theory, expectancy theory, reinforcement theory, and Theory Z.

         F.          Explain several techniques for increasing employee motivation.

    8.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of human resources management.

         A.          Describe the major components of human resources management.

         B.          Identify the steps in human resources planning.

         C.          Describe cultural diversity and understand some of the challenges and opportunities associated with it.

         D.          Explain the objectives and uses of job analysis.

         E.          Describe the processes of recruiting, employee selection, and orientation.

         F.          Discuss the primary elements of employee compensation and benefits.

         G.         Explain the purposes and techniques of employee training, development, and performance  appraisal.

         H.         Outline the major legislation affecting human resources management.

     9.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of union-management relations.

         A.          Explain how and why labor unions came into being.

         B.          Discuss the sources of unions’ negotiating power and trends in union membership.

         C.          Identify the main focus of several major pieces of labor-management legislation.

         D.          Enumerate the steps involved in forming a union, and show how the National Labor Relations. Board is involved in the process.

         E.          Describe the basic elements in the collective bargaining process.

         F.           Identify the major issues covered in a union-management contract.

         G.          Explain the primary bargaining tools available to unions and management.

    10. Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of an overview of marketing.

         A.          Know the meaning of marketing, and explain how it creates utility for purchasers of products.

         B.          Trace the development of the marketing concept and understand how it is implemented.

         C.          Describe what markets are and how they are classified.

         D.          Identify the four elements of the marketing mix, and be aware of their importance in developing a marketing strategy.

         E.          Explain how the marketing environment affects strategic market planning.

         F.           Describe how market measurement and sales forecasting are used.

         G.          Distinguish between a marketing information system and marketing research.

         H.          Identify several factors that may influence buying behavior.

         I.           Describe three ways of measuring consumer income.

    11. Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of money, banking and credit.

         A.          Identify the functions and important characteristics of money.

         B.          Describe the differences between commercial banks and other financial institutions in the banking industry.

         C.          Identify the services provided by commercial banks and other financial institutions.

         D.          Summarize how the Federal Reserve System regulates the money supply.

         E.          Explain the function of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), Savings Association Insurance Fund (SAIF), Bank Insurance
                       Fund (BIF), and National Credit Union Association (NCUA).

         F.          Discuss the importance of credit and credit management

    12. Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of financial management.

         A.          Explain the need for financing and financial management in business.

         B.          Summarize the process of planning for financial management.

         C.          Describe the advantages and disadvantages of different methods of short-term financing.

         D.          Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of equity financing and debt financing from the corporation’s standpoint.

         E.          Discuss the importance of using funds effectively.

    13. Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of securities markets and investments.

         A.          Describe how securities are bought and sold through the primary and secondary markets.

         B.          Develop a personal investment plan.

         C.          Explain how the factors of safety, risk, income, growth, and liquidity affect an individual’s investment decisions.

         D.          Identify the advantages and disadvantages of the traditional investment alternatives: savings accounts, bonds, stocks, mutual funds, and
                       real estate.

         E.          Describe the high-risk investment techniques, including buying on margin and selling short.

         F.           Use the various sources of financial information to evaluate potential investments.

         G.          Explain how federal and state authorities regulate trading in securities.

  
  •  

    MGT 157 - Principles of Merchandising

    Credits: 3
    Studies merchandising, with an emphasis on contemporary designers and issues. Explores primary, secondary, and consumer markets. Discusses merchandise characteristics, planning and profitability. Addresses technology in the merchandising environment.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of consumer motivation.
      1. Explain the role of “taste” in the consumer selection process
      2. Discuss why consumers prefer one retail store over another
      3. Discuss personal motivation in merchandise preference
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of image as it relates to merchandising
      1. Identify the established levels of merchandise (couture, designer, bridge, ready-to wear, mass)
      2. Discuss how merchandise level relates to image
      3. Explain how merchandise buying relates to image
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of figure types and figure sizes and how they affect apparel styling.
      1. Identify figure types and sizes for the main categories of apparel (men’s, women’s, children’s)
      2. Discuss the differences in sizing for the main categories and how this impacts the consumer
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the forces that influence retailing and merchandising (social, economical, and political)
      1. Discuss the retail fashion and trade fashion calendars.
      2. Explain the fashion cycle
      3. Explain the consumer calendar
      4. Discuss the relationship of the economy to the retail environment
      5. Discuss the relationship of the political climate to the retail environment
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the product life cycle and how it applies to hard line and soft line products.
      1. Identify the components of the product life cycle
      2. Discuss Trickle-Down theory and how it relates to merchandising
      3. Discuss Bottom-Up theory and how it relates to merchandising
      4. Identify trends and trend setters
    6. Student will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship of designer to manufacturer to buyer to consumer.
      1. Discuss the fashion diagram depicting the functions of a typical wholesale apparel manufacturer
      2. Discuss the process for merchandise orders and shipping
      3. Identify correct merchandise terminology and details
    7. Demonstrate an understanding of the primary market and how it affects Merchandising
      1. Identify the materials of fashion (fibers, fabrics, leather, fur)
      2. Identify components of mills (converters, horizontal, vertical)
    8. Demonstrate an understanding of the divisions of the softline industry.
      1. Identify the categories of outerwear
      2. Identify the categories of intimate wear
      3. Identify the categories of accessories
    9. Demonstrate an understanding of market comparisons and how price affects styling
      1. Discuss percentage share of the market
      2. Explain value factors
    10. Demonstrate an understanding of careers in merchandising
      1. Discuss the designer’s role in product development
      2. Explore the center of fashion (foreign, domestic)
  
  •  

    MGT 243 - Principles of Marketing

    Credits: 3


    Provides an understanding and interpretation of the marketing system and its importance in the economy and the place of the marketing function in business management. Establishes a basic understanding of the psychological, environmental, and managerial functions and presents processes that are employed in contemporary marketing.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  either with a minimum grade of “C”. Completion of or concurrent enrollment in CST 147 MGT 153W  is also recommended
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Demonstrate an understanding of developing relationships through customer focus, quality, technology, and ethical behavior.

         A.          Explain how marketing creates utility

         B.          Define the marketing concept

         C.          List three reasons for studying marketing

     2.   Demonstrate an understanding of ways to create value through customer satisfaction and quality.

         A.          Explain the relationship between value, customer satisfaction, and quality

         B.          Identify the major components of customer satisfaction.

         C.          List the goals of internal marketing

         D.          Explain the primary methods by which marketers measure customer satisfaction.

         E.          Describe the historical development of the quality movement.

         F.           Outline the objectives of a marketing audit.

         G.          Discuss the benchmarking process and its role in improving a marketing strategy

         H.          Discuss how marketing managers can deliver value to customers by balancing the marketing mix elements.

    3.    Demonstrate an understanding of the marketing environment, ethics, and social responsibility.

         A.          Identify the five components of the marketing environment

         B.          Describe the types of competition that marketers face and the steps they take to develop  competitive strategies.

         C.          Discuss how the government and other groups regulate marketing activities

         D.          Describe the impact of technology on the firm’s marketing activities.

     4.    Demonstrate an understanding of the global dimensions of marketing.

         A.          Describe the importance of international marketing from the perspectives of the individual firm and the nation.

         B.          Identify the major components of the environment for international marketing.

         C.          Compare alternative strategies for entering international markets.

         D.          Discuss the attractiveness of the U.S. market as a target for foreign marketers.

    5.    Demonstrate an understanding of marketing planning and forecasting.

         A.          Distinguish between strategic planning and tactical planning.

         B.          Identify the steps in the marketing planning process.

         C.          Describe the concept of SWOT analysis and its four major elements.

         D.          Identify the major types of forecasting methods.

         E.          Discuss the steps in the forecasting process.

    6.    Demonstrate an understanding of marketing research.

         A.          List the steps in the marketing research process

         B.          Discuss the different sampling techniques used by marketing researchers.

         C.          Differentiate between the types and sources of primary and secondary data

         D.          Identify the methods by which marketing researchers collect data.

    7.    Demonstrate an understanding of market segmentation, targeting, and positioning.

         A.          Identify the essential components of a market

         B.          Discuss the role of market segmentation in developing a marketing strategy.

         C.          Describe the criteria necessary for effective segmentation.

         D.          Identify the steps in the market segmentation process.

    8.    Demonstrate an understanding of consumer behavior.

         A.          Differentiate between buyer and consumer behavior

         B.          Explain how marketers classify behavioral influences on consumer decisions.

         C.          Discuss the steps in the consumer decision process.

    9.    Demonstrate an understanding of business - to - business marketing.

         A.          List the components of the business market

         B.          Describe the major approaches to segmenting business-to-business markets.

         C.          Identify the major characteristics of the business market and its demand

         D.          Describe the major influences on business buying behavior

    10. Demonstrate an understanding of relationship marketing.

         A.          Contrast relationship marketing with transaction based marketing.

         B.          Identify and explain each of the core elements of relationship marketing.

         C.          Explain the role of databases in relationship marketing.

    11. Demonstrate an understanding of product strategy.

         A.          Explain the broader marketing view of products.

         B.          List the classifications of consumer products.

         C.          Describe the types of business products.

         D.          Explain the concept of the product life cycle.

    12. Demonstrate an understanding of brand management and new-product planning.

         A.          Describe the benefits of branding and brand management

         B.          Describe the different types of brands

         C.          Explain the value of brand equity

         D.          List the stages in the new-product development process

    13. Demonstrate an understanding of marketing of services

         A.          Differentiate service offerings from goods

         B.          Identify the primary characteristics of services

         C.          Explain the concept of service quality

    14. Demonstrate an understanding of distribution

         A.          Describe the role that distribution plays in marketing strategy.

         B.          Describe the various types of distribution channels available to marketers.

    15. Demonstrate an understanding of logistics and value chain management.

         A.          Explain the role of logistics in an effective marketing strategy.

         B.          Describe the impact of transportation deregulation on logistics activities.

  
  •  

    MGT 245 - Principles of Management

    Credits: 3


    Discusses theories of management practices and explains fundamentals of administrative, executive, and staff management. Emphasizes the management functions of planning, organizing, directing, controlling, as well as preparation of information required for decision making. Covers the analysis of management problems and the synthesis of solutions.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  either with a minimum grade of “C”. MGT 153W  is recommended
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives Outcome 1:     Demonstrate knowledge of Managing a Dynamic Environment.

         Objective

         A.          Define managers and management.

         B.          Identify the different managerial functions and roles.

         C.          Describe the duties and responsibilities of various levels of management.

         D.          Explain the impact of work-force diversity on organizations.

         E.          Describe the five basic types of managerial skills and their relative importance.

         F.           Explain management as a dynamic process.

    2.    Demonstrate knowledge of Strategic Management and its Environmental Forces.

         A.          Describe the main forces in the external business environment and how they influence organizations.

         B.          Define the role of the task environment and how it changes.

         C.          Identify the five competitive forces that directly affect organizations in an industry.

         D.          Explain why technological forces have become increasingly important in strategic planning.

         E.          Describe the principal political strategies used by managers to cope with external political-legal forces.

    3.    Demonstrate knowledge of Strategic Planning and Strategy Formation.

         A.          Explain why planning may help achieve organization effectiveness.

         B.          State the characteristics of strategic and tactical planning.

         C.          Differentiate the corporate, business, and functional levels of planning and strategies.

         D.          Explain the eight tasks of the strategic planning process.

         E.          Use models of business-level strategy to develop competitive strategies.

    4.    Demonstrate knowledge of Ethics and Social Responsibility.

         A.          State the importance of ethics for organizations and their employees.

         B.          Describe how the societal, legal, organizational , and individual levels of ethics influence decisions and behavior.

         C.          Discuss the standards and principles of utilitarian, moral rights, and justice models of ethics.

         D.          Explain how the traditional, stakeholder, and affirmative social responsibility concepts are related to the three models of ethics.

    5.    Demonstrate knowledge of Fundamentals of Decision Making.

         A.          Define decision making.

         B.          State four preconditions for meaningful decision making.

         C.          Explain the conditions of certainty, risk, and uncertainty under which decisions are made.

         D.          Describe a framework for understanding the three primary categories of decisions.

         E.           Apply goals to decision making.

         F.           Describe the rational, bounded rationality, and political models of decision making.

    6.    Demonstrate knowledge of Traditional Organization Designs.

         A.          Describe the main elements of organizational structure and how they’re shown on an organization chart.

         B.          Discuss the most common types of departmentalization.

         C.          State the basic principles of coordination.

         D.          Describe the authority structure of an organization.

         E.          Explain the factors that affect the centralization or decentralization of decision making.

         F.           State the differences between line and staff authority.

    7.    Demonstrate knowledge of innovation and change in the workplace.

         A.          Explain why innovation and change is important to organizations.

         B.          Identify the different methods managers can use to manage innovation and change.

         C.          Discuss the different methods that managers can use to better manage change.

         D.          Identify sources and solutions to change.

    8.    Demonstrate knowledge of Motivating for Performance.

         A.          State the main factors that affect work motivation.

         B.          Identify the primary approaches to work motivation.

         C.          Use the needs hierarchy to describe how individuals’ needs motivate them to perform their jobs.

         D.          Use the ERG model to describe how need satisfaction and need frustration affect motivation.

         E.          Discuss how achievement, affiliation, and power influence work motivation.

         F.           Describe the characteristics of work and the work environment that affect job satisfaction and performance.

         G.          Explain how job enrichment affects people’s motivation at work.

         H.          Discuss the basic assumptions and concepts underlying the expectancy model of motivation.

         I.            Describe how perceptions of equity and inequity arise and how they affect motivation.

         J.           State how rewards and punishments may be used to influence employees in organizations.

    9.    Demonstrate knowledge of The Dynamics of Leadership.

         A.          Describe the basics of leadership.

         B.          State the contributions of the traits models of leadership.

         C.          Describe the primary behavioral models of leadership.

         D.          Explain the principal contingency models of leadership and the situational factors that determine a leader’s effectiveness.

         E.          State the unique behaviors of transformational leaders and their impact on followers.

    10. Demonstrate knowledge of Organizational Communication.

         A.          Define the main elements of the communication process.

         B.          Describe the importance of information technology in the communication process.

         C.          Define barriers to communication and describe ways to overcome them.

         D.          State the guidelines for effective communication.

    11. Demonstrate knowledge of Controlling in Organizations.

         A.          Explain the foundations of control.

         B.          Discuss ways that organizations create effective controls.

         C.          Identify the six steps of the corrective control model.

         D.          Describe the primary types of organizational control.

         E.          Discuss ethical control issues confronting managers.

  
  •  

    MGT 247 - Principles of Retailing

    Credits: 3


    Discusses store location, organization structure, and retail personnel management in detail. Presents merchandising policies and budgets, and buying and pricing merchandise. Presents in some detail retail advertising, personal selling, customer services, and loss prevention. Discusses the scope of the retailing industry, requirement of retail management as well as careers in retailing.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  either with a minimum grade of “C” and completion of or concurrent enrollment in CST 147 . MGT 153W  is also recommended
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Demonstrate a general knowledge of the word of retailing.

         A.          Define retailing.

         B.          Identify the differences between the various types of retail transactions.

         C.          Describe how retailing benefits customers, manufactures, and wholesalers.

         D.          Describe the factors that will contribute to success in retailing in the future.

    2.    Demonstrate an understanding of how to create a competitive advantage.

         A.          Describe the basic dimensions of retail strategies.

         B.          Explain how quality is the result of a successful strategy.

         C.          Identify the steps in retail planning.

         D.          Explain why retail planning is essential to the retailer.

         E.          Define competitive advantage.

    3.    Demonstrate an understanding of the retail environment.

         A.          Discuss how external environments affect retailing.

         B.          Describe what constitutes a personal ethical framework.

         C.          Describe the basic laws that affect retailing.

         D.         Describe how economic environment has affected retailing.

         E.          Discuss the competitive market structure and how retailing has changed in response to competition.

         F.          Discuss how technological and global environments will transform retailing.

    4.    Demonstrate an understanding of how to identify the customer.

         A.          Explain the importance of customer satisfaction.

         B.          Identify basic needs, secondary motives, and patronage motives.

         C.          Describe the steps in the purchase decision process.

         D.          Describe the new global consumer.

    5.    Understand the importance of customer information from research.

         A.          Explain why retailers engage in research.

         B.          Define the steps in the research process.

         C.          Describe how to select a research design.

         D.          Explain how to locate and use secondary information.

         E.          Describe the different methodologies available to collect primary data.

    6.    Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of store location and site evaluation.

         A.          Describe the guidelines for selecting a retail location.

         B.          Describe the various tools available in retail site selection.

         C.          Discuss future strategies for retail location.

         D.          Discuss and evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of each type of retail location.

         E.          Discuss the importance of selecting the appropriate site for the retail store.

         F.           Describe the techniques and criteria used in site selection.

    7.    Demonstrate an understanding of store design and layout.

         A.          Explain how to design a comprehensive store plan.

         B.          Describe how interior store design is affected by existing space, stock storage, customer traffic flow, and types of goods.

         C.          Define the basic interior design elements of a store.

         D.         Explain how to develop a planigram and know how it is used.

    8.    Demonstrate an understanding of store organization.

         A.          Describe the basic skills required by retail supervisors.

         B.          Define the management concepts that affect retail supervision.
    9:    Demonstrate an understanding of financial analysis as it relates to retailing.

         A.          Describe financial, sales, and merchandise inventory records.

         B.          Analyze retailer’s financial position.

         C.          Define: balance sheet, assets, liabilities, net worth and profit.

         D.          Calculate gross margin return on investment, return on space, and return on labor.

    10. Demonstrate an understanding of merchandise planning and merchandise budgets.

         A.          Develop a merchandise budget for planned purchases.

         B.          Calculate a planned sales figure from estimated sales.

         C.          Explain the impact of planned reductions on merchandise budgets.

         D.          Illustrate how to plan for beginning and ending inventories.

         E.          Describe how to manage merchandise using open-to-buy.

         F.           Explain the cost, retail, and book methods for determining the value of inventory.

    11. Demonstrate an understanding of pricing merchandise.

         A.          Define price.

         B.          Define the concept of elasticity.

         C.          Explain the importance of pricing.

         D.          Describe the fundamental pricing strategy.

         E.          Discuss markdown strategies and psychological.

         F.           Perform pricing calculations

         G.          Discuss the federal legal environment of pricing.

    12. Demonstrate an understanding of retail selling.

         A.          Describe the roles of personal selling, publicity, and sales promotion.

         B.          Explain the duties and responsibilities of a sales person.

         C.          Explain the retail selling process.

         D.          Demonstrate how to manage salespeople and improve employee productivity.

         E.          Identify the forms of employee compensation.

  
  •  

    MGT 248 - Principles of Buying for Resale

    Credits: 3
    Explores the buying function in retailing and wholesaling in depth. Covers the principles of foreign and domestic vendor location and the legality and ethics in the buyer-vendor relationship. Studies the factors determining merchandise selection, including consumer analysis, building model stocks, and estimating sales potential. Studies merchandising expense control factors, manual and computer inventory control systems, as they relate to buying.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  and MGT 110  each with a minimum grade of “C”. MGT 247  is recommended
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts of buying.
      1. Explain how and why buying decisions are made.
      2. Describe the breadth of the buyer’s role in a retail organization.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the current market trends.
      1. Identify market dates for the coming year.
      2. Describe trade shows and trade show locations.
      3. Discuss the characteristics of the children-wear industry.
      4. Discuss the characteristics of the women and mens wear industry.
      5. Discuss the lead time on both domestic and foreign goods
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the buying plan.
      1. Define planned sales
      2. Define beginning-of-the-month (BOM) stock
      3. Define planned markdowns
      4. Define planned purchases
      5. Discuss the formats for a six month merchandise plan
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of how to develop stock plans.
      1. Identify classifications
      2. Discuss assortment plans
      3. Describe monthly sales by classification
      4. Discuss price lines
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of how to plan market purchases.
      1. Define divisional merchandise manager (DMM)
      2. Define general merchandise manager (GMM)
      3. Discuss resources
      4. Describe a resident buying office
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of how to work with and negotiate with vendors.
      1. Discuss building relationships with vendors.
      2. Discuss negotiation techniques with vendors
      3. Describe steps in visiting vendors
      4. Discuss purchase order writing
    7. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic math concepts required of a buyer.
      1. Applying buying formulas and mathematical examples in a realistic format.
      2. Discuss information typically required for the completion of an order form.
      3. Describe terms of the sale
      4. Discuss the buying calendar and merchandise flow.
      5. Explain and apply open-to-buy concepts.
    8. Demonstrate an understanding of planning the sales promotion for the buyer.
      1. Discuss the sales promotion budget 8B. Define vendor co-op
      2. Describe the advertising calendar
      3. Discuss the monthly promotional plan
    9. Demonstrate an understanding of the financial health of a company.
      1. Define gross margin
      2. Define sales volume
      3. Define cost of goods sold
      4. Define operating expenses
      5. Define fixed expenses
      6. Describe an income statement
      7. Discuss profit and loss
  
  •  

    MGT 251W - Business Law I

    Credits: 3


    This course provides a comprehensive study of both state and federal court systems, and the relationships of the participants in a lawsuit, including judges, juries, litigants, witnesses and attorneys. Particular areas of business law that are studied in the context noted above include tort law, contract law, agency law, and the law of personal property and bailments.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  either with a minimum grade of “C”
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of the nature of law.

         A.          Define legal rights and give examples.

         B.          Explain how rights and duties relate.

         C.          List the sources of law and give examples of each.

    2.    Demonstrate understanding of the court system and dispute resolution.

         A.          Explain the federal and state court systems.

         B.          Define the types of jurisdiction courts can have and how these are different.

         C.          List the initial steps in a lawsuit and explain how pleadings are used.

         D.          Explain how a party who prevails in court collects the judgment.

         E.          Give examples of alternative dispute resolution.

    3.    Demonstrate understanding of the different product liability theories available to purchasers.

         A.          List the theories of product liability.

         B.          Identify who may sue and who may be sued when a defective product causes harm.

         C.          List and define the implied warranties and distinguish them from express warranties.

         D.          Explain and distinguish between full warranties and limited warranties under federal law.

         E.          State what constitutes a breach of warranty.

         F.          Demonstrate an introductory understanding of the Uniform Commercial Code.

    4.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of tort liability.

         A.          Define torts and distinguish them from contracts and from crimes.

         B.          Explain the basis of tort liability.

         C.          Define absolute liability and describe circumstances where the law imposes it.

         D.          Define negligence and explain its application.

         E.          Give examples of both negligent and intentional torts.

    5.    Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of how a contract arises.

         A.          List the essential elements of a contract.

         B.          Describe the way in which a contract arises.

         C.          State how contracts are classified.

         D.          Differentiate contracts from agreements that are not contracts.

         E.          Differentiate formal contracts from simple contracts.

         F.           Differentiate express contracts from implieds contracts.

         G.          Differentiate contractual liability from quasi-contractual liability.

    6.    Demonstrate knowledge of what constitutes an offer and what constitutes an acceptance.

         A.          Determine whether a statement is an offer or an invitation to negotiate.

         B.          Determine whether an agreement is too indefinite to be enforced.

         C.          Describe the exceptions that the law makes to the requirement of definiteness.

         D.          List all the ways an offer is terminated.

         E.          Compare offers, firm offers, and option contracts.

         F.           Define what constitutes the acceptance of an offer.

    7.    Demonstrate knowledge of what is required to have legal contractual capacity.

         A.          Define contractual capacity.

         B.          State the extent and effect of avoidance of a contract by a minor.

         C.          Classify unilateral and bilateral mistakes.

         D.          Distinguish between innocent misrepentation, fraud, and nondisclosure.

         E.          List those classes of persons who lack contractual capacity.

         F.           Distinguish between undue influence and duress.

    8.    Discuss the concept of mutual consideration with respect to enforcing a promise.

         A.          Define what consitutes consideration.

         B.          State the effect of the absence of consideration.

         C.          Identify promises that can serve as consideration.

         D.          Distinguish between present consideration and past consideration.

         E.          State when forbearance can be consideration.

         F.           Recognize situations in which adequacy of consideration has significance.

         G.          List the exceptions to the requirement of consideration.

    9.    Distinguish legal contracts from illegal contracts.

         A.          State the effect of illegality on a contract.

         B.          Compare illegality and unconscionability.

         C.          Distinguish between illegality in performing a legal contract and the illegallity of a contract.

         D.          Recognize when a contract is invalid because it obstructs legal processes.

         E.          State the elements of a lottery.

         F.           State the extent to which agreements not to compete are lawful.

    10. Recognize when a contract must be in writing in order to be enforceable.

         A.          State when a contract must be evidenced by a writing.

         B.          List the requirements of a writing that evidences a contract.

         C.          State the effects of the absence of a sufficient writing when a contract must be evidenced by a writing.

         D.          List the exceptions that have been made by the courts to the laws requiring written evidence of contracts.

         E.          Compare statute of frauds requirements with the parole evidence rule.

         F.           List exceptions to the parole evidence rule.

    11. Demonstrate knowledge of a judge’s power to determine intent of parties to a contract.

         A.          Compare the effect of objective and subjective intent of the parties to a contract.

         B.          Distinguish between conditions precedent and conditions subsequent.

         C.          State the rules for interpreting ambiguous terms in a contract.

         D.          State the effect of contradictory terms.

         E.          Define and illustrate implied terms.

         F.          State what controls the choice of law applicable to an interstate contract.

    12. Demonstrate an understanding of how third parties can acquire rights and obligations under a contract between others.

         A.          Distinguish between a third party beneficiary and an incidental beneficiary.

         B.          Define an assignment of contract rights.

         C.          State the limitations on the assignability or a right to performance.

         D.          Describe what constitutes a delegation of duties.

         E.          State the liability of the parties after a proper delegation of duties has been made.

         F.           Describe the status of an assignee with respect to defenses and setoffs available against the assignor.

         G.          State the significance of a notice of assignment.

         H.          State the liability of an assignor to an assignee.

    13. Recognize the various ways contractual obligations are terminated.

         A.          List the ways in which a contract can be discharged.

         B.          Distinguish between the effect of a rejected tender of payment and a rejected tender of performance.

         C.          Define when time is of the essence.

         D.          Compare performance to the satisfaction of the other contracting parties, performance to the  satisfaction of a reasonable person, and
                       substantial performance.

         E.          State when a consumer contract may be rescinded by the consumer.

         F.          Compare the discharge of a contract by rescission, cancellation, substitution, and novation.

         G.         State the effect on a contract of the death or disability of one of the contracting parties.

         H.         Define the concept of economic frustration.

    14. Recognize the various remedies available to the plaintiff in litigation as a result of defendant’s breach of contract.

         A.          List and define the kinds of damages that may be recovered when a contract is broken.

         B.          Describe the requirement of mitigation of damages.

         C.          State when liquidated damages clauses are valid.

         D.          State when liability-limiting clauses are valid.

         E.          State when a breach of contract is waived.

         F.           List the steps that may be used to prevent a waiver of breach of contract.

    15. Differentiate the various methods to acquire ownership.

         A.          Write a definition of personal property.

         B.          Differentiate between patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets.

         C.          List and explain the various types of gifts.

         D.          Identify the four forms of multiple ownership of personal property.

         E.          Set forth the remedies for violations of property rights.

    16. Demonstrate knowledge of the bailment of personal property.

         A.          Describe how a bailment is created.

         B.          List and distinguish the various classifications of bailments.

         C.          Contrast the renting of space with the creation of bailment.

         D.          Explain the standard of care a bailee is required to exercise over bailed property.

         E.          State the burden of proof when a bailor sues a bailee for damages to bailed property.

         F.           Define a bailor’s implied warranty concerning goods furnished by the bailor.

    18. Use writing tasks to promote the learning of points of law.

    19. Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of how to access law.

  
  •  

    MGT 252 - Business Law II

    Credits: 3


    This course provides a continued study of court systems, with emphasis in specialized areas of business law including sales law, commercial paper law, secured transactions and bankruptcy law, real property law and corporation law. The Uniform Commercial Code and recent consumer protection legislation are stressed.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  either with a minimum grade of “C” and MGT 251W  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Demonstrate a general knowledge of sale of goods under the Uniform Commercial Code.

         A.          Describe how the Code treats a sale of goods as a unique contractual agreement, different from traditional contract law.

         B.          List points of difference between general contract law and the law of sales.

         C.          State when a contract for the sale of goods must be evidenced by a writing.

         D.          List and explain the exceptions to the requirement that certain contracts be evidenced by a writing.

         E.          Define and state the purpose of the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods.

         F.           State the distinguishing features of a consumer lease and a finance lease.

    2.    Describe the timing of passage of title and risk of loss in sale of goods transaction.

         A.          State when title and risk of loss pass with respect to goods.

         B.          State who bears the risk of loss when goods are damaged or destroyed.

         C.          Classify transactions in which the person dealing with the seller may return the good.

         D.          Describe contrasting views of courts as to when a sale occurs in a self-service store.

    3.    Demonstrate an understanding of delivery terms in a contract for the sale of goods under the Uniform Commercial Code.

         A.          Describe the rights afforded a party when it  appears that the other party in the contract will not perform.

         B.          State what steps can be taken by a party to a sales contract who feels insecure.

         C.          State the obligations of the seller and the buyer in a sales contract.

         D.          Identify conduct that constitutes an acceptance.

    4.    Demonstrate an understanding of product liability theories.

         A.          List the theories of product liability.

         B.          Say who may sue and who may be sued when a defective product causes harm.

         C.          List and define the implied warranties and distinguish them from express warranties.

         D.          Explain and distinguish between full warranties and limited warranties under federal law.

         E.          State what constitutes a breach of warranty.

         F.           Describe the extent and manner in which implied warranties may be disclaimed under the UCC and the CISG.

     5.    Demonstrate an understating of remedies.

         A.          List the remedies of the seller when the buyer breaches a sales contract.

         B.          List the remedies of the buyer when the seller breaches a sales contract.

         C.          Distinguish between rejection of nonconforming goods and revocation of acceptance.

         D.          Determine the validity of clauses limiting damages.

         E.          Discuss the waiver of and preservation of defenses of a buyer.

    6.    Demonstrate an understanding of the negotiable instruments.

         A.          Explain the importance and function of commercial paper.

         B.          Name the parties to commercial paper.

         C.          Describe the concept of negotiability and distinguish it from assignability.

         D.          List the essential elements of a negotiable instrument.

    7.    Gain an understanding of the mechanics of the transfer of commercial paper.

         A.          Describe specific applications to the liability of parties when there has been a forgery.

         B.          Distinguish the effect of a transfer by assignment from that of a negotiation.

         C.          Explain the difference between negotiation of order paper and negotiation of bearer paper.

         D.          Determine the legal effect of forged and unauthorized indorsements.

         E.          Be familiar with the forged payee imposter exceptions.

         F.           List the indorser’s warranties and describe their significance.

         G.          Solve problems involving the transfer of commercial paper.

    8:    Demonstrate an understanding of the different types of holders of commercial paper.

         A.          Describe the specific defenses available to a party to commercial paper when sued by the holder.

         B.          List the requirements for becoming a holder in due course.

         C.          Explain the rights of a holder through a holder in due course.

         D.          List and explain the limited defenses not available against a holder in due course.

         E.          List and explain the universal defenses available against all holders.

         F.          Describe how the rights of a holder in due course have been limited by the Federal Trade Commission.

    9.    Demonstrate understanding of the ways parties to commercial paper are discharged of liability.

         A.          Distinguish between primary parties and secondary parties.

         B.          Explain why presentment for payment and presentment for acceptance are important.

         C.          Explain the importance of giving notice of dishonor and when such notice is excused.

         D.          List and explain the various methods of discharge.

         E.          Distinguish the discharge of individual parties from the discharge of all parties.

         F.           Describe the procedural steps the holder must follow to collect on commercial paper upon default.

    11: Demonstrate an understanding of the types of bankruptcy discharge.

         A.          List the requirements for the commencement of a voluntary bankruptcy case and an involuntary bankruptcy case.

         B.          Describe the rights of the trustee in bankruptcy.

         C.          Explain the procedure for the administration of the debtor’s estate.

         D.          List the debtor’s duties and exemptions.

         E.          Explain the significance of a discharge in bankruptcy.

         F.           Explain when a business reorganization and an extended time payment plan might be used.

         G.          Describe the procedural requirements for they types of bankruptcy discharge.

         H.          Describe what assets are exempt upon filing for bankruptcy.

    11. Acquire knowledge of what is included in the concept of real property, the various ways to acquire ownership of real property, and the
          legal 
    requirements to transfer title to real property.

         A.          List the kinds of real property.

         B.          Distinguish between liens, licenses, and easements.

         C.          List and illustrate the forms of co-ownership of real property.

         D.          Define a deed and describe its operation.

         E.          Describe and illustrate the warranties of the grantor and the grantee of real estate.

         F.           Describe the characteristics and effect of a mortgage.

    12. Demonstrate an understanding of how lease relationships are created.

         A.          Define a lease and list its essential elements.

         B.          List the ways in which a lease may be terminated.

         C.          List and explain the rights and duties of the parties to a lease.

         D.          Describe the remedies of a landlord for breach by the tenant.

         E.          Describe a landlord’s liability for a tenant’s and a third person’s injuries.

         F.           Define and distinguish between a sublease and an assignment of a lease.

         G.          Describe the rights and duties of the respective parties in a lease relationship.

         H.          Describe who is liable for injury on premises.

    13. Demonstrate knowledge of how a corporation is formed.

         A.          Classify corporations according to nature, state of incorporation, and functions performed.

         B.          State why and when the corporate entity will be ignored.

         C.          List the steps to be taken in forming a corporation.

         D.          Compare corporations de jure, de facto, and by estoppel.

         E.          List and describe the ways in which corporate existence may be terminated.

         F.          Compare consolidations, mergers, and conglomerates.

         G.         Describe the advantages of forming a corporation.

  
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    MGT 254 - Applied Marketing

    Credits: 3
    Introduces strategic marketing decisions using cases and real life experiences. Introduces the conception, development and implementation of a marketing activity, that will be conducted by the students, with an actual budget. Uses practical experience in preparing and giving several types of presentations to live audiences.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  and MGT 243 , each with a minimum grade of “C”, and MGT 143 .
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of actual business situations permitting further familiarization with marketing principles and methods as they are employed in various industries.
      1. Discuss the basic nature and scope of marketing
      2. Describe the various types of business settings, such as retail stores, specialty shops, and catalog houses
      3. Describe the various types of wholesale settings that will interact with the marketing process, such as a buying office, consulting firm, mills, and trade associations
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the roles of promotion and the global nature of promotion.
      1. Explain reasons for the transition to a global perspective
      2. Discuss the concept of thinking globally, acting locally
      3. Discuss future trends for global marketing
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the promotion mix.
      1. Define advertising
      2. Define direct marketing
      3. Define sale promotion
      4. Define publicity and public relations
      5. Define personal selling
      6. Define special events
      7. Define fashion shows
      8. Define visual merchandising
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the promotional structure.
      1. Describe the fundamental tasks of promotional personnel
      2. Discuss characteristics of successful promotional personnel
      3. Describe how retailers are organized
      4. Describe how manufacturers are organized
      5. Discuss how in-house promotions are organized
      6. Discuss how advertising agencies are organized
      7. Identify future trends in promotional organization
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of promotion planning.
      1. Describe the planning time frame
      2. Identify the personnel responsible for promotion planning
      3. Discuss strategic analysis
      4. Discuss mission statements
      5. Discuss promotion objectives
      6. Apply promotional objectives
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of promotional calendars.
      1. Describe a trade calendar and it’s use
      2. Describe a retail calendar and it’s use
      3. Identify promotional mix calendars
      4. Identify future trends in promotion planning
    7. Demonstrate an understanding of budget.
      1. Discuss various methods of budget allocation
      2. Demonstrate allocating a promotional budget
      3. Demonstrate allocating a manufacturing promotional budget
      4. Describe allocating advertising agency compensation
      5. Describe ways to extend the budget through cooperative activities
      6. Identify future trends in budgeting
    8. Demonstrate an understanding of the promotional aspects of forecasting.
      1. Explain forecasting
      2. Identify forecasting personnel
      3. Discuss the relationship of forecasting to promotional activities
      4. Define primary market forecasts
      5. Define secondary market forecasts
      6. Define tertiary market forecasts
      7. Discuss theme development
      8. Identify trends for forecasting and promotion
    9. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of special events in promotion
      1. Identify the goals of special events
      2. Describe the types of special events
      3. Discuss institutional events
      4. Discuss merchandise events
      5. Conduct a feasibility study
      6. Identify the personnel involved in special events
      7. Discuss the size and scale of events
      8. Discuss financial considerations related to special events
  
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    MGT 256 - Human Resources Management I

    Credits: 3
    Explains human resources management; the environment in which human resources management must operate; contemporary legal guidelines; human resource planning and recruitment; developing effectiveness in human resources through training, development, and appraisal; and creating a productive work environment through motivation, communication, leading and directing.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  either with a minimum grade of “C”. MGT 153W  is also recommended
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the human resources management.
      1. Describe why it is important to study human resources management
      2. Identify and explain at least three competitive challenges effecting human resources management
      3. Describe demographic and employee concerns as related to human resources management
      4. Explain the partnership of line managers and the human resources department(s)
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of equal employment opportunity.
      1. Identify and explain the historical perspective of EEO legislation
      2. Explain government regulation law pertaining to equal employment opportunity
      3. Describe sexual harassment in the workplace and methods of curtailing it
      4. Describe government agencies and methods used in enforcing equal employment opportunity legislation
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of job requirements and employee contributions.
      1. Explain the relationship of job requirements and human resources management functions
      2. Explain the process of job analysis
      3. Describe job design and its impact on human resources management
    4. Demonstrate a familiarity with human resources planning and recruitment.
      1. Discuss the importance of human resources planning
      2. Identify and explain elements of effective human resources planning
      3. Describe the benefits and limitations of recruiting within the organization
      4. Describe the methods used in recruiting outside the organization
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the selection process in human resources management.
      1. Describe the concept of matching people and jobs
      2. Explain the sources used to obtain information about job candidates
      3. Discuss the purpose and methods of the employment interview
      4. Describe considerations involved in reaching a selection decision
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of human resources training.
      1. Discuss the systems approach to training
      2. Explain the process involved in conducting a training-needs assessment
      3. Discuss considerations in designing a training program
      4. Explain methods for management development
    7. Demonstrate an understanding of career development in the workplace.
      1. Discuss the elements of career development programs
      2. Describe career development and its impact on management development
      3. Describe the process of personal career development
    8. Demonstrate an understanding of appraising performance.
      1. Describe the purpose of a performance appraisal
      2. Explain the process of developing an effective appraisal program
      3. Describe at least three performance appraisal methods
      4. Describe methods and consideration factors of the appraisal interview
    9. Demonstrate an understanding of employee rights and discipline.
      1. Describe employee rights in the workplace
      2. Identify and explain disciplinary policies and procedures
      3. Explain at least one method used in appealing disciplinary actions
      4. Explain organizational ethics in employee relations
  
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    MGT 257W - Human Resources Management II

    Credits: 3
    Develops advanced understanding in a variety of Human Resource topics which may include but is not limited to employee-management relationships, dynamics of labor relations, collective bargaining, disciplinary action, compensation management, incentive compensation, employee benefits, safety and health, auditing the Human Resources Management program, and international Human Resources Management.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  either with a minimum grade of “C”, and MGT 256  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate understanding of various human resource management issues.
      1. Recognize the nature of human resource management conflicts or issues so as to be able to indicate the main business problems presented.
      2. Use one of various theories or points of view to analyze human resource management issues or conflicts and reach a reasonable conclusion about the issue.
      3. Explain how the analysis can be used to enhance productivity and efficiency in a human resource office or the advancement of the organization.
      4. Analyze arguments, positions, and pros and cons of human resource management.
      5. Determine appropriate objections to human resource management issues in writing.
    2. Describe Human Resource issues.
      1. Explain the unique nature of Human Resource Management decisions and what separates them from other fields.
      2. Compare and contrast the different types of issues and arguments clearly and with original insight.
      3. Explain the importance of the distinction between Human Resource Management and other fields so as to be able to analyze issues using the appropriate methods.
    3. Demonstrate understanding of human resource management terminology.
      1. Define and correctly use the key terms appropriate to the topics of the class when discussing and analyzing the issues of the course.
      2. Apply the terms to the readings to analyze the text and the issues raised in them.
      3. Offer critical comments and questions addressed to the readings so as to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the text and the issues raised, orally and in writing.
    4. Demonstrate critical thinking skills about Human Resource Management topics, through argument.
      1. Apply the appropriate concepts and strategies of critical thinking to the analysis and understanding of Human Resource Management issues.
      2. Recognize strong and weak arguments and reasons.
      3. Formulate arguments in favor of his/her own analyses of the issues of the class.
      4. Anticipate objections to his/her own arguments and be able to respond to the objections with justifiable answers.
    5. Practice intellectual curiosity with human resource management issues.
      1. Complete at least one significant project, either individually or as a group depending on the instructor’s discretion, and work with the instructor to assure that the project demonstrates intellectual curiosity and academic rigor.
      2. Actively engage with his/her peers in conversations, seminars, or in other formats at the instructor’s discretion to enhance the depth of knowledge of the relevant material.
      3. Demonstrate active analysis in advanced reading surrounding Human Resource issues through written summaries/papers.
    6. Use writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Practice critical writing skills within the subject.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of subject matter through extended writings.
    7. Demonstrate an understanding of collective bargaining and contract administration
      1. Describe the bargaining process.
      2. Identify and discuss trends in collective bargaining.
      3. Describe the “labor agreement” in human resources management.
      4. Describe the administration of the labor agreement.
    8. Demonstrate an understanding of International Human Resource Management.
      1. Identify and describe the issues involved in managing human resources across borders.
      2. Describe the process and concerns of international staffing.
      3. Identify and discuss the skills of the global manager.
      4. Identify and discuss the issues involved in compensation across borders.
      5. Explain how labor relations in countries outside the United States differ from those in the United States.
  
  •  

    MGT 265 - International Business

    Credits: 3


    Examines the three environments within which the typical business person must function in a global economy: domestic, foreign and international. The international organizations (i.e., GATT, IMF, OPEC, EC and the UN) and the international monetary system will be covered. Physical, sociocultural, political, legal, labor and financial forces in global markets will be analyzed. Case studies will be used to emphasize  management decision making in marketing, production, financing and staffing in world-wide companies.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  either with a minimum grade of “C”. MGT 153W  is recommended.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Demonstrate an understanding of the globalization of the world economy.

         A.          Discuss the globalization of markets and production over the last two decades.

         B.          Describe the factors that underlie the trend toward globalization.

         C.          Discuss the barriers that traditionally prohibit the flow of goods, services, and capital.

     2.    Describe different country’s internal systems.

         A.          Discuss how political systems can be assessed according to two dimension–the degree to which they emphasize collectivism as opposed
                       to individualism and the degree to which they are democratic or totalitarian.

         B.          Discuss collectivism as an ideology that views the needs of society as being more important than the needs of the individual.

         C.          Discuss individualism as an ideology that is built on an emphasis on the primacy of individual’s freedoms in the political, economic, and
                       cultural realm.

         D.          Describe how democracy and totalitarianism are at different ends of a political spectrum.

    3.    Demonstrate an understanding of the social culture’s implications for business practice.

         A.          Discuss culture as a complex whole that includes knowledge, belief, art, morals, law, custom, and other capabilities acquired by people as
                       members of society.

         B.          Discuss how values and norms are the central components of a culture.

         C.          Describe how all societies are stratified into different classes.

         D.          Identify the world’s major religions, and discuss how religion may be defined as a system of shared beliefs and rituals that are concerned
                       with the realm of the sacred.

         E.          Describe language as the one defining characteristic of a culture.

         F.           Discuss how formal education is the medium through which individuals learn skills and are socialized into the values and norms of society.

    4.     Demonstrate an understanding of why it is beneficial for a country to engage in international trade.

         A.          Discuss the theory of absolute advantage.

         B.          Discuss the theory of comparative advantage.

         C.          Describe the product life cycle and how trade patterns are influenced why where a new product is introduced.

    5.    Demonstrate an understanding of how the reality of international trade deviates from the theoretical ideal of unrestricted free trade.

         A.          Describe how tariffs raise the cost of imported products.

         B.          Describe how an import quota is a direct restriction imposed by an importing country on the quantity of some good that may be imported.

    6.    Demonstrate an understanding of theories that attempt to explain the pattern of foreign direct investment between countries.

         A.          Discuss how foreign direct investment occurs when a firm invests directly in facilities to produce in a foreign country.

         B.          Describe how horizontal FDI is FDI in the same industry abroad as a firm operates at home.

         C.          Discuss any theory seeking to explain FDI must explain why firms go to the trouble of acquiring or establishing operations abroad, when
                       the alternatives of exporting and licensing are available to them.

    7.    Demonstrate an understanding of the influence of governments on firms’ decisions to invest in foreign countries.

         A.          Discuss political ideology and how it affects FDI.

         B.          Describe the “radical view.”

         C.          Describe the “free market view.”

         D.          Discuss the benefits of FDI to the host country and how it can make a positive contribution to the economy of the host country.

    8.    Demonstrate an understanding of regional economic integration.

         A.          Discuss the levels of economic integration that are possible in theory.

         B.          Describe regional economic integration and its attempt to achieve economic gain.

         C.          Discuss the economic and political debate surrounding regional economic integration.

         D.          Discuss regional economic integration in Europe, the Americas, and elsewhere.

         E.          Discuss the important implication of regional economic integration for the practice on international business.

    9.    Demonstrate an understanding of how the foreign exchange market works.

         A.          Discuss the functions of the foreign exchange market.

         B.          Explain why international business participates in the foreign exchange market.

         C.          Explain how using forward exchange rates can reduce the foreign exchange risk.

    10. Demonstrate an understanding of the workings of the international monetary systems.

         A.          Explain the gold standard and how it relates to a monetary standard.

         B.          Discuss the break-down of the gold standard.

         C.          Describe the European Monetary System.

    11. Demonstrate an understanding of the international capital market.

         A.          Define the function of a capital market.

         B.          Discuss the growth of the international capital market during the 1970s and 80s.

         C.          Define Eurocurrency.

         D.          Discuss the two classifications of the international bond market.

         E.          Define the implications of international capital market for international business practice.

    12. Demonstrate an understanding of the various way in which firms can profit from global expansion.

         A.          Discuss how, for some firms, international expansion represents a way of earning greater returns by transferring the skills and product
                       offerings derived from their core competencies to markets where indigenous competitors lack those skills.

    13. Demonstrate an understanding of  organizational structures and internal control mechanisms.    

         A.          Identify the four main dimensions of organizational structure.

         B.          Define vertical differentiation.

         C.          Define horizontal differentiation.

         D.          Discuss how firms usually begin abroad with an international division.

    14. Demonstrate an understanding of the steps firms must take to establish themselves as exporters.    

         A.          Discuss the biggest impediment to exporting ignorance of foreign market opportunities.

         B.          Describe why neophyte exporters often become discouraged or frustrated with the exporting process.

         C.          Explain how information gathering is the best way to overcome ignorance.

         D.          Discuss the many pitfalls associated with exporting.

         E.          Discuss the “trust” factor and how it relates to the individuals involved in the exporting process.

         F.           Discuss problems that may arise because of a lack of trust between parties.

    15. Demonstrate an understanding of how efficient manufacturing and materials management functions can help improve an international
          business’s competitive position.

         A.          Discuss how the choice of an optimal manufacturing location must consider country factors, technological factors and product factors.

         B.          Explain country factors.

         C.          Explain technological factors.

         D.          Explain product factors.

         E.          Discuss the advantages of making components in-house.

         F.           Discuss the advantages of buying components from independent suppliers.

    16. Demonstrate an understanding of the marketing and R & D functions in international business.

         A.          Discuss how a product can be viewed as a bundle of attributes.

         B.          Describe country differences in consumer tastes and preferences.

         C.          Define distribution strategy.

         D.          Discuss barriers to international communication.

    17. Demonstrate an understanding of human resource management in international business.

         A.          Discuss how the firm’s strategy needs to be congruent with the HRM policies.

         B.          Discuss how a staffing policy can be a tool for developing and promoting a corporate culture.

         C.          Define ethnocentric, polycentric, and geocentric staffing policies.

         D.          Explain how training can lower the probability of expatriate failure.

    18: Demonstrate an understanding of financial accounting within the  multinational firm.

         A.          Discuss how accounting is the language of business.

         B.          Explain how accounting is shaped by the environment in which it operates.

         C.          Describe the five main factors that influence the type of accounting system that a country has.

         D.          Discuss the national differences in accounting and auditing standards.

         E.          Discuss how the annual budget is the main instrument by which headquarters controls foreign subsidiaries.

  
  •  

    MGT 275 - Management Seminar

    Credits: 3
    Enhances and integrates topics introduced in the Management Program courses. Includes discussion of a variety of significant issues related to management, decision-making, teamwork, conflict, sustainability, and organizational leadership in today’s dynamic, customer-driven, global economy. Focuses on the variety of management models and leadership styles. Uses peer-teaching and learning approaches, involves group learning experiences in a team environment, requires practical application of concepts, and includes research and case studies in a seminar format. Culminates the management associate degree program.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  either with a minimum grade of “C”, MGT 110 , MTH 153 , and MGT 245  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Perform effectively in teams as leader and member.
      1. Identify team building blocks, purpose, effectiveness needs and potential constraints.
      2. Identify strategies for dealing with uncooperative team members.
      3. Learn to assess team effectiveness, convert groups into effective teams, and lead high-performance teams.
    2. Analyze appropriate leadership styles for specific situations.
      1. Complete an assessment instrument (such as the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI)) that contributes to students’ understanding of their current management and/or leadership behavior.
      2. Identify classical, behavioral, and modern management models and discuss what can be learned from each set of theories.
      3. Discuss effective, influential and responsible leadership.
      4. Identify leadership theories, models, and styles and discuss effectiveness based on various situation scenarios.
    3. Use decision-making methods from the leader/manager perspective.
      1. Discuss the anatomy of decisions and use of heuristics in decision-making.
      2. Identify common biases and limitations caused by bounded awareness.
      3. Discuss the motivational and emotional influences on decision-making.
      4. Discuss fairness and ethics in decision-making.
      5. Practice making rational decisions in negotiations.
      6. Identify tools for improving decision-making.
    4. Use the concept of Emotional Intelligence to practice quality management and leadership skills.
      1. Define emotional intelligence as an important human skill and complete an emotional intelligence inventory.
      2. Use the results of the inventory to identify areas for improvement.
      3. Practice emotional intelligence in decision-making and negotiation.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of how management decisions affect sustainability.
      1. Identify reasons for managing and leading a sustainable organization.
      2. Research sustainable practices and discuss opportunities within various industries.
    6. Use communication skills to demonstrate an understanding of management and leadership.
      1. Research, write, and present on various case analysis throughout the semester.
      2. Research, write, and present a final paper.
  
  •  

    MGT 280 - Market Experience New York

    Credits: 2
    Studies the New York business market through visits to manufacturers, designers, buyer showrooms, resident buying offices, advertising agencies, retailers, museums, Wall Street, and other places of interest. Student pays tuition plus all expenses.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  either with a minimum grade of “C” and permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the general operation of a buying office.
      1. Describe a resident buying office
      2. Discuss buyer showrooms and how they are used
      3. Explain how the buying process works and how it relates to the manufacturer and the retailer
    2. Demonstrate an understanding manufacturing operations.
      1. Discuss the various types of manufacturers
      2. Explain how the manufacturer fits into the channel of distribution
      3. Discuss the relationship between a manufacturer and the other channel members
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the design process.
      1. Discuss the role of the designer
      2. Identify the responsibilities of the designer
      3. Explain how the designer fits into the manufacturing process
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the Wall Street area.
      1. Discuss the components of the financial district
      2. Explain the significance of the financial district to the channel of distribution.
      3. Identify the future trends for the financial world
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the historical value of the New York market.
      1. Describe the general architecture of the New York market
      2. Identify the value of historical museums
      3. Discuss the general history of New York and the surrounding area
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of cultural diversity.
  
  •  

    MGT 281 - Market Experience Chicago

    Credits: 1
    Studies the Chicago market through visits to the Apparel Center, buyers showrooms, resident buying offices, designers, ready-to wear merchants, the Mercantile Exchange, and other areas of interest. Student pays tuition plus all expenses.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  or OAT 151  either with a minimum grade of “C” and permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the Chicago Market.
      1. Describe the general Chicago Market, geographically
      2. Explain the significance of the Chicago Market to mid-western business
      3. Identify the key elements of this market
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the Mercantile Exchange.
      1. Discuss the buying and selling of “futures”
      2. Explain how this exchange generates business for individuals in our market
      3. Describe the business value of the exchange
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the market centers.
      1. Describe the Merchandise Mart
      2. Describe the Apparel Center
      3. Describe the Magnificent Mile
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of architecture in and around Chicago.
      1. Discuss Frank Lloyd Wright and his relationship to architectural history.
      2. Identify primary elements in the Chicago market
  
  •  

    MGT 290-299 - Special Projects in Management


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Manufacturing & Industrial Technology

  
  •  

    MIT 111W - Manufacturing Processes

    Credits: 3
    Teaches the fundamentals of engineering materials and manufacturing processes, and how they interrelate in the design of products. Credit may be earned in MFG 111W or MIT 111W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 4
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe the engineering properties of materials used to manufacture and assemble products.
      1. Differentiate between the structures of pure metals, metal alloys, polymers, ceramics/glass, and composites.
      2. Explain the importance of mechanical properties of materials.
      3. Explain the importance of physical and chemical properties of materials.
      4. Relate the use of the properties of various materials to the manufacturing design process.
    2. Determine the inter-relationship between material properties, manufacturing process, and product design.
      1. Cite examples where property requirements have altered material selection.
      2. Describe how a change in material can appreciably alter the manufacturing process.
      3. Describe how a change in material can significantly affect the design of the part.
      4. Describe how a given manufacturing process alters the properties of the material.
    3. Describe the major manufacturing processes used in industry today.
      1. Differentiate between the various casting processes.
      2. Differentiate between the various metal formig processes.
      3. Compare powder metallurgy with other metal forming processes.
      4. Associate sheet metal formed parts with everyday consumer products.
      5. Relate consumer plastic products with their manufacturing processes.
      6. Differentiate between the plastic forming processes and identify the strengths of each.
      7. Compare forming of thermoplastic products with thermosets.
      8. List applications of composite materials.
      9. Compare glass forming with plastic forming.
      10. Relate the advantages and applications of machining and turning centers to current manufacturing practices.
      11. Compare and contrast the various nontraditional machining processes.
      12. Relate manufacturing process choices and material properties.
      13. Compare and contrast the various welding processes.
      14. Describe metal cutting parameters.
      15. Cite applications of various surface treatments and coatings.
    4. Access, analyze and use information relating to material selection, manufacturing processes and manufacturing issues.
      1. Identify sources of relevant information about manufacturing issues and concepts. This will include electronic sources along with traditional sources.
      2. Interpret graphs and charts to access information.
      3. Synthesize information concerning manufacturing issues so it is understandable by a target population.
      4. Use gathered information for oral, written, and/or electronic presentations to the targeted population and include appropriate academic documentation of sources.
    5. Demonstrate effective written communication for a specific audience.
      1. Identify and articulate key manufacturing concepts.
      2. Employ conventions of written, edited, standard English.
      3. Present manufacturing processes and engineering material information in tables, charts and graphs.
      4. Quote, paraphrase and summarize important manufacturing processes and engineering material information accurately.
      5. Use appropriate vocabulary for the target audience.
    6. Use writing tasks to promote learning about manufacturing and engineering materials.
      1. Document knowledge of manufacturing concepts and engineering materials.
      2. Using writing tasks, compare and contrast key manufacturing concepts.
      3. Using writing tasks, compare and contrast engineering materials and their properties.
  
  •  

    MIT 118 - Safety Practices and Procedures

    Credits: 2
    General Industry safety fundamentals including; introduction to OSHA, managing health and safety, walking and working surfaces, exit routes, emergency action plans, fire prevention plans, fire protection, electrical, personal protective equipment, material handling, hazard communication, hazardous material, permit required confined spaces, lockout / tagout, machine guarding, welding, cutting and brazing, introduction to industrial hygiene, bloodborne pathogens, ergonomics, safety and health program, fall protection and powered industrial vehicles. Credit may be earned in IS 118 or MIT 118 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the OSH Act and its impact on the current workforce.
      1. Explain the importance of the OSH Act.
      2. Explain how OSHA provides a safe and healthful workplace to workers covered by OSHA .
      3. Explain the role management plays in creating a healthy and safe work environment through safety and health programs.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to identify workplace hazards.
      1. Identify Worksite hazards and the level of control used to eliminate or limit the exposure to hazards.
      2. Identify proper Personal Protective Equipment based on worksite hazard analysis.
      3. Identify electrical safe work practices.
      4. Define safe walking and working surfaces, including fall protection. Identify ways to prevent falls in general industry
      5. Recognize material handling hazards.
      6. Identify permit required confined spaces. Define the criteria of confined spaces and permit required confined spaces. Identify duties and responsibilities of confined space workers.
      7. Identify machine hazards and how to eliminate or control machine hazards using safeguarding practices.
      8. Recognize welding, cutting and brazing hazards. Define safe practices for safe welding, cutting and brazing.
      9. Define industrial hygiene and identify the core elements of industrial hygiene.
      10. Identify the impact ergonomics plays in workforce safety.
      11. Define fall protection and the elements associated with fall protection. Recognize hazards in falls and how to select, inspect and maintain fall protection.
      12. Recognize safe operating practices for powered industrial trucks. Define hazards associated with powered industrial trucks.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of safety and health program and associated training
      1. Define a Hazard Communication program and identify the components.
      2. Identify emergency exit routes, analyze emergency action plans and fire prevention and protection plans.
      3. Identify hazardous materials and identify plans to lessen hazards associated with those materials.
      4. Identify lockout / tagout needs and protocol.
      5. Recognize bloodborne pathogens and train against the hazards associated with bloodborne pathogens.
      6. Define a safety and health program and identify key elements.
  
  •  

    MIT 210 - Lean Thinking Strategies

    Credits: 3
    Explores the principles of Lean Thinking as a method of organizational management. Emphasizes the techniques used to achieve quality, cost and delivery goals such as Just-In-Time or Pull systems, 5-S, value stream mapping, workplace organization and visual controls. Discusses the roles and responsibilities in the organization for allocating resources to achieve lean management. Credit may be earned in MFG 113, MFG 114, and MFG 115 or MFG 210 or MIT 210 but not more than one.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe the principles of lean thinking and discuss how they are used in organizations.
      1. Identify the main elements of the lean thinking philosophy.
      2. Differentiate between the principles and practices of lean thinking and discuss their applications in an organization.
      3. Describe the methods used to identify value as defined by the organization’s customers.
      4. Compare and contrast current processes within an organization with lean thinking.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the application of lean thinking principles for the delivery of goods and services by an organization.
      1. Describe the elements of a pull system and how they are applied in an organization.
      2. List the main issues encountered when organizing the workplace.
      3. Identify applications for 5-S activities to improve the organization’s ability to deliver goods and services.
      4. Identify strategies for visual controls and workplace organization.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the application of lean thinking principles for achieving quality, cost and delivery goals.
      1. Describe the value stream using process mapping techniques.
      2. Identify areas in the value stream for improvement in quality and cost and the reduction of delivery times.
      3. Identify measurements to monitor lean thinking strategy implementation.
      4. Compare and contrast current organizational roles and responsibilities with those in a lean organization.
      5. Identify strategies for improving the value stream for a product or service.
    4. Access, analyze and use information needed for the implementation of lean thinking within an organization.
      1. Identify, through writing and oral communication, key components of the lean thinking philosophy.
      2. Differentiate between long and short term activities needed for the implementation of lean thinking strategies.
      3. Compare and contrast current buzz word strategy elements with required process improvement activities.
  
  •  

    MIT 212 - Manufacturing Cell

    Credits: 2
    Introduces the manufacturing cell as it relates to the workplace. Teaches various cell information, i.e. tooling, material handling, layout, etc. Credit may be earned in MFG 212 or MIT 212 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. The student will define manufacturing cell requirements.
      1. Describe the concept of a manufacturing cell.
        1. What is it
        2. Basic components of manufacturing cells
        3. Economic justification
        4. Advantages and limitations of manufacturing cells
    2. The student will determine the procedures for integrating manufacturing cells into an angile manufacturing environment.
      1. Describe the requirements for a manufacturing cell.
        1. layout, equipment, workforce training
        2. management system
        3. tooling, setup, delivery and maintenance
        4. use of robotics
    3. The student will identify the decision making process and define the criteria for integrating manufacturing cells into an agile manufacturing environment.
      1. Identify and discuss issues that need to be addressed in order to design and implement a manufacturing cell.
        1. Tool management and maintenance
        2. Inspection equipment
        3. Floor layout
        4. Workforce development
        5. Type of cell
        6. Planning and designing the cell
        7. Building, installing and debugging the cell
        8. Resource allocation
  
  •  

    MIT 213 - Mechanical Power Transmission

    Credits: 3
    Develops skills in designing and specifying mechanical power transmission components for use in a product or process. Uses mathematical skills to design parts, calculate design requirements, specify commercial components and design the layout of the mechanical power drive train. Verifies that the assembly meets all specifications and quality requirements. Develops a Bill of Materials for the mechanical power transmission components. Uses presentation skills to demonstrate how the components were designed and specified. Credit may be earned in MFG 213 or MIT 213 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): DRF 121 , MS 113 , and MT 221W .
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the ability to design and specify a mechanical power transmission drive.
      1. Identify the components required for a solution to a drive system for a product or process.
      2. Determine the output torque and speed required in a given product or process.
      3. Select the type of drive components and co-requisite space available for the drive system as well as providing for environmental conditions encountered by the drive system.
      4. Select the material the drive system will be made of based on design and environmental requirements.
      5. Verify the design meets all applicable regulations. This would include all governmental regulations, primarily OSHA requirements.
      6. Demonstrate the ability to identify torque and speed requirements by doing the correct calculations using appropriate mathematical tools.
      7. Provide for system failure when verifying the design.
    2. Develop a sequence of drive components based on available commercial components.
      1. Produce a preliminary sketch of the drive system.
      2. Design the low speed output shafting if required.
      3. Calculate the required torque and speed of the components.
      4. Design the low speed intermediate shafting if required.
      5. Select the drive components such as gear reducer, chain drive, v-belt drive, coupling systems and electric motor.
      6. Produce a final sketch of the drive system based upon the space required by the system including center distances and any take-up mechanism needed for adjustments.
    3. Calculate and specify individual components parts of the final drive system.
      1. Select the individual commercial components based upon calculations of torque and speed required.
      2. Arrange the components and layout the components mounting requirements.
      3. Calculate any low speed shafting required using stress design or deflection design techniques.
      4. Select the drive motor or primary mover required to provide the input horsepower and speed observing customary standards for the industry.
      5. Verify that the individual parts meet drive system specifications using measurement processes.
    4. Assemble the drive components to meet the product or process requirements.
      1. Verify the center distances are correct.
      2. Verify the final drive meets functional and environment requirements.
      3. Develop a Bill of Materials for the drive system components.
    5. Utilize catalogs of commercial components to analyze and interpret how the drive system meets the design intent product or process requirements.
      1. Use presentation skills to summarize the design intent and how the drive system meets the requirements.
      2. Identify and assess the reasoning and purpose of the drive system design and the logic for choosing the individual components.
      3. Summarize and present the complete drive system to a specific audience using written or oral communication.
  
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    MIT 240 - Manufacturing and Industrial Technology Capstone

    Credits: 3
    Demonstrates application based activities that tie previous manufacturing learning together. Incorporates skills learned in drafting, CAD CAM, and manual and CNC machining to complete a capstone project. Applies critical thinking skills in design, build and test of the product. Includes process planning, cost analysis and marketing as part of the capstone project. Requires a final presentation of product design and development. Must request approval from program coordinator to apply for capstone course one semester prior to enrollment.

    Prerequisite(s): CAD 114 , and CAD 226 , and CNC 225  and instructor permission
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Produce a 3D parametric model of a product and process for manufacturing.
      1. Use navigantional tools such as Rotate, Pan, and Zoom in the modeling mode.
      2. Modify the 3D solid using Cut, Fillet, Chamfer, and Shell features.
      3. Use Boolean editing features to modify 3D solid models.
      4. Analyze the shape of the model and determine which method(s) of producing 3D objects and which Boolean operations are necessary for the completion of the model.
      5. Use animation feature to demonstrate product performance.
      6. Create 3D Model of product using rapid prototype equipment.
    2. Use conventional and computer manufacturing equipment to produce product proto type.
      1. Use a variety of machining skills by completing product proto type.
      2. Select proper tooling for specific machining operations.
      3. Select proper work holding devices.
      4. Use precision measuring instruments to machine parts to tolerance.
    3. Design manufacturing process utilizing manual or automated systems for production of product.
      1. Identify and select the best type of machine for production.
      2. Identify and select automated transfer systems for production.
      3. Identify and select appropriate gaging and inspection processess for quality assurance.
    4. Create and deliver a presentation of the complete process of manufacturing the product.
      1. Use electronic media to create PowerPoint presentation of product and process.
      2. Deliver the presentation to panel of student peers and program discipline faculty.
        1. Demonstrate effective use of terminology.
        2. Demonstrate effective use of voice, posture, and eye contact.
        3. Demonstrate effective use of visual aids and technology.
      3. Incude the final product, process, and cost analysis.
  
  •  

    MIT 290-299 - Special Projects in Manufacturing and Industrial Technology


    Prerequisite(s): N/A
    Corequisite(s): N/A
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No


Mathematics

  
  •  

    MTH 090 - Math Study Skills and Practical Applications

    Credits: 2
    Practices success strategies to be utilized in a math class. Includes learning styles, memory process, math anxiety, time management, reading, test taking, as well as other study skills. Applies success strategies to their current math class as well as collaborative problem solving using quantitative literacy applications from many other disciplines. Does not earn credit toward graduation.

    Prerequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in a math course is required.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Distinguish that learning mathematics is different than any other subject.
      1. Identify the differences between learning mathematics and various others topics.
    2. Distinguish between taking high school mathematics and college mathematics.
      1. Identify the difference between the two learning enviornments.
    3. Identify learning styles and appropriate study skills for that learning style.
      1. Take a learning styles inventory.
      2. Identify the techniques that fit that style.
    4. Develop an understanding of the memory process.
      1. Introduce stages of learning.
      2. Apply reasoning in learning.
      3. 4C. Use learning style to enhance memory process.
    5. Develop the study skill of number sense.
      1. Use estimation of sums, differences, products, quotients, etc. to judge reasonableness of answers.
    6. Develop the study skill of metacognition.
      1. Develop a plan for addressing a problem.
      2. Learn how to monitor the process.
      3. Learn how to evaluate the appropriateness of the answer.
    7. Develop skills to reduce math anxiety and math test anxiety.
      1. Learn the definition of math anxiety and math test anxiety.
      2. Learn the causes of math anxiety and math test anxiety.
      3. Learn the different types of math anxiety and math test anxiety.
      4. Learn the affects of math anxiety and math test anxiety.
      5. Learn techniques of how to reduce math anxiety and math test anxiety.
    8. Prioritize their time.
      1. Learn to schedule time for mathematics daily.
      2. Learn to schedule so there is a balance of life.
    9. Create a positive study environment.
      1. Select an appropriate environment for study base on his/her learning style.
      2. Learn techniques to maximize learning efficiency.
    10. Develop active note taking and listening skills.
      1. Learn about the golden triangle of success.
      2. Learn the importance of correct note taking and how to effectively take notes.
      3. Learn the importance of asking questions in class.
    11. Improve homework skills and math reading skills.
      1. Learn the importance of pre-reading.
      2. Learn how to read mathematics.
      3. Learn to define all symbols for full comprehension.
      4. Learn and utilize the vocabulary of mathematics.
    12. Improve test-taking skills.
      1. Learn rules for pretest preparation.
      2.     Learn 10 steps for better test taking.
      3.   Learn 6 common errors while taking tests.
    13. Apply the above mentioned study skills to the math class they will be taking concurrently.
    14. Apply quantitative literacy skills in a collaborative, problem solving environment, to problems involving mathematics in other disciplines.
  
  •  

    MTH 092 - Basic Mathematics

    Credits: 2
    Provides a foundation in arithmetic. Covers four fundamental operations of whole numbers, fractions, and decimals. Includes percentages, ratios, proportions, and applications. Does not earn credit toward graduation.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 1
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Solve a variety of real world problems.
      1. Solve real world problems involving whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, proportions, perimeter and area, and measurement.
    2. Compute with and understand the meaning of whole numbers, fractions, and decimals.
      1. Add, subtract, multiply, and divide whole numbers.
      2. Add, subtract, multiply, and divide fractions.
      3. Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals.
      4. Simplify numerical expressions using the order of operations.
    3. Work with and understand the meaning of ratios, rates, proportions, and percents.
      1. Set-up and simplify ratios and rates.
      2. Solve proportions.
      3. Carry our fraction, decimal, and percent conversions.
      4. Solve percent equations.
    4. Estimate and judge the reasonableness of answers.
      1. Estimate sums, differences, products, and quotients of whole numbers, fractions, or decimals.
      2. Estimate the percent of a number.
      3. Identify an approximate answer to an application problem prior to working it out.
    5. Communicate effectively about mathematics.
      1. Use mathematics terminology effectively in writing and speaking.
  
  •  

    MTH 096 - Pre-Algebra

    Credits: 2
    Provides preparation for algebra. Includes fractions, decimals, integers, ratios, and percentages with an introduction to equations, graphs, and functions. May receive credit in only one of the following: MTH 106, MTH 096, SKMA 096  or SKMA 101. Does not earn credit toward graduation.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Solve a variety of real world problems.
      1. Solve real world problems involving integers, fractions, decimals, percents, proportions, perimeter and area, measurement, linear equations, and the Pythagorean Theorem.
    2. Compute with demonstrate understanding of integers,fractions and decimals.
      1. Add, subtract, multiply, and divide integers.
      2. Add, subtract, multiply, and divide fractions.
      3. Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals.
      4. Simplify numerical expressions using the order of operations.
    3. Demonstrate an understand of the meaning of ratios, rates, proportions, percents, exponents, and square roots.
      1. Set up and simplify ratios and rates.
      2. Solve proportions.
      3. Carry out fraction, decimal, and percent conversions.
      4. Solve percent equations.
      5. Evaluate square roots and exponents.
    4. Estimate and judge answers.
      1. Estimate sums, difference, products, and quotients of integers, fractions, or decimals.
      2. Estimate the percent of a number.
      3. Identify an approximate answer to an application problem prior to working it out.
    5. Perform basic algebraic operations.
      1. Use the Distributive Law.
      2. Combine like terms.
      3. Evaluate algebraic expressions.
      4. Simplify algebraic expressions using the order of operations.
      5. Solve simple linear equations.
    6. Construct and interpret graphs.
      1. Construct bar graphs and line graphs.
      2. Interpret bar graphs, pie charts, and line graphs.
      3. Understand the Cartesian (rectangular) coordinate system.
    7. Explain mathematics effectively.
      1. Use mathematics terminology effectively in writing and speaking.
  
  •  

    MTH 097 - Algebra I

    Credits: 3
    Includes natural numbers, integers, first-degree equations and inequalities, special products, factoring, rational expressions and equations, graphs, and linear systems, exponents, and quadratic equations. May receive credit in only one of the following: MTH 107, MTH 097, SKMA 097  or SKMA 102. (Equivalent to first year high school algebra). Does not earn credit toward graduation.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Students will develop their skills in number patterns, relationships, and computation.
      1. Compute (add, subtract, multiply and divide) with signed numbers without the use of a calculator.
      2. Simplify numerical expressions with multiple operations and grouping symbols using the order of operations.
      3. Simplify rates and ratios.
      4. Compute the opposite, reciprocal, and absolute value of a given real number.
      5. Estimate the value of a numerical expression.
      6. Identify an approximate answer to an application problem prior to working it out.
      7. Identify the appropriate unit of an answer to a word problem.
    2. Students will develop their skills in the computation and recognition of algebraic expressions.
      1. Add, subtract, and multiply polynomial expressions.
      2. Simplify algebraic expressions with multiple operations and grouping symbols using the order of operations.
      3. Simplify algebraic expressions using the rules of exponents.
      4. Simplify algebraic expressions using the distributive property.
      5. Compare and contrast terms and factors.
      6. Simplify rational expressions.
      7. Factor polynomials by taking out a common factor.
      8. Factor trinomials.
      9. Factor binomials of the form x2 - y2
      10. Identify an algebraic expression that cannot be factored.
      11. Compute the opposite and reciprocal of a given algebraic expression.
      12. Identify and give examples of like and unlike terms.
      13. Identify and give examples of linear, quadratic, rational, and radical expressions.
      14. Compare and contrast expressions and equations.
    3. Student can solve a variety of equations, inequalities, and systems of equations.
      1. Solve a variety of linear, quadratic (using the factoring method and the quadratic formula), radical, and rational equations.
      2. Verify the solution of an equation.
      3. Recognize situations in which an equation has no solution or has multiple solutions.
      4. Solve a variety of linear inequalities.
      5. Verify the solution of a linear inequality.
      6. Recognize situations in which a linear inequality has no solution or multiple solutions.
      7. Use interval notation, relational symbols <, >, <, >) dimensional graph, or a verbal description to describe a set of numbers.
      8. Solve a variety of systems of linear equations.
      9. Verify the solution of a system of linear equations.
      10. Recognize situations in which a system of linear equations has no solution or multiple solutions
    4. Student can recognize and understand concepts related to linear functions.
      1. Solve linear equations algebraically, graphically, and numerically.
      2. Solve systems of linear equations algebraically, graphically, and numerically.
      3. Compute the slope of a line in a variety of contexts.
      4. Identify the slope of a line as positive, negative, zero, or undefined.
      5. Interpret the slope of a line in context as a rate of change.
      6. Compute the y-intercept of a line in a variety of contexts.
      7. Interpret the y-intercept of a line in context as an initial amount.
      8. Compute the equation of a line in form in a variety of contexts.
    5. Students will develop their skills in the construction and interpretation of Cartesian graphs.
      1. Construct the graph of a line if given the equation of the line.
      2. Identify an appropriate scale for both axes when constructing a graph.
      3. Approximate one coordinate of a point on a graph is given the other.
      4. Identify graphs as linear or non-linear.
    6. Students will develop their problem-solving skills.
      1. Set up an equation or expression if given a word phrase.
      2. Describe in words the meaning of an expression or equation.
      3. Solve a variety of real world problems using the tools of algebra and mathematical modeling.
    7. Students will communicate effectively about mathematics.
      1. Use mathematics terminology effectively in writing and speaking.
  
  •  

    MTH 098 - Mathematical Reasoning

    Credits: 4


    Develops conceptual understanding and acquires multiple strategies for solving problems using big mathematical and statistical concepts. Makes connections between concepts and applies previously learned material to new contexts. Practices using mathematical, statistical, and quantitative information to make decisions. Explores strategies for success in future courses; gains skills for the workplace and participating as citizens in our society. A graphing calculator is required.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Interpret and communicate quantitative information and mathematical and statistical concepts using language appropriate to the
            context and intended 
    audience.

         A.          Use appropriate mathematical language.

         B.          Read and interpret short, authentic texts such as advertisements, consumer information, government forms, and newspaper articles
                       containing quantitative information, including graphical displays of quantitative information.

         C.          Write 1 to 2 paragraphs using quantitative information to make or critique an argument or to summarize information from multiple sources.

    2.    Develop strategies to find solutions and solve problems.

         A.           Solve multistep problems by applying strategies in new contexts or by extending strategies to related problems within a context.

    3.   Reason, model, and make decisions with mathematical, statistical, and quantitative information.

         A.           Make decisions in quantitatively based situations that offer a small number of defined options. The situations will not be limited to contexts
                        in which there is a single correct answer based on the mathematics (e.g., which buying plan costs less over time), but will include
                        situations in which the quantitative information must be considered along with other factors.

         B.           Present short written or verbal justifications of decisions that include appropriate discussion of the mathematics involved.

    4.    Critique and evaluate quantitative arguments that utilize mathematical, statistical, and quantitative information.

         A.          Identify mathematical or statistical errors, inconsistencies, or missing information in arguments.

    5.    Use appropriate technology in a given context.

         A.          Use a spreadsheet to organize quantitative information and make repeated calculations using simple formulas.

         B.          Use the Internet to find quantitative information on a given subject. The topics should be limited to those that can be researched with a
                       relatively simple search.

         C.          Use internet-based tools appropriate for a given context (e.g., an online tool to calculate credit card interest).

    6:    Demonstrate a number sense and the ability to apply concepts of numeracy to investigate and describe quantitative relationships and solve real - world problems in a variety of contexts.

         A.          Demonstrate operation sense and communicate verbally and symbolically with real numbers.

         B.          Demonstrate an understanding of fractions, decimals, and percentages by representing quantities in equivalent forms, comparing the size
                      of numbers in different forms and interpreting the meaning of numbers in different forms.

         C.          Solve problems involving calculations with percentages and interpret the results.

         D.          Demonstrate an understanding of large and small numbers by interpreting and communicating with different forms (including words,
                       fractions, decimals, standard notation, and scientific notation) and compare magnitudes.

         E.          Use estimation skills, and know why, how, and when to estimate results.

         F.           Solve problems involving measurement including the correct use of units.

         G.          Use dimensional analysis to convert between units of measurements and to solve problems involving multiple units of measurement.

         H.           Read, interpret, and make decisions about data summarized numerically (e.g., measures of central tendency and spread), in tables, and
                        in graphical displays (e.g., line graphs, bar graphs, scatterplots, and histograms).

    7.    Use proportional reasoning to solve problems that require ratios, rates, proportions, and scaling.

         A.          Represent, and use ratios in a variety of forms (including percentages) and contexts.

         B.          Determine whether a proportional relationship exists based on how one value influences

         C.          Analyze, represent, and solve real - world problems involving proportional relationships, with attention to appropriate use of units.

    8.    Demonstrate ability to transition from specific and numeric reasoning to general and abstract reasoning using the language and
           structure of algebra to investigate, represent, and solve problems.

         A.          Demonstrate understanding of the meaning and uses of variables as unknowns, in equations, in simplifying expressions, and as quantities
                      that vary, and use that understanding to represent quantitative situations symbolically.

         B.          Describe, identify, compare, and contrast the effect of multiplicative or additive change.

         C.          Analyze real - world problem situations, and use variables to construct and solve equations involving one or more unknown or variable
                      quantities.

         D.          Express and interpret relationships using inequality symbols.

         E.          Construct and use mathematical models to solve problems from a variety of contexts and to make predictions/decisions. Representations
                       will include linear and exponential contexts.

         F.           Represent mathematical models in verbal, algebraic, graphical, and tabular form.

         G.          Recognize when a linear model is appropriate and, if appropriate, use a linear model to represent the relationship between two quantitative
                       variables.

     9.    Demonstrate an understanding of and critically evaluate statements that appear in the popular media (especially in presenting medical
            information) 
    involving risk and arguments based on probability.

         A.          Interpret statements about chance, risk, and probability that appear in everyday media (including terms like unlikely, rare, and impossible).

         B.          Identify common pitfalls in reasoning about risk and probability.

         C.          Interpret in context marginal, joint, and conditional relative frequencies in context for data summarized in a two - way table and identify
                       which relative frequency is appropriate to answer a contextual question.

         D.          Demonstrate understanding of absolute risk and relative risk (percent age change in risk) by describing how each provides different
                       information about risk.10.

    10. Demonstrate an understanding of, interpret, and make decisions based on financial information commonly presented to consumers.

         A.          Demonstrate understanding of common types of consumer debt and explain how different factors affect the amount that the consumer
                       pays.

         B.          Demonstrate understanding of compound interest and how it relates to saving money.

         C.          Identify erroneous or misleading information in advertising or consumer information.

    11. Demonstrate an understanding that quantitative information presented in the media and by other entities can sometimes be useful and
          sometimes be
    misleading.

         A.          Use quantitative information to explore the impact of policies or behaviors on a population. This might include issues with social, economic,
                       or environmental impacts.

         B.           Identify erroneous, misleading, or conflicting information presented by individuals or groups regarding social, economic, or environmental
                        issues.

  
  •  

    MTH 103 - Applied Geometry and Trigonometry

    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite: Math Level 4. Includes the following geometry topics: angles, triangles, polygons, circles, prisms, cylinders, and cones. Includes right-triangle trigonometry, radian measure, oblique-triangle trigonometry, and graphs of trigonometric functions. May receive credit in only one of the following: MTH 103 or SKMA 103  or MT 110 .

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 4
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Define and identify the characteristics of and solve problems related to plane figures (angles, parallel lines, triangles).
      1. Define basic terminology of angles (acute, right, obtuse, straight, complementary and supplementary angles).
      2. Measure angles with a protractor.
      3. Define basic terminology of angles formed by parallel lines cut by a transversal (corresponding alternate interior and exterior angles.)
      4. Define the characteristics of triangles and their properties (altitude, medians, vertex, and sides).
      5. Express an understanding of and identify the characteristics of congruent and similar triangles.
      6. Relate to the work place operations.
    2. Define and identify the characteristics of and solve problems related to Polygons (triangles, squares, rhombus, rectangles, parallelograms, trapezoids and multi-sided polygons).
      1. Use the proper formula for determining area of polygons (square measure).
      2. Determine the measure of interior angles by using diagonals.
      3. 2Relate to the work place operations.
    3. Define and identify the characteristics of right, isosceles, equilateral and 30? - 60? - 90? triangles.
      1. Know and apply the Pythagorean Formula in solving right triangle problems.
      2. Solve problems involving similar triangles (tapers).
    4. Define and identify the characteristics of a circle (chords, central angles, inscribed, segments and sectors)
      1. Demonstrate the relationships between the diameter, radius, and circumference of a circle (? value).
      2. Solve problems involving area of circles, sectors, and segments.
      3. Determine arc lengths by using proportions.
    5. Define and identify the characteristics of an eclipse (enter, major and minor axes).
      1. Solve problems involving area and circumference of an eclipse.
      2. Express uses of eclipses in everyday situations (orbits, racetracks, buildings, and cutting pipes).
    6. Define and identify the characteristics of geometric solids (prisms, cylinders, pyramids, cones, frustrums, spheres, torus, prisimatoids).
      1. Use proper formulas to determine surface area of all geometric solids.
      2. Use proper formulas to determine volume of all geometric solids.
      3. Figure a cost factor with respect to volume and materials (surface area) of various geometric solids (cylinders, cones, spheres, cubicle containers).
      4. Relate to the work place operations.
    7. Define and apply the six trigonometric ratios.
      1. Express the relationship between the sides of a right triangle and the six trigonometric ratios.
      2. Evaluate the six trigonometric ratios and their inverses with a calculator.
      3. Apply the six trigonometric ratios to right triangle problems.
      4. Relate to the work place operations.
    8. Solve oblique triangles.
      1. Solve oblique triangles using the Law of Sines.
      2. Solve oblique triangles using the Law of Cosines.
      3. Relate to the work place operations.
  
  •  

    MTH 115W - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I

    Credits: 3


    Includes numeration systems, sets and their properties, classification of number systems (whole numbers through real number), operations and their properties, arithmetical algorithms, and problem solving. Uses a variety of learning styles, manipulatives, and calculator and computer applications. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Standards are incorporated. Students may use either MTH 115W or MTH 110, not both, to fulfill graduation requirements.

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 097  with a grade of “C” or better or an acceptable score on the current college assessment instrument
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.:     Students will develop their problem-solving skills.

         A.          Give a general definition of problem solving in mathematics and distinguish between exercises and problems.

         B.          Explain, illustrate and use Polya’s 4-step problem solving process:

                      1.    understand the problem;

                      2.    devise a plan;

                      3.    carry out the plan;

                      4.    look back.

         C.          Explain, illustrate, and apply strategies that include but are not limited to:

                      1.    guess and test;

                      2.    use a variable;

                      3.    draw a picture;

                      4.    look for a pattern;

                      5.    make a list;

                      6.    solve a simpler problem.

    2.    Use technology appropriately to do mathematics.

         A.          Use and review software packages established for use in the elementary classroom for mathematics.

    3.    Students will develop their understanding, vocabulary, and nomenclature of sets to enable them to formalize the meaning of whole
           numbers.

         A.          Define a set by using:

                      1.    the roster or list method.

                      2.    set builder notation

         B.          Use the concept of matching sets to formalize the meaning of whole numbers.

         C.          Describe and compare the concepts of cardinal, ordinal, and identification numbers.

         D.          Describe the difference between a whole number, the name of a whole number, and the numeral of the whole number.

         E.          Describe the relations of less than and greater than for whole numbers using sets.

    4.    Students will enhance their computational skills with and without a calculator.

         A.          Add, subtract, multiply and divide whole numbers.

         B.          Add, subtract, multiply, and divide fractions.

         C.          Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals.

         D.          Add, subtract, multiply, and divide with percents.

         E.          Add, subtract, multiply, and divide real numbers.

         F.          Set-up and simplify ratios and rates.

         G.         Solve proportions.

         H.         Carry out fraction, decimal, and percent conversions.

         I.           Solve percent equations.

         J.          Simplify numerical expressions using the order of operations.

         K.          Add, subtract, multiply, and divide integers.

         L.          Add, subtract, multiply, and divide real numbers.

    5.    Students will demonstrate their understanding of mathematical ideas and operations with concrete models.

         A.          Represent addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers (fractions, and decimals) using a set model and a
                       measurement model.

         B.          Give examples of real world addition, subtraction, multiplication and division problems involving set and measurement models.

         C.          Explain and illustrate the comparison model of subtraction.

         D.          Represent fractions, decimals, and percents using area models, measurements models, set models, and towers of bars.

         E.          Represent integers with the chip (or charged ion) model.

         F.           Use manipulative to illustrate basic arithmetic operations.

    6.   Students will develop an arsenal of computational algorithms.

         A.          Explain, illustrate and use a)intermediate algorithm, b) standard algorithm, c) the lattice method for addition and multiplication.

         B.          Explain, illustrate and use long division algorithms that lead to the standard division algorithm (scaffolding, intermediate).

         C.          Find the GCF and LCM of a given pair of numbers using a) the set intersection method, (factor list method), b) the prime factorization
                       method and c) the Euclidean Algorithm.7.

    7.   Students will develop their estimation and thinking skills.

         A.          Use, identify, and apply various mental computation and estimation strategies including:

                      1.    rounding strategy

                      2.    compatible numbers strategy

                      3.    using properties

                      4.    equal additions method

         B.          Explain, illustrate, and use the following thinking strategies for learning basic addition facts:

                      1.    commutativity

                      2.    adding zero

                      3.    counting on by 1 and 2

                      4.    combinations to 10

                      5.    doubles

                      6.    adding 10

                      7.    associativity

         C.          Explain, illustrate, and use the following thinking strategies for learning basic multiplication facts:

                      1.    commutativity

                      2.    multiplication by 0

                      3.    multiplication by 1

                      4.    multiplication by 2

                      5.    multiplication by 5

                      6.    multiplication by 9

                      7.    associativity

                      8.    distributivity

    8.    Students will develop their skills with number theory.

         A.          Define, compare, and contrast the following terms: prime, composite, divides, factor (divisor), factor trees, multiple, is divisible by, common
                       factor (divisor), common multiple, greatest common factor (GCF), least common multiple (LCM)

         B.          Use the sieve of Eratosthenes to find prime numbers.

         C.          State and apply the fundamental theorem of arithmetic.

         D.          State and apply tests for divisibility by 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12.

         E.          Find the prime factorization of a given composite number.

         F.           Use the exponents in the prime factorization of a number to count its factors.

         G.          Relate the GCF and LCM of any two numbers to the product of the numbers.

         H.          State and use the Prime Number Test.

    9.    Communicate effectively about mathematics.

         A.          Perform writing tasks to promote learning.

  
  •  

    MTH 116W - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II

    Credits: 3


    Investigates problem solving, statistical charts and graphs, geometric figures and properties, and measurement systems including metric. Reviews fractions, decimals, percents, real numbers, their operations and properties. Reviews algebra of lines and equations. Includes a variety of learning styles using manipulatives, calculators and computer application. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Standards are incorporated.

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 115W  with a grade of “C” or better
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Solve problems using various problem solving strategies.

         A.          Define, illustrate, and utilize various problem solving strategies.

    2.    Use technology appropriately to do mathematics.

         A.          Define, explain, and utilize the terminology and resources necessary for the world wide web.

         B.          Use and review software packages established for use in the elementary classroom for mathematics.

         C.          Utilize a spreadsheet to perform calculations and to represent data in a statistical manner.

         D.          Utilize the graphing calculator for graphing and data analysis.

    3.    Examine the integration of mathematics and other curricula in the

         A.          Investigate and utilize the literature available for easily integrating mathematics and literature at the K-8 level.

         B.          Design integrated activities.

    4.    Students will develop their skills with the calculator.

         A.          Graph linear and quadratic functions with the calculator.

    5.    Students will define, recognize, and understand concepts related to function.

         A.          State the definition, the domain, range and codomain of a function.

         B.          Describe the concept of function and represent functions in several ways.

         C.          Construct and interpret graphs: linear, quadratic, exponential, cubic, and step functions.

         D.          Apply the vertical line test to determine if a graph is the graph of a function.

     6.    Students will develop their skill with handling exponents and integers.

         A.          Explain the relationship between mulitiplication and exponentiation.

         B.          Explain the meaning of a zero exponent.

         C.          State the definition of rational exponent.

         D.          State and apply properties of rational exponents.

         E.          Represent integers with the chip (or changed ion) mode 1

    7.    Students can solve a variety of equations and inequalities.

         A.          State and apply the definitions of the following terms: equation, inequality, variables, solution,solution set.

    8.    Students will develop their skills in using and graphing statisitics.

         A.          Identify, give an example and interpret the following types of graphs: line plots, stem and leaf plots, pictographs, bar graphs, double bar
                      graphs, frequency polygons, histograms, line graphs, circle graphs, box and whisker plots, double broken line graphs.

         B.          Identify clusters and gaps (if they exist) on stem and leaf plots.

         C.          Calculate the lower quaritle, upper quartile, the interquartile (IQR), and any outliers for a box and whisker plot.

         D.          Discuss in writing how you would determine for all types of data collections the appropriate graph and be able to take the given date sets
                       and graph using an appropriate graph.

         E.           Describe and give examples of how graphs can be deceptive.

         F.           Define and determine the following measures of central tenancy for given data: mode, median, and mean.

    9.    Develop data analysis skills.

         A.          Analyze data using statistical graphs.

         B.          Examine measure of central tendency (mode, median, mean, variance, and standard deviation).

         C.          Illustrate and compare the above measures by hand and using technology.

    10. Investigate elementary logic.

         A.          Examine and utilize truth tables and deductive (direct) reasoning.

    11. Students will develop their skills in elementary probability.

         A.          State and apply the definitions of experiment, event, outcome, and sample space.

         B.          Explain what is meant by the probability of an event and distinguish between experimental and theoretical probability.

         C.          Compute probabilities for events with equally likely outcomes.

         D.          Use a tree diagram to represent the outcomes in a sample space.

         E.          Draw Pascal’s triangle and be able to apply it in a binomial experiment.

    12. Students will develop their skills in geometry.

         A.          Give analytical descriptions of various types of triangles.

         B.          List several properties common to various types of triangles and quadrilaterals.

         C.          Illustrate reflection and rotation symmetry of polygons, regular n-gons, and other shapes.

         D.          Define and identify properties of points, rays, lines, planes, line segments and angles.

         E.          Describe a) the interior of an angle; b) adjacent angles and ; c) how to measure an angle with a protractor.

         F.           Explain and use the corresponding angles property, the alternate interior angles property and derive the angle sum in a triangle property.

         G.          Determine the measures of central angles, vertex angles, and exterior angles in regular polygons and discuss the relationships among
                       their measures.

         H.          Describe and analyze tessellations with regular polygons.

         I.            Identify the regular polygons that form tessellations of the plane.

         J.           Define, compare and contrast parallel, intersecting, perpendicular and skew lines in space.

         K.          Sketch or build and identify properties of polyhedra.

         L.           Discover Euler’s formula for polyhedra.

         M.          Sketch and identify properties of cones; cylinders; and spheres.

    13. Students will describe and perform conversions in various systems of measurement.

         A.          State the three steps of the measurement process.

         B.          Describe what is meant by informal measurement using non-standard units.

         C.          Work with English system of measurement.

         D.          Work with the Metric System

         E.          Convert between Celsius and Fahrenheit systems of measurement.

     14. Communicate effectively about mathematics.

         A.          Perform writing tasks to promote learning.

  
  •  

    MTH 117 - Math for Allied Health

    Credits: 2
    Reviews (very briefly) fractions, decimals, percentages, and proportions. Includes a study of the metric system and the household system with applications in converting from one system to another. Emphasizes applications including those involved in giving medications and in finding times and various rates for intravenous feedings.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the ability to perform operations with fractions.
      1. Change improper fractions to mixed numbers and mixed numbers to improper fractions.
      2. Reduce fractions to lowest terms.
      3. Multiply and divide fractions.
      4. Compare fraction values.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to perform operations with decimals.
      1. Read and write decimals.
      2. Round decimal numbers to a given place value.
      3. Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimal numbers.
      4. Compare decimals values.
      5. Change fractions and mixed numbers to decimal equivalents.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to work with proportions.
      1. Solve and check proportions.
      2. Use proportions to solve applied problems.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to work with percents.
      1. Change a percent to a fraction.
      2. Change a fraction to a percent.
      3. Change a fraction to a decimal.
      4. Change a decimal to percent.
      5. Compare fractions, decimals, and percents.
      6. Use percents to solve applied problems.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to work with metric and household units.
      1. Read and write units (including abbreviations) in the metric and household systems.
      2. Convert within the metric system.
      3. Convert between household and metric units.
      4. Solve practical problems involving metric and household units.
    6. Demonstrate the ability to interpret labels:
      1. Read drug labels and identify trade and generic names.
      2. Interpret labels involving units, percentages, ratios, and milliequivalents.
      3. Locate dosage strengths and calculate dosages.
    7. Demonstrate the ability to read syringe calibrations.
      1. Identify the amount of solution in a syringe.
      2. Draw an arrow or shade a syringe barrel to indicate level of a required dosage.
    8. Demonstrate the ability to calculate oral and parenteral dosages.
      1. Calculate dosage of tablets and capsules.
      2. Calculate dosages of oral solutions.
      3. Calculate dosages of injectable drugs.
      4. Work practical problems involving drug dosages.
    9. Demonstrate the ability to do calculations involving intravenous fluids.
      1. Interpret IV fluid abbreviations.
      2. Calculate various rates of flow for IV fluids.
      3. Calculate the running time for IV fluids.
      4. Work practical problems involving IV fluids.
    10. Demonstrate the ability to assess the accuracy of dosages.
      1. Calculate a patient’s body surface area.
      2. Use a patient’s weight to calculate a dosage.
      3. Use a patient’s body surface to calculate a dosage.
      4. Assess the accuracy of dosage on the basis of a patient’s weight.
      5. Assess the accuracy of a dosage on the basis of a patient’s body surface area.
  
  •  

    MTH 118W - Mathematical Explorations

    Credits: 4
    Provides a course for students majoring in fields that do not have a specific mathematics requirement. Emphasizes practical applications of mathematics, problem solving, and the communication of mathematics. Includes core topics in Finance, Probability, Statistics, and Geometry. Integrates measurement in the geometry topic, and infuses algebra throughout all topics. A minimum of 4 additional topics will be selected from Economics, Calculus, Graph Theory, Set Theory, Game Theory, Number Theory, Logic, Voting, Apportionment, Combinatorics, Linear Programming, or other approved topics. A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 4
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Students will apply the basic concepts and formulas of mathematical finance.
      1. Apply the concepts and formulas of compound interest, simple interest and future value and present value annuities.
      2. Model a scenario for wealth accumulation.
      3. Work with amortization tables.
      4. Explore the brilliant human invention of compound interest and exponential growth.
    2. Students will apply the basic concepts of statistics.
      1. Present data using statistical graphs: stem and leaf plots, bar graphs, histograms, line graphs, circle graphs, and box and whisker plots.
      2. Interpret several types of graphs.
      3. Summarize data using the following measures of central tendency: mode, median, and mean.
      4. Summarize data using the following measures of dispersion: standard deviation, variance and range.
      5. Apply and interpret percentiles.
      6. Describe features of a normal distribution.
    3. Students will apply the basic concepts of elementary probability.
      1. Use sample spaces to show possible outcomes and calculate probabilities.
      2. Use a tree diagram to represent the outcomes in a sample space and calculate probabilities.
      3. Compute probabilities in a binomial experiment.
      4. Determine the odds in favor of or against an event occurring.
      5. Compute the expected value of an event.
      6. Determine whether two events, A and B, are dependent or independent.
      7. Determine whether two events, A and B, are mutually exclusive.
      8. Compute compound probabilities, that is P(A and B) or P(A or B).
    4. Students will investigate and apply several concepts in geometry.
      1. Find the area of rectangles, squares, parallelograms, triangles, and circles.
      2. Find the perimeter of any given polygon and the circumference of any given circle.
      3. Find the volume of rectangular solids, cylinders, cones, and spheres.
      4. Find the surface area of rectangular solids and cylinders.
      5. Explore and describe the numerical and geometric patterns that occur in art and nature.
      6. Perform conversions in various systems of measurement.
      7. Work with English and Metric systems of measurement.
      8. Convert between Celsius and Fahrenheit.
    5. Students will communicate effectively about mathematics.
      1. Provide complete written solutions to problems using appropriate terminology.
      2. Articulate important ideas and conclusions in writing.
    6. Students will use technology (graphing calculator) appropriately as a tool to assist in mathematical problem solving, sketching statistical graphs, and simplifying tedious calculations.
      1. Use the Finance menu of the graphing calculator to simplify complicated mathematical calculations.
      2. Use the binomial probability distribution function of the calculator to simplify binomial probability calculations.
      3. Use the Stat Plot feature of the graphing calculator to assist in generating statistical graphs.
      4. Use the Stat menu of the graphing calculator to assist in calculating complicated statistics such as the standard deviation.
    7. Note: Faculty members will choose at least 4 outcomes from the following list (outcomes 7 - 17). Students will investigate and apply the mathematics of economics.
      1. Use and apply growth models such as population growth, Ponzi schemes, and chain letters.
      2. Use and apply decay models such as population decline, radioactive decay, half-life and carbon-14 dating.
      3. Use and apply logistic models.
      4. Describe the mathematics behind the Consumer Price Index.
      5. Model biological populations with chaos theory.
    8. Students will investigate and apply the elementary concepts of calculus.
      1. Define a derivative and provide several of examples of its use.
      2. Define an integral and provide several of examples of its use.
      3. Explain the relationship between a derivative and a rate of change.
      4. Explain the relationship between and integral and an area.
      5. Solve elementary problems in differential calculus.
      6. Solve elementary problems in integral calculus.
    9. Students will use graph theory to solve problem
  
  •  

    MTH 119AW - Intermediate Algebra Extended Hours

    Credits: 4


    Includes fundamental concepts of algebra and applications, equation solving, graphs, systems of linear equations, quadratic equations, algebraic fractions, exponents, radicals, functions, and logarithms. Same content as MTH 119, but class meets 2 additional contact hours per week to allow 50% more time to review and learn each concept in MTH 119W . Credit may be earned in MTH 119W  or MTH 119AW, but not both. A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 4 or MTH 097  with a grade of C or better
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 90 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Students will develop their skills in recognizing, evaluating, and simplifying algebraic expressions.

         A.          Add, subtract, multiply, and divide polynomial expressions.

         B.          Factor a variety of polynomials. (Taking out a common factor, difference of squares, sum/difference of cubes, trinomials, and by grouping.)

         C.          Reduce, add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational expressions.

         D.          Convert between radical and exponential form.

         E.          Simplify expressions using the rules of exponents (including negative and fractional exponents).

         F.           Simplify expressions using the laws of logarithms.

         G.          Convert between exponential and logarithmic form.

         H.          Write complex numbers in a + bi form.

         I.            Add, subtract, multiply, and divide complex numbers.

     2.    Students can solve a variety of equations, inequalities, and systems of equations.

         A.          Solve a variety of polynomial, radical, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and absolute value equations.

         B.          Solve equations symbolically, graphically, and numerically.

         C.          Solve a variety of linear and absolute value inequalities.

         D.          Solve inequalities symbolically and graphically.

         E.          Use interval notation, relational symbols (< , >, , ), a 1-dimensional graph, or a verbal  description to describe a set of numbers.

         F.           Solve systems of equations algebraically, graphically and using TI-83 software (rref).

    3.    Students can define, recognize, and understand concepts related to functions.

         A.          State and explain the definition of a function.

         B.          Identify several characteristics of functions.

         C.          Identify or describe relationships between the numerical, graphical, and algebraic representations of a function.

         D.          Evaluate, compose, and compute with functions.

         E.           Identify examples of functions in the real world.

         F.           Describe the relationships between a function and its inverse function.

    4.    Students can recognize and understand concepts related to linear functions.

         A.          Calculate the slope of a line in a variety of contexts.

         B.          Identify the slope of a line as positive, negative, zero, or undefined.

         C.          Interpret the slope of a line in an applied context.

         D.          Calculate the y-intercept of a line in a variety of contexts.

         E.          Interpret the y-intercept of a line in an applied context.

         F.           Calculate the x-intercept of a line in a variety of contexts.

         G.          Interpret the x-intercept of a line in an applied context.

         H.          Calculate the equation of a line in a variety of contexts.

         I.            Recognize a linear function and its corresponding graph.

    5.    Students can recognize and understand concepts related to quadratic functions.

         A.          Complete the square for a variety of quadratic expressions.

         B.          Recognize a quadratic function and its corresponding parabolic graph.

         C.          Determine the x and y coordinates of the maximum or minimum point of a parabola.

    6.    Students can recognize and understand concepts related to logarithmic and exponential functions.

         A.          Recognize an exponential function and its corresponding graph.

         B.          Recognize a logarithmic function and its corresponding graph.

         C.          Describe the inverse relationships between the logarithmic and exponential functions.

         D.          Describe the growth and decay properties of exponential and logarithmic functions.

    7.    Students will develop their skills in the construction and interpretation of Cartesian graphs.

         A.          Construct the graph of a polynomial, absolute value, logarithmic, exponential, or radical function if given the corresponding equation.

         B.          Construct a graph representing a given scenario.

         C.          Identify an appropriate scale for both axes when constructing a graph.

         D.          Approximate a curve of best fit if given a set of data.

         E.          Describe trends in a set of data.

         F.           Identify the x and y coordinates of maximums and minimums of a graph.

         G.          Identify where a graph is increasing, decreasing, and constant.

         H.          Approximate one coordinate of a point on a graph if given the other.

         I.            Identify graphs as linear, quadratic, exponential, or logarithmic.

    8.    Students will develop their problem-solving and mathematical modeling skills.

         A.          Solve real world problems involving linear equations, quadratic equations, exponential equations, logarithmic equations, rational equations,
                       and systems of equations.

         B.          Use mathematical modeling to solve real world problems.

         C.          Clarify and analyze the meanings of words, phrases and statements.

         D.          Learn the meanings of relevant symbols used in the discipline and ways to use them.

         E.          Transfer problem solving strategies for use in new contexts.

         F.           Organize and present information or data in tables, charts, and graphs.

         G.          Use symbol systems to raise questions about models and proposed answers to problems.

         H.          Identify, state and clarify arguments or reasoning, including those codified by systems of symbols.

         I.           Generate and assess solutions to problems.

     9.    Students will communicate effectively about mathematics.

         A.          Orally describe solutions to problems using appropriate terminology.

         B.          Provide complete written solutions to problems using appropriate terminology.

         C.          Use appropriate vocabulary for the audience and purpose.

         D.          Derive meaning from a reading.

         E.          Articulate important ideas and conclusions in writing.

    10. Students will use a graphing calculator to evaluate and analyze linear, quadratic, square root, exponential, and logarithmic functions.

         A.          Graph and linear, quadratic, square root, exponential, or logarithmic function.

         B.          Create a table of input/output pairs for any given function.

         C.          Determine an appropriate window to obtain a complete graph of a linear, quadratic, square root, exponential, or logarithmic function.

         D.          Find the intersection of any two functions.

         E.          Evaluate any numerical expression involving linear, quadratic, rational, square root, exponential, or logarithmic functions.

  
  •  

    MTH 119W - Intermediate Algebra

    Credits: 4


    Includes fundamental concepts of algebra and applications, equation solving, graphs, systems of linear equations, quadratic equations, algebraic fractions, exponents, radicals, functions, and logarithms. Credit may be earned in MTH 119W or MTH 119AW , but not both. A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 5
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Students will develop their skills in recognizing, evaluating, and simplifying algebraic expressions.

         A.          Add, subtract, multiply, and divide polynomial expressions.

         B.          Factor a variety of polynomials. (Taking out a common factor, difference of squares, sum/difference of cubes, trinomials, and by grouping.)

         C.          Reduce, add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational expressions.

         D.          Convert between radical and exponential form.

         E.          Simplify expressions using the rules of exponents (including negative and fractional exponents).

         F.           Simplify expressions using the laws of logarithms.

         G.          Convert between exponential and logarithmic form.

         H.          Write complex numbers in a + bi form.

         I.            Add, subtract, multiply, and divide complex numbers.

    2.    Students can solve a variety of equations, inequalities, and systems of equations.

         A.          Solve a variety of polynomial, radical, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and absolute value equations.

         B.          Solve equations symbolically, graphically, and numerically.

         C.          Solve a variety of linear and absolute value inequalities.

         D.          Solve inequalities symbolically and graphically.

         E.          Use interval notation, relational symbols (< , >, , ), a 1-dimensional graph, or a verbal description to describe a set of numbers.

         F.          Solve systems of equations algebraically, graphically and using TI-83 software (rref).

    3.    Students can define, recognize, and understand concepts related to functions.

         A.          State and explain the definition of a function.

         B.          Identify several characteristics of functions.

         C.          Identify or describe relationships between the numerical, graphical, and algebraic representations of a function.

         D.          Evaluate, compose, and compute with functions.

         E.          Identify examples of functions in the real world.

         F.           Describe the relationships between a function and its inverse function.

    4.     Students can recognize and understand concepts related to linear functions.    

         A.          Calculate the slope of a line in a variety of contexts.

         B.          Identify the slope of a line as positive, negative, zero, or undefined.

         C.          Interpret the slope of a line in an applied context.

         D.          Calculate the y-intercept of a line in a variety of contexts.

         E.           Interpret the y-intercept of a line in an applied context.

         F.           Calculate the x-intercept of a line in a variety of contexts.

         G.          Interpret the x-intercept of a line in an applied context.

         H.          Calculate the equation of a line in a variety of contexts.

         I.            Recognize a linear function and its corresponding graph.

    5.    Students can recognize and understand concepts related to quadratic functions.

         A.          Complete the square for a variety of quadratic expressions.

         B.          Recognize a quadratic function and its corresponding parabolic graph.

         C.          Determine the x and y coordinates of the maximum or minimum point of a parabola.

    6.    Students can recognize and understand concepts related to logarithmic and exponential functions.

         A.          Recognize an exponential function and its corresponding graph.

         B.          Recognize a logarithmic function and its corresponding graph.

         C.          Describe the inverse relationships between the logarithmic and exponential functions.

         D.          Describe the growth and decay properties of exponential and logarithmic functions.

     7.    Students will develop their skills in the construction and interpretation of Cartesian graphs.

         A.          Construct the graph of a polynomial, absolute value, logarithmic, exponential, or radical function if given the corresponding equation.

         B.          Construct a graph representing a given scenario.

         C.          Identify an appropriate scale for both axes when constructing a graph.

         D.          Approximate a curve of best fit if given a set of data.

         E.          Describe trends in a set of data.

         F.          Identify the x and y coordinates of maximums and minimums of a graph.

         G.         Identify where a graph is increasing, decreasing, and constant.

         H.         Approximate one coordinate of a point on a graph if given the other.

         I.           Identify graphs as linear, quadratic, exponential, or logarithmic.

    8.    Students will develop their problem-solving and mathematical modeling skills.

         A.          Solve real world problems involving linear equations, quadratic equations, exponential equations, logarithmic equations, rational equations,
                       and systems of equations.

         B.          Use mathematical modeling to solve real world problems.

         C.          Clarify and analyze the meanings of words, phrases and statements.

         D.          Learn the meanings of relevant symbols used in the discipline and ways to use them.

         E.          Transfer problem solving strategies for use in new contexts.

         F.           Organize and present information or data in tables, charts, and graphs.

         G.          Use symbol systems to raise questions about models and proposed answers to problems.

         H.          Identify, state and clarify arguments or reasoning, including those codified by systems of symbols.

         I.           Generate and assess solutions to problems.

    9.    Students will communicate effectively about mathematics.

         A.          Orally describe solutions to problems using appropriate terminology.

         B.          Provide complete written solutions to problems using appropriate terminology.

         C.          Use appropriate vocabulary for the audience and purpose.

         D.          Derive meaning from a reading.

         E.          Articulate important ideas and conclusions in writing.

    10. Students will use a graphing calculator to evaluate and analyze linear, quadratic, square root, exponential, and logarithmic functions.

         A.          Graph and linear, quadratic, square root, exponential, or logarithmic function.

         B.          Create a table of input/output pairs for any given function.

         C.          Determine an appropriate window to obtain a complete graph of a linear, quadratic, square

         D.          Find the intersection of any two functions.

         E.          Evaluate any numerical expression involving linear, quadratic, rational, square root, exponential, or logarithmic functions.

  
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    MTH 120 - Finite Mathematics

    Credits: 3
    Includes topics of mathematical modeling (polynomial and rational functions; their graphs and applications; and arithmetic and geometric progressions), systems of equations and inequalities, linear programming, and an introduction to probability (binomial distributions and graphing qualitative data). Covers computer applications of some topics. A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED. (Those students planning to take MTH 161  should take MTH 151  rather than MTH 120.)

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 119W  or MTH 119AW  with a grade of “C” or better, or two years of high school algebra.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Students will demonstrate an understanding of functions and function notation.
      1. Define the terms function, domain and range.
      2. Determine if a relationship is a function.
      3. Graph functions.
      4. Evaluate functions at points in its domain.
      5. Determine the domain of a function.
      6. Distinguish between different types of functions.
      7. Manipulate the algebraic representation of a function.
      8. Use functions as mathematical models.
    2.  
      1. Use matrices as a tool to manipulate systems of equations.
      2. Solve systems of equations using appropriate methods.
      3. Formulate the parts of linear programming problem
      4. Solve a 2 variable linear programming problem graphically.
      5. Set up the linear programming problem for solution by Simplex Method.
      6. Determine if the Simplex Method has found the optimal solution.
      7. Write out the solution given by the Simplex Method.
    3. Students can demonstrate an understanding of basic probability and counting.
      1. Define classical and empirical probability, permutations and combinations.
      2. Use the definitions to determine the probabilities of events.
      3. Differentiate between permutations and combinations.
      4. Use the language of sets appropriately.
    4. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic formulas of finance.
      1. Determine the appropriate financial formula to use for a given problem.
      2. Correctly compute values derive from these formulas.
      3. Define the terms compound interest, simple interest, annuity, future value and present value.
    5. Students can demonstrate an understanding of measures of central tendency and variation.
      1. Define and compute the mean, median, and mode.
      2. Define and compute the standard deviation, variance and range.
    6. Students will demonstrate an understanding of how to apply mathematics to solve real world problems.
      1. Use the concepts of functions and function notation to solve application problems.
      2. Use the concepts of systems of equations and inequalities to solve application problems.
      3. Use the concepts of probability and counting to solve application problems.
      4. Use financial formulas to solve application problems.
    7. Students will demonstrate an understanding of functions and function notation.
    8. Students will use technology (calculator/computer software) appropriately to do mathematics
  
  •  

    MTH 121 - Plane Trigonometry

    Credits: 3
    Includes trigonometric functions and their graphs, solution of triangles, identities, trigonometric equations, inverse trigonometric functions, and complex numbers. A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 119W  or MTH 119AW  with a grade of “C” or better or two years of high school algebra
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Define, identify the characteristics of, and solve problems related to angles.
      1. Define basic terminology of angles and triangles (initial side, terminal side, vertex, positive angle, negative angle, coterminal angles, right angle, straight angle, acute angle, obtuse angle, complementary angles, supplementary angles.)
      2. Differentiate between radian and degree measure.
      3. Convert between radian and degree measure.
      4. Solve problems involving similar triangles.
    2. Student can define and apply the 6 trigonometric ratios.
      1. Express the relationship between the sides of a right triangle and the 6 trigonometric ratios.
      2. Evaluate the 6 trigonometric ratios and their inverses with a calculator.
      3. Use the sign properties of the six trigonometric functions.
      4. Use reference angles and triangles to determine the values for trigonometric functions whose terminal sides are not in the first quadrant.
      5. Apply the 6 trigonometric ratios to right triangle problems.
    3. Student can construct and interpret graphs of trigonometric functions.
      1. Determine the domain and range of a trigonometric function.
      2. Sketch the graphs of the 6 basic trigonometric functions.
      3. Graph and interpret transformations of sine and cosine functions.
    4. Student can use and apply inverse trigonometric functions.
      1. Identify the algebraic and geometric properties of inverse functions.
      2. Determine the domain and range of the three basic inverse trigonometric functions.
      3. Sketch the graphs of the 3 basic inverse trigonometric functions.
      4. Rewrite a composition of trigonometric and inverse trig functions as an algebraic expression.
    5. Student can solve a variety of trigonometric equations.
      1. Solve trigonometric equations of the form f (x) = a, where f is a basic trigonometric function and a is a real number.
      2. Solve trigonometric equations of the form f (kx) = a, where f is a basic trigonometric function, k is a natural number, and a is a real number.
      3. Solve trigonometric equations which are quadratic in form.
    6. Student can use identities to rewrite trigonometric expressions.
      1. Know and apply Pythagorean identities.
      2. Know and apply quotient identities.
      3. Know and apply reciprocal identities.
      4. Use basic identities (sum, difference, double angle, half angle) to rewrite expressions.
    7. Student can demonstrate an understanding of polar coordinates, polar equations, and polar graphs.
      1. Plot points in a polar coordinate system.
      2. Convert between polar and rectangular coordinates.
      3. Convert equations between polar and rectangular form.
      4. Graph simple polar equations.
    8. Student can define and use complex numbers in trigonometric form.
      1. Plot complex numbers in the complex plane.
      2. Convert complex numbers between rectangle and trigonometric form.
      3. Apply DeMoivre’s Theorem.
      4. Perform operations with complex numbers in trigonometric form.
    9. Students can demonstrate an understanding of vectors.
      1. Add and subtract vectors graphically.
      2. Add and subtract vectors algebraically.
      3. Use trigonometry to solve problems involving vectors.
    10. Student can solve a variety of oblique triangles.
      1. Use the Law of Sines to solve oblique triangles.
      2. Use the Law of Cosines to solve oblique triangles.
    11. Student can communicate effectively about mathematics.
    12. Student can use technology appropriately to do mathematics.
      1. Identify when technology is appropriate for problem solving.
      2. Evaluate the reasonableness of results.
  
  •  

    MTH 122W - College Algebra

    Credits: 4


    Reviews the mechanics of basic Algebra and solidifies understanding by using algebraic techniques, constructing mathematical models, solving problems and interpreting results. Includes: algebraic expressions; equations and inequalities; functions, inverse functions, and graphs; polynomial and rational functions; radical functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; matrices and determinants; systems of equations and inequalities; complex numbers; sequences and series. A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 6
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Students will  recognize and understand notation describing sets of real numbers.

         A.          Understand set and interval notation .

         B.          Apply the operations of intersection and union.

    2.    Students can perform operations on polynomial functions.

         A.          Apply properties of positive integral exponents.

         B.          Perform addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of polynomial functions.

         C.          Perform synthetic division.

         D.          Factor polynomials.

         E.          Reduce rational expression to simplest form.

         F.           Add, subtract, multiply and divide rational expressions (including complex fractions).

    3.    Students can perform operations on radical functions.

         A.          Apply the properties of rational exponents.

         B.          Add, subtract, multiply and divide radicals, expressing solutions in simplest form.

    4.    Students can recognize, graph and solve problems relating to linear functions.

         A.          Graph ordered pairs of any relation and identify whether or not it is a function.

         B.          Graph any linear function.

         C.          Find the distance between any two points in the plane.

         D.          Find the slope of a line.

         E.          Find the equation of a line, given information.

         F.           Solve and graph a linear inequality.

         G.          Solve absolute value equations and inequalities.

    5.    Students will be able to graph any polynomial function

         A.          Determine intercepts, axis of symmetry and maximum or minimum of a quadratic.

         B.          Graph any quadratic function.

         C.          Use synthetic division to identify zeros and graph any polynomial function.

     6:    Students can solve nonlinear equations and inequalities involving a function of one variable.

         A.          Solve quadratic equations by factoring, the quadratic formula, and graphing.

         B.          Solve equations involving radicals.

         C.          Solve polynomial equations symbolically (using synthetic division).

         D.          Solve polynomial equations of degree greater than 2 using tables and graphs.

         E.          Solve quadratic inequalities.

         F.           Set up and solve application problems .

    7.    Students can recognize and understand concepts related to logarithmic and exponential functions.

         A.          Recognize an exponential or logarithmic function and its graph.

         B.          Solve exponential or logarithmic equations.

    8.    Students can solve systems of equations and inequalities.

         A.          Solve systems of  2 and 3 linear equations.

         B.          Solve linear programming problems.

         C.          Solve systems of inequalities graphically.

         D.          Set up and solve application problems.

    9.    Students can work with matrices and determinants.

         A.          Apply basic operations to matrices.

         B.          Evaluate determinants.

         C.          Solve systems of equations by matrix methods.

    10. Students can work with complex numbers.

         A.          Define numbers in the form a + bi.

         B.          Add, subtract, multiply, and divide complex numbers.

         C.          Solve quadratic equations with complex solutions.

    11. Students can work with sequences and series.

         A.          Find the terms of an arithmetic and geometric sequence.

         B.          Find the sum of an arithmetic and geometric series.

         C.          Apply the Binomial Theorem.

    12. Students can communicate effectively about mathematics in writing.

         A.          Provide complete written solutions to problems using appropriate terminology.

         B.          Articulate important ideas and conclusions in writing.

    13. Students will develop their problem-solving and mathematical modeling skills.

         A.          Solve real world problems involving linear equations, quadratic equations, exponential equations, logarithmic equations, rational equations,
                       and systems of equations.

         B.          Use mathematical modeling to solve real world problems.

         C.          Clarify and analyze the meanings of words, phrases and statements.

         D.          Learn the meanings of relevant symbols used in the discipline and ways to use them.

         E.          Transfer problem solving strategies for use in new contexts.

         F.           Organize and present information or data in tables, charts, and graphs.

         G.          Use symbol systems to raise questions about models and proposed answers to problems.

         H.           Identify, state and clarify arguments or reasoning, including those codified by systems of symbols.

         I.            Generate and assess solutions to problems.

    14. Students will use graphing calculator technology to evaluate and analyze solutions to various functions.

         A.          Graph linear, quadratic, radical, polynomial, exponential, or logarithmic function.

         B.          Create a table of input/out pairs for any given function.

         C.          Determine an appropriate window to obtain a complete graph of a linear, quadratic, square root, exponential, or logarithmic function.

         D.          Find the intersection of any two functions

         E.          Evaluate any numerical expression involving linear, quadratic, rational, square root, exponential, or logarithmic functions.

  
  •  

    MTH 151 - Pre-Calculus Mathematics

    Credits: 4
    Designed for students planning to take calculus. Includes a study of the elementary functions, equations and inequalities, systems of equations, review of trigonometry, and analytic geometry. A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 119W  or MTH 119AW  and MTH 121  with grade of “C” or better, or three years of high school college-preparatory mathematics including trigonometry. MTH 121  may be taken concurrently with instructor approval.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Develop problem-solving and mathematical modeling skills.
      1. Solve application problems involving algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions.
      2. Use mathematical modeling to fit a curve of best fit to a set of real world data.
    2. Demonstrate a conceptual understanding of a function.
      1. Recognize the multiple representations of a function.
      2. Translate between different representations of a function.
    3. Understand functions and functional notation.
      1. Identify the domain and range of a function.
      2. Add, subtract, multiply, divide, and compose functions. Identify their resulting domains.
      3. Describe the effect a horizontal or vertical shift of a function has on its graph and equation.
      4. Describe the effect a reflection of a function about an axis has on its graph and equation.
      5. Evaluate functions exactly and approximately.
    4. Demonstrate a conceptual understanding of an inverse function.
      1. Identify the algebraic and graphical relationship between a function and its inverse.
      2. Describe and compute the inverse of a one-to-one function.
    5. Understand the algebraic and geometric properties of linear, quadratic, polynomial, piecewise, rational, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric, and logarithmic and exponential functions.
      1. Identify the extreme values of these functions and their locations.
      2. Identify intervals in which these functions are increasing or decreasing.
      3. Describe the end behavior of these functions.
      4. Identify the x- and y-intercepts of the graphs of these functions.
      5. Identify the linear asymptotes of these functions.
      6. Sketch the graphs of these functions.
    6. Solve a variety of equations, inequalities, and systems of equations.
      1. Solve an n x n system of linear equations, n = 2, 3, or 4.
      2. Solve polynomial, trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential equations.
      3. Solve polynomial and rational inequalities.
      4. Solve systems of nonlinear equations graphically and by substitution.
    7. Demonstrate an understanding of conic sections.
      1. Sketch the graph of a conic section given its equation or characteristics.
      2. Write the equation of a conic section in standard form given its graph or characteristics.
      3. Determine the characteristics of a conic section given its equation or graph.
    8. Demonstrate an understanding of parametric equations.
      1. Sketch graphs of parametric equations.
      2. Convert between parametric and rectangular equations.
    9. Demonstrate an understanding of polar equations and their graphs.
      1. Sketch polar graphs.
      2. Convert points and equations between rectangular and polar form.
      3. Identify symmetries in polar graphs.
    10. Demonstrate a basic understanding of sequences and series. Objectives
      1. Identify and evaluate basic sequences, including arithmetic and geometric sequences.
      2. Identify and evaluate arithmetic and geometric series.
      3. Express series in summation notation.
    11. Communicate effectively about mathematics.
  
  •  

    MTH 153 - Algebra for Calculus

    Credits: 3
    Provides a review of algebra as related to calculus topics of limits, differentiation, and integration. Please note: This is a special section of math that may not be used to fulfill prerequisites required for other Delta College math courses.

    Prerequisite(s): Two years of high school algebra and permission of the instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Provide high school students the opportunity to use their algebra and to experience a college taught course in mathematics.
      1. To provide opportunities for students to use their algebra skills while being introduced to the topics in Calculus.
      2. To provide opportunities for students to identify their weaknesses in algebra.
      3. To provide opportunities for students to become more aware of the importance of algebra in learning other topics of mathematics.
      4. To provide opportunities for student to communicate in mathematics.
      5. To provide opportunities for students to experience a college taught mathematics course.
      6. To provide opportunities for students to prepare for a college course in Calculus.
      7. To provide opportunities for students to tutor algebra at Ricker Middle School.
  
  •  

    MTH 160 - Calculus for the Social and Managerial Sciences

    Credits: 4
    Satisfies the mathematics requirements for students majoring in business or social sciences. Covers topics including graphing, differentiation, and integration of functions (algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic), and the use of these techniques within business and economic models. A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 8 or MTH 120  or MTH 121  or MTH 122W  or MTH 151  with a grade of “C” or better or three and a half years of high school/college preparatory mathematics.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the mathematical concepts of limit and continuity.
      1. Determine the existence of a limit algebraically or from a graph of the function.
      2. Determine one-sided and two-sided limits algebraically or from a graph of the function.
      3. Determine the continuity of a function at a point from the definition of continuity at a point or from the graph of the function.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the mathematical concept of derivative.
      1. State the definition of a derivative.
      2. Use the different interpretations of a derivative appropriately.
      3. Approximate the value of a derivative of a function at a point from a graph of the function.
      4. Use the formulas to determine the derivatives (first derivative, second derivative, partial derivative) of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and radical functions.
      5. Determine, from the graph of the function, each point where the derivative of the function does not exist.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the mathematical concept of integration.
      1. Evaluate indefinite integrals of elementary polynomial, rational, and exponential function.
      2. Define the definite integral using the concept of a limit.
      3. Appropriately use tables of integrals to determine the integral of a function.
      4. Determine the numerical value of a definite integral.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the concepts of limit, continuity, derivation, and integration.
      1. State the relationship between differentiation and integration.
      2. State the relationship between the existence of a limit, the continuity of a function, and the existence of a derivative of a function at a point.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of how derivatives and integrals can be used to solve problems.
      1. Determine the nature of a function (increasing or decreasing, concavity, inflection points, maximums or minimum) using derivatives.
      2. Use the derivative as a measure of rate of change in applied problems.
      3. Use integration to determine the total amount of change in a function in applied problems.
      4. Use an integral to determine area.
      5. Use numerical integration techniques to approximate definite integrals.
    6. Communicate effectively about calculus.
      1. Use the specialized notation of derivatives and integrals appropriately.
      2. Describe solutions to problems, both verbally and in written form, using appropriate terminology.
    7. Use technology appropriately to do mathematics.
  
  •  

    MTH 161 - Analytic Geometry and Calculus I

    Credits: 4
    Includes functions, graphs, limits, continuity, derivatives and their applications, integrals, as well as differentiation and integration of exponential and logarithmic functions. A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 151  with a grade of “C” or better or four years of high school college-preparatory mathematics including trigonometry.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. The student will develop an understanding of, calculate with, and apply limits in several contexts.
      1. Evaluate limits symbolically, numerically and graphically with and without technology.
      2. Discuss the definition of the limit.
      3. Explain the relationship between limits and other concepts including continuity, derivatives, and integrals.
      4. Use L’Hopital’s Rule to evaluate limits.
    2. The student will develop an understanding of, calculate with, and apply derivatives in several contexts.
      1. State the definition of the derivative.
      2. Determine where a function is differentiable and where it is not differentiable.
      3. Compute elementary derivatives using the limit definition.
      4. Compute derivatives symbolically, numerically and graphically without technology. Elementary derivatives include polynomials, powers, exponential and logarithmic functions, and trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions.
      5. Compute derivatives using the power rule, product rule, quotient rule, chain rule and implicit differentiation without technology.
      6. Explain the relationship between a function and its derivatives in a graphical setting.
      7. Use derivatives to solve applied problems including related rates, optimization, and differentials.
    3. The student will develop an understanding of, calculate with, and apply integrals in several contexts.
      1. Define the definite integral using the concept of a limit.
      2. Determine the antiderivative of several elementary functions.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of the Riemann Sum definition of integrals.
      4. Explain the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and its importance.
      5. Evaluate definite and indefinite integrals using antiderivatives and substitution.
      6. Use appropriate approximation techniques to estimate integrals.
      7. Use integration techniques to solve applied problems.
    4. The student will use technology appropriately to do mathematics.
      1. Evaluate limits.
      2. Numerically estimate the values of derivatives.
      3. Estimate definite integrals.
      4. Use tables.
      5. Graph a variety of functions.
    5. The student will communicate effectively about mathematics.
      1. Verbally describe solutions to problems using appropriate terminology.
      2. Provide complete written explanations of concepts using appropriate terminology.
    6. The student will develop problem-solving and mathematical modeling skills.
      1. Clarify and analyze the meanings of words, phrases and statements.
      2. Learn the meanings of relevant symbols used in mathematics and use them appropriately.
      3. Organize and present information or data in tables, charts, and graphs.
      4. Use mathematics to model and solve problems.
      5. Identify, analyze and evaluate assumptions.
      6. Using mathematical symbolism, identify, state and clarify arguments or reasoning.
      7. Generate and assess solutions to problems.
  
  •  

    MTH 162 - Analytic Geometry and Calculus II

    Credits: 4
    Includes applications of integrals, integration techniques, limits and indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite series, polar coordinates, parametric equations, as well as differentiation and integration of trigonometric and hyperbolic functions. A TI 89 GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 161  with a grade of “C” or better.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. The student will develop an understanding of hyperbolic functions.
      1. Evaluate derivatives of hyperbolic functions .
      2. Evaluate integrals related to hyperbolic functions.
    2. The student will use integration to solve applied problems in a variety of settings.
      1. Find the area between two curves.
      2. Find volumes of solids of revolution.
      3. Find lengths of curves.
      4. Find the surface area of a solid of revolution.
      5. Solve applied problems which may include work, fluid pressure, and centers of mass.
    3. The student will use a variety of integration techniques to solve problems in various settings.
      1. Determine which integration technique is appropriate to solve a given problem.
      2. Evaluate integrals using integration by parts.
      3. Evaluate integrals using the method of partial fraction decomposition.
      4. Evaluate integrals using trigonometric substitution.
      5. Evaluate integrals using trigonometric identities where appropriate.
      6. Evaluate integrals using integration tables.
      7. Evaluate improper integrals.
      8. Estimate definite integrals using the trapezoid rule and Simpson’s rule.
      9. Evaluate integrals using a computer algebra system (CAS).
    4. The student will develop an understanding of sequences and series.
      1. Differentiate and integrate perform numerical estimates using power series.
      2. Determine whether a sequence converges or diverges.
      3. Determine the sum of a convergent geometric series.
      4. Use the following tests to determine the convergence, absolute convergence, or divergence of an infinite series: comparison test, integral test, and ratio test.
      5. Determine which test is appropriate to use on a given problem.
      6. Determine the radius and interval of convergence for power series.
      7. Determine the Taylor or Maclaurin series for a variety of functions.
    5. The student will develop an understanding of the calculus of conic sections, parametric curves and polar equations.
      1. Determine parametric equations for a curve.
      2. Sketch graphs of parametric curves.
      3. Evaluate derivatives of curves defined parametrically.
      4. Find lengths of curves defined parametrically.
      5. Find the surface area of a solid of revolution for a parametric curve.
      6. Sketch graphs of polar equations.
      7. Determine the area enclosed by a polar curve or between 2 polar curves.
      8. Determine the length of a polar curve and the surface area of a solid of revolution for a polar curve.
    6. The student will use technology appropriately to do mathematics.
    7. The student will communicate effectively about mathematics.
      1. Verbally describe solutions to problems using appropriate terminology.
      2. Provide complete written solutions to problems using appropriate terminology.
  
  •  

    MTH 208W - Elementary Statistics

    Credits: 3
    Studies statistical concepts including frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, confidence intervals, hypotheses testing, linear correlation and regression, chi-square, ANOVA. A SPECIFIC GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 6 or MTH 098 , or MTH 118W  or MTH 119W  or MTH 119AW  with a grade of “C” or better or two years of high school algebra.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Students will be able to calculate, describe, and apply each of the standard measures of descriptive statistics.
      1. Measures of center (mean, median, mode).
      2. Measures of variation (standard deviation, variance range).
      3. Percentiles.
      4. Graphs (frequency distributions, histograms, stem and leaf plots, box and whisker plots).
    2. Students will demonstrate their understanding of basic concepts and principles essential to statistical inference..
      1. Students will be able to identify different methods of data collection.
      2. Students will be able to calculate and describe basic probability.
      3. Students will be able to calculate probability using the binomial distribution, the normal distribution, and the central limit theorem.
      4. Students will be able to use correlation and regression to describe relationships between numerical variables.
      5. Students will be able to calculate confidence intervals to estimate population averages and proportions.
    3. Students will demonstrate their understanding of the logic of statistical inference.
      1. Students will manually perform all of the steps of a hypothesis test for a claim about the population mean.
      2. Students will demonstrate their understanding of the significant level of a test and the use of p-values in statistical software.
      3. Students will be able to determine the appropriate test statistic and make inferences for a variety of models, including single sample mean (large and small sample), proportion and variance, two sample mean and proportion, Chi Square and ANOVA.
    4. Students will be able to communicate their understanding of statistical concepts in writing.
  
  •  

    MTH 209W - Statistics

    Credits: 4
    Studies statistical concepts including frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, confidence intervals, hypotheses testing, linear correlation and regression, chi-square, ANOVA, non-parametric tests.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 6 or MTH 098  or MTH 118W  or MTH 119W  or MTH 119AW  with a C or better or two years of high school algebra
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Calculate, describe, and apply each of the standard measures of descriptive statistics.
      1. Calculate, describe, and apply measures of center (mean, median, mode).
      2. Calculate, describe, and apply measures of variation (standard deviation, variance range).
      3. Calculate, describe, and apply percentiles.
      4. Calculate, describe, and apply graphs (frequency distributions, histograms, stem and leaf plots, box and whisker plots).
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of basic concepts and principles essential to statistical inference.
      1. Identify different methods of data collection.
      2. Calculate and describe basic probability.
      3. Calculate probability using the binomial distribution, the normal distribution, and the central limit theorem.
      4. Use correlation and regression to describe relationships between numerical variables.
      5. Calculate confidence intervals to estimate population averages and proportions.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the logic of statistical inference.
      1. Manually perform all of the steps of a hypothesis test for a claim about the population mean. Students will demonstrate their understanding of the significant level of a test and the use of p-values in statistical software.
      2. Determine the appropriate test statistic and make inferences for a variety of models, including single sample mean (large and small sample), proportion and variance, two sample mean and proportion, Chi Square and ANOVA.
      3. Determine the appropriate non-parametric test statistic and make inferences for a variety of models, including sign test, Wilcoxon Signed-Rank test for Matched pairs, Kruskal-Wallis Test and Rank Correlation
    4. Communicate an understanding of statistical concepts in writing.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of a statistical computer software package.
  
  •  

    MTH 260 - Discrete Mathematics

    Credits: 3
    Introduces discrete mathematics topics for applied mathematics and computer science. Includes Boolean algebra, predicate logic, sets, relations, induction and recursion, counting theory, graphs and trees.

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 161  with a grade of “C” or better.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. The student will learn the fundamental terms and vocabulary of mathematical discourse.
      1. Use functions, sequences and summations.
      2. Use the fundamental properties of the integers.
      3. Use matrices in a variety of contexts.
      4. Use the basic principles of mathematical logic.
      5. Define, identify, and apply sets and set operations.
      6. Use the concepts of algorithm, recursion, and iteration.
      7. Use the concept of mathematical induction.
    2. The student will learn the fundamental principles of counting.
      1. Set-up and solve problems related to permutations and combinations.
      2. Use generalized permutations and combinations.
      3. Apply the basic rules of probability in solving problems.
      4. Define, identify, and apply recurrence relations.
      5. Use the principle of inclusion-exclusion.
    3. The student will learn about relations and their representations.
      1. Identify several fundamental properties of relations.
      2. Use tables, graphs, and matrices.
      3. Identify and define constructions of fundamental closures of relations.
      4. Define and identify equivalence relation and partition.
      5. Use various examples of partial orderings.
    4. The student will learn the fundamental properties and applications of graphs and trees.
      1. Use fundamental graph and tree terminology.
      2. Identify several graphs.
      3. Define, identify, and apply Euler and Hamilton paths.
      4. Define, identify, and apply weighted graphs and shortest path problems.
      5. Define and solve problems related to homeomorphism and isomorphism of graphs.
      6. Define and solve problems related to tree traversal, spanning trees and minimal spanning trees.
    5. The student will learn the fundamental properties and applications of Boolean algebra.
      1. Define and represent Boolean functions.
      2. Recognize various examples of Boolean algebras.
      3. Identify and define logic gates and combinatorial circuits.
      4. Apply algorithms for minimization of circuits.
  
  •  

    MTH 261 - Analytic Geometry and Calculus III

    Credits: 4
    Includes solid analytical geometry, vectors, partial differentiation, multiple integration, line and surface integrals, Green’s, Stokes’, and Gauss’ theorems. A CAS GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 162  with a grade of “C” or better.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the concept of a vector and manipulate and represent vectors geometrically and algebraically.
      1. Perform basic calculations with vectors such as addition, subtraction, scalar multiplication, and finding the magnitude of a vector.
      2. Find the cross product and dot product of two vectors and use them in various applications.
      3. Describe some key differences between the dot product and the cross product.
      4. Find the angle between two given vectors.
      5. Use a dot product to calculate the work done by a constant force.
      6. Use a cross product to calculate torsion.
      7. Use dot products to find the projection of one vector onto another.
      8. Find the equation of a plane.
      9. Find the parametric equation of a line in space.
    2. Develop an understanding of the relationships between numerical, graphical, and algebraic representations of curves and surfaces in space.
      1. Graph standard quadric surfaces and curves in space.
      2. Recognize the relationships between curves, surfaces and their equations.
      3. Graph using cylindrical and spherical coordinates.
      4. Convert among rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates.
    3. Define, apply, and identify several properties of vector-valued functions.
      1. Identify differences between vector-valued functions and scalar-valued functions.
      2. Evaluate a limit of a vector-valued function.
      3. Evaluate a derivative of a vector-valued function.
      4. Use and understand the velocity and acceleration of vector-valued functions.
      5. Construct a TNB frame.
      6. Calculate and apply the curvature and the torsion of a curve in space.
    4. Define, apply, calculate with, and identify properties of a multivariable real valued function.
      1. Determine the domain and range of a function.
      2. Construct level curves and level surfaces of a function
      3. Calculate the limit of functions when they exist.
      4. Use paths on a surface to show when a limit of a function does not exist at a point.
      5. Determine if a function is continuous at a point.
      6. Calculate partial derivatives of a function.
      7. Calculate the linear approximations to a function.
      8. Use partial derivatives to find absolute and local extrema and saddle points for two variable scalar functions.
      9. Use Lagrange multipliers to find extrema for constrained functions.
      10. Define, calculate and apply the gradient of a function.
      11. Use the gradient of a function to calculate directional derivatives.
    5. Apply, evaluate, and understand integrals of multi-variable scalar-valued functions.
      1. Define double and triple integrals.
      2. Construct a region of integration.
      3. Represent areas and volumes with double and triple integrals.
      4. Evaluate double and triple integrals using rectangular coordinates.
      5. Calculate surface area.
      6. Evaluate surface integrals.
      7. Use cylindrical and spherical coordinates to evaluate triple integrals.
      8. Change the order or variables of integration when appropriate.
      9. Apply formulas that deal with mass, center of mass, and moments.
    6. Develop an understanding of vector fields.
      1. Define a vector field.
      2. Give examples of vector fields in an abstract and physical setting.
      3. Evaluate line integrals in conservative and nonconservative fields.
      4. Explain the relationships between conservative fields, path independence, and potential functions.
      5. Calculate work in a variety of contexts.
      6. Explain and evaluate the curl and divergence of vector fields.
      7. Explain and apply Green’s Theorem.
      8. Apply Stokes’ and Gauss’ Theorems and explain their relationship to Green’s Theorem.
    7. Communicate effectively about mathematics.
      1. Verbally describe solutions to problems using appropriate terminology.
      2. Provide complete written explanations of concepts using appropriate terminology.
    8. Use technology appropriately to do mathematics.
  
  •  

    MTH 263 - Introduction to Linear Algebra

    Credits: 3
    Investigates matrices, determinants, linear systems, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors.

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 261  with a grade of “C” or better.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. The student will learn the fundamental properties of matrices.
      1. Add, subtract, multiply, and invert matrices on appropriate occasions and in an appropriate manner.
      2. Describe and solve systems of linear equations with matrices.
      3. Perform elementary row operations with and without elementary matrices.
      4. Define and apply symmetric and skew-symmetric matrices.
      5. Define and apply the determinant of a matrix, and the applications of determinants in a variety of contexts.
      6. Define and apply eigenvalues and eigenvectors.
      7. Recognize digonalizable matrices and transform such matrices into diagonal matrices.
      8. Use the specific properties of symmetric matrices.
      9. Perform orthogonal diagonalization on symmetric matrices.
    2. The student will learn the fundamental language and processes of vector spaces and inner product spaces.
      1. Motivate and execute the definitions of vector space and inner-product space.
      2. Recognize vectors, vector spaces, inner-product spaces, and subspaces in a variety of contexts.
      3. Define and apply length and orthogonality in a variety of inner-product spaces.
      4. Define and apply linear dependence/independence and spanning.
      5. Define and apply basis, dimension, and coordinates relative to a basis.
      6. Define and apply an orthonormal basis.
      7. Define and apply the Gram-Schmidt process.
    3. The student will learn about linear transformations.
      1. Motivate and execute the definition of linear transformation.
      2. Use the language of linear transformations correctly.
      3. Recognize the consequences of linear transformation on dimensions and bases of vector spaces.
      4. Identify matrices with linear transformations and to represent linear transformations with matrices.
      5. Define and apply the similarity of transformations/matrices.
      6. Employ transition matrices to effect a change of basis.
  
  •  

    MTH 264 - Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations

    Credits: 3
    Studies the techniques for solving first and second-order differential equations and first-order systems of differential equations both linear and nonlinear, through qualitative, quantitative and numerical approaches. Includes Laplace transforms and uses applications in science and engineering throughout the course.

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 261  with a grade of “C” or better.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Develop the ability to recognize, classify, and solve different types of first-order differential equations.
      1. Identify and solve separable and linear first-order equations.
      2. Use slope fields and equilibrium solutions to understand the qualitative properties of first-order equations.
      3. Use the concept of bifurcation to understand the qualitative properties of a family of first-order equations.
      4. Apply numerical methods to generate approximations to solutions of first-order equations.
      5. Understand the conditions that guarantee the existence and uniqueness of solutions to first-order equations.
    2. Solve first-order systems of differential equations and demonstrated knowledge of properties and applications.
      1. Use direction fields and equilibrium solutions to understand the qualitative properties of first-order systems.
      2. Solve decoupled and partially-decoupled systems.
      3. Apply numerical methods to generate approximations of solutions of first-order systems.
      4. Investigate the special properties of linear systems.
      5. Classify and solve first-order linear systems with constant coefficients.
      6. Use first-order linear systems to investigate the properties and solve equations arising from harmonic oscillation.
      7. Linearize nonlinear systems when appropriate.
      8. Apply appropriate quantitative, qualitative, and numerical techniques to study nonlinear systems.
    3. Analyze and solve second-order differential equations and use them to various applications.
      1. . Identify homogeneous and nonhomogeneous linear differential equations.
      2. Construct particular and general solutions to homogeneous linear differential equations.
      3. Construct particular and general solutions to linear differential equations.
      4. Solve linear differential equations with constant coefficients.
      5. Use second-order linear differential equations to model damped/undamped forced/unforced oscillations.
      6. Apply power series to solve or approximate solutions of differential equations.
    4. Use Laplace transforms to solve a variety of differential equations.
      1. Apply the definition and properties of the Laplace transform.
      2. Apply Laplace transforms to various fundamental functions.
      3. Apply the shifting theorems to a variety of functions and equations.
      4. Use Laplace transforms to solve a variety of initial value problems.
      5. Understand and use the Laplace transform in applications of discontinuous forcing functions.
      6. Use the convolution theorem on appropriate first- and second-order equations.
    5. Use appropriate technology to investigate and solve differential equations.
      1. Generate and graph numerical solutions with a computer algebra system.
      2. Graph and recognize the relationships between forcing functions and solutions to harmonic oscillation.
      3. Recognize initial conditions in the graphs of solutions to first-order equations and systems.
      4. Generate and graph slope fields and direction fields for first-order equations and systems.
      5. Recognize and verify the correspondence between slope/direction fields and solutions of equations or systems.
      6. Graph multiple representations of solutions to first-order systems.
    6. Communicate effectively about differential equations and their applications.
      1. Verbally describe solutions to problems using appropriate terminology.
      2. Provide complete written solutions to problems using appropriate terminology.
      3. Use appropriate vocabulary.
  
  •  

    MTH 290-299 - Special Projects in Mathematics


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Mechanical Technology

  
  •  

    MT 110 - Machine Tool Calculations

    Credits: 4
    Includes the following geometry topics: angles, triangles, polygons, circles, prisms, cylinders, and cones. Includes right-triangle trigonometry, radian measure, oblique-triangle trigonometry, and graphs of trigonometric functions. May receive credit in only one of the following: MTH 103 , SKMA 103  or MT 110.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 4
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Define and identify the characteristics of and solve problems related to plane figures (angles, parallel lines, triangles).
      1. Define basic terminology of angles (acute, right, obtuse, straight, complementary and supplementary angles).
      2. Measure angles with a protractor.
      3. Define basic terminology of angles formed by parallel lines cut by a transversal (corresponding alternate interior and exterior angles.)
      4. Define the characteristics of triangles and their properties (altitude, medians, vertex, and sides).
      5. Express an understanding of and identify the characteristics of congruent and similar triangles.
      6. Relate to the work place operations.
    2. Define and identify the characteristics of and solve problems related to Polygons (triangles, squares, rhombus, rectangles, parallelograms, trapezoids and multi-sided polygons).
      1. Use the proper formula for determining area of polygons (square measure).
      2. Determine the measure of interior angles by using diagonals.
      3. Relate to the work place operations.
    3. Define and identify the characteristics of right, isosceles, equilateral and 30? - 60? - 90? triangles.
      1. Know and apply the Pythagorean Formula in solving right triangle problems.
      2. Solve problems involving similar triangles (tapers).
    4. Define and identify the characteristics of a circle (chords, central angles, inscribed, segments and sectors).
      1. Demonstrate the relationships between the diameter, radius, and circumference of a circle (? value).
      2. Solve problems involving area of circles, sectors, and segments.
      3. Determine arc lengths by using proportions.
    5. Define and identify the characteristics of an eclipse (enter, major and minor axes).
      1. Solve problems involving area and circumference of an eclipse.
      2. Express uses of eclipses in everyday situations (orbits, racetracks, buildings, and cutting pipes).
    6. Define and identify the characteristics of geometric solids (prisms, cylinders, pyramids, cones, frustrums, spheres, torus, prisimatoids).
      1. Use proper formulas to determine surface area of all geometric solids.
      2. Use proper formulas to determine volume of all geometric solids.
      3. Figure a cost factor with respect to volume and materials (surface area) of various geometric solids (cylinders, cones, spheres, cubicle containers).
      4. Relate to the work place operations.
    7. Define and apply the six trigonometric ratios.
      1. Express the relationship between the sides of a right triangle and the six trigonometric ratios.
      2. Evaluate the six trigonometric ratios and their inverses with a calculator.
      3. Apply the six trigonometric ratios to right triangle problems.
      4. Relate to the work place operations.
    8. Solve oblique triangles.
      1. Solve oblique triangles using the Law of Sines.
      2. Solve oblique triangles using the Law of Cosines.
      3. 8C. Relate to the work place operations.
  
  •  

    MT 151 - Power Transmission

    Credits: 3
    Identifies and explains safety rules, regulations, test procedures, installation, removal, and operation of belt drives, chain drives, mechanical couplings, and mechanical drive systems. Demonstrates the concepts of shaft alignment. Credit may be earned in MT 151 or SKMT 151  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 5
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand the principal functions of all the various mechanical power transmission components used on industrial machinery. Components may be individual parts or assembled units.
      1. Understand the principles of power transmission systems; recognize, remove and refit taper-lock bushes, keyed shafts, belts, chains & couplings; install & align shafts and tension drive train components.
      2. Analyze the components or failures of the power transmission units or parts.
      3. Determine the causes related to the failure of proper machine performance.
      4. Visualize the procedures required to repair or replace assemblies or components that have failed.
      5. Recognize the “wear” patterns causing the machine failures.
      6. Assess failure mechanisms.
    2. Use “tools of the trade” to remove all parts or assemblies associated with a machine failure.
      1. Use common hand tools to assemble mechanical components.
      2. Be familiar with the source of various machine failures and the parts needed to repair the failures.
      3. Measure and calculate sizes for replacement of parts using tables of dimensions found in manufactured parts catalogs or the textbook used in class.
      4. Be able to communicate with others involved in failures other than “normal wear” (i.e. design overload, shock or any abnormal conditions).
      5. Follow-up with periodic adjustments, vibration samples, lubrication schedules, etc. upon completion of repairs.
    3. Understand the principal operations of mechanical power transmissions.
      1. Evaluate the general characteristics and terms of chain and belt drives.
      2. Evaluate the general characteristics and terms of clutches and brakes.
      3. Explain proper machinery lubrication procedures.
      4. Explain proper maintenance procedures for bearings.
      5. Align coupling using the following methods: straight edge with feeler gauge and dial indicator.
      6. Interpret gear terms and mathematical relationships and compute spur gear ratios.
      7. Evaluate the general characteristics and terms of shaft couplings.
      8. Explain the operation of brakes and clutches.
      9. Use various methods to perform shaft alignment.
      10. Evaluate the general characteristics and terms of closed gear and variable speed drives.
      11. Evaluate the general characteristics and terms of compound gear trains.
      12. Evaluate the general characteristics and terms of worm and wheel gear trains.
      13. Evaluate the general characteristics and terms of helical and bevel gears.
      14. Explain the operation of planetary gear system.
      15. Evaluate the general characteristics and terms of lever classes and compound levers.
    4. Demonstrate proper safety techniques and proper use of personal protective equipment.
      1. Demonstrate safety rules, regulations, test procedures, installation, removal, and operation of mechanical drive equipment.
    5. Perform appropriate mechanical drive calculations.
      1. Convert between metric and U.S. standard.
      2. Perform calculations related to gears and gearboxes, chain drives, and belt drives.
      3. Calculate rpm, gear ratios, and torques.
    6. Identify types and specifications of fasteners and lubricants.
      1. Identify types and specifications of fasteners used in wind turbines.
      2. Demonstrate use of torque wrenches.
      3. List effects of torque, lubricants, hydraulic bolt stretchers, tensioners, and high torque on fasteners.
      4. Identify type, application, and compatibility of lubricants.
      5. List effects of lubricants and tensioners on fasteners.
  
  •  

    MT 161 - Industrial Rigging and Safety

    Credits: 2


    Studies the methods of safe transfer of loads and provides comprehensive, easy to understand, and reliable information of the entire field of rigging operations. Discusses techniques and methods to accomplish the rigger’s task with the greatest safety for all of the workers on a project, as well as for passers-by and the public in general. Identifies sources of, organizes, and describes safety rules, regulations and practices related to job-site hazards, personal protective equipment, aerial work, hazard communication, and electrical safety. Credit may be earned in MT 161 or SKMT 161  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives   Outcome 1:    Understand what is required for safe operations in rigging procedures.

         Objective

         A.          Practice and demonstrate proper rigging hand signals.

         B.          Identify unsafe loads, equipment, and work practices.

         C.          Inspect rigging equipment and determine proper solutions.

         D.         Tie proper knots in accordance with load applications and proper safety procedures.

         E.          Store rigging equipment in a safe environment.

      Outcome 2:    Discuss proper use of rigging tools in industrial applications.

         Objective

         A.          Identify the tools used in rigging and explain the purpose of each.

         B.          Give examples of three methods of calculating the weight of a load.

         C.          Explain center of gravity and its importance in rigging a load.

         D.         Describe four common sling arrangements and the relation between sling angle and

                      horizontal force.

         E.          Name five types of hooks frequently used in rigging and explain the purpose of each.

         F.          Discuss proper hook use and cite four reasons for removing a hook from service.

      Outcome 3:    Understand components of wire rope construction, classification, strength,

                               and signs of damage.

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         Objective

         A.          Identify the component parts of wire rope and describe its construction and classification.

         B.          Identify and discuss the factors that affect wire rope strength.

         C.          Describe the basic single-leg and multiple-leg slings and the calculation of their allowable

                      loads.

         D.         Enumerate the signs of damage that would probably cause a wire rope to be removed from

                      service.

      Outcome 4:    Understand welded-link chain, chain grades and strength, chain slings,

                               inspecting slings, metal mesh slings, sling materials, and proper applications.

         Objective

         A.          Identify the different grades of chain and name some of their applications.

         B.          Define the terms working load limit, proof test, and minimum breaking force.

         C.          List and discuss four factors that affect the strength of chain slings.

         D.         Describe three types of damage you might see in a daily inspection of chain slings that would

                       lead you to set the sling aside for more thorough examination.

         E.          Describe the two standard types of end fittings for metal mesh slings and the hitches for

                      which each can be used.

         F.          Name several advantages of, and applications for, metal mesh slings.

         G.         List the visible signs of damage that would cause you to recommend a sling’s removal from

                      service.

      Outcome 5:    Understand ropes, fiber and synthetic fiber slings, and proper application of

                               materials.

         Objective

         A.          Identify the grades of manila rope that can be used for overhead lifting.

         B.          Name the three commonly used synthetic-fiber ropes and list three of their advantages over

                      manila.

         C.          Discuss the factors that affect the strength of fiber rope.

         D.         Name the signs of wear or damage that would warrant setting a fiber-rope sling aside for

                      more detailed inspection.

         E.          Describe an encased polyester fiber sling.

         F.          Explain the construction of synthetic-web slings and name four of the basic types.

         G.         List examples of visible damage that should cause a synthetic-web sling to be removed from

                      service.

      Outcome 6:    Understand concepts of overhead manual chain, power, and wire-rope

                               hoists, side pulls, overload limit devices, underhung and top-running cranes,

                               jib cranes, and inspection.

         Objective

         A.          Describe the characteristics of the various kinds of overhead hoists.

         B.          Explain the differences between single and double reeving.

         C.          Explain the proper function and operation of an upper limit switch and an overload limit device.

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         D.         Describe and contrast the construction of top-running and under-hung cranes.

         E.          Identify the three basic types of jib cranes.

         F.          Describe what the rigger’s daily visual inspection should include.

         G.         List examples of conditions that should warrant removal of wire rope or hoist load chain from

                       service.

      Outcome 7:    Understand safe practices as they apply to hoist and crane operation,

                               special heavy lifts,  and all tools of rigging.

         Objective

         A.          Enumerate the general operating practices that apply to all tools of rigging.

         B.          Explain the 11 operating practices that apply to slings.

         C.          Discuss nine operating practices that should be observed when using a hoist or crane.

         D.         Detail the special circumstances under which a hoist or crane may be used to pull a load or

                      lift a load heavier than the equipment’s rated capacity.

         E.          Describe three methods of turning a load.

         F.          Discuss the eight questions that a rigger must answer in the thought process that should

                      precede any lift.

      Outcome 8:    Explain types of scaffolds, lift platforms, ladders, guy lines, lift belts and how

                               to safely use them.

         Objective

         A.          Explain the construction of pole and suspension scaffolds and lift platforms, and the safety

                      measures that apply to them.

         B.          Name several scaffolding accessories and explain their use.

         C.          Discuss recommended usage and inspection of the three common types of ladders.

  
  •  

    MT 215 - Introduction to Composite Materials

    Credits: 3
    Prepares student in the basic concepts and definitions of composite materials. Covers fabrication, structure, properties, and applications of fibrous materials as well as structure and properties of polymer matrix, metal matrix, and ceramic matrix materials. Studies interface between fiber and matrix, fabrication methods, properties and applications of composites structures which include wind energy, marine, aerospace, etc. Credit may be earned in MT 215 or WTT 215 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 6
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify the materials and construction methods of composite structures.
      1. Identify and explain the basic principles of the design, construction, maintenance, and repair of composite structures.
      2. Identify the resin materials that are common to the composite industry.
      3. Identify the reinforcement fabrics that are common to the composite industry.
      4. Describe the core materials used in sandwich laminates.
      5. Explain the advantages and disadvantages and properties of the four classes of composites.
      6. Describe finishing materials and processes including gel coats, UV protection, etc.
    2. Demonstrate the proper techniques to repair composite structures.
      1. Demonstrate the skills required to return a composite structure back to service life.
      2. Compare different repair methods.
      3. Inspect, select, and demonstrate proper composite repair techniques.
      4. Identify the various composite structures manufacturing methods as they relate to various industries including wind energy, marine, aerospace, automotive, etc.
    3. Identify composite failures and modes of failure.
      1. Explain mechanical behavior, fatigue behavior, and construction of composite structures.
      2. Identify damage that can affect structural integrity.
      3. Explain composites failures and identify techniques for failure identification which may include noise problems and visual identification.
      4. Explain the industy standards that impact composite performances, operation, and maintenance characteristics.
      5. Explain nondestructive and destructive composite evaluation techniques.
    4. Demonstrate thorough understanding of knowledge related to safety and personal protection when performing maintenance actions on composite structures.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding to read MSDS for required safety information associated with composites materials used in this course.
      2. Demonstrate proper safety techniques.
      3. Demonstrate proper use of personal protection equipment.
  
  •  

    MT 220 - Hydraulics and Pneumatics I

    Credits: 3


    Focuses on the operation and function of fluids, pumps, compressors, valves, cylinders, motors, filters, and other components used in the power and control of machine tools, construction and agricultural equipment. Uses algebraic formulas, charts, and graphic symbols for design and diagnosis of basic circuits. Credit may be earned in either SKMT 101 or MT 220 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 4
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Solve fluid power problems using basic algebra

         A.          Calculate pressure given force and cross-sectional area, or diameter.

         B.          Calculate pressure given the head of the liquid above the point desired.

         C.          Calculate area of a circle given its diameter.

         D.          Calculate velocity of a cylinder given its diameter and flow rate.

         E.          Calculate torque on the shaft of a hydraulic motor given the pressure drop and volumetric displacement.

         F.           Calculate rpm of a hydraulic motor given its volumetric displacement and flow rate.

         G.          Calculate horsepower given pressure and flow rate.

         H.          Calculate output force and motion of a hydraulic jack, given input conditions.

         I.           Calculate efficiency, given input and output horsepower.

    2.    Demonstrate advanced principles of fluid power

         A.          Describe flow velocity and pressure conditions in a venturi.

         B.          Calculate flow velocity at an orifice in a tank given the head of liquid above it.

         C.          Describe pressure drop in a hydraulic circuit.

    3.    Demonstrate the importance of the fluid in a fluid power circuit

         A.          List at least 5 functions of the fluid.

         B.          Differentiate between compressibility and incompressibility of the fluid and how that affects performance.

         C.          Differentiate between viscosity and viscosity index of an oil.

         D.          Explain the symptoms of a hydraulic circuit with oil viscosity too high.

         E.          Explain the symptoms of a hydraulic circuit with oil viscosity too low.

         F.          List the factors that enhance oxidation, and explain its effect on performance.

         G.         Differentiate between the several fire-resistant fluids.

    4.    Explain the operation and list applications of hydraulic pumps    

         A.          Explain how centrifugal pumps work.

         B.          Explain how gear pumps work.

         C.          Explain how vane pumps work.

         D.          Explain how piston pumps work.

         E.          Explain how screw and lobe pumps work.

         F.          Compare the pros and cons of each pump type.

         G.         Identify at least 2 industrial/commercial applications for each pump type.

    5.    Explain the operation and list applications of fluid power actuators

         A.          Explain how a single-acting cylinder works.

         B.          Explain how a double-acting cylinder works.

         C.          Explain how a gear motor works.

         D.          Explain how a vane motor works.

         E.          Explain how a piston motor works.

         F.          Explain how a gerotor motor works.

         G.         Explain how a vane rotary actuator works.

         H.         Explain how a rack/pinion rotary actuator works.

         I.           Identify at least 2 industrial/commercial applications for each actuator type.

    6.    Explain the operation and list applications of control valves

         A.          Explain the operation and differentiate between the 5 pressure control valves:

                      1.    relief valve

                      2.    unloading valve

                      3.    sequence valve

                      4.    counterbalance valve

                      5.    pressure reducing valve

         B.          Identify where in a circuit each pressure control valve is normally placed.  May be used in conjuction with the automation equipment.

         C.          Explain the operation and differentiate between the 4 directional control valves

                      1.    one way

                      2.    two way

                      3.    three way

                      4.    four way

         D.         Identify at least 5 different operators for directional control valves.

         E.          Compare 4-port and 5-port operation in directional control valves.

         F.          Compare sliding spool, shear seal, and poppet designs for directional control valves.

         G.         Explain the operations of simple flow control valves and pressure-compensated flow control valves.

         H.         Differentiate between a restrictor-inlet flow control and a bypass type.

         I.          Compare the 3 types of flow control circuits.

         J.         Explain the operation of a flapper-nozzle electrohydraulic servo valve.

         K.         Compare the operation and applications of electrohydraulic servo valves with proportional valves.

         L.         Explain the operation of a cartridge valve.

     7.    Explain the operation and application of several components typically found in a hydraulic circuit.

         A.          Explain the operation and use of an accumulator.

         B.          Explain the operation and use of an intensifier.

         C.          Explain the operation and use of a filter or strainer.

         D.          Explain the operation and use of a pressure gage and flow meter.

         E.          Explain the operation and use of a reservoir.

         F.           Explain the operation and use of a heat exchanger.

    8.    Explain the sequence of operations of a fluid power circuit.

         A.          Identify all graphic symbols in a fluid power circuit drawing.

         B.          Explain the sequence of operations, with different positions of the directional control valve, of the following types of circuits:

                      1.    linear

                      2.    regenerative

                      3.    pressure reducing

                      4.    sequence

                      5.    hydrostatic transmission

                      6.    meter-in and meter-out

                      7.    accumulator

                      8.    intensifier

    9.    Design a 3-cylinder/one-motor hydraulic sequence circuit commonly found in industrial applications.

         A.          Size all conductors in the circuit.

         B.          Recommend settings for all flow control valves.

         C.          Size all cylinders and the motor for proper force/torque and speed/rpm outputs.

         D.          Select proper directional control valves for the sequence.

         E.          Calculate the cycle time for each actuator in the sequence.

         F.          Recommend pump type and size.

         G.         Size the reservoir.

  
  •  

    MT 221W - Introduction to Engineering Materials

    Credits: 3


    Examines the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of metals, ceramics, polymers, and composite materials and relates these properties to application requirements. Exams the micro and macro structures of these materials along with the tests and measurements designed to identify them. Discusses concepts necessary to the selection and specification of materials for making products and building structures.

    Prerequisite(s): MIT 111W  and MATH LEVEL 6
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     List the materials related criteria of engineering design.

         A.          List the decisions that need to be addressed when selecting materials for design.

         B.          Give the names of the 5 groups of engineering materials.

         C.          List the 4 levels of structure for materials.

         D.          Distinguish between mechanical, chemical and physical properties.

     2.    Describe the mechanical tests typical used to characterize materials.

         A.          Explain what is measured by a hardness test.

         B.          Explain which properties of a material are measured by a tensile test machine.

         C.          Distinguish between elastic and plastic behavior of materials.

         D.          Explain what is measured by an impact test.

         E.          Describe what material property is measured by a fatigue test.

         F.           Explain the conducting of a creep test and describe the material properties measured.

    3.    Describe the characteristics of atomic arrangement for materials.

         A.          List the atomic structure for all materials.

         B.          Describe the mechanisms of atomic bonding in various materials.

         C.          List the characteristic properties of metals, polymers, ceramics and composites.

         D.          Distinguish between amorphous and crystalline materials.

         E.          List the common unit cells for materials.

         F.          Give the relationship between atomic packing factor and coordination number.

         G.          Describe the interstitial space of lattice systems.

         H.          Distinguish between allotropic and polymorph materials.

         I.           Explain isotropic behavior of materials.

    4.    Characterize the imperfections of atomic arrangements in materials.

         A.          List the reasons for the intentional control of imperfections of atomic arrangment of materials.

         B.          Name the various kinds of imperfections found in the atomic arrangement of materials.

         C.          Explain “critical resolved shear stress” and its importance in accounting for the plastic deformation of materials.

         D.          Use the concept of atomic imperfections to describe point defects and grain boundary crystalline defects.

         E.          Use the concept of atomic diffusion to name and describe industrial processes where materials properties are determined.

         F.           Name the two mechanisms of diffusion and two types of diffusion.

         G.          Use microscopes to view various grain structures and imperpections.

    5.    Describe what the polymeric materials are, and the general properties for plastics.

         A.          Specify advantages and disadvantages of plastics when compared with other materials.

         B.          Define mer, polymer, and degree of polymerization.

         C.          Cite the differences in behavior for thermosets and thermoplastic materials.

         D.          Name the three types of stereoisomers.

         E.          Distinguish between homopolymer and copolymer, and list the four types of copolymers.

         F.           Explain why plastics have low strength compared to engineering alloys.

    6.    Explain the mechanism of solid solution alloys.

         A.          List the possible levels of solubility for any two crystalline materials.

         B.          Read diagrams of phase equilibrium to determine freeze and melt temperatures and phase compositions.

         C.          Calculate the freeze range for specific alloy compositions.

         D.          Calculate phase compositions and fractional amounts for alloys with partial solubility.

    7.    Explain the mechanism of solid solution and dispersion strengthening by solidification.

         A.          Distinguish between the effects on mechanical properties of the size, shpae, amount, and  distribution of precipitate particles.

         B.          Distinguish between solid solutions, compounds, and pure metals.

         C.          Distinguish between an ordered and normal (disordered) crystal lattice.

         D.          Describe the eutectic reaction.

         E.          Distinguish between the precipitate and matrix micro constituents.

    8.    Explain dispersion strengthening by precipitation hardening and alloying.

         A.          List and explain the steps of precipitation hardening.

         B.          Give the conditions for an alloy in order for age hardening to be effective.

         C.          Distinguish between eutectic and eutectoid reactions.

         D.          Sketch the iron-iron carbide diagram.

         E.          List all the names and nominal properties of the phases within the iron-iron carbide equilibirum alloy system.

    9.    Explain dispersion strengthening by phase transformation, alloying, and heat treatment.

         A.          Read isothermal transformation diagrams to predict structures and mechanical properties in a specific alloy.

         B.          Explain the purpose of tempering.

         C.          Distinguish between hardness and hardenability of steels.

         D.          Explain: carburizing, nitriding, induction hardening, and carbonitriding.


    10. Describe a ceramic material, and cite typical mechanical, physical, thermal, and electrical properties of ceramics.

         A.          Distingish between traditional ceramics and engineering ceramics.

         B.          Explain why ceramics are used in capacitors.

         C.          Cite some applications of ceramics as refractory materials.

         D.          Explain why ceramics have both high compressive strength and low tensile strength.

         E.          Briefly describe the three types of oxides used to fabricate glass.

    11. Describe a composite material based on its basic constituents.

         A.          Compare mechanical properties of composites with metallic materials and plastics.

         B.          Cite the three most common used fibers for reinforcement of composite materials.

    12. Characterize the forms of material degradation, metallic corrosion and corrosive environments.

         A.          List the forms of corrosion cells.

         B.          Explain each of the corrosion mechanisms:

                      1.    Liquid metal

                      2.    Selective leaching

                      3.    Chemical attack

                      4.    Electrochemical: composition cell, stress cell, and concentration cell

                      5.    Graphitic

         C.          Explain how the galvanic series in seawater may be used to predict and minimize corrosion.

         D.          Explain how inhibitors, cathodic protection, and passivation are useful to minimize corrosion.

    13. Characterize the forms, mechanisms, and environments of material failure.

         A.          Name and describe the common fracture mechanisms.

         B.          Describe the evidence to indicate a ductile failure.

         C.          Describe the evidence to indicate a brittle failure.

         D.          What is the effect of temperature and rate of load application on failure.

         E.          List the conditions which are frequently implicated as causes for the start of a fatigue fracture.

         F.          List service conditions, which can contribute to material failure.

    14. Demonstrate the ability to think critically

         A.          Integrate the concepts of material systems with their properties and applications.

         B.          Solve materials problems.

         C.          Draw logical conclusions from the results of research and lab exercises.

         D.          Make predictions based on evidence.

         E.          Identify trends and patterns.

    15. Communicate effectively about materials.

         A.          Read various forms of written communication to gather information about materials.

         B.          Organize and integrate materials information into patterns and hierarchies.

         C.          Analyze various forms of communication.

         D.          Write effectively for a specific audience and purpose.

         E.          Use writing tasks to promote the learning of materials and material systems.

         F.         Demonstrate the learning of materials and material systems through writing.

  
  •  

    MT 250 - Statics and Strength of Materials

    Credits: 4
    Studies forces acting on rigid bodies, including applications of these forces to practical design problems. Introduces and uses concepts of stress in tension, compression, torsion, and shear in various combinations.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 111  and MTH 121 
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze forces used in mechanical systems.
      1. Demonstrate the concepts of vectors and be able to calculate resultants of collinear, concurrent, and coplanar forces.
      2. Demonstrate the concepts of and calculate the summation of moments and forces, and free body diagrams to analyze the loading of machine components and structures.
    2. Calculate the shape functions of mechanical components.
      1. Demonstrate and apply the concepts of and calculate centroid to analyze and design machine components and structures.
      2. Demonstrate and apply the concepts of and calculate moment of inertia, to analyze and design machine components and structures.
      3. Demonstrate and apply the concepts of and calculate section modulus to analyze and design machine components and structures.
    3. Determine the geometry and material of mechanical components to withstand an applied load using stress or deflection design systems.
      1. Demonstrate the concepts of axial stress and strain to the design of machine members and structures. Use the tensile tst machine to compare actual stress and strain to theoretical values.
      2. Demonstrate the concepts of design factors, torsion, shear and bending moment diagrams, and deflection to the analysis and selection of uniform section beams, machine members, shafting, and structures.
      3. Demonstrate the concepts of axially loaded, uniform section, column formula design methods to the analysis and selection of columns for machine components and structures, including Euler, J. B. Johnson and AISC methods.
      4. Practice problems may include robotics, automation, and machinery.
  
  •  

    MT 251 - Statics and Dynamics

    Credits: 3
    Studies statics and dynamics of mechanical systems by solving problems of small sub-systems using a calculator. Studies forces in 2-D and 3-D acting on particle systems and rigid bodies. Solves problems using the following concepts: equilibrium laws, centroids, center of gravity, moment of inertia. Uses 3 methods to study dynamics of motion - kinematics, work/energy and impulse/momentum.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 111  and MTH 121  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Solve for systems of static forces.
      1. Apply the concepts and calculate vectors for collinear, concurrent, coplanar force systems and friction force systems
      2. Apply the concepts and calculate external statically determinate forces on machine elements and structures to determine reaction forces
      3. Apply the concepts of internal forces and calculate forces on elements of a truss or frame
      4. Apply the concepts and calculate centroid and moment of inertia for single and composite machine elements or structural sections
      5. Practice problems may include robotics, automation, and machinery.
    2. Able to solve for systems of dynamic forces.
      1. Apply the concepts and calculate displacement, velocity, acceleration, force, work, or energy, to particles or a system of particles in linear or angular motion
      2. Apply concepts and calculate impulse and momentum forces to rigid bodies in motion
      3. Practice problems may include robotics, automation, and machinery.
  
  •  

    MT 252 - Strength of Materials

    Credits: 3
    Uses mathematical and computer methods, as well as Mohr’s circle, to determine stress, strain, load, and deflection relationships for structure and machine elements. Uses machine components in tension, compression, or shear, beams in bending or deflection, columns, and bolted joints in design calculations.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 112  or ENG 113  and MT 251  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Calculate the stress or strain of a machine or structural component in tension, compression, or shear.
      1. Given the loading and dimensions, calculate the stress.
      2. Given the load, dimensions, and material, calculate the axial deformation.
      3. Given the material, load, and dimensions, calculate the strain.
      4. Given longitudinal strain and material, calculate lateral strain.
      5. Given material and temperature change in an unrestrained member, calculate thermal strain.
      6. Given material and temperature change in a restrained member, calculate thermal stress.
      7. Given two dissimilar materials supporting a single load, calculate their stresses.
      8. Demonstrations of teoretical principles will utilize tension test machine, torsion machine and impact testor.
    2. Calculate the stress or deflection of a simply supported or cantilever beam.
      1. Given a beam span and a combination of concentrated and uniformly-distributed loads, calculate the support reaction forces.
      2. Given a complete Loading Diagram, sketch and label the Vertical Shear Force Diagram.
      3. Given a complete Vertical Shear Force Diagram, sketch and label the Moment Diagram.
      4. Given a beam loading and cross-section dimensions, calculate the bending stress.
      5. Given a beam loading, of one cross section, and material, calculate its deflection using the appropriate case in the appendix of any Mechanics of Materials text.
      6. Given a beam or shaft with an abrupt change in cross-section (e.g., keyway, shoulder, hole), calculate the stress at the discontinuity using Kt found in the appendix of any Mechanics of Materials text.
    3. Calculate the stress and angle of twist of a shaft in torsion.
      1. Given a shaft with a keyway, shoulder, etc., calculate the stress at the discontinuity using Kt found in the appendix of any Mechanics of Materials text.
      2. Given a shaft with multiple diameters, calculate the combined angle of twist from end to end.
      3. Given a transmission shaft, sketch the Torque Diagram and calculate the shear stresses and angle of twist from end to end.
    4. Calculate the total stress in components under both normal and shear stress loading.
      1. Given a member exposed to tensile, compressive, and bending loading, calculate the total normal stresses at critical points.
      2. Given a member exposed to a combination of normal stresses and shear stresses due to torsion, calculate the principle normal stresses and the maximum shear stress using Mohr’s Circle.
    5. Calculate the stresses developed in the plates and the bolts of a bolted joint under load.
  
  •  

    MT 256 - Machine Design

    Credits: 3
    Uses hand calculator and computer methods to solve for the dimensions and allowable loads of machine elements and power trains. Studies shafts, keyed couplings, bearings, gear trains, V-belt and chain drives, springs and fasteners. Requires a final design using CAD.

    Prerequisite(s): MT 250  with a grade of “C” or better
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Explain the steps and features of the design process.
      1. Describe the attributes of a good designer.
      2. Differentiate between the steps in the design process.
      3. Apply a class brainstorm session to a product design.
      4. List the tools used by a designer
    2. Review engineering properties of materials as they apply to design.
      1. Discuss load-stress relations of products and machine elements under static loading:
        1. Tension/compression
        2. Torsion
        3. Bending
      2. Discuss load-deflection relations of products and machine elements under static loading:
        1. Uniaxial deformation / Poissons Effect
        2. Thermal expansion
        3. Angle of twist
        4. Beam deflection
      3. Demonstrations will include the use of tensile test machine, torsion machine, and bending testing.
    3. Determine the factor of safety given the loading on a machine element of all dimensions and materials.
    4. Use the appropriate mathematical formulas and design factors to produce an acceptable paper design given the loading, either static or time-varying, on a machine element.
      1. Specify dimensions for a brittle element.
      2. Specify dimensions and material for a ductile link in tension/compression/bending
      3. Specify dimensions and material for a ductile pin in shear.
      4. Specify dimensions and material for a shaft in a power transmission with shoulders, keyways, and bearing locations.
      5. Specify dimensions and material of a screw fastener, both diameter and thread engagement.
      6. Specify dimensions and material of the key in a keyed coupling, or the bolts and flange of a flanged coupling.
      7. Specify the wire diameter, OD, pitch, and length of a helical coil compression spring using appropriate software, and check buckling stability and natural frequency when appropriate.
    5. Use the appropriate mathematical formulas, design factors, and charts to produce an acceptable paper design of a transmission given the torque-speed requirements between two shafts of a transmission.
      1. Specify the belt cross-section, length, sheave diameters, and center-to-center distance for a belt drive.
      2. Specify the chain size, length, sprocket sizes, center-to center distance and lubrication for a roller chain drive.
      3. Specify number of teeth, diametral pitch, pitch diameter, and other dimensions for a gear drive.
      4. Create a layout drawing of a gear transmission using CAD software.
    6. Demonstrate General Education Concepts.
      1. Demonstrate Critical Thinking in Design.
        1. Obtain 80% accuracy in calculations, based on testing.
        2. Obtain 75% in problem setup such as Free Body Diagram, theory application, and assumptions, based on testing.
        3. Obtain 75% in inferential reasoning, whereby experience in a related problem solution carries over to the new problem, based on testing.
      2. Demonstrate skill to work on your own.
        1. Demonstrate reading skills and problem identification from the text.
        2. Demonstrate resourcefulness using the text, Internet, co-workers, other books or magazines, fellow students.
        3. Demonstrate self-motivation by surviving the online course, through weekly homework assignments.
  
  •  

    MT 290-299 - Special Projects in Mechanical Technology


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Music

  
  •  

    MUS 100 - Music Elements I

    Credits: 3
    Understand basic music elements such as rhythm, meter, form, melody and harmony through seeing, hearing and performing musical examples.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify musical elements.
      1. Listen and identify basic music elements.
      2. Describe and discuss various basic music elements.
    2. Demonstrate learned musical concepts effectively.
      1. Show comprehension by demonstrating various basic music concepts such as rhythm, meter, form, melody, and harmony effectively.
      2. Provide examples of various music elements through personal demonstration and/or recordings.
  
  •  

    MUS 103 - Music Composition

    Credits: 3
    Explains fundamentals of composition, including notation, melodic construction, melodic dictation, functional harmony, basic music theory and analysis. Uses knowledge of fundamentals to create a musical composition.

    Prerequisite(s): MUS 100  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Manipulate pitch and rhythm as they relate to the construction of melodic content.
      1. Construct basic melodic motives utilizing varying pitch degrees (scaler and intervallic).
      2. Construct intermediate melodic sentences by combining motivic ideas.
    2. Read, write, and perform basic melodic ideas.
      1. Show comprehension by demonstrating various basic melodies in their construction and content.
      2. Compare and contrast melodic ideas with respect to meters, modes, and melodic contour.
    3. Develop a comprehensive analysis of functional melody and harmony.
      1. Explore various compositions and provide a brief harmonic and melodic analysis.
      2. Employ analytical techniques to create a musical composition.
  
  •  

    MUS 110 - Music Elements II

    Credits: 3
    Continues study of basic music elements such as rhythm, meter, form, melody and harmony. Applies music elements to the communication of musical concepts.

    Prerequisite(s): MUS 100  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify musical elements.
      1. Listen and identify basic music elements.
      2. Describe and discuss various basic music elements.
    2. Demonstrate learned musical concepts effectively.
      1. Show comprehension by demonstrating various basic music concepts such as rhythm, meter, form, melody and harmony effectively.
      2. Provide examples of various music elements through personal demonstration and/or recordings.
    3. Develop a session for communicating musical elements.
      1. Explore various ways of demonstrating and communicating music elements.
      2. Prepare a short lesson explaining one of the musical elements.
  
  •  

    MUS 111 - Music Appreciation I

    Credits: 3
    Provides fundamentals of listening to and understanding of instrumental music (concerto, small ensemble). Presents basic principles for discussion as they relate to a variety of examples from classical, folk, and pop styles.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the elements of listening to music analytically.
      1. Define music/purposes of music.
      2. Define Melody, Harmony, Form, Color, and Rhythm.
      3. Characterize 3 major style sources (Folk, Art, Pop).
      4. Understand fundamental principles of acoustics:
        1. Four properties of sound (pitch, intensity, timbre, duration);
        2. How the harmonic series affects harmony and color;
        3. Source, Medium, and receiver.
    2. Demonstrate an awareness of the elements of music as applied to the composer.
      1. Understand how the composer works.
      2. Understand the Inspired, the Struggler, and the Craftsman approaches.
      3. Compare approaches among major composers.
      4. Compare among composer, arranger, and improviser.
      5. Understand major forms composers use: song, part forms, contrapuntal forms, developmental forms, variations, and multi-movement forms.
      6. Understand the instruments and mediums of musical expression.
    3. Demonstrate an awareness of elements of music as applied to the performer.
      1. Understand how the conductor works.
      2. Develop talent and self-discipline.
      3. Understand dramatic effects of music.
      4. Understand how the performance affects listeners.
    4. Demonstrate an awareness of the elements of music as applied to the listener.
      1. Differentiate between live and recorded music.
      2. Understand levels of listening; passive, sensory, emotional, perceptive, active.
      3. Understand music as a language.
      4. Identify major time periods of Western music.
      5. Identify recorded and live examples of music.
  
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    MUS 112 - Music Appreciation II

    Credits: 3
    Continued study of instrumental music (concerto small ensemble). Promotes an understanding of and for vocal forms (Opera, art, song, large choral work, i.e., oratorios, masses).

    Prerequisite(s): MUS 111  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the creative principles of music.
      1. Review the elements of music (Melody, Harmony, Form, Color, and Rhythm)
      2. Describe and define creativity
      3. Understand:
        1. Principle of 3 tenses of music
        2. Principle of balance in creativity
        3. Principles of process in the arts
        4. Principles of mood
        5. Principle of focus of musical ideas
        6. Principle of the many purposes of music
        7. Principle of humor in music
        8. Principle of “Art for the Heart”
        9. Principles of creative listening
        10. Principles of hearing and singing mechanisms
    2. Identify the major composers and stylistic features of Western music.
      1. Identify textures, and cultural background of:
        1. The Middle Ages
        2. The Renaissance
        3. The Baroque Period
        4. The Viennese Classical Period
        5. The Romantic Period
        6. The Twentieth Century
      2. Know the major composers from each of the above periods
      3. Analyze, outline, and discuss major compositions for their design and their social impacts.
  
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    MUS 118 - Jazz History: Origins to the Present

    Credits: 3
    Assists students in developing an interest in and respect for Jazz as an original American art form. Traces Jazz history from its theoretical origins to the present. Focuses on the evolutionary development of the music and the artists who brought about Jazz.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify different styles of jazz and the era they came from.
      1. Identify different song structures and instrumentations through an understanding of the origins of Jazz including New Orleans, African and non-African influences.
      2. Investigate Caribbean brass bands, New Orleans brass marching bands as well as African music.
      3. Analyze ensemble playing, collected improvising, the birth of Dixieland Jazz, the role of Jazz on society, and development of swing.
      4. Review the impact of records, popular music of the time, big bands, origins of Be-bop, development of small bands, and the radical departure of Be-bop.
      5. Identify some of the important figures of Jazz and their contributions to the Jazz movement. These would include King Oliver, Louis Armstrong, Jelly Roll Morton, Sidney Bechet, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Count Basie, Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, Sun Ra and Charles Mingus.
      6. Develop a respect and appreciation for the Jazz movement from its origins through the Swing era, Be-Bop, Hard bop and Cool Jazz, the Free Jazz Avant-Garde, and Fusion Jazz.
  
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    MUS 119W - The History of Rock and Roll: From Its Origins to 1980

    Credits: 3
    Develops an interest and respect for the origins and growth of Rock and Roll music in the United States and Europe through the focus on recordings and videos that documented its progress.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify rock music from different decades and regions, and the relationship of the musical and cultural forces that shaped it.
      1. Understand fundamental approaches and influences used in the development of rock music, and be able to identify song structures and instrumentation.
      2. Analyze ensemble playing and musical influences from different styles and recognize the similarities and differences.
      3. Review the cultural and political influences and the effect on the development of rock music.
    2. Research, access, and apply knowledge gained from this course.
      1. Access and apply readings from the text, Internet and magazine articles to the listening of the music in the form of written papers and classroom discussions.
      2. Analyze the music and develop an appreciation and respect for innovators of themusic and their musical influences.
      3. Research background information on different artists and relevant cultural influences that will help put the music into a historical context.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to listen effectively by reading and responding through writing and analysis of the music.
      1. Compose written critiques on each musical section, which include a discussion of song context, instrumentation and cultural backdrop.
      2. Identify some of the important individuals and groups, and their contributions to rock and roll. Some of the primary figures will include Bill Haley, Elvis Presley, Beatles, Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, Byrds, Pink Floyd and Can.
      3. Develop an understanding and appreciation of the differences between live and recorded music.
      4. Speak, write and formulate informed conclusions on musical pieces based on in class listening, discussion and evaluation.
      5. Compare and contrast the musical forms of different eras and regions.
    4. Tie the history and the evolution of rock and roll to the technological advancements in the music industry.
      1. Review the influences that media and technology has brought to the different phases of development of rock music.
      2. Analyze ensemble playing and the impact of amplification of the instruments to the music’s growth and its popularity.
      3. Review musical developments that have been the result of the development of radio, television and recording studio production.
      4. Discuss the concept of music as a carrier of social messages.
  
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    MUS 120W - World Music: Survey

    Credits: 3
    Develops an interest and respect for music from different countries and cultures by tracing the development and structures of non-European music forms through a focus on recordings and artists that have documented these unique musical traditions.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify the music of different cultures of the world and the countries or regions of its origin.
      1. Understand fundamental approaches and theories used by different cultures in their music, and identify the different song structures and instrumentation.
      2. Analyze ensemble playing and cross-cultural musical influences; and recognize the similarities and differences.
      3. Review the influences that language has on the basic rhythmic structure of a culture’s traditional music.
    2. Research, access, and apply knowledge gained in this course.
      1. Apply knowledge gained through reading the text to the listening of music, in the form of written papers, and class discussion.
      2. Research information that will help asosciate the music to culture of its origin and bring into context.
      3. Develop an appreciation and respect for the histories and traditions of the featured cultures through music by analyzing and comparing these to Western and European music forms.
    3. Listen effectively, read and respond through written and oral critique of the music.
      1. Compose written critiques on each type of music that ties an artist to a cultural form and timeframe.
      2. Identify some of the important musical figures of each culture and identify their contributions to the music of their respective cultures. These will include some of the following artists: Olatunji, Fela Kuti, Hamza El Din, Ravi Shankar, Ali Akbar Kahn, Hozan Yamahoto, Toru Takemitsu, Mercedes Sosa, and Carlos Nakai.
      3. Speak, write and formulate informal conclusions of musical pieces based on listening and in class discussion.
      4. Compare and contrast specific tunes from different cultures in the context of musical forms.
    4. Explore the concept of music as a universal language and how the media uses that language.
      1. Compare and contrast specific tunes from different cultures.
      2. Review the impact that recording technology has had on world music.
      3. Form knowledge of music as a vital part of every culture and its specific cultural uses.
      4. Explore the concept of sound as a form of communication and how technology uses sound to convey meaning.
    5. Participate through discussion, preparation and involvement in the classroom.
      1. Develop an interest in current events, local musical concepts and lectures, and Internet information.
      2. Demonstrate effort, grasp and quality of understanding.
      3. Demonstrate commitment by completing the assigned work on time.
  
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    MUS 126 - Music Theory I

    Credits: 3
    Identifies and composes basic musical patterns found in melody, harmony, and form. Writes basic intervals, scales, and triads in all major and minor keys. Identifies basic tonal melodies, harmonies, progressions and form. Course designed for music majors.

    Prerequisite(s): MUS 110  with a minimum grade of C or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in MUS 128  is recommended
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify basic musical patterns.
      1. Analyze tonal melodies.
      2. Identify tonal harmonies.
      3. Understand basic formal structures of music.
      4. Identify musical intervals.
      5. Identify tonal scales and triads.
    2. Compose examples of music using basic musical elements.
      1. Compose melodies using appropriate intervals.
      2. Compose tonal harmonies.
      3. Compose basic harmonic progressions with voice leading.
    3. Analyze basic written musical scores.
      1. Provide harmonic analysis for a basic tonal composition.
      2. Identify formal structural elements of a composition.
  
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    MUS 127 - Music Theory II

    Credits: 3
    Identifies advanced musical patterns found in melody, harmony, and form and those using intervals, scales and chords in all major and minor keys. Analyzes advanced musical compositions in order to comprehend harmony and form/structure. Composes advanced tonal melodies, harmonies, and progressions. Course designed for music majors.

    Prerequisite(s): MUS 126  with C or better or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in MUS 129  is recommended
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify advanced musical patterns.
      1. Analyze tonal melodies.
      2. Identify tonal harmonies.
      3. Understand advanced formal structures of music.
      4. Identify musical intervals.
      5. Identify tonal scales and triads.
    2. Compose music using advanced musical elements.
      1. Compose melodies using appropriate intervals.
      2. Compose tonal harmonies.
      3. Compose advanced harmonic progressions with voice leading.
    3. Analyze advanced written musical scores.
      1. Provide harmonic analysis for an advanced tonal composition.
      2. Identify formal structural elements of a composition.
  
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    MUS 128 - Musicianship Skills I

    Credits: 2
    Develops aural skills related to sight singing and ear training. Sings basic intervals, scales, melodies, and rhythm patterns from a score. Identifies intervals, scales, melodies, rhythmic patterns, and harmonic progressions from an auditory source. Uses knowledge to improve general musicianship skills. Course designed for music majors.

    Prerequisite(s): MUS 110  with C or better or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): MUS 126 
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Sing basic musical patterns.
      1. Sing all intervals within an octave.
      2. Sing tonal scales.
      3. Sing melodies from a score.
      4. Sing rhythm patterns.
    2. Identify basic musical elements by ear using music notation.
      1. Identify intervals by ear from an auditory source.
      2. Identify scales by ear from an auditory source.
      3. Identify melodies by ear from an auditory source.
      4. Identify rhythms by ear from an auditory source.
      5. Identify harmonic progressions by ear from an auditory source.
  
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    MUS 129 - Musicianship Skills II

    Credits: 2
    Develops aural skills related to sight singing and ear training. Sings advanced intervals, scales, melodies, and rhythm patterns from a score. Identifies advanced intervals, scales, melodies, rhythmic patterns, and harmonic progressions from an auditory source. Uses knowledge to improve general musicianship skills. Course designed for music majors.

    Prerequisite(s): MUS 128  with a C or better or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): MUS 127 
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Sing advanced musical patterns.
      1. Sing all intervals within an octave.
      2. Sing tonal scales.
      3. Sing melodies from a score.
      4. Sing rhythm patterns.
    2. Identify advanced musical elements by ear using music notation.
      1. Identify intervals by ear from an auditory source.
      2. Identify scales by ear from an auditory source.
      3. Identify melodies by ear from an auditory source.
      4. Identify rhythms by ear from an auditory source.
      5. Identify harmonic progressions by ear from an auditory source.
  
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    MUS 131 - Piano I

    Credits: 2
    Beginning class instruction leading to the ability to play melodies and accompanying chord patterns and rhythms.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Associate notes on the grand staff with the correct location on the keyboard.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of the letter names of notes on grand staff and ledger lines.
      2. Apply letter names to black and white keys on piano.
      3. Demonstrate ability to read notation and play on piano.
      4. Demonstrate ability to read by interval from note to note.
    2. Read and perform rhythm patterns.
      1. Identify time value names for notes.
      2. Demonstrate understanding of relative note value.
      3. Determine meter indicated by meter signature.
      4. Demonstrate ability to tap/play and count rhythms in simple and compound meter using eighth, quarter, dotted quarter, half, dotted half, and whole notes.
    3. Perform piano pieces in major and minor keys.
      1. Perform short pieces in 5-finger positions, alternating left and right hand.
      2. Perform short pieces in 5-finger positions, hands together, parallel or contrary motion.
      3. Perform short pieces in 5-finger positions, melody with accord.
      4. Perform short pieces including more than one hand position.
      5. Demonstrate understanding of tempo indications, style, and dynamics in performance.
    4. Develop technical skills for piano playing.
      1. Demonstrate proper sitting posture.
      2. Demonstrate correct arm, hand, and finger position.
      3. Develop coordination between the hands.
      4. Demonstrate ability to distribute notes on grand staff to left and right hands.
      5. Develop eye-hand coordination for reading and playing by direction and interval.
      6. Apply different touches-legato phrasing, staccato, accents, and varying dynamic levels f to p.
    5. Transpose melodies and harmonize a given melody.
      1. Use whole and half step patterns to build major and minor 5-finger patterns and triads.
      2. Play major scales in tetra chord patterns.
      3. Transpose a 5-finger melody or simple piece from the key it is written in to other keys.
      4. Use tonic and dominant tones or chords to harmonize a melody.
 

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