Jun 25, 2022  
2017-2018 
    
2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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MT 250 - Statics and Strength of Materials

Credits: 4
Studies forces acting on rigid bodies, including applications of these forces to practical design problems. Introduces and uses concepts of stress in tension, compression, torsion, and shear in various combinations.

Prerequisite(s): PHY 111  and MTH 121 
Corequisite(s): None
Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
Meets MTA Requirement: None
Pass/NoCredit: No

Outcomes and Objectives
  1. Analyze forces used in mechanical systems.
    1. Demonstrate the concepts of vectors and be able to calculate resultants of collinear, concurrent, and coplanar forces.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts of and calculate the summation of moments and forces, and free body diagrams to analyze the loading of machine components and structures.
  2. Calculate the shape functions of mechanical components.
    1. Demonstrate and apply the concepts of and calculate centroid to analyze and design machine components and structures.
    2. Demonstrate and apply the concepts of and calculate moment of inertia, to analyze and design machine components and structures.
    3. Demonstrate and apply the concepts of and calculate section modulus to analyze and design machine components and structures.
  3. Determine the geometry and material of mechanical components to withstand an applied load using stress or deflection design systems.
    1. Demonstrate the concepts of axial stress and strain to the design of machine members and structures. Use the tensile tst machine to compare actual stress and strain to theoretical values.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts of design factors, torsion, shear and bending moment diagrams, and deflection to the analysis and selection of uniform section beams, machine members, shafting, and structures.
    3. Demonstrate the concepts of axially loaded, uniform section, column formula design methods to the analysis and selection of columns for machine components and structures, including Euler, J. B. Johnson and AISC methods.
    4. Practice problems may include robotics, automation, and machinery.



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