Sep 26, 2022  
2017-2018 
    
2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Academic Career Experience

  
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    ACE 101W - Career Professional Development I

    Credits: 2
    Introduces planning and goal setting. Provides opportunities for team building. Practices skills essential in the workplace. Introduces employment portfolio to manage academic and career information. Evaluates the student in a program-related, supervised worksite.

    Prerequisite(s): Must be employed in a major-related position, and have completed the program application process in the Office of Academic Career Experience (Cooperative Education) and Service Learning.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 180
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Develop Academic Career Experience course plan and set goals.
      1. Establish workplace and educational goals.
      2. Demonstrate good attendance and punctuality.
    2. Begin development of an employment portfolio.
      1. Write a cover letter.
      2. Revise resume.
    3. Demonstrate confidence in presenting a professional image.
      1. Display appropriate dress and grooming for the respective worksite.
      2. Practice presenting professional credentials.
      3. Reflects through writing the experiences that build confidence and exemplify personal discovery.
    4. Demonstrate favorable work ethics.
      1. Analyze personal choices and responsibilities as they pertain to the workplace.
      2. Uphold organizational image in and out of the workplace setting.
    5. Cooperate within a team.
      1. Analyze prior teamwork experience.
      2. Infer meaning and course of action based on prior experience.
      3. Apply team-building skills to situations in the workplace.
      4. Assume the role of team member and contribute to team goals.
    6. Perform writing tasks to promote learning of concepts.
      1. Document attainment of skills learned.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of the subject.
    7. Manage stress through structured planning.
      1. Practice prioritizing workload.
      2. Arrange tasks according to priority rank.
      3. Divide tasks into smaller components and track progress of each component.
      4. Align work, educational and personal schedules to effectively meet goals.
      5. Track assignments, projects and job tasks in order to meet deadlines.
    8. Integrate into the organizational culture.
      1. Exemplify organizational values.
      2. Participate in organizational mission.
      3. Align workplace behaviors with organizational policies and procedures.
    9. Demonstrate an understanding of essential skills for success in chosen career.
      1. Identify essential skills necessary for career success.
      2. Compare one's own soft skills with requirements of job objective(s).
    10. Demonstrate an understanding of professional communication in the workplace.
      1. Identify professional workplace communication.
      2. Practice effective communication in the workplace.
  
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    ACE 102W - Career Professional Development II

    Credits: 2
    Continues from Career Professional Development I with additional responsibilities at the worksite. Explores work cultures and diversity. Develops team-building skills in a virtual setting. Continues development of employment portfolio and improves job interviewing skills. Continues practicing and developing essential skills necessary in the workplace. Evaluates the student in a program-related, supervised worksite.

    Prerequisite(s): ACE 101W  with a minimum grade of B. Must be employed in a major-related position, and have completed the program application process in the Office of Academic Career Experience (Cooperative Education) and Service Learning.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 180
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate sensitivity to diversity.
      1. Analyze diverse viewpoints in the workplace.
      2. Question assumptions, points of view, and expectations where appropriate.
      3. Resolve differences through compromise, assertiveness, or surrender where appropriate.
      4. Explore other workplace cultures.
    2. Demonstrate favorable work habits.
      1. Perform job tasks according to supervisor expectations.
      2. Demonstrate alignment with employer expectations.
      3. Demonstrate initiative, self-motivation, and self-management when appropriate.
    3. Produce and exchange professional communications.
      1. Apply listening skills and engagement strategies in verbal communications.
      2. Utilize appropriate vocabulary, tone, and terminology in all workplace communications.
      3. Maintain respect for self and others during verbal, electronic, written, and telephone communications.
    4. Continue development of employment portfolio.
      1. Revise resume.
      2. Identify appropriate work samples.
      3. Create a professional online profile.
    5. Perform writing tasks to promote learning of concepts.
      1. Document attainment of skills learned.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of the subject.
    6. Cooperate within a team.
      1. Apply team-building skills to situations in the workplace.
      2. Assume the role of a team member in a virtual setting and contribute to team goals.
      3. Apply leadership skills when appropriate.
      4. Investigate personal and collective successes and failures in team experiences.
    7. Demonstrate knowledge of the employment interview process.
      1. Identify different types of interview questions.
      2. Demonstrate how to respond effectively to interview questions.
      3. Demonstrate knowledge of proper follow-up techniques.
    8. Demonstrate continuous improvement in professional skill sets.
      1. Identify workplace competencies.
      2. Determine methods for self-assessment.
      3. Map achievement of workplace competencies.
      4. Plan goals for future professional development.
      5. Summarize the continuous improvements resulting from the Academic Career Experience.
    9. Demonstrate an understanding of transferable skills for success in chosen career.
      1. Practice problem-solving and critical thinking.
      2. Demonstrate creativity and innovation in the workplace.
  
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    ACE 201W - Career Work Experience - Business & Human Services

    Credits: 2
    Continues from Career Professional Development II with additional responsibilities at the worksite. Provides further opportunity to produce and exchange professional communications and demonstrate continuous improvement in professional skill sets. Integrates, reinforces, and documents the student’s academic studies with related career experience of at least 180 hours at an approved worksite. Evaluations are made by the employer/site supervisor and the college coordinator. Credit can be earned in ACE 201W, ACE 202W , ACE 203W  or ACE 204W  but not more than two courses (4 credits).

    Prerequisite(s): ACE 102W  with a minimum grade of “B”; must be employed in a major-related position.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 180
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate adaptability in varying work environments as assessed by immediate workplace supervisor’s observations and final evaluation analysis.
      1. Adapt and be productive with different types/levels of people, tasks, and responsibilities.
      2. Relocate from classroom to work environment while applying learned skills.
    2. Maintain control over actions to monitor and/or regulate processes, tasks, or activities and keep track of delegated assignments and projects as assessed by immediate workplace supervisor’s observations and final evaluation analysis.
      1. Establish priorities for given assignments, tasks, and projects.
      2. Establish follow-up procedures for delegated assignments, tasks, and projects.
      3. Complete all assignments, tasks, and projects according to set procedures and/or guidelines for given situation.
    3. Demonstrate employability skills as evaluated by immediate workplace supervisor’s observations and final evaluation analysis.
      1. Demonstrate proper work ethics.
      2. Handle workplace politics in a positive manner.
      3. Prioritize work load.
      4. Display good communication skills.
      5. Utilize team-building skills.
      6. Practice good attendance and punctuality skills.
      7. Display good customer relations skills.
      8. Display a professional demeanor.
    4. Perform writing tasks to promote learning of concepts.
      1. Write employment goals with worksite supervisor.
      2. Keep reflective journal entries.
      3. Write a report summarizing the continuous improvements resulting from the Academic Career Experience.
  
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    ACE 202W - Career Work Experience - Communications & Sciences

    Credits: 2
    Continues from Career Professional Development II with additional responsibilities at the worksite. Provides further opportunity to produce and exchange professional communications and demonstrate continuous improvement in professional skill sets. Integrates, reinforces, and documents the student’s academic studies with related career experience of at least 180 hours at an approved worksite. Evaluations are made by the employer/site supervisor and the college coordinator. Credit can be earned in ACE 201W , ACE 202W, ACE 203W  or ACE 204W  but not more than two courses (4 credits).

    Prerequisite(s): ACE 102W  with a minimum grade of “B”; must be employed in a major-related position.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 180
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate adaptability in varying work environments as assessed by immediate workplace supervisor’s observations and final evaluation analysis.
      1. Adapt and be productive with different types/levels of people, tasks, and responsibilities.
      2. Relocate from classroom to work environment while applying learned skills.
    2. Maintain control over actions to monitor and/or regulate processes, tasks, or activities and keep track of delegated assignments and projects as assessed by immediate workplace supervisor’s observations and final evaluation analysis.
      1. Establish priorities for given assignments, tasks, and projects.
      2. Establish follow-up procedures for delegated assignments, tasks, and projects.
      3. Complete all assignments, tasks, and projects according to set procedures and/or guidelines for given situation.
    3. Demonstrate employability skills as evaluated by immediate workplace supervisor’s observations and final evaluation analysis.
      1. Demonstrate proper work ethics.
      2. Handle workplace politics in a positive manner.
      3. Prioritize work load.
      4. Display good communication skills.
      5. Utilize team-building skills.
      6. Practice good attendance and punctuality skills.
      7. Display good customer relations skills.
      8. Display a professional demeanor.
    4. Perform writing tasks to promote learning of concepts.
      1. Write employment goals with worksite supervisor.
      2. Keep reflective journal entries.
      3. Write a report summarizing the continuous improvements resulting from the Academic Career Experience.
  
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    ACE 203W - Career Work Experience - Health

    Credits: 2
    Continues from Career Professional Development II with additional responsibilities at the worksite. Provides further opportunity to produce and exchange professional communications and demonstrate continuous improvement in professional skill sets. Integrates, reinforces, and documents the student’s academic studies with related career experience of at least 180 hours at an approved worksite. Evaluations are made by the employer/site supervisor and the college coordinator. Credit can be earned in ACE 201W , ACE 202W , ACE 203W or ACE 204W  but not more than two courses (4 credits).

    Prerequisite(s): ACE 102W  with a minimum grade of B; must be employed in a major-related position.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 180
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate adaptability in varying work environments as assessed by immediate workplace supervisor’s observations and final evaluation analysis.
      1. Adapt and be productive with different types/levels of people, tasks, and responsibilities.
      2. Relocate from classroom to work environment while applying learned skills.
    2. Maintain control over actions to monitor and/or regulate processes, tasks, or activities and keep track of delegated assignments and projects as assessed by immediate workplace supervisor’s observations and final evaluation analysis.
      1. Establish priorities for given assignments, tasks, and projects.
      2. Establish follow-up procedures for delegated assignments, tasks, and projects.
      3. Complete all assignments, tasks, and projects according to set procedures and/or guidelines for given situation.
    3. Demonstrate employability skills as evaluated by immediate workplace supervisor’s observations and final evaluation analysis.
      1. Demonstrate proper work ethics.
      2. Handle workplace politics in a positive manner.
      3. Prioritize work load.
      4. Display good communication skills.
      5. Utilize team-building skills.
      6. Practice good attendance and punctuality skills.
      7. Display good customer relations skills.
      8. Display a professional demeanor.
    4. Perform writing tasks to promote learning of concepts.
      1. Write employment goals with worksite supervisor.
      2. Keep reflective journal entries.
      3. Write a report summarizing the continuous improvements resulting from the Academic Career Experience.
  
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    ACE 204W - Career Work Experience - Technical & Industrial

    Credits: 2
    Continues from Career Professional Development II with additional responsibilities at the worksite. Provides further opportunity to produce and exchange professional communications and demonstrate continuous improvement in professional skill sets. Integrates, reinforces, and documents the student’s academic studies with related career experience of at least 180 hours at an approved worksite. Evaluations are made by the employer/site supervisor and the college coordinator. Credit can be earned in ACE 201W , ACE 202W , ACE 203W  or ACE 204W but not more than two courses (4 credits).

    Prerequisite(s): ACE 102W  with a minimum grade of “B”; must be employed in a major-related position.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 180
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate adaptability in varying work environments as assessed by immediate workplace supervisor’s observations and final evaluation analysis.
      1. Adapt and be productive with different types/levels of people, tasks, and responsibilities.
      2. Relocate from classroom to work environment while applying learned skills.
    2. Maintain control over actions to monitor and/or regulate processes, tasks, or activities and keep track of delegated assignments and projects as assessed by immediate workplace supervisor’s observations and final evaluation analysis.
      1. Establish priorities for given assignments, tasks, and projects.
      2. Establish follow-up procedures for delegated assignments, tasks, and projects.
      3. Complete all assignments, tasks, and projects according to set procedures and/or guidelines for given situation.
    3. Demonstrate employability skills as evaluated by immediate workplace supervisor’s observations and final evaluation analysis.
      1. Demonstrate proper work ethics.
      2. Handle workplace politics in a positive manner.
      3. Prioritize work load.
      4. Display good communication skills.
      5. Utilize team-building skills.
      6. Practice good attendance and punctuality skills.
      7. Display good customer relations skills.
      8. Display a professional demeanor.
    4. Perform writing tasks to promote learning of concepts.
      1. Write employment goals with worksite supervisor.
      2. Keep reflective journal entries.
      3. Write a report summarizing the continuous improvements resulting from the Academic Career Experience.
  
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    ACE 280W - Internship: Technology Management

    Credits: 1
    Integrates, reinforces, and documents the student’s academic studies with related career experience of at least 180 hours at an approved worksite. Evaluations are made by the employer/site supervisor and the college coordinator.

    Prerequisite(s): (1) Majoring in construction management, industrial supervision, manufacturing industrial technology, or lean manufacturing, (2) employed in a major-related placement and (3) completed the program application process in the Office of Academic Career Experience (Cooperative Education) and Experiential Learning.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 180
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate adaptability in varying work environments as assessed by immediate workplace supervisor’s observations and final evaluation analysis to the Office of Academic Career Experience (Cooperative Education) and Experiential Learning.
      1. Adapt and be productive with different types/levels of people, tasks, and responsibilities.
      2. Relocate from classroom to work environment while applying learned skills.
    2. Maintain control over actions to monitor and/or regular processes, tasks, or activities and keep track of delegated assignments and projects environments as assessed by immediate workplace supervisor’s observations and final evaluation analysis to the Office of Academic Career Experience (Cooperative Education) and Experiential Learning.
      1. Establish priorities for given assignments, tasks, and projects.
      2. Establish follow-up procedures for delegated assignments, tasks, and projects.
      3. Complete all assignments, tasks, and projects according to set procedures and/or guidelines for given situation.
    3. Demonstrate employability skills as evaluated by immediate workplace supervisor’s observations and final evaluation analysis.
      1. Demonstrate proper work ethics.
      2. Handle workplace politics in a positive manner.
      3. Prioritize work load.
      4. Utilize good telephone skills.
      5. Utilize team-building skills.
      6. Practice good attendance and punctuality skills.
      7. Display good customer relations skills.
      8. Speak clearly, project voice sufficiently to be heard, employ appropriate non-verbal communication, and utilize appropriate vocabulary.
      9. Pay attention and listen carefully and respectfully, and filter out some messages and focus on others.
      10. Make sense of a message.
      11. Act appropriately and effectively based on given information.
    4. Perform writing tasks to promote learning of concepts.
      1. Keep journal entries of daily routines and procedures done on the job.
      2. Write a two-page report on meeting with supervisor after “Abilities Ranking” was done by supervisor/student.
  
  •  

    ACE 285W - Internship: Design Technology

    Credits: 1
    Integrates, reinforces, and documents the student’s academic studies with related career experience of at least 180 hours at an approved worksite. Evaluations are made by the employer/site supervisor and the college coordinator.

    Prerequisite(s): (1) Majoring in architectural technology, CAD, residential construction, RHA, CNC technology, mechanical engineering technology, machine tool, manufacturing/welding engineering technology or similar program of study, (2) employed in a major-related placement, and (3) completed the program application process in the Office of Academic Career Experience (Cooperative Education) and Experiential Learning.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 180
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate adaptability in varying work environments as assessed by immediate workplace supervisor’s observations and final evaluation analysis to the 0ffice of Academic Career Experience (Cooperative Education) and Experiential Learning.
      1. Adapt and be productive with different types/levels of people, tasks, and responsibilities.
      2. Relocate from classroom to work environment while applying learned skills.
    2. Maintain control over actions to monitor and/or regular processes, tasks, or activities and keep track of delegated assignments and projects environments as assessed by immediate workplace supervisor’s observations and final evaluation analysis to the Academic Career Experience (Cooperative Education) and Experiential Learning.
      1. Establish priorities for given assignments, tasks, and projects.
      2. Establish follow-up procedures for delegated assignments, tasks, and projects.
      3. Complete all assignments, tasks, and projects according to set procedures and/or guidelines for given situation.
    3. Demonstrate employability skills as evaluated by immediate workplace supervisor’s observations and final evaluation analysis.
      1. Demonstrate proper work ethics.
      2. Handle workplace politics in a positive manner.
      3. Prioritize work load.
      4. Utilize good telephone skills.
      5. Utilize team-building skills.
      6. Practice good attendance and punctuality skills.
      7. Display good customer relations skills.
      8. Speak clearly, project voice sufficiently to be heard, employ appropriate non-verbal communication, and utilize appropriate vocabulary.
      9. Pay attention and listen carefully and respectfully, and filter out some messages and focus on others.
      10. Make sense of a message.
      11. Act appropriately and effectively based on given information.
    4. Perform writing tasks to promote learning of concepts.
      1. Keep journal entries of daily routines and procedures done on the job.
      2. Write a two-page report on meeting with supervisor after “Abilities Ranking” was done by supervisor/student.
  
  •  

    ACE 290-299 - Special Projects in Academic Career Experience

    Credits: N/A
    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Accounting

  
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    ACC 110 - Introduction to QuickBooks

    Credits: 1
    Introduces the use of QuickBooks to assist in the basic accounting function in a small business or office environment. This course is appropriate for students desiring these skills and/or in office systems, small business management, trades or medical programs.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 2 and CST 103  or equivalent computer background
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate a working knowledge of basic data entry functions in QuickBooks software.
      1. Identify various sources and documents regarding accounts payable.
      2. Perform data entry for processing accounts payable.
      3. Identify various source documents regarding accounts receivable.
      4. Perform data entry for processing accounts receivable.
      5. Process cash reconciliation.
    2. Demonstrate the production of appropriate outputs regarding accounts payable and accounts receivable in QuickBooks.
      1. Produce checks from QuickBooks.
      2. Run accounts payable reports.
      3. Process deposits and other receipts.
      4. Run accounts receivable reports.
      5. Run reports for reconciliation.
    3. Demonstrate the production of appropriate reports from QuickBooks for an office environment.
      1. Produce monthly reports for documentation of transactions.
      2. Produce monthly cash-based financial statements.
  
  •  

    ACC 111 - Introductory Accounting

    Credits: 4
    Practices basic accounting procedures including journalizing, posting, preparation of financial statements, special journals, subsidiary ledgers, petty cash fund, bank reconciliation, and payroll accounting. Not recommended if credit has already been earned in ACC 211 .

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of the role of accounting in business.
      1. Define accounting and explain its relevance for business.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of the effect of transactions on the basic accounting equation.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of the interrelationship of the financial statements.
    2. Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of the accounting cycle.
      1. Explain the organization of a chart of accounts.
      2. Record transactions using the rules of debit and credit.
      3. Post from a journal to a ledger and prepare a trial balance.
      4. Prepare basic adjusting entries and an adjusted trial balance.
      5. Prepare financial statements from an adjusted trial balance.
      6. Journalize and post closing entries and prepare a post-closing trial balance.
    3. Describe procedures for control of cash.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of basic bank reconciliations.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of petty cash procedures.
    4. Describe payroll concepts and procedures.
      1. Calculate and journalize employee gross pay, tax withholdings, and net pay.
      2. Calculate and journalize employer payroll taxes.
      3. Demonstrate knowledge of payroll records.
    5. Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of accounting for merchandising firms.
      1. Describe the specific accounts used by merchandising firms.
      2. Prepare basic journal entries for merchandising firms.
      3. Describe the use of the accounts receivable and accounts payable ledgers.
      4. Prepare classified financial statements for merchandising firms.
    6. Recognize the role of ethics in the business environment.
      1. Describe the social and ethical responsibility of financial managers to stockholders and society.
      2. Indicate and discuss ethical situations in finance.
  
  •  

    ACC 121 - Accounting for Managers

    Credits: 3
    Develops ability to use accounting information in planning, evaluating and decision-making as a business manager. This course is appropriate for students in business, trades, and dual-degree programs. May be substituted for ACC 111  in most programs.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe the use and role of accounting for business.
      1. Describe the importance of accounting information in business planning, evaluation, and decision-making.
      2. Demonstrate use of basic accounting terminology.
      3. Describe the importance of ethics in accounting and business management.
    2. Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of the financial statements and related concepts.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of accrual and other underlying accounting concepts.
      2. Demonstrate preparation of financial statements and their inter-relationships.
      3. Recognize the impact of transactions and accounting procedures on the financial statements.
      4. Recognize the impact of transactions and accounting procedures on managing a business.
    3. Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of analysis and use of financial information for managerial decision-making.
      1. Demonstrate the use of financial statement analysis techniques for evaluation of business performance.
      2. Demonstrate understanding of business cost concepts and behaviors.
      3. Demonstrate use of financial information for business planning.
  
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    ACC 211 - Principles of Financial Accounting

    Credits: 4
    Introduces basic concepts of accounting principles. Includes the accounting cycle for service and merchandising businesses, internal control, accounting for current assets, long-term assets, current liabilities, and owner’s equity. Recommended for transfer students.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and MATH LEVEL 4 or “B-” or higher in MGT 110  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Apply accounting concepts and principles.
      1. Describe and utilize the assumptions and principles in financial reporting.
      2. Explain characteristics of useful information to meet stakeholder requirements and reporting standards.
      3. Describe the role of the accountant in the broader business environment.
      4. Explain accounting terminology and its use in the broader business context.
    2. Describe the preparation and use of financial statements for strategic decision-making.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the interrelationship of the financial statements.
      2. Characterize the users and the uses of financial information displayed in the financial statements.
      3. Describe the elements and purpose of each of the required financial statements.
      4. Prepare a multistep income statement, retained earnings statement, and classified balance sheet.
      5. Interpret the results presented in financial statements.
    3. Illustrate the use of the accounting information system.
      1. Perform the basic steps in the accounting information system.
      2. Evaluate business events and their impact on the entity’s financial position and operating results.
      3. Recognize the process of the accounting system and its relationship to double-entry accounting and accrual-based financial statements.
    4. Associate accounting methods and procedures with financial position and operating results.
      1. Demonstrate the appropriate accounting treatment for assets, liabilities, and equity.
      2. Explain the effects of various accounting methods on the financial statements.
      3. Prepare information for financial statements according to appropriate accounting methods for current and long-term assets, current and long-term liabilities, and equity accounts.
      4. Describe the application and results of accounting methods and procedures to service and merchandising businesses.
    5. Explain internal controls and ethics in relation to the business environment.
      1. Discuss common ethical dilemmas in the business environment.
      2. Describe ethical standards as they apply to the accounting profession and accounting information.
      3. Explain internal controls for the accounting information system, compliance, and information reliability.
      4. Recognize internal controls for safeguarding assets.
    6. Recognize diverse alternative career paths through the exploration of accounting specialties.
      1. Describe the profession of accounting and explain the related work activities within the specialized fields of accounting.
      2. Identify and recognize the professional certifications available in accounting careers.
      3. Describe the role of the accountant in the broader business environment.
    7. Associate accounting methods and procedures with financial position and operating results.
      1. Demonstrate the appropriate treatment of accounting for equity.
      2. Consider the disclosure and presentation of sustainable income and irregular items on the income statement.
  
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    ACC 212 - Principles of Managerial Accounting

    Credits: 4
    Includes a study of corporate basic theory and methodology, statement of cash flows, accounting for manufacturing operations, and accounting data as used in performance measurement, decision making, planning, and control.

    Prerequisite(s): ACC 211  with a C (2.0) minimum grade
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe the preparation and use of financial statements.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the interrelationship of the statement of cash flows to the income statement and balance sheet.
      2. Prepare the statement of cash flows and related financial information.
      3. Describe the elements and purpose of the statement of cash flows.
      4. Describe the expanded elements of the corporate income statement.
    2. Illustrate and analyze an entity’s liquidity, solvency, and profitability.
      1. Apply basic tools in financial statement analysis to highlight the significance of financial statement data.
      2. Practice skills to render analysis based on available business information.
      3. Present analysis results to aid in judging operating performance and financial position.
    3. Apply basic elements of managerial and manufacturing accounting for strategic decision-making.
      1. Contrast managerial and financial accounting by identifying distinguisging features of managerial accounting.
      2. Associate the broad functions of management with the role of the accountant.
      3. Describe the elements of the manufacturing income statement.
    4. Explain the purposes and characteristics of cost accounting.
      1. Describe the cost flows of a manufacturing accounting system.
      2. Differentiate the uses and users of various costing systems.
      3. Account for product costs using various costing systems.
      4. Prepare product costing information associated with related management decisions.
    5. Illustrate the significance of cost behaviors.
      1. Explain the characteristics of cost behaviors.
      2. Calculate mixed costs using associated costs and methods.
      3. Complete cost-volume-profit analysis and related decision-making.
      4. Prepare the income statement in the contribution format.
    6. Describe the planning and control process as it relates to the business environment.
      1. Demonstrate the process of effective budgeting.
      2. Describe the concept of budgetary control and responsibility accounting.
      3. Prepare performance reports presenting variances to aid in controlling operations.
      4. Compute variances in a standard costing environment.
    7. Explain tools used in the decision-making process.
      1. Display effective problem solving and decision-making skills.
      2. Associate relevant costs with decision making.
      3. Use the capital budgeting process to make effective decisions.
  
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    ACC 214 - Computerized Accounting

    Credits: 3
    Introduces microcomputer applications in general ledger, accounts receivable, accounts payable, payroll, and inventory/invoicing. Develops electronic spreadsheet applications using appropriate software. Outside laboratory assignments are required.

    Prerequisite(s): CST 133W  or CST 134  with a “C” or better and ACC 211  with a “C” or better
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use the basic components and operating characteristics of a typical small computer system.
      1. Manage files using various drives and the Internet.
      2. Access applications using the current operating system.
      3. Describe the use and benefits of a computer system for accountants.
      4. Describe the Accounting Information System in a business context.
    2. Apply basic accounting concepts and procedures.
      1. Use account normal balances to prepare journal entries.
      2. Use the accounting cycle to process transactions to financial statement.
      3. Apply basic accounting principles to process accounting information in an electronic format.
      4. Apply accounting procedures and methodologies through proper presentation of financial statements.
    3. Use an integrated accounting software package.
      1. Accomplish data entry of business accounting transactions.
      2. Process transactions involving the general ledger and various subsidiary ledgers.
      3. Produce financial statements and other accounting reports.
      4. Process typical transactions for service and merchandising business through the accounting cycle.
      5. Find and correct errors.
      6. Apply knowledge of accounting procedures and methodologies through completion of various accounting projects.
    4. Demonstrate a basic working knowledge of spreadsheet software as it integrates with accounting software.
      1. Present worksheet information appropriately.
      2. Manage multiple worksheets within one or more workbook.
      3. Demonstrate knowledge of accounting procedures and methodologies through presentation of financial statements.
  
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    ACC 215W - Federal Tax Accounting

    Credits: 3
    Studies the Federal income tax law. Emphasizes core income tax principles and relates them to individual and business entity applications. Includes preparation of individual and business entity tax returns.

    Prerequisite(s): ACC 212  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe an introduction to taxation.
      1. Identify several types of common taxes imposed on individuals, corporations, and partnerships at both the federal and state levels.
      2. Describe the reasons for and uses of tax revenue at the government level.
      3. Describe the guiding principles of tax planning.
    2. Identify and apply processes involved in working with the tax law.
      1. Identify the primary sources of tax law.
      2. Perform tax research on an introductory spectrum of tax issues.
      3. Apply the steps in effective tax research and communication.
      4. Recognize the nature of tax research coverage on the CPA examination.
    3. Describe and apply the tax concept of gross income.
      1. Apply tax formulas in deriving income tax liability.
      2. Describe the timing of income recognition.
      3. Identify and analyze specific taxable income items.
      4. Identify and analyze specific nontaxable income items.
      5. Discuss tax planning strategies regarding various income items.
    4. Describe and apply the tax concepts of business deductions and losses.
      1. Describe the timing of expense and loss deductibility.
      2. Identify and analyze specific deductible expense and loss items.
      3. Identify and analyze specific nondeductible expense and loss items.
      4. Apply cost recovery principles in computing depreciation deductions.
      5. Discuss tax planning strategies regarding various deduction items.
    5. Describe and apply the concepts associated with property transactions.
      1. Explain the concept of, and calculate, basis relating to property transactions.
      2. Calculate gain or loss on disposition of property.
      3. Differentiate between taxable property transactions and nontaxable exchanges and conversions.
      4. Determine gain or loss classification upon disposition of property for noncorporate taxpayers.
      5. Determine gain or loss classification upon disposition of property for corporate taxpayers.
      6. Discuss tax planning strategies regarding disposition of property.
    6. Describe and analyze the tax issues of business entities.
      1. Describe and analyze the different types of business formation and the rationale involved in choosing a structure.
      2. Explain the tax consequences of the various types of business formation.
      3. Corporations:
        1. Describe corporate formation, structure, operational issues, and procedural matters.
        2. Prepare basic tax returns.
        3. Explain the accounting for income taxes in the financial statements.
      4. Partnerships and Limited Liability Entities:
        1. Describe partnership formation and operational issues.
        2. Prepare basic tax returns.
      5. Subchapter S Corporations:
        1. Describe Subchapter S qualification requirements.
        2. Describe Subchapter S operational issues.
        3. Prepare basic tax returns.
    7. Describe and analyze the tax issues of individuals.
      1. Explain and analyze personal and dependency exemptions.
      2. Calculate tax liability using the tax formulas and tables.
      3. Identify items of includible and excludible income relevant to individuals.
      4. Identify certain itemized deductions available to individuals.
      5. Identify and explain issues regarding self-employed individuals.
      6. Prepare basic tax returns.
  
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    ACC 216W - Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA)

    Credits: 2
    Provides instruction in preparation of federal, state, and local individual income tax returns and uses practical experience in the preparation of these returns. Provides service to qualifying citizens within the tri-county district by preparing tax forms and filing electronically. Requires 30 hours of service-learning.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 4 and READING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe and analyze the characteristics of federal, state, and local income tax returns.
      1. Identify and analyze key components of all federal income tax returns (filing requirements, filing status, personal exemptions).
      2. Identify and analyze common federal taxable income and deduction items.
      3. Identify and analyze common federal tax credits.
      4. Identify and analyze components of state and local income tax returns.
      5. Demonstrate efficiency with, and knowledge of, income tax filing software.
      6. Demonstrate efficiency with and knowledge of, IRS online training modules.
    2. Prepare federal, state, and local income tax returns for individual taxpayers.
      1. Identify relevant tax issues for specific taxpayers through interview process.
      2. Prepare federal, state, and local income tax returns using tax filing software.
      3. Identify and correct tax preparation errors through self-review process.
      4. Apply constructive feedback from quality review personnel.
    3. Communicate personal reflections pertaining to experience in the program.
      1. Explain the concept of service-learning.
      2. Describe experiences obtained during the tax season.
      3. Discuss personal and professional implications of the course.
  
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    ACC 227W - Intermediate Accounting I

    Credits: 4
    Includes a study of accounting processes, theory, and principles. Includes financial statement presentation, revenue recognition, evaluation of current assets, property plant and equipment, intangible assets, and time value of money. Designed for transfer.

    Prerequisite(s): ACC 212  with a “C” (2.0) minimum grade or equivalent.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe the conceptual framework environment of Financial Accounting.
      1. Identify and describe standard-setting entities in the accounting field.
      2. Identify the major financial statements and their usefulness in financial decision making.
      3. Apply generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) to financial accounting.
    2. Provide useful and effective financial statements in an accrual basis accounting system.
      1. Accurately perform steps in the accounting information system.
      2. Analyze a variety of business transactions.
      3. Analyze results of operations.
      4. Identify special line items and required disclosures to the financial statements.
    3. Identify internal control procedures.
      1. Describe appropriate controls for assets.
      2. Evaluate alternative methods and apply appropriate valuation methods to assets of the entity.
    4. Explore alternative decisions for making written and verbal recommendations to users.
      1. Apply time value of money concepts.
      2. Use critical thinking, problem solving, and ethical principles to assist in making recommendations to users.
      3. Apply qualitative characteristics of accounting within the conceptual framework.
    5. Assess current developments in accounting theory and practice.
      1. Use authoritative pronouncements, professional literature, and other resources to solve accounting problems.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of the federal tax laws and their impact on the financial statements as they relate to assets.
      3. Develop the ability to apply technology as it impacts the accounting profession.
    6. Exhibit a desire for professional growth and improvement of performance as a professional accountant.
      1. Communicate accurately and effectively, both verbally and in writing, with clients, customers, co-workers, and supervisors in the workplace.
      2. Plan and prepare for employment, education, and career advancement.
      3. Apply the standards of ethical conduct to students’ personal and professional lives.
  
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    ACC 228W - Intermediate Accounting II

    Credits: 4
    Presents accounting for current liabilities, stockholders’ equity, EPS, income taxes, pensions, leases, long-term liabilities, and the statement of cash flows. Designed for transfer.

    Prerequisite(s): ACC 227W  with a “C” (2.0) minimum grade or equivalent.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Provide useful and effective financial statements in an accrual basis accounting system.
      1. Accurately evaluate and record transactions relating to the equity structure of the entity.
      2. Analyze business transactions related to all classifications of liabilities and the appropriate forms of valuation.
      3. Analyze results of cash flows.
      4. Apply generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) to financial accounting.
    2. Identify special financial statement items.
      1. Identify and describe financial and taxable income as it relates to taxes and their impact on the financial statements.
      2. Evaluate alternative methods and apply appropriate valuation methods to account for pensions and post-retirement benefits.
      3. Explain the nature, economic substance, and advantages of lease transactions and use the appropriate method to account for these transactions.
    3. Explore alternative decisions for making written and verbal recommendations to users.
      1. Analyze the impact to the financial statements of accounting changes and errors.
      2. Use critical thinking, problem solving, and ethical principles to assist in making recommendations to users.
      3. Apply qualitative characteristics of accounting within the conceptual framework.
    4. Assess current developments in accounting theory and practice.
      1. Use authoritative pronouncements, professional literature, and other resources to solve accounting problems.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of the federal tax laws and their impact on the financial statements as they relate to liablilities and equity.
      3. Develop the ability to apply technology as it impacts the accounting profession.
    5. Exhibit a desire for professional growth and improvement of performance as a professional accountant.
      1. Communicate accurately and effectively, both orally and in writing, with clients, customers, co-workers, and supervisors in the workplace.
      2. Plan and prepare for employment, education, and career advancement.
      3. Apply the standards of ethical conduct to students’ personal and professional lives.
  
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    ACC 229 - Practical Intermediate Accounting

    Credits: 2
    Presents accounting for assets, liabilities, and equity through practical application. Focuses on supporting schedules and reconciliation of the items in the financial statements. Opportunities are provided to practice quality internal control procedures.

    Prerequisite(s): ACC 212  with a “C” (2.0) minimum grade
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Critically assess and execute the steps in the accounting cycle.
      1. Perform steps accurately in the accounting information system .
      2. Record a variety of business transactions.
      3. Use software to complete end-of-period reports.
    2. Demonstrate practical applications related to financial statement items.
      1. Complete supporting schedules and reconciliations accurately.
      2. Understand requirements for timely reporting to various outside entities.
      3. Communicate results and/or resolution to financial statement items.
    3. Identify internal control procedures.
      1. Understand the audit process and the professional’s role in the process.
      2. Describe appropriate controls for assets.
      3. Maintain documents supporting internal control procedures.
    4. Describe growth and improvement opportunities for accounting professionals.
      1. Communicate accurately and effectively, both verbally and in writing, with clients, customers, co-workers, and supervisors in the workplace.
      2. Plan and prepare for employment, education, and career advancement.
      3. Apply the standards of ethical conduct to students’ personal and professional lives.
  
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    ACC 230 - Operational Business Taxes

    Credits: 2
    Provides practical training regarding various federal, state, and local operational business taxes. Focuses on filing requirements and completion of appropriate forms through use of technology.

    Prerequisite(s): ACC 212  with a “C” (2.0) minimum grade
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe governing authorities and legislative processes relating to common business taxes.
      1. Identify federal taxing authorities and legislative processes.
    2. Describe and analyze common business taxes.
      1. Identify common types of federal, state, and local business taxes.
      2. Identify online and print resource guidance for common federal, state, and local business taxes.
      3. Analyze and interpret legislative guidance for common federal, state, and local business taxes.
    3. Prepare common business tax filings using appropriate forms and technology.
      1. Identify filing and payment methods of common federal, state, and local business tax obligations.
      2. Identify, analyze, and use paper and electronic methods to prepare common federal, state, and local business tax filings.
  
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    ACC 233 - Managerial Cost Accounting

    Credits: 3
    Relates principles and methods of handling materials, labor costs, and manufacturing expenses to the formulation of reports to management. Includes job order, process, standard, direct and budgetary costing procedures.

    Prerequisite(s): ACC 212  with a C (2.0) minimum grade.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Prepare accounting information that supports manufacturing operation decision-making.
      1. Explain basic cost accounting concepts and procedures.
      2. Calculate product costs using standard, Job order, process, variable, and ABC costing methods.
      3. Record product cost transactions and results with various costing systems.
      4. Describe the use, flow of costs, and appropriate business environment for each method.
      5. Compare the use and results for each method.
      6. Explain customer and product profitability analysis.
    2. Explain how cost behaviors affect cost management.
      1. Prepare CVP-analysis calculations and procedures.
      2. Prepare and interpret the Contribution Income Statement format.
      3. Describe cost behavior concepts in the larger business decision making context.
    3. Describe the business financial planning process.
      1. Describe factors related to projecting business activity and predictive accounting.
      2. Prepare budgets for various types of entities.
      3. Explain the use and importance of budgets in the business planning and performance process.
    4. Apply procedures used for controlling costs.
      1. Apply flexible budget processes and concepts.
      2. Explain the use of spending and activity cost variances in controlling cost, budgets, and forecasts.
      3. Calculate and interpret variances in a standard costing system.
      4. Explain the use of standard cost variances in controlling costs.
    5. Interpret accounting information to support decision-making.
      1. Explain relevant costs.
      2. Apply relevant cost calculations to business decisions.
      3. Explain the use of financial information in the larger business decision making context.
    6. Explain performance measurement tools in a decentralized environment.
      1. Describe Responsibility accounting concepts and procedures.
      2. Prepare calculations for measuring manufacturing processes.
    7. Integrate managerial accounting concepts and procedures with the work of management.
      1. Apply managerial accounting concepts and procedures to business situations and problems.
      2. Use technology to prepare financial information that supports the work of management.
      3. Practice appropriate communication skills through written and oral presentation opportunities.
      4. Explain the career opportunities and certification process in management accounting.
    8. Demonstrate the master budget and its components.
      1. Prepare a master budget and the components involved.
      2. Use the master budget to explain the importance and use of planning to manage costs in an organization.
    9. Demonstrate overhead analysis using flexible budgets.
      1. Prepare a flexible budget, and explain the advantages of the flexible budget approach over the static budget approach.
      2. Use the flexible budget to prepare an overhead performance report containing spending variances.
      3. Explain how flexible budgets can be used in a company that employs activity-based costing.
      4. Compute and properly interpret the fixed overhead budget and volume variances.
      5. Explain how variances can be presented on the income statement for management’s use.
    10. Describe decision-making using segment reporting.
      1. Prepare a segmented income statement using the contribution format.
      2. Use the segmented income statement for decision-making.
      3. Compute and use ROI for decision-making.
  
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    ACC 235 - Financial Management

    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ACC 212  with a C (2.0) minimum. An introduction to the basic concepts of financial management. Includes goals and functions of financial management, financial forecasting, leverage, working capital management, time value of money, stock and bond valuation, cost of capital, capital budgeting, and concept of risk.

    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: ACC 212  with a C (2.0) minimum.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Recognize the goals and functions of financial management and alternative career paths in finance.
      1. Describe the field of finance and the role of the financial manager in the broader business environment.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of the job opportunities and work activities within the specialized fields of finance.
    2. Identify and apply financial models of analysis and planning in a business setting.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of financial forecasting and its uses in business.
      2. Evaluate operating and financial leverage and the impact of leverage on business decisions.
    3. Recognize and apply financial concepts related to working capital management.
      1. Describe the impact of working capital decisions in financial management.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of current asset management.
      3. Demonstrate knowledge of the sources and costs of short-term financing.
    4. Recognize and interpret financial concepts of the capital budgeting process.
      1. Apply concepts of time value of money to capital budgeting decisions.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of the valuation of stocks and bonds.
      3. Describe the cost of capital and its impact on capital budgeting decisions.
      4. Evaluate various capital budgeting techniques.
      5. Describe the impact of risk in the decision-making process.
    5. Recognize the role of ethics in the business environment.
      1. Describe the social and ethical responsibility of financial managers to stockholders and society.
      2. Indicate and discuss ethical situations in finance.
  
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    ACC 285 - Professional Accounting Careers

    Credits: 2
    Includes development of career materials to illustrate professionalism and accounting skills, and an integrated capstone accounting project. Recommended to be taken in the last semester of a student’s accounting program.

    Prerequisite(s): ACC 227W  with a C or better or permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the use of appropriate computer resources for the accounting profession.
      1. Use appropriate computer applications to prepare and analyze accounting work.
      2. Demonstrate the results of research concerning accounting career options, certification, job search techniques, and tools using the Internet and other sources.
      3. Develop a career/learning portfolio and other job seeking-tools using appropriate technology.
    2. Illustrate proof of learning based on Accounting Program outcomes.
      1. Use basic accounting concepts and terminology.
      2. Demonstrate an ability to process transactions in a paper or electronic accounting information system resulting in preparation of financial statements.
      3. Apply financial decision-making tools to various business problems or situations.
      4. Interpret Annual Report content.
    3. Demonstrate professionalism appropriate to the accounting profession.
      1. Practice oral and written presentation and communication skills.
      2. Research opportunities and practice networking.
      3. Practice collaboration for projects and tasks.
  
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    ACC 290-299 - Special Projects in Accounting


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Agriculture

  
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    AGR 105 - Introduction to Agriculture

    Credits: 1


    Explores the agricultural industry from a historical and modern day perspective. Investigates the broad range of career opportunities in agriculture in the local, regional, and global environment. Explores ethical issues in agriculture including the environment and sustainablilty. Credit may be earned in AGR 105 or SKAG 105  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Explore careers in the agricultural industry

        A.        Explore the opportunities in the various agricultural industries

        B.        Discuss the necessary training and educational requirements in agricultural occupations

        C.        Investigate health and safety issues confronting the agricultural industry

        D.        Discuss wages, hours, and working conditions in the various agricultural fields

    2.    Investigate the history and development of agriculture in the region, State, and country.

        A.        Explore agriculture in the Great Lakes Bay Region

        B.        Explore agriculture in the State of Michigan

        C.        Explore agriculture in the United States

        D.        Explore agriculture around the world

    3.    Explore sustainability in the agricultural industry

        A.        Define sustainability and how it relates to the agricultural industry

        B.        Investigate the impact of agriculture on the environment

        C.        Explore the evolution of ethics in agriculture

    4.    Develop a knowledge of the role of organizations and government in the  agricultural industry

        A.        Investigate key agricultural organizations and the impact they have on agriculture       

        B.        Explore the role of education in agriculture

        C.        Discuss the role that the government plays in the agricultural industry

        D.        Explore the role of education in agriculture


American Sign Language

  
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    ASL 111 - American Sign Language I

    Credits: 3
    Introduces American Sign Language, the language of many deaf or hearing impaired individuals. Identifies grammatical and syntactic structure of ASL. Demonstrates receptive and expressive ASL language. Conducts class in ASL. Emphasizes full immersion where nonverbal communication will be practiced. 

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate expressive and receptive skills appropriate to novice level (first semester) ASL.
      1. Apply pantomime, appropriate facial expressions, and gestures to convey emotion, pose questions, make statements, respond to questions, and negate statements.
      2. Practice asking and answering questions using a variety of tenses and correct ASL syntax.
      3. Produce signs from a variety of categories introduced in the textbook and by the instructor accurately and with fluency appropriate to novice-level, first semester ASL.
      4. Use manual signs to express and receive concepts.
      5. Recognize and produce clearly the manual alphabet.
      6. Use the manual alphabet and fingerspelling to communicate isolated words, full sentences, and concepts appropriate to novice-level, first semester ASL.
      7. Apply and modify the grammatical structures introduced in the textbook and by the instructor.
      8. Translate English words and sentences into correct ASL signs and sentences, and vice-versa.
    2. Apply and modify grammar rules of ASL.
      1. Demonstrate grammatical aspects.
        1. Indexing
        2. Possessive and reflexive pronouns
        3. Agent markers
        4. Adjectives
        5. WH-question types and yes/no question type
        6. Negation
        7. Past, present, and future tense
        8. Topic/comment structure
        9. Directional and non-directional verbs
        10. Temporal aspects
        11. Plurals and quantifiers of the following: family, colors, time, pronouns, emotion/feelings, people/occupations, opposites/adjectives, communication, education, health/body, around the house, clothing, food, animals
    3. Demonstrate ASL proficiency
      1. List five parameters of a sign.
      2. Restate contrastive structure.
      3. Give examples on rhetorical statements.
      4. Produce accurately the numbers up to #100.
      5. Translate ASL into appropriately constructed English sentences.
      6. Present an accurate model of asking questions in ASL.
  
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    ASL 112 - American Sign Language II

    Credits: 4
    Continues study of ASL expanding upon knowledge, grammar, skills and vocabulary. Continues study of ASL receptive and expressive skills. Uses full immersion in classroom, and nonverbal communication will be practiced. 

    Prerequisite(s): ASL 111   with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or permission of ASL coordinator.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate expressive and receptive skills appropriate to second level (second semester) of ASL.
      1. Reproduce signs given by the instructor and uses them to express oneself.
      2. Make requests by articulating them in ASL.
      3. Follow and give directions to physical locations.
      4. Describe physical attributes and clothing articles
      5. Show appropriate signs for differenct occupations.
      6. Increase vocabulary including but not limited to the following: animals, money, ethnicity, countries, and nature.
    2. Use critical thinking skills to form sentences and conversations spontaneously, forming appropriate grammatical rules in ASL.
      1. Demonstrate role shifting.
      2. Use topic/comment structure when necessary.
      3. Indicate temporal sequencing, frequency, and proper use of time signs.
      4. Model listing instead of using “and”
      5. Indicate which classifier is being used for an object, person, or adjective
    3. Access, analyze, and use information with ASL vocabulary and grammar.
      1. Differentiate between numbers used for age, time, money, and ordinals.
      2. Use directional, spatial, and inflecting verbs appropriately.
      3. List synonyms for English words that can represent ASL concepts.
      4. Translate English sentences to ASL appropriately.
    4. Demonstrate ASL proficiency
      1. Recall and use descriptive classifiers.
      2. Indentify and use locative classifiers.
      3. Construct temporal aspects accurately.
      4. Compare and contrast between ASL glossing and English text.
      5. Describe using signs for ethnicity or nationality.
  
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    ASL 113 - American Sign Language Fingerspelling A

    Credits: 1
    Introduces the smallest meaningful units of American Sign Language. Focuses on fingerspelling as a part of the communication process of American Sign Language in order to recognize and generate hand shapes and numbers used in American Sign Language. Addresses expressive and receptive skills. 

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Increase receptive fingerspelling skills.
      1. Recognize fingerspelled words at or near functional speed in the context of a conversation.
      2. Require fewer repetitions of a fingerspelled word before recognizing it in the context of a sentence or story.
      3. Recall and recognize alternate handshapes of certain fingerspelled letters in context.
      4. Know and recognize the manual alphabet and numbers in ASL.
      5. Recognize fingerspelled “loan” signs.
    2. Increase production skills in expressive fingerspelling.
      1. Increase functionality of fingerspelling.
      2. Increase speed of fingerspelling.
      3. Produce the manual alphabet and numbers.
      4. Choose and produce palm orientation, location, movement and handshape of numbers in expressing cardinal, ordinal, time and age numbers.
      5. Demonstrate production of fingerspelled “loan” signs when prompted.
    3. Demonstrate ability to interact with others using ASL.
      1. Practice the rules of ASL to use fingerspelling appropriately.
      2. Use fingerspelling as a part of ASL to interact with members of the signing community.
      3. Communicate with other students using ASL, including fingerspelling.
  
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    ASL 114 - American Sign Language Fingerspelling B

    Credits: 1
    Continues practice of the smallest meaningful units of American Sign Language. Focuses on fingerspelling as a part of the communication process of American Language in order to recognize hand shapes and numbers used in American Sign Language. Expands the ability to generate ASL hand shapes and numbers when prompted and within the appropriate context. Addresses expressive and receptive skills. 

    Prerequisite(s): ASL 113  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Increase the complexity of receptive fingerspelling skills.
      1. Recognize fingerspelled words at or near fluent speed in the context of a conversation.
      2. Require fewer to no repetitions of a fingerspelled word before recognizing it in the context of a sentence or story.
      3. Differentiate between alternate handshapes of certain fingerspelled letters in context.
      4. Analyze fingerspelled words and distinguish their meaning.
    2. Increase production skills in expressive fingerspelling.
      1. Develop rhythm and fluidity of fingerspelling.
      2. Produce the manual alphabet and numbers in a variety of contexts.
      3. Choose and produce palm orientation, location, movement, and handshape of numbers in expressing cardinal, ordinal, time and age numbers in appropriate context.
      4. Demonstrate production of fingerspelled “loan” signs from a select list.
    3. Have production interaction with others using ASL.
      1. Practice the rules of ASL to use fingerspelling appropriately.
      2. Use fingerspelling as a part of ASL to interact with members of the signing community.
      3. Communicate with other students using ASL, including fingerspelling.
  
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    ASL 200W - Deaf Culture

    Credits: 3
    Studies the Deaf community and culture. Addresses a broad array of topics, including history, rules for social interaction, group norms, identity, language and values. Discusses Deaf perspective and its interface with the hearing culture.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Access, analyze and use information relating to Deaf culture.
      1. Identify through writing and orally key figures and eras of Deaf history
      2. List Deaf individuals that have made contributions to the general culture
      3. Examine the Deaf President Now movement and the changes that occurred from it
      4. Compare/contrast ASL and English language structure
      5. Discuss the importance of language in Deaf culture
      6. Differentiate (written and orally) between Deaf and hearing cultural behaviors
      7. Identify several current issues in the Deaf community
    2. Use critical thinking skills to evaluate Deaf education.
      1. Debate the merits/deficiencies of different educational systems for the Deaf throughout history
      2. Explain changes in Deaf education and perception of the Deaf
      3. Evaluate current educational methods
    3. Value and practice citizenship through an understanding of Deaf and hearing cultures.
      1. Appreciate differences in cultures
      2. Relate how understanding Deaf culture will affect future interactions
      3. Compare and contrast hearing and Deaf culturally accepted behaviors
      4. Examine Deaf in the Arts: literature, poetry, drama and art
    4. Have productive interaction with others by group projects on Deaf culture topics.
      1. Identify current issues in the Deaf community and discuss in groups, write and present in class
      2. Display tolerance of different cultures
  
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    ASL 211 - American Sign Language III

    Credits: 4
    Builds upon previous knowledge and skills in ASL emphasizing expressive skills. Participates in class in ASL. Emphasizes full immersion where nonverbal communication is practiced. 

    Prerequisite(s): ASL 112  with a minimum grade of C or permission of ASL coordinator.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use critical thinking skills to apply appropriate grammar and signs to construct ASL sentences.
      1. Show various aspects of time signs, including recurring and continuous.
      2. Model classifiers, including locative, and using non-dominant hand as reference.
      3. Incorporate role shifting in narrating a short story.
      4. Use topic/comment structure appropriately.
    2. Access, analyze, and use information to produce concepts represented by ASL signs in interaction with others.
      1. List English synonyms for ASL concept words.
      2. Model appropriate signs in making complaints or requests in ASL.
      3. Describe one’s emotions and feelings accurately.
      4. Explain the reason for relocating or moving away.
    3. Demonstrate ASL proficiency.
      1. Differentiate signs for multiple meaning words.
      2. Compose a story about life events from the beginning to the end.
      3. Use appropriate classifiers to describe a room or a house.
      4. Reconstruct appropriate classifiers to accurately represent the concepts.
      5. Distinguish between the use of transitions and continuity in signs.
  
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    ASL 212 - American Sign Language IV

    Credits: 4
    Provides opportunity to develop and refine advanced skills and fluency in ASL. Conducts class in ASL. Emphasizes full immersion where nonverbal communication will be praticed.

    Prerequisite(s): ASL 211  with a minimum grade of C, or permission of ASL coordinator.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use ASL expressive and receptive skills to communicate and respond to others in a variety of conversational situations.
      1. Tell stories and antedotes.
      2. Participate in discussions.
      3. Conduct private conversations.
    2. Use critical thinking skills to converse spontaneously in ASL.
      1. Describe and expand on life events using appropriate grammatical structures
      2. Choose appropriate classifiers to describe shapes, locations, patterns, and textures.
      3. Discuss activities, plans, and opinions.
    3. Access, analyze, and use information with ASL grammar and vocabulary.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of concept and multiple meaning words.
      2. Differentiate between types of numbers (cardinal, ordinal, money, time).
      3. Use rhetorical questions accurately.
      4. Model proper usage of ASL conjunctions.
      5. Show time reduplication.
    4. Demonstrate ASL proficiency.
      1. Explain and discuss how a decision has been made including listing the pros and cons.
      2. Presenting facts by using ratio, listing, fraction, ranking, and percentage.
      3. Narrate a story that supports the knowledge of elements in storytelling.
      4. Listing classifiers: instrument, element, locative, semantic, body, and body parts.
      5. Describe symptoms, causes, and treatments in regards to a medical condition.
  
  •  

    ASL 290-299 - Special Projects in American Sign Language


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Applied Behavioral Studies

  
  •  

    ABS 101W - College Success

    Credits: 2
    Explores academic skills and strategies needed for college-level learning and success. Examines effective personal attributes/behaviors, available college resources, and general expectations of college professors and courses. Practices engagement in the greater campus culture and recognition of the value of learning beyond the classroom. Assists in the identification of individual strengths and the creation of a personal plan for reaching college goals using information from the course. Encourages writing, as a reflective practice, to enhance learning.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Develop and practice a lifestyle management plan associated with attitudes and habits that leads to successful attainment of academic goals.
      1. Develop and practice appropriate wellness skills; e.g., stress management, personal health, etc.
      2. Identify appropriate support strategies outside the college environment.
      3. Identify personal values and strengths and connect those to successful college behavior.
      4. Evaluate the financial consequences of decisions both directly related to and outside the college experience that will impact reaching one’s goals.
    2. Develop and practice habits associated with enhancing effective academic foundational skills.
      1. Identify reading, writing, math, and basic technology skills and assess areas for improvement.
      2. Identify study skills such as note taking, test preparation, etc. and assess areas for improvement.
      3. Identify time management and organizational skills and assess areas for improvement.
      4. Identify common expectations of college professors and appropriate classroom behavior and decorum and assess areas for improvement.
    3. Engage in the larger campus culture and explore co-and extra-curricular opportunities that enhance the college experience.
      1. Discover and demonstrate knowledge of a variety of college clubs and organizations, available campus life experiences, and service learning opportunities.
      2. Participate at the level of audience member or greater in one or more campus life opportunities; e.g. organizations, speakers, programs, activities, and diversity and inclusion programs.
    4. Identify, assess, and utilize college resources to maximize academic and personal success.
      1. Visit, either on-line or in person, a variety of available college resources such as Financial Aid, Counseling and Advising, the Reading Writing Center, the Teaching Learning Center, Disabilities Services, the Career Center, the Fitness Center, instructor on-line information and office hours, etc. and demonstrate knowledge of these resources.
      2. Access appropriate college materials; e.g.; the website, catalog, course syllabi, “Student Rights and Responsibilities.” etc. and demonstrate knowledge of these materials.
    5. Develop a comprehensive college success plan.
  
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    ABS 200W - Career Decision Making

    Credits: 1
    Develops student ability to make career choices by focusing on the steps in the career decision making process (Self Awareness, Career Awareness, Decision Making, and Creating a Plan). Investigates personal values, skills, interests and abilities and explores a variety of careers using campus resources. Assists in matching personal characteristics with careers and creating a plan of action to accomplish short- and long-range career goals while working in a cooperative, respectful group atmosphere. Encourages writing, as a reflective practice, to enhance learning. Credit may be earned in ABS 103 or ABS 200W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 or WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate appropriate interpersonal skills necessary for both class and workplace effectiveness.
      1. Demonstrate respect for peers/colleagues by m aintaining confidentiality, listening actively, and accepting the rights of others to express diverse opinions.
      2. Participate actively in class activities.
    2. Engage in activities designed to build self-awareness as the first step in developing a successful career plan.
      1. Discuss the components of self-awareness including self-esteem, assertiveness, values, skills and abilities, interests, and personality characteristics.
      2. Explore the above components using Holland’s Codes and some form of Myers-Briggs Personality Indicator.
      3. Explore the above components using Sigi 3, Eureka, MOIS, and/or various other similar tools.
      4. Apply this understanding and knowledge of self-awareness to the career decision-making process.
    3. Build career-awareness and exploration as the second step in developing a successful career plan.
      1. Use campus career resources to broaden career awareness.
      2. Use Career Center resources such as Sigi 3, MOIS, Eureka, and/or other relevant sources to explore career awareness.
      3. Use the “Dictionary of Occupational Titles,” the “Occupational Outlook Handbook,” and other relevant resources to explore career awareness.
      4. Identify and interview someone employed in a field of interest.
      5. Present an oral and written report summarizing and analyzing the interview.
    4. Apply information learned during self-awareness and career exploration to making a decision as the third step in developing a career plan.
      1. Analyze and integrate the knowledge of self- and career-awareness explorations to match personal characteristics with careers.
      2. Discuss and apply steps in the decision-making process to prepare a plan of action.
    5. Develop a comprehensive career plan.
  
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    ABS 201W - Employability Skills for Success

    Credits: 1
    Develops skills in identifying students’ job-related abilities and attitudes; locating leads in the job market; writing resumes and cover letters; completing applications, and interviewing. Encourages writing, as a reflective practice, to enhance learning. Credit may be earned in ABS 201W or ABS 102, but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify and classify personal job-related skills, abilities, and attitudes and how they fit into the world of work.
      1. Describe three categories of job skills: transferable, job specific, and personal/adaptive.
      2. Analyze and classify one’s own experiences and skills relative to the three categories.
      3. Compare one’s own qualifications with requirements of job objective(s).
    2. Identify and demonstrate ability to deal with barriers to employment.
      1. Discuss and describe barriers including, but not limited to, attitude/self-sabotage, possible discrimination factors, and work and personal history.
      2. Identify one’s own barriers in the job search including, but not limited to, geographic, transportation, and computer skills.
      3. Devise a positive plan to counteract these barriers.
    3. Describe and demonstrate the ability to use the process/methods available for getting job leads.
      1. Identify agencies and organizations (including, but not limited to, temporary, employment, and government agencies and college placement office) that could be used for job leads.
      2. Use resources such as newspaper ads, journals, job fairs, personal contacts, business directories, and social media/social networking sites.
      3. Use the following methods for job leads: networking, occupational interviewing, telephone techniques, cold calling, researching of employers,and other methods as appropriate.
    4. Research targeted job(s) requirements, expectations, and benefits.
      1. Demonstrate successful use of resources (such as the Career Center resources), including computer systems and various written materials, as well as other appropriate resources.
      2. Demonstrate successful use of methods, such as networking and informational interviewing.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to research career and/or employer-specific requirements such as licensing, background checks, physical demands, etc.
    5. Complete an employment application, resume, cover letter, and follow-up.
      1. Gather information for properly completing an employment application.
      2. Recognize the types of resumes including, chronological, functional, combination, online, and targeted.
      3. Determine when to appropriately use each type of resume.
      4. Produce an acceptable, professional-looking resume.
      5. Discuss the purpose of a cover letter.
      6. Describe the proper format of a cover letter.
      7. Produce an appropriate cover letter.
      8. Discuss when and how to do a proper follow-up.
    6. Discuss, describe, and demonstrate knowledge about the interview process (preparation, participation, follow-up, etc.)
      1. Describe different kinds of interviews such as telephone, screening, individual, group, lunch, behavioral, and series interviews.
      2. Describe the different parts of an interview.
      3. Identify different types of questions and questioning formats, such as legal and illegal, skeleton, demonstrations, and case studies; demonstrate how to respond effectively.
      4. Discuss most frequently asked questions.
      5. Identify proper questions you may ask in an interview.
      6. Develop your own personal list of appropriate questions.
      7. Discuss appropriate interview etiquette such as dress, mannerisms, and language.
      8. Demonstrate interview skills by completing a mock interview.
      9. Demonstrate knowledge of proper follow-up techniques.
      10. Write an apropriate follow-up letter.
    7. Evaluate the importance of proper job acceptance and denial.
      1. Discuss negotiated items such as salary and benefits, obligations made prior to employment, etc.
      2. Discuss proper notification to current employer.
      3. Analyze long-term benefits to multiple jobs.
    8.   Develop a comprehensive employability plan.
  
  •  

    ABS 290-299 - Special Projects in Applied Behavioral Science


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Architectural Technology

  
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    ARC 101 - Materials and Methods of Construction

    Credits: 3
    Introduces basic construction materials; properties, recommended use, space requirements, methods of finishing, building code implications, and energy conservation applications.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify the primary residential building components.
      1. Draw and label a cross section of typical residential platform frame construction.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of fasteners.
      1. Demonstrate the specification and application of construction fasteners.
    3. Communicate basic terminology, technology, and application of primary construction units.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge and applications of:
        1. Masonry units
        2. Concrete products
        3. Insulation and ventilation
        4. Roofing material
        5. Plywood and composite material
        6. Interior finish material
        7. Truss manufacturing and application
  
  •  

    ARC 105 - Architectural Drafting I

    Credits: 4
    Teaches fundamentals of architectural drafting including linework emphasis, lettering design, symbol applications, multiview projections relative to architectural drawings, one point perspective, two point perspective, graphic design elements, and presentation of floor plans, sections and elevations. Studies space requirements and method or representing basic residential elements. Includes demonstrations and instruction in basic procedures of CAD.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Draw a floor plan at 1/4” scale, given a floor plan sample at 1/8” scale.
      1. Scales and draws using basic tools.
      2. Represents walls doors, windows, fixtures, appliances, and other plan related items with lines, circles, and arcs.
      3. Demonstrates basic standard sizes of walls, doors, cabinets, shelves, and other items used on typical floor plan drawings.
      4. Demonstrates basic dimensioning techniques.
    2. Draw a floor plan at 1/4” scale, given a partially completed floor plan sample at 1/8” scale.
      1. Scales and draws using basic tools.
      2. Represents walls doors, windows, fixtures, appliances, and other plan related items with lines, circles, and arcs.
      3. Demonstrates basic standard sizes of walls, doors, cabinets, shelves, and other items used on typical floor plan drawings.
      4. Demonstrates basic dimensioning techniques.
    3. Draw a large scale wall section, given a sample wall section at small scale.
      1. Practices drawing in 3/4” or 1” scale.
      2. Draws wall sections.
      3. Applies notes to the wall section drawing using left margins and groups of notes.
      4. Demonstrates methods for assembling selected materials into a wall assembly.
    4. Draw three cross sections of the plan used for outcome #2 given a list of material requirements and a sample cross section.
      1. Targets locations for cross section development.
      2. Demonstrates 1/4” scale cross sections.
      3. Establishes heights of planes and points critical to cross section development.
      4. Constructs selected roof slopes.
      5. Applies all objectives from wall section outcome #4.
    5. Draw four exterior elevations of the plan used for outcome #2.
      1. Translates lines from plan drawings to create the vertical lines required for elevations.
      2. Translates lines from cross section drawings to create the horizontal lines required for elevations.
      3. Renders exterior symbols to represent exterior view of materials used on the building.
      4. Draw a selected interior one point perspective, given simple drawings, classroom demonstration, and textbook discussion.Interprets appropriate ingress/egress codes.
    6. Draw a floor plan at 1/4” scale derived from a magazine” published floor plan.
      1. Establishes scale when no scale is given.
      2. Assigns recommended sizes and clearances to typical room arrangements.
      3. Distinguishes between published dimensions and required dimensions required by building code or general use requirements.
      4. Applies all objectives required in outcome # 1 and # 2.
    7. Draw an isometric object given several choices and given an example drawing.
      1. Represents an object in three dimensions.
      2. Demonstrates axis dimensioning techniques required.
      3. Demonstrates technique of displaying circular objects on isometric surfaces.
    8. Draw a selected interior one point perspective, given simple drawings, classroom demonstration, and textbook discussion.
      1. Draws elevation view of subject wall.
      2. Establishes horizon and vanishing point.
      3. Draws 3D framework by connecting and extending lines from the VP through the edges of the subject wall.
      4. Determines the desired viewing extents within the 60 degree cone of vision.
      5. Determines the location of the diagonal vanishing point and shall complete the 3D grid construction.
      6. Completes the 3D drawing within the 3D perspective.
    9. Complete a final project to be assigned.
      1. Draws a choice of exterior perspective drawing (using the Goff method) of a building exterior or an assigned mini” set of construction drawings of a small garage structure. (Lawrence Technological University students for transfer must elect the exterior perspective as the final project.)
  
  •  

    ARC 106 - Architectural Drafting II

    Credits: 4
    Introduction to construction drawing organization. Development of coordinated drawings for one small building with emphasis on application of notes, dimensions, and development of graphic skills. Includes a study of CAD techniques and the use of the computer for drawing production, storage and retrieval, development of selected architectural details relating to foundation, floor, wall, and roof assemblies, with emphasis on energy conservation.

    Prerequisite(s): ARC 105   or permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Draw floor plan at 1/4” scale.
      1. Represent typical wall thicknesses
      2. Insert required doors and windows
      3. Insert required appliances and fixtures
      4. Insert suitable dimensioning
      5. Apply suitable architectural notes
      6. Use suitable title block and border
    2. Draw roof plan at 1/4” scale.
      1. Establish overhang line
      2. Establish all potential ridge locations
      3. Draw all hip and valley lines
      4. Resolve all hip, valley, and ridge lines
    3. Draw 1/4” cross sections.
      1. Determine the locations for cross sections
      2. Cut the section and show all appropriate roof lines, wall lines, floor lines, and interior elements visible in the section
      3. Apply appropriate dimensions to cross sections
      4. Apply appropriate architectural notes to cross sections
    4. Draw large scale wall section.
      1. Select the most typical wall section
      2. Draw all wall materials at actual size, at appropriate scale
      3. Apply appropriate notes and dimensions
      4. Apply suitable material textures to elements shown in cut section
    5. Draw floor framing plan at 1/4” scale.
      1. Determine location and spacing of each floor joist and shall draw appropriately on framing plan
      2. Determine location and spacing of structural beams and shall place them in the appropriate location on the framing plan
      3. Appropriately dimension the overall frame dimensions and the location of floor openings
      4. Determine locations for double or triple framing members for unusual loads under equipment or around openings
    6. Draw roof framing plan at 1/4” scale.
      1. Determine location and spacing of each truss or rafter and shall draw appropriately on the roof framing plan
      2. Appropriately dimension the frame dimensions and the location of roof openings
      3. Determine locations for double or triple framing members for unusual loads around openings
    7. Draw exterior elevations at 1/4” scale.
      1. Use floor plan to project vertical lines needed for elevations
      2. Use cross sections to project horizontal lines needed for elevations
      3. Locate and show all window and door openings on the exterior elevations
      4. Show grade lines and floor lines on exterior elevations
      5. Show material textures on all visible materials
      6. Add notes to call out all visible materials
    8. Draw foundation plan at 1/4” scale.
      1. Use floor plan to determine the footprint required for the foundation plan
      2. Draw the foundation wall lines (showing the thickness required), the footing lines, and drain tile lines as required around the perimeter of the foundation wall
      3. Show the location of structural beams, including beam pockets required
      4. Show location of columns and independent column footings
      5. Dimension foundation wall plan and shall include location of all structural beams and columns
    9. Draw construction details.
      1. Draw stairway head, landing, and foot details
      2. Draw handrail details
      3. Draw window head, jamb, and sill details
      4. Draw door head, jamb, and sill details
  
  •  

    ARC 111 - Mechanical and Electrical Systems for Buildings

    Credits: 3
    Fundamentals and operating principles of air conditioning, plumbing, and electrical systems; including typical layout, calculations, sizing, and methods of installation. Credit may be earned in ARC 111 or RC 206  but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of a residential electrical system.
      1. Describe and use electrical symbols properly.
      2. Identify electrical devices and fixtures.
      3. Complete wiring diagrams of residential circuits.
      4. Draw and label a schematic of the service entrance system.
      5. Calculate the electrical demand load of a residential structure.
      6. Evaluate the NEC as a minimum standard for the electrical industry.
      7. Analyze minimum standards versus a “code-plus” approach.
      8. Complete hands-on wiring of basic residential circuits.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of a residential plumbing system.
      1. Describe and use plumbing symbols properly.
      2. Identify plumbing piping and fixtures.
      3. Complete plumbing diagrams of residential dwellings.
      4. Draw and label a schematic of the water supply system.
      5. Draw and label a schematic of the water drainage system.
      6. Calculate the supply fixture units for a residential structure.
      7. Calculate the drainage fixture units for a residential structure.
      8. Analyze a public vs. private plumbing system.
      9. Evaluate the plumbing code as a minimum standard for the plumbing industry.
      10. Analyze minimum standards versus a “code-plus” approach.
      11. Complete hands-on work on supply and drainage systems.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of residential HVAC systems.
      1. Identify the elements of various heating systems.
      2. Compare and contrast the various heating systems.
      3. Identify the elements of various air conditioning systems.
      4. Compare and contrast the various air conditioning systems.
      5. Evaluate the effects of different fuels on these systems.
      6. Calculate heat loss and gain in order to properly size a HVAC system.
  
  •  

    ARC 114 - Introduction to CAD

    Credits: 3
    Introduces 2D and 3D CAD drawing, including basic drawing and editing commands. Studies CAD systems interface, hardware, a current operating system, file management techniques, creating templates, creating and modifying geometry, dimensions and text styles, block and external reference insertion, attributes and creating tables, model space/paper space layouts, rendering and plotting techniques. Credit may earned in only one of the following: ARC 114, CAD 114 , or SKCA 114 .

    Prerequisite(s): CST 103  recommended or basic knowledge of the Windows Operating System.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use reading and writing skills to gather information from technical texts.
      1. Complete assignments by gathering information from reading.
      2. Use the index of CAD texts to access information regarding commands and processes.
      3. Create a notebook as an essential reference.
      4. Record sufficient notes from which to work.
    2. Use a computer, a current operating system and word processing software.
      1. Start and exit software as required.
      2. Use disk directories and change directory paths to access files and programs.
      3. Use Save AS and name files as prescribed.
      4. Perform file management skills such as copying, pasting, and deleting files as prescribed.
      5. Identify and properly use CAD file extensions.
      6. Use a word processing program for all written assignments.
    3. Demonstrate mastery of CAD program basics.
      1. Identify the features of the system interface.
      2. Differentiate between methods of entering commands and determine which method is most efficient for the purpose.
      3. Create absolute, relative and polar coordinate methods correctly.
      4. Demonstrate several object selection methods.
    4. Manipulate geometry using CAD drawing aids.
      1. Use Zoom. Panning and Viewing tools for navigation.
      2. Apply the proper Osnap features to drawing situations for accurate drawing.
      3. Use Undo, Redo and Regenerate drawing when necessary.
      4. Distinguish and change properties efficiently.
      5. Utilize and control accuracy enhancement tools such as Ortho, Grid, Snap and Osnap.
      6. Use Object Tracking and Polar tools to enhance efficiency.
    5. Use basic construction and modification commands of a CAD program in the accurate completion of 2D CAD drawings.
      1. Use drawing commands to effectively create lines, circles, arcs, polylines and polygons,
      2. Modify existing geometry using erase, copy, mirror, offset, move, trim extend, fillet, array, stretch, scale and break commands.
      3. Apply and modify hatching fills and patterns.
      4. Create and insert Blocks.
      5. Insert ready-made blocks from the CAD program and from online sources.
      6. Use Wblock, Copy and Paste, and External References to move drawings and parts of drawings.
      7. Create table styles and insert information.
      8. Add attributes to blocks and extract data to tables.
    6. Develop and use a drawing prototype template.
      1. Set the appropriate drawing Units and Limits.
      2. Create Text using the prescribed syle and size.
      3. Creat appropriate layers assigning colors, linetypes and lineweights as necessary.
      4. Modify Dimension and Leader variables to create a dimension style.
    7. Apply complete and orderly dimensions and text to CAD drawings.
      1. Use associative dimensioning to apply linear, radial, diameter, aligned and angular dimensions.
      2. Use dimenstion according to prescribed dimensioning conventions.
      3. Apply text and use text editing tools.
    8. Use the 3D Workspace to create solid models.
      1. Analyze information about coordinates in 3D space in the completion of 3D objects.
      2. Create models using 3D primitive shapes, region, extrude and press-pull tools.
      3. Use Boolean editing tools to modify 3D geometry.
      4. Use View Manager, navigation tools and visual style tools to create views.
      5. Render views to a file.
    9. Demonstrate appropriate printing techniques.
      1. Set up printing parameters for printing from Model Space.
      2. Access and configure Layout mode for printing from Paper Space.
      3. Create, scale and align viewports in Layout mode.
      4. Determine the proper viewports for a multi-view drawing.
    10. Demonstrate productive interaction with others.
      1. Practice citizenship by respecting each person’s drawing file as their personal property.
      2. Ask and respond to questions during drawing demonstrations.
      3. Demonstrate teamwork skills.
      4. Use effective listening skills during classroom demonstrations.
  
  •  

    ARC 118 - AutoCAD Applications

    Credits: 3
    Uses and expands on commands learned in ARC 114 , AutoCAD Basics. Accomplishes this through the development of various additional working drawings such as elevations, sections and details.

    Prerequisite(s): ARC 114  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic AutoCAD commands.
      1. Illustrate concepts of file management
      2. Draw lines using multiple methods
      3. Use line manipulation commands to build components
      4. Utilize hatch and other fill techniques
      5. Incorporate dimensioning in drawings
      6. Complete drawing setup in preparation for plotting
    2. Derive a sectional view from an existing floorplan.
      1. Interpret structure to devise an accurate section view
      2. Use AutoCAD commands to translate from plan to section
      3. Analyze structural information as it relates to new section
    3. Conceptualize elevations from floorplan.
      1. Formulate an impression of the exterior from floorplan
      2. Use AutoCAD commands to translate from plan to elevation
      3. Use template techniques to build basis for elevations
      4. Embellish elevation with AutoCAD symbols and hatching
    4. Construct representative details.
      1. Isolate critical areas needing clarification by detail
      2. Use scaling operations to draw detail at a larger scale
      3. Investigate structural data to complete accurate details
  
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    ARC 204 - Estimating Building Construction

    Credits: 3
    Introduces methods and procedures commonly used in determining the costs of construction materials.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 4, ARC 101  and RC 101  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the fundamentals of material estimation.
      1. Calculate, using specific mathematical procedures, quantity estimation problems
      2. Experience the value and application of computerized estimation packages
      3. Manipulate material take-off procedures and apply them to working drawings
      4. Discuss standard practice and conventions used in the residential and light commercial construction market
  
  •  

    ARC 205 - Architectural Drafting III

    Credits: 3
    Develops construction documents for a non-residential building. Introduces concrete, masonry, and steel construction with their various detailing requirements, symbolisms, and characteristics utilized in installation of mechanical and electrical systems. Includes a study of computer-aided design examples.

    Prerequisite(s): ARC 106  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Draw 3/4” scale wall sections with series of details provided by instructor.
      1. Learn the relationship between detail decisions and project general dimension control
      2. Learn about concrete wall detailing above and below grade
      3. Learn about steel framing, both beams and steel joist framing
      4. Learn about laminated wood framing and wood deck detailing
      5. Learn generally, the use architectural preliminary drawings have in developing construction drawings
    2. Draw 1/4” scale floor plan with the use of wall sections and plan provided by instructor.
      1. Learn to incorporate various commercial building materials (concrete, steel, laminated wood) into working drawing plan
      2. Learn decision process for non-standard commercial doors and windows
      3. Learn requirements for ada handicap accessible bathroom
      4. Learn to develop research resources for additional information (sweets catalogues, graphic standards, ada standards, etc.)
    3. Shall draw 1/4” scale cross sections of building.
      1. Learn to use 3/4” wall sections and floor plan to draw building cross sections
      2. Learn to use target height controls for setting building vertical definition
      3. Learn to accommodate various heights of rooms and building walls
      4. Learn new material coordination through vertical development
      5. Learn analysis of sections to provide building information
    4. Draw 1/4” scale exterior elevations.
      1. Learn to draw 1/4” elevations using previously developed drawings
      2. Learn representation of various footing depths and grade elevations
      3. Learn height representation of control elevations and coordination to common ridge
      4. Learn relationship of site grading to exterior of building
    5. Draw 1/4” scale section and various 1-1/2” scale details.
      1. Learn to compose drawing with multiple objects and varying scales
      2. Learn detailing of manufacturer or custom windows in their choice of locations
      3. Learn general relationship of detailing to building construction
      4. Learn drawing coordination and referencing for various section and detail notations
    6. Draw on a medium other than vellum (2-mil mylar).
      1. Learn the characteristics of a drawing surface other than vellum
      2. Learn types of leads and erasers needed to work cleanly on the matte surface
      3. Learn to letter on surface and to control line quality with various hardness and sizes of leads
      4. Learn blue line layout and guide line techniques for non-print
      5. Learn additional characteristics for printing with mylar medium as compared to vellum
  
  •  

    ARC 206 - Architectural Drafting IV

    Credits: 3
    Develops sketches into preliminary and construction drawings. Uses CAD for design and drafting examples and production. Continues the design and drafting of concrete, masonry, and steel construction. Integrates structural, mechanical, electrical, and solar strategies into commercial buildings.

    Prerequisite(s): ARC 205  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Draw commercial building 1/8” scale floor plan based on dimensioned but unscaled preliminary plan.
      1. Learn relationship of scale to information shown
      2. Learn relationship of hatch and detail to scale of drawings and to requirements for information
      3. Learn requirements for ada handicap accessible public restrooms
      4. Will learn coordination of drawings for dimensioning and grid control
      5. Learn to use elevation designations for drawing reference
      6. Draw 1/4” scale cross sections of building
    2. Draw 1/4” scale enlargement of part of floor plan.
      1. Learn relationship of hatch and detail to scale of drawings and to requirements for information
      2. Learn requirements for ada handicap accessible public restrooms
      3. Learn coordination of drawings for dimensioning and grid control
      4. Learn to use elevation designations for drawing reference
    3. Draw 1/4” scale cross sections of building.
      1. Learn to draw partial sections with interrupting cuts to represent complete cross sections
      2. Learn drawing techniques for large building structural framing
      3. Learn drawing techniques for steel stud framing
      4. Will learn to use vertical control targets for height
    4. Draw 1/8” scale exterior elevations.
      1. Learn to draw elevations specifically for large building size
      2. Learn to use coursing and modular control of exterior materials
      3. Learn use of decorative objects for building design representation
      4. Learn to use non-standard windows and doors
    5. Draw door and room finish schedules.
      1. Learn to draw door and room finish schedules
      2. Learn to designate doors and relationship to information needed for door description
      3. Learn to designate room and relate information needed to describe room finishes and additional information.
      4. Learn to select doors and finishes based on use, building code and fire safety
    6. Draw on any medium and may use either manual drafting or CAD.
      1. Learn methods used to translate information both manually and on cad for different scales
      2. Learn importance of layering, color and adjustments to views in CAD
      3. Learn to use special features of CAD processing for doors and room finishes
      4. Learn coordination of drawing title blocks using CAD to develop block and either drawing method
      5. Learn additional characteristics for plotter configuration to vary drawing plot size
  
  •  

    ARC 211 - Elements of Structural Design

    Credits: 2
    Bridges the gap of understanding between engineering and building contractors. Identifies the weights of construction materials. Analyzes loads, stresses, and deflections of beams, floor joists, roof trusses and columns. Provides basic design experience in wood, steel, and concrete.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 4
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze Loads in Construction.
      1. Determine the weights of construction materials.
      2. Calculate total loads, both live and dead.
      3. Determine the external reactions of a symmetrically-loaded 2-D truss.
      4. Review algebra.
      5. Calculate loads in tension, compression, shear.
    2. Analyze the Mechanical Properties of a Structural Member Under Load.
      1. Calculate the tensile or compressive stress imposed on a member given its cross-section dimensions and the axial load.
      2. Compare stress with material allowable strength to determine over- or under-loaded conditions.
      3. Calculate shear stress given force and shear area and identify where shear is present.
      4. Determine the axial deformation of a structural member under load.
      5. Compare the stiffness of different materials using the Modulus of Elasticity.
    3. Analyze Distributed Load Systems Using Beams Under Load.
      1. Identify where simply-supported beams and cantilever beams are used in the building industry.
      2. Calculate moments on beams due to both concentrated and distributed loads.
      3. Calculate reactions on beams using moments.
      4. Determine the shear force anywhere along a beam using a shear diagram.
      5. Determine the bending moment anywhere along a beam using a moment diagram.
    4. Obtain the Proper Section property for Analysis or Design.
      1. Find cross-sectional area in the table.
      2. Find centroid of a cross-section in the table for sections such as I-beams, angle irons, etc.
      3. Find moment of inertia of a cross-section in the table such as for I-beams, channels, angles, etc. as well as for regular geometric shapes.
      4. Find the section modulus of a cross-section in the table.
      5. Calculate the centroid for a cross-section not found in the tables.
      6. Calculate the moment of inertia for a cross-section not found in the tables.
    5. Analyze a Beam Under Load or Design a New Beam Given the Loading and Span.
      1. Calculate the maximum bending stress using moment formulas from beam tables.
      2. Compare maximum stress with allowable stress for either wood or steel.
      3. Calculate maximum deflection using formulas from beam tables.
      4. Compare maximum deflection with code.
      5. Calculate maximum horizontal shear stress and location for wooden beams or manufactured steel beams.
      6. Compare maximum horizontal shear stress with allowable for a wooden beam.
      7. Design a wooden beam, given the load and span, specifying wood and dimensions.
      8. Design a steel beam, given the load and span, specifying cross section and dimensions.
    6. Design All Wooden Load-Bearing Structures in a House Addition.
      1. Find the code distributed load values in the tables for floors, ceilings, roofs, etc.
      2. Calculate roof loads in walls, wall loads on floor, etc.
      3. Design the floor joists, specifying size, spacing, and bridging.
      4. Design the ceiling or roof rafters, specifying size and spacing.
    7. Design Wooden Structures Other Than Beams.
      1. Specify the bolt size and pattern in a bolted joint.
      2. Specify the cross-section of a wood column, given unsupported height, end conditions, and load.
    8. Design Steel Structures.
      1. Find safe loads in steel load tables.
      2. Specify steel joist dimension and spacing, given roof load and span.
      3. Specify a steel column H-section from the table, given height and load.
    9. Understand Design of Concrete Structures.
      1. Determine location of stresses and use of reinforcing rod in concrete beams.
  
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    ARC 214 - Architectural AutoCAD 3D Basics

    Credits: 3
    Introduces construction of 3D parametric architectural models using BIM (building information modeling) software –interface, menus, toolbars and editing. Covers creating and managing project files and sheets, using a template, using basic linework and modeling tools, adding annotations and dimensions to models, loading and using 3D architectural components from online sources, and printing methods to produce construction documents. Includes generating plan, elevation, section views and schedules from the architectural model, using rendering tools to set up camera views and creating photo-realistic renderings. Introduces analysis software.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use BIM software and a current operating system.
      1. Open, save and close a modeling file.
      2. Use a current saving device.
      3. Create a project file.
    2. Create 3D geometry.
      1. Create exterior, interior, and custom walls.
      2. Insert doors and windows.
      3. Construct roof systems.
      4. Complete floor and ceiling systems.
      5. Place light fixtures.
      6. Add annotations and dimensions to the geometry.
    3. Generate elevation views from the 3D model.
      1. Create and view exterior elevations.
      2. Modify exterior elevations.
      3. Create and view interior elevations.
      4. Modify interior elevations.
    4. Derive section views from the 3D model.
      1. Set a cutting plane line.
      2. Produce wall sections.
      3. Produce building sections.
      4. Apply section annotations.
    5. Create customized views from the 3D model.
      1. Download families of 3D architectural components.
      2. Use 3D components to design interiors, including a custom kitchen layout.
      3. Add handrails to stairs.
    6. Prepare schedules from the 3D model.
      1. Modify room and door tags.
      2. Generate door schedules.
      3. Generate room finish schedules.
    7. Demonstrate the ability to create realistic renderings.
      1. Create a toposurface using site tools.
      2. Produce a realistic exterior rendering of the model.
      3. Create a realistic interior rendering.
    8. Give examples of analysis software.
      1. Name and describe several applications of analysis software.
      2. Explain the importance of analysis software in sustainable design.
  
  •  

    ARC 221 - Site Preparation

    Credits: 3
    Studies fundamentals of site analysis, including utility services, metes and bounds, solar access and restrictions. Teaches elements of surveying including use of instruments, leveling, measurement of angles and distances, contours, location of site elements and development of a site plan from field data. Interprets engineering surveys, introduces landscape design, and studies computer aided design examples. Credit may be earned in ARC 221 or SKCT 105  but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 4
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Develop knowledge of the techniques and technology relating to site development and surveying.
      1. Measure distances
      2. Measure angles
      3. Perform land surveys
      4. Generate contour maps
      5. Compute cut and fill
      6. Demonstrate use of survey equipment
      7. Perform building site layout
  
  •  

    ARC 224 - Building Information Modeling

    Credits: 3
    Requires a basic knowledge of a Windows Operating System. Continues work with modeling software to successfully and efficiently produce building information models. Uses the entire software platform, while moving through a building project, in the design integration of the following building disciplines: Architectural, Interior Design, Structural, Mechanical, Plumbing and Electrical. Includes the generation of plans, elevations, section views and schedules.

    Prerequisite(s): ARC 214  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use reading and writing skills to gather information from technical texts.
      1. Complete assignments by gathering information from reading.
      2. Use the index of CAD texts to access information regarding commands and processes
      3. Create a notebook as an essential reference
      4. Record sufficient notes from which to work
    2. Use BIM Software and a current operating system.
      1. Open, save, and close a modeling file
      2. Use a current saving device
      3. Create a project file
    3. Create three-dimensional geometry.
      1. Create exterior, interior and curtain walls
      2. Insert doors and windows
      3. Complete floor and ceiling systems
      4. Construct roof systems
      5. Create girds, columns and beams
      6. Create foundations and footings
      7. Add annotations and tags
    4. Generate elevation and section views.
      1. Produce a complete set of exterior elevations
      2. Develop views and create interior elevations
      3. Prepare a wall section
      4. Develop section detail views
      5. Complete a building section
      6. Apply section annotations
    5. Create schedules from the three-dimensional model.
      1. Add room and door tags
      2. Generate a door schedule
      3. Develop a room finish schedule
      4. Create a graphical column schedule
    6. Model mechanical and electrical systems.
      1. Create views and load content
      2. Place units for MEP systems and ductwork
      3. Create a plumbing layout
      4. Place panel board and power devices
      5. Create light fixture and light switch layout
    7. Produce realistic renderings.
      1. Create a toposurface using site tools
      2. Develop a realistic exterior rendering of the model
      3. Create a realistic interior rendering
    8. Assemble a construction document set.
      1. Set up views on sheets
      2. Create a sheet set index
      3. Print a set of construction documents
  
  •  

    ARC 290-299 - Special Projects in Architectural Technology


    Meets MTA Requirement: None
  
  •  

    ARC 314 - Architectural Rendering Basics

    Credits: 3
    Introduces 3D studio VIZ rendering mechanisms/AutoCAD rendering mechanisms. Operates camera angles, creates light sources, digital materials and applies existing digital materials to 3D model from ARC 114 . Introduces rendering techniques in both 3D studio VIZ and AutoCAD. Renders bitmap image for final class project. Continues, from ARC 214 , to next logical sequential rendering level.

    Prerequisite(s): ARC 214  or working knowledge of AutoCAD and permission of the instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Practice and understand the basic rendering mechanisms and interfaces of both AutoCAD and 3D Studio Viz.
      1. Learn basic editing techniques in 3D Studio Viz
      2. Learn about light, camera and material placement in 3D Studio Viz
      3. Learn about basic rendering in 3D Studio Viz
      4. Become familiar with the AutoCAD/3D Studio Viz rendering dialogs
    2. Learn the difference between classic and neo classic camera theory.
      1. Understand the following concepts:
        1. view cone and FOV
        2. dollying the camera
        3. perspective flare (lens flare)
        4. walkarounds/walkthroughs
        5. camera/target locations
        6. safe frame
        7.  topping verticals
      2. Understand and practice the Dview command
      3. Understand the effects of extreme zoom settings
      4. Understand the effects of extreme wide angle settings
    3. Practice hands-on, the concepts relating to camera placement.
      1. Place cameras using the Dview command
      2. Place cameras using the ADT camera utility
      3. Create several camera views using different vertical camera and target locations
      4. Create and save several camera views using different FOV and distance settings
      5. Create an extreme zoom/wide angle view
    4. Understand the rudiments of light/color principles.
      1. Understand the difference between additive and subtractive color-light versus Pigment color
      2. Understand the principles of the color wheel-complimentary color
      3. Understand ambient light
      4. Understand point lights
      5. Understand spot lights
      6. Understand falloff, attenuation, sharpness
      7. Understand light ranges using 3D Studio Viz
      8. Understand the built-in sun position locator
    5. Place and experiment with different light sources.
      1. Create light sources using the AutoCAD method
      2. Create light sources using the ADT method
      3. Create light sources using different ambient, point, spot light settings
      4. Create light sources using different attenuation settings
      5. Create artificial suns using the sun position locator
      6. Create several scenes using different light/camera combinations
    6. Understand the principles of digital material creation and placement.
      1. Understand mapping and its different forms
        1. planar
        2. cubical
        3. cylindrical
        4. spherical
      2. Understand the concept of tiling
      3. Understand the following concepts:
        1. bump maps
        2. opacity
        3. reflectivity/shininess/specular qualities of materials
        4. roughness/smoothness
      4. Understand composited materials using AutoCAD
      5. Understand procedural materials using 3D Studio Viz
      6. Understand scaling factors when placing materials
      7. Understand material assignment-by layer/color/object-creating material sets
      8. Understand creating custom material libraries
    7. Create/place materials and create material libraries.
      1. Place materials using AutoCAD
      2. Place materials using 3D Studio Viz
      3. Place materials and mapping on planar, cubical, cylindrical and spherical objects
      4. Create several custom materials and store them in custom libraries
      5. Create several procedural materials using 3D Studio Viz
    8. Understand and apply rendering techniques to model created in ARC 214 .
      1. Understand file type, file size issues
      2. Understand rendering to file as opposed to rendering to viewport
      3. Understand facetratio/facetres system variables
      4. Understand exporting to 3D Studio Viz for rendering
      5. Understand flipping normals when exporting to 3D Studio Viz
      6. Understand the concept of smoothing
      7. Understand the importance of exporting/importing in 3DS format
      8. Understand the concepts or raytracing, refraction
    9. Learn about advanced rendering techniques and methods.
      1. Learn advanced time saving rendering techniques

Art

  
  •  

    ART 105 - Art Experience

    Credits: 3
    Designed for non-Art & Design majors. Provides an enriching experience in basic studio art and art appreciation.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate ability to recognize creative visual expression.
      1. Produce art using a variety of media including pencil, paint, and some 3 dimensional materials.
    2. Describe the benefits of art in society.
      1. Identify some historical works of art.
      2. Write a research paper on an historically relevant artist.
  
  •  

    ART 107 - Elements of Photography

    Credits: 3
    Designed for non-Art and Design majors. Introduces technical operation of the camera. Emphasizes image construction, image production, and critical analysis of image aesthetics. Credit may be earned in ART 100 or ART 107, but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe camera operations.
      1. Understand shutter speeds, Aperture settings and their affects on image.
    2. Demonstrate basic photographic processes.
      1. Develop an image using concurrent technological methods
    3. Apply critical thinking skills to analyzing a photograph
      1. Develop aesthetic awareness and visual vocabulary
  
  •  

    ART 111 - Drawing I

    Credits: 3
    Introduces techniques in various drawing media and concepts in visual art with emphasis in drawing from observation.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Gain a critical understanding of the formal aspects of two dimensional art.
      1. Discuss the elements of art and design in art-historic references, instructor demonstrations and student work.
      2. Apply knowledge of these elements to the drawing process through practice.
      3. Analyze the formal aspects of student work, both in written and verbal critiques.
      4. Synthesize information from various sources.
    2. Practice the technical application of various drawing media with an emphasis placed on drawing from observation.
      1. Demonstrate drawing techniques.
      2. Practice drawing techniques.
      3. Participate in group critiques.
    3. Gain a critical understanding of drawing concepts, and gain visual literacy.
      1. Synthesize information from Instructor’s lectures, demonstrations and supplemental reading, and test this information in drawing projects.
      2. Respond to Instructor feedback by making revisions to work that is in progress.
      3. Articulate knowledge of drawing concepts during class critique by learning and using the specialized language.
    4. Interact productively with others in the studio environment.
      1. Participate in peer review
      2. Engage in arranged and impromptu discussions on the progress of student work.
      3. Share resources and space.
  
  •  

    ART 112 - Drawing II

    Credits: 3
    Continues the exploration of formal aspects of visual art with emphasis placed on articulating a personal response to various drawing problems. Practices drawing techniques and processes at the intermediate level using a variety of drawing media.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 111  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Develop a critical understanding of the formal aspects of drawing.
      1. Discuss the elements of art and design in art-historic references, instructor demonstrations and student work.
      2. Apply knowledge of these elements to the drawing process through practice.
      3. Analyze the formal aspects of student work, both in written and verbal critiques.
      4. Synthesize information from various sources.
    2. Practice the technical application of various drawing media.
      1. Demonstrate drawing techniques.
      2. Practice drawing techniques.
      3. Participate in group critiques.
    3. Gain a critical understanding of drawing concepts with emphasis placed on personal response.
      1. Synthesize information from Instructor’s lectures, demonstrations and supplemental reading, and test this information in drawing projects.
      2. Respond to Instructor feedback by making revisions to work that is in progress.
      3. Articulate knowledge of drawing concepts during class critique.
      4. Develop personal themes through informal writing in sketchbooks.
      5. Develop variations on themes through sketches.
    4. Interact productively with others in the studio environment.
      1. Participate in peer review.
      2. Engage in arranged and impromptu discussions on the progress of student work.
      3. Share resources and space.
  
  •  

    ART 113 - Art Education

    Credits: 3
    Develops the ability to stimulate children’s creative interests. Acquaints the student with a variety of teaching methods and materials appropriate to child development.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate development of creative abilities through personal involvement in art experiences.
      1. Observe and differentiate between the perceptual processes (highlighting the aesthetics of beauty) resulting in the completion of a 2-dimensional and/or 3-dimensional art project expressed in the form of crayon resist, photo montage, and/or clay.
      2. Complete projects aimed at specific qualities and functions of different creative mediums such as pencil, chalk, and photo images.
      3. Complete design projects which exhibit the appreciation of color theory, positive-negative shapes, basic shapes, rhythm, abreaction, realism, and non-objective.
      4. Exhibit successful sensitivity, handling and craftsmanship of each medium utilized in the projects.
    2. Relate classroom art experiences to elementary teaching situations.
      1. Verbalize in classroom discussion principles and philosophy of art in education, teaching situations, and school curricula.
      2. Target specific art projects, for example, the creation, design, authorship, and completion of a children’s book assigned during the semester to the appropriate child growth and development stages in elementary education schools.
      3. Participate in discussion and self-discovery regarding practical problem solving in the classroom, methods of teaching, handling of supplies and materials.
  
  •  

    ART 115 - Two-Dimensional Design

    Credits: 3
    Explores basic two-dimensional design elements such as: line, form, space, value, texture and color. Employs a variety of media to develop a basic design vocabulary.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 60
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate recognition of design problems.
      1. Analyze design problems.
      2. Discuss and study art from different periods and regions to become familiar with how other artists have solved design problems.
      3. Experiment visually and develop a direction for the design problem.
    2. Practice principles of design.
      1. Achieve unity in the design.
      2. Develop a point of emphasis/focal point.
      3. Achieve balance in the design - asymmetrical, symmetrical, radial.
      4. Use scale, proportion, rhythm, shape, volume and texture in design.
    3. Create illusion of space.
      1. Use devices (size, overlapping, etc.) to show depth.
      2. Use transparencies to create equivocal space.
    4. Apply color theory to two-dimensional design.
      1. Work hue into design.
      2. Work color value into design.
      3. Employ color intensity into design.
      4. Utilize color schemes in design (complimentary colors, warm and cool colors, etc.)
  
  •  

    ART 116 - Three-Dimensional Design

    Credits: 3
    Examines a series of three-dimensional design/spacial composition problems using a variety of basic materials.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 111  and ART 115  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 60
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the three-dimensional basic principles of Art/Architecture/Sculpture in a historical and/or present day contexts.
      1. Design and complete 3-D projects utilizing composition-design principles such as proportion, symmetry, scale, movement, etc.
      2. Design and complete 3-D projects incorporating color dynamics such as hue, value, intensity, etc.
      3. Design and complete 3-D projects demonstrating themes such as realism, symbolism, allegorical, visually, etc.
      4. Differentiate the history of contemporary sculptors and architects related to the specific assignments.
  
  •  

    ART 151W - Art History and Appreciation I

    Credits: 3
    Required of all first-year Art & Design majors. Surveys Western art and architecture from Prehistoric through Early Renaissance eras. Focuses on architecture, sculpture, and painting from Prehistoric, Ancient Egyptian, Ancient Greek and Roman, Early Christian, art of the Middle Ages, and Early Renaissance master pieces. Credit may be earned in ART 151W or ART 151HW, but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe informed relationships between works of art and the historical period and culture in which it was created.
      1. Describe artworks in relation to the originating culture.
      2. Identify aesthetic, political, technological, and spiritual values which influenced or are represented in works of art.
      3. Articulate a recognition of and appreciation for cultural values inherent in works of art.
    2. Recognize styles and identify specific works of art from a variety of the world’s ancient cultures.
      1. Identify specific examples of art by artist, historical period, style, and culture as appropriate.
    3. Demonstrate a basic vocabulary for the discussion of works of art.
      1. Use, in writing and discussion, specific art terms such as form, texture, composition, symmetry, pattern, symbolism, color, foreground.
      2. Describe works of art correctly, using this vocabulary in historical and cultural contexts for specific works of art.
    4. Demonstrate effective writing skills.
      1. Write effective essays as a means of demonstrating their understanding of the concepts and knowledge from Outcomes I, II, and III.
    5. Demonstrate critical thinking skills.
      1. Evaluate previously unseen works in terms described in Outcomes I, II, III.
      2. Propose a personal position based on their own values in relation to these works.
      3. Advocate and defend personal choices and positions through informed and appropriate use of the values and vocabulary previously described.
  
  •  

    ART 152W - Art History and Appreciation II

    Credits: 3
    Required of all first-year Art & Design majors. Examines the history of Western modern art. Renaissance through contemporary periods. Emphasizes painting, sculpture, and architecture.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 or a minimum grade of “C” (2.0) in any approved college level composition I course.ART 151W  is highly recommended.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe informed relationships between works of art and the historical period and culture in which it was created.
      1. Describe artworks in relation to the originating culture.
      2. Identify aesthetic, political, technological, and spiritual values, which influenced or are represented in works of art.
      3. Articulate a recognition of and appreciation for cultural values inherent in works of art.
    2. Recognize styles and identify specific works of art from a variety of the world’s ancient cultures.
      1. Identify specific examples of art by artist, historical period, style, and culture as appropriate.
    3. Demonstrate a basic vocabulary for the discussion of works of art.
      1. Use, in writing and discussion, specific art terms such as form, texture, composition, symmetry, pattern, symbolism, color, and foreground.
      2. Describe works of art correctly, using this vocabulary in historical and cultural contexts for specific works of art.
    4. Demonstrate effective writing skills.
      1. Write effective essays as a means of demonstrating their understanding of the concepts and knowledge from Outcomes I, II, and III.
    5. Demonstrate critical thinking skills.
      1. Evaluate previously unseen works in terms described in Outcomes I, II, III
      2. Propose a personal position based on their own values in relation to these works.
      3. Advocate and defend personal choices and positions through informed and appropriate use of the values and vocabulary previously described.
  
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    ART 201 - Introduction to Graphic Design

    Credits: 3
    Introduces the fundamental principles, practices, and software of current creative industries. Identifies, applies, and practices design foundations through a survey of common creative industry assignments introducing basic standard software program techniques. Credit may be earned in ART 201 or ART 171 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify and assess the foundations of digital technologies used in the current creative industries.
      1. Define computer technology vocabulary, history, and current opportunities in the creative industries.
      2. Construct critical dialogue and written analysis of contemporary creative industry works and student projects.
    2. Describe and demonstrate basic industry standard tools, practices, and technology of the fundamental software applications used in all creative industries.
      1. Describe and assess file types, image resolution, and the current desktop operating system for Macs.
      2. Introduce and apply the foundations of multiple industry standard software programs through a survey of common graphic design and digital photograply industry scenarios including digital photography, digital image manipulation, digital illustration, page layout design and web design techinques.
  
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    ART 210 - Figure Drawing

    Credits: 3
    Introduces drawing of the human figure in pictorial space. Emphasizes in-depth awareness of the body’s underlying geometry and anatomical structure working with live model.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 111  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Develop a critical understanding of the major masses of the human body and their geometric equivalent, and to understand how these interlocking parts move in space relative to one another.
      1. Develop conceptual model through on-going lectures and demonstrations.
      2. Apply conceptual model during in-class drawing sessions.
      3. Synthesize information from in-class lectures and examples of master drawings.
      4. Present work to instructor for critical analysis.
      5. Review of work in written and verbal form by peers.
    2. Develop a beginning understanding of anatomy that will include the skeleton and major muscle groups that give the human body its particular form.
      1. Develop a working knowledge of anatomy through on-going lectures and demonstrations.
      2. Apply this knowledge during in-class drawing sessions.
      3. Work on anatomical drawings outside.
      4. Present work to instructor for critical analysis.
      5. Review of work in written and verbal form by peers.
    3. Sharpen perceptual and technical skills related to drawing the figure from observation.
      1. Utilize sighting and scanning techniques.
      2. Observe the effects of foreshortening on forms that comprise the human figure.
      3. Conceptualize the underlying structure of the human body so that it can be readily seen.
    4. Address formal and narrative concepts in figurative art.
      1. Discuss art historical references, and strategies for story telling in figurative art across culture and periods.
      2. Develop personal themes through informal writing in sketchbooks.
      3. Develop variations on themes through sketches.
    5. Interact productively with others in the studio environment.
      1. Participate in peer review.
      2. Engage in arranged and impromptu discussions on the progress of student work.
      3. Share resources and space.
  
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    ART 217 - Painting I

    Credits: 3
    Identifies, demonstrates, and discusses painting concepts and techniques. Interprets and analyzes various processes from traditional to contemporary painting styles.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 112 , ART 115  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify art historically relevant painting schools and traditions.
      1. Discuss formal, technical, and pedagogical aspects of various painting styles.
      2. Summarize formal, technical, and pedagogical aspects of various painting styles.
    2. Demonstrate various painting applications, methods, and techniques.
      1. Demonstrate formal, technical, and pedagogical lessons.
      2. Interpret various painting methods and techniques.
    3. Summarize critical analysis of painting concepts.
      1. Analyze applied painting concepts through written critique.
      2. Analyze applied painting concepts through oral critique.
  
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    ART 218 - Painting II

    Credits: 3
    Discusses relevant classical, modern and contemporary painting concepts and techniques. Constructs paintings based on self-devised painting styles and methods. Analyzes critically and defends individual painting portfolio.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 217  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Discuss relevant classical, modern, and contemporary painting schools and traditions.
      1. Identify formal, technical, and pedagogical aspects of various painting styles.
      2. Summarize formal, technical, and pedagogical aspects of various painting styles.
    2. Construct paintings based on self-devised painting styles and methods.
      1. Assess learned painting methods.
      2. Demonstrate synthesis of ideas and painting methods.
    3. Argue application of painting concepts.
      1. Defend applied painting concepts through written critique.
      2. Defend applied painting concepts through oral critique.
  
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    ART 220 - Mural Painting

    Credits: 3
    Introduces techniques in mural painting with an emphasis on community involvement.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 112  and ART 115  both with a grade of “C” or better.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify historically significant murals and works of public art.
      1. Collect and categorize examples of public murals to draw inspiration from.
      2. Develop a working knowledge of the history of mural painting through assigned reading and in class presentations.
    2. Prepare a proposal for a public mural.
      1. Describe the process of submitting a public art proposal.
      2. Prepare a proposal for a public mural.
    3. Apply the various methods of mural and large-format painting.
      1. Employ painting applications within a large, formal, collaborative public project.
  
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    ART 222 - Sculpture

    Credits: 3
    Identifies, demonstrates and discusses sculptural concepts and techniques. Interprets and analyzes various processes from traditional to contemporary sculptural styles. Employs a variety of sculptural methods using a variety of sculptural media to produce sculpture.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 116  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify art historically relevant sculptural styles and processes.
      1. Discuss formal, technical, and pedagogical aspects of various sculpture.
      2. Summarize formal, technical, and pedagogical aspects of various sculptural styles.
    2. Demonstrate various sculptural methods and techniques to produce sculpture.
      1. Interpret various methods of fabricating sculpture.
      2. Apply relevant concurrent technologies to produce sculpture.
    3. Summarize critical analysis of sculptural concepts.
      1. Analyze applied sculptural concepts through written critiques of sculpture.
      2. Analyze applied sculptural concepts through oral critiques of sculpture.
  
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    ART 224 - Photography

    Credits: 3
    Identifies, demonstrates, and discusses photographic concepts and techniques. Interprets and analyzes various processes from traditional to contemporary photographic styles. Employs concurrent technologies. Course intended for Art and Design Majors. Credit may be earned in only one of ART 101, ART 206, or ART 224.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 60
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify art historically relevant photographic styles and processes.
      1. Discuss formal, technical, and pedagogical aspects of various photographic styles.
      2. Summarize formal, technical, and pedagogical aspects of various photographic styles.
    2. Demonstrate various photographic methods and techniques to produce a photograph.
      1. Interpret various methods of constructing photographic images.
      2. Apply relevant concurrent technologies to produce photographs.
    3. Evaluate critical analysis of photographic concepts.
      1. Analyze applied photographic concepts through written critiques of photographs.
      2. Analyze applied photographic concepts through oral critiques of photographs.
  
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    ART 225W - Advanced Photography

    Credits: 3
    Expands artistic and professional tools. Adds advanced technical skills in camera and lighting to develop an individual photographic style. Uses film and digital photography assignments emphasizing experimentation in multiple areas including “in camera” compositing, professional artificial lighting techniques, non-traditional cameras, and color management techniques. Students will supply their own camera. Credit may be earned in only one of: ART 102, ART 206, or ART 225W.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 224  and ART 241  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 60
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Create an individual photographic style.
      1. Demonstrate knowledge of the formal, technical, and pedagogical aspects of various photographic techniques.
      2. Apply the formal, technical, and pedagogical aspects of various photographic techniques.
      3. Demonstrate various advanced photographic methods and techniques to produce body of photographic work.
    2. Demonstrate advanced understanding of photographic aesthetics.
      1. Proficiently interpret various methods of constructing photographic images.
      2. Apply research and creative problem solving techniques to photographic projects.
      3. Apply relevant concurrent advanced and experimental technologies to produce photographs.
    3. Critically analyze using photographic concepts.
      1. Analyze using applied photographic concepts through written and verbal critiques of photographs.
      2. Evaluate using applied photographic concepts through written and verbal critiques of photographs.
  
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    ART 231 - Ceramics I

    Credits: 3
    Identifies, demonstrates, and discusses basic clay hand building techniques and surface design. Interprets and analyzes various processes of traditional and contemporary ceramic styles. Employs a variety of methods to produce ceramic vessels and objects.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify art historically relevant ceramic styles and processes.
      1. Discuss formal, technical, and pedagogical aspects of various ceramic traditions.
      2. Summarize formal, technical, and pedagogical aspects of various ceramic styles.
    2. Demonstrate various technical clay construction methods to produce hand-built or wheel-thrown ceramic vessels and objects.
      1. Interpret various methods of fabricating ceramic vessels and objects.
      2. Apply relevant concurrent technologies to produce ceramic vessels and objects.
    3. Use ceramic glazing and surface design techniques.
      1. Apply ceramic glazes, oxidization, marbling, and slip to produce surface designs on three-dimensional clay vessels and objects.
    4. Summarize critical analysis of ceramic concepts.
      1. Analyze applied ceramic concepts through written critiques.
      2. Analyze applied ceramic concepts through oral critiques.
  
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    ART 232 - Ceramics II

    Credits: 3
    Identifies, demonstrates, and discusses wheel throwing and clay mold making techniques. Generates complex ceramic surface design. Interprets and analyzes various traditional and contemporary ceramic processes. Employs a variety of methods to produce a portfolio of ceramic vessels and objects.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 231  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify advanced art historically relevant ceramic styles and processes.
      1. Discuss advanced formal, technical, and pedagogical aspects of various ceramic traditions.
      2. Summarize advanced formal, technical, and pedagogical aspects of various ceramic styles.
    2. Demonstrate advanced technical clay construction methods to produce a portfolio of ceramic vessels and objects.
      1. Interpret advanced methods of fabricating ceramic object portfolio.
      2. Apply advanced concurrent technologies to produce ceramic object portfolio.
    3. Use ceramic glazing and surface design technique.
      1. Apply advanced ceramic surface designs methods to portfolio of clay vessels and objects.
    4. Summarize critical analysis of ceramic concepts.
      1. Analyze advanced applied ceramic concepts through written critiques.
    5. Exhibit basic knowledge of a high temperature reduction firing, and be able to differentiate and identify between wares that have been fired using different firing techniques.
      1. Participate in some stage of faculty facilitated high-temperature reduction kiln firing.
      2. Distinguish visually between wares fired using different firing techniques.
  
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    ART 241 - Graphics Studio 1

    Credits: 3
    Introduces digital photography manipulation software. Identifies and applies basic to advanced image manipulation techniques through projects relevant to current graphic design and photography industries. Credit may be earned in ART 241 or ART 271 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify and assess the foundations of digital image manipulation.
      1. Define digital image manipulation vocabulary, history, standard practices, and current industry trends.
      2. Construct critical dialogue and written analysis of contemporary graphic design and digital photography works in addition to student projects.
    2. Describe and demonstrate basic to advanced industry standard tools, practices, and current technology used in digital image manipulation.
      1. Describe and apply industry standard digital photography capture, correction, and manipulation software techniques to current photography industry scenarios.
      2. Describe and apply industry standard graphic design software techniques to print design and web design scenarios.
  
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    ART 242 - Graphics Studio 2

    Credits: 3
    Introduces digital illustration and page layout software. Identifies and applies vector illustration and page layout techniques to projects relevant to digital illustration and page layout design industries. Credit may be earned in only one of: ART 242; or both ART 276 and ART 277.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify and assess the foundations of digital illustration and page layout design.
      1. Define digital illustration and page layout vocabulary, history, standard practices and current industry trends.
      2. Construct critical dialogue and written analysis of contemporary illustration and graphic design works in addition to student projects.
    2. Describe and demonstrate basic to advanced industry standard tools, practices, and current technologies used in digital illustration and page layout design.
      1. Identify and apply research, brainstorming, sketching, and creative problem solving techniques to projects.
      2. Describe and apply basic to advanced industry standard digital illustration software techniques to current digital illustration industry scenarios within the graphic design industry.
      3. Describe and apply industry standard type design, page layout, and multi-page software techniques to common print design scenarios within the graphic design industry.
  
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    ART 243 - Graphics Studio 3

    Credits: 3
    Introduces the foundations of web design. Identifies and applies basic HTML and CSS code through web design software to projects relevant to the current trends in the web design industry. Credit may be earned in ART 243 or ART 279 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 241  or ART 242  with a grade of “C” or better.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify and assess the foundations of web design
      1. Define web design vocabulary, history, standard practices, and current industry trends.
      2. Construct critical dialogue and written analysis of contemporary web design works, current and future web design technology, and student projects.
    2. Describe and demonstrate industry standard tools, practices, and current technology used in web design.
      1. Apply research, brainstorming, and site map creation techniques to web design projects.
      2. Describe and apply standard techniques of effective web design file preparation.
      3. Describe and apply current HTML and CSS standard practices to web design industry scenarios.
      4. Describe and apply basic industry standard web design software techniques to current web design industry scenarios.
  
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    ART 251W - Architectural History

    Credits: 3
    Examines the historical development of architecture as a major art form. Emphasizes this development in relation to man’s knowledge of building techniques and available materials as affected by geographic, economic, political, and religious influences.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3; or any English Composition 1 course with a grade of “C” or higher; or ART 152W with a grade of “C” or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Draw informed relationships between works of architecture and the historical period and culture in which it was created.
      1. Describe architecture in relation to the originating culture.
      2. Identify aesthetic, political, technological, and spiritual values which influenced or are represented in works of architecture.
      3. Articulate a recognition of and appreciation for cultural values inherent in works of architecture.
    2. Recognize styles and identify specific works of architecture from a variety of the world’s ancient cultures.
      1. Identify specific examples of architecture by artist, historical period, style, and culture as appropriate.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of a basic vocabulary for the discussion of works of art.
      1. Use, in writing and discussion, specific architectural terms such as form, function, symbolism, rustication, pilaster, corbel arch, etc.
      2. Describe works of architecture correctly, using this vocabulary in historical and cultural contexts for specific works of architecture.
    4. Demonstrate effective writing skills.
      1. Write effective essays as a means of demonstrating their understanding of the concepts and knowledge from Outcomes I, II, and III.
    5. Demonstrate critical thinking skills.
      1. Evaluate previously unseen architecture in terms described in Outcomes I, II, III.
      2. Propose a personal position based on their own values in relation to these buildings.
      3. Advocate and defend personal choices and positions through informed and appropriate use of the values and vocabulary previously described.
  
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    ART 255W - Contemporary Art History

    Credits: 3
    Examines Contemporary Art using contemporary theoretical methods. Engages in readings, discussions, and written analysis of globally recognized artists, artworks, and stylistic trends.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3; or any ENG Composition I course with a grade of “C” or higher; or ART 152W  with a grade of “C” or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify art historically relevant styles and artworks from contemporary global culture.
      1. Classify specific contemporary artists and artworks into relevant stylitic trends or movements
    2. Use relevant art historical vocabulary in discussion of contemporary art.
      1. Describe contemporary artworks
      2. Analyze contemporary artworks employing contemporary theoretical analytic methods such as: formalism, iconography, Marxism, feminism, biography, semiology, deconstuction, and psychoanalysis
    3. Construct various effective written analysis of contemporary images
      1. Employ formalist, iconographic, Marxist, feminist, biographical, semiological, deconstructive, and psychoanalytic methodologies in written analysis of contemporary artworks
  
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    ART 256W - Art History Travel

    Credits: 3
    Examines art from major collections in specified locale. Provides opportunity for travel, engagement in related readings, and a variety of discussions on artworks, relevant museum(s), and historical contexts. Includes written formal analysis using contemporary theoretical methods. Expenses for travel are the responsibility of the student.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of any ENG Composition I course with a grade of “C” or higher; or ART 152W  with a grade of “C” or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify art styles and artworks that are historically relevant.
      1. Classify specific artists and artworks into relevant stylistic trends or movements.
    2. Use relevant art historical vocabulary in discussion of art.
      1. Describe artworks.
      2. Analyze artworks employing contemporary theoretical analytic methods such as; formalism, iconography, Marxism, feminism, semiology, deconstruction and psychoanalysis.
    3. Construct various effective written analyses of works of art.
      1. Employ contemporary theoretical analytic methods to construct written analyses of artworks.
    4. Travel to specified location to visit major art museum collections.
      1. Examine artworks face-to-face.
      2. Relate artworks to readings and discussions.
  
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    ART 262 - Art and Design Internship

    Credits: 1-3
    The internship opportunity provides hands-on work experience in an off-site professional Art or Design business, company, gallery, museum, or organization. Requires 2 hours per week per credit hour under direct supervision of onsite internship coordinator.

    Prerequisite(s): Second year art student with minimum of a 2.5 GPA and instructor approval.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30/90
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate advanced skills related to the individual Art or Design internship.
      1. Operate equipment and/or software related to Art or Design internship.
      2. Perform related tasks as needed at the direction of on-site internship facililtator.
    2. Successfully complete a total of 30, 60, or 90 hours of internship work within the scheduled semester.
      1. Provide weekly progress reports to faculty facilitator.
      2. Furnish written performance self-examination at conclusion of internship.
  
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    ART 280 - Printmaking

    Credits: 3
    Explores various traditional and contemporary printmaking methods and techniques to produce prints. Employs concurrent technologies such as block printing press and digital imaging methods.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 112  and ART 115  both with a grade of “C” or better.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify various printmaking methods.
      1. Classify specific printmaking methods such as block printing, intaglio printing, lithography, screen printing, digital printing, etc.
    2. Use relevant tools and techniques in construction of print matrices.
      1. Employ relevant block cutting tools on wood or linoleum to cut a block matrix
      2. Use associated metal plates and/or chemistry to incise or etch an inaglio plate
      3. Use associated lithographic crayon/s, touche/s and gum/s to etch the lithographic matrix
    3. Employ various print equipment to create printed images.
      1. Employ printing press to pull prints
      2. Employ concurrent technologies to produce prints
    4. Explore various papers to create prints.
      1. Use rice paper, rag paper, handmade paper, digital paper, and other print papers to create printed images
  
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    ART 284 - Typography

    Credits: 3
    Provides an introduction to the fundamental aspects of typography. Identifies and applies the history of typography, vocabulary terms, and foundational typography techniques to a survey of typography design assignments.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 241  or ART 242  with a grade of “C” or higher.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify the foundations of Typography.
      1. Define and access typography design vocabulary, history, standard practices, and current industry trends.
      2. Construct critical dialogue and writing analysis of historical and contemporary type design works, in addition to student projects.
    2. Demonstrate industry standard tools, practices, and current technology used in typography design.
      1. Apply research and brainstorming techniques to industry standard typography design projects.
      2. Apply standard guidelines in custom typography creation for web and print design projects.
      3. Apply industry standard typography design software techniqes to current type design indurstry scenarios.
  
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    ART 286 - Digital Animation

    Credits: 3
    Introduces the fundamentals of digital animation. Identifies and applies various digital animation techniques to a survey of projects using industry standard digital animation software.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 241  or ART 242  with a grade of “C” or higher
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify the foundations of digital animation.
      1. Define web design vocabulary, history, standard practices, and current industry trends.
      2. Construct critical dialogue and written analysis of historical and contemporary digital animation works current and future technology, and student projects.
    2. Demonstrate industry standard tools, practices, and current technology used in digital animation.
      1. Apply research, brainstorming, character development, and story boarding techniques to digital animation projects.
      2. Apply standard techniques of effective digital animation file preparation.
      3. Apply industry standard digital animation software techniqes to a survey of relevant digital animation industry scenarios.
  
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    ART 289 - Art and Design Portfolio

    Credits: 3
    Completes an art portfolio package for both school applications and job applications. Credit may be earned in only one of ART 288, ART 289 or IHU 289.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 112 , ART 116  and ART 152W  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify the foundations of current industry trends in portfolio presentation.
      1. Explore best practices in portfolio presentation.
      2. Construct critical dialogue and written analysis of portfolio pieces.
      3. Demonstrate professional written and presentation skills of final portfolio packages.
    2. Identify industry standard tools and current technologies used in portfolio creation.
      1. Demonstrate standard techniques in effective artwork documentation.
      2. Demonstrate standard techniques in effective digital and printed portfolio book creation.
      3. Demonstrate a survey of standard techniques in creating portfolio package collateral.
  
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    ART 290-299 - Special Projects in Art


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Astronomy

  
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    AST 111 - Introduction to Astronomy

    Credits: 3
    Observes celestial objects in the night sky and studies their motions. Discusses the origin, characteristics, and evolution of the solar system, stars, and galaxies. Emphasizes the way in which our understanding of the universe has changed over human history through the study of astronomy and uses astronomical instruments. 

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 2.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Explain aspects of science related to the night sky.
      1. Describe how the positions of objects in the sky change both nightly and monthly.
      2. Discuss both the celestial sphere and also the system of celestial coordinates of the sky (horizon and equator systems).
      3. Describe how our time-keeping and seasons are connected to the changing night sky.
      4. Explain the phases of the Moon from the Moon’s motion around the Earth.
      5. Explain eclipses from the relative motion of the Earth, Sun, and Moon.
      6. Discuss both the precession of the North Celestial Pole and also equinoxes.
      7. Interpret star maps.
      8. Discuss the consequences of light pollution.
    2. Explain foundations of astronomy and the history of space exploration.
      1. Explain how astronomy is primarily an observational science.
      2. Explain the importance of the scientific method in astronomy.
      3. Use scientific notation with astronomical measurements and calculations.
      4. Identify astrology as a pseudoscience.
      5. Discuss the controversy over the benefits of space exploration.
      6. Evaluate the chance of finding life elsewhere in the universe.
      7. Explain some of the techniques used to search for extraterrestrial life.
    3. Explain aspects of the history of astronomy.
      1. Describe how ancient civilizations attempted to explain the heavens in terms of the Earth-centered model of the universe (Geocentric model).
      2. Identify some ancient societies that had relatively sophisticated knowledge of celestial objects and features of the Earth.
      3. Explain the modern view of the Sun-centered solar system (Heliocentric model) and its supporting evidence.
    4. Explain aspects of the primary science used in astronomy.
      1. Explain Kepler’s law of planetary motion.
      2. Explain the concept of gravity and its relation to planetary motion.
      3. Describe how stellar distances are determined.
      4. Explain that radiation consists of more than visible light.
      5. Explain the basic concepts of modern spectroscopy.
      6. Describe the different types of spectra.
      7. Describe how motion changes our measurements of radiation.
      8. Describe how we know the Universe is expanding.
      9. Explain how the temperature of an object is determined by its emitted radiation.
      10. Describe the different types of optical telescopes and how they work.
      11. Identify the advantages of radio astronomy.
    5. Explain aspects of our solar system.
      1. Describe the major steps in the evolution of the solar system.
      2. Explain the motion of the planets both as seen from Earth and also as viewed in the solar system.
      3. Compare and contrast the properties of the terrestrial and Jovian planets.
      4. Compare and contrast the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets in terms of temperature, pressure, and chemical composition.
      5. Explain how Earth became the only planet with abundant life.
      6. Compare and contrast the geologic and atmospheric development of both Venus and also Earth in terms of their respective greenhouse effects.
      7. Explain how Earth’s atmosphere is changing and what the risks of those changes are.
      8. Describe the nature and origin of the Earth’s magnetosphere and the causes of the northern and southern lights.
      9. Compare and contrast the major moons of the Solar System.
      10. Explain what we have learned about Earth’s Moon.
      11. Discuss the origin of asteroids, comets, and meteoroids.
      12. Describe the relationship between meteoroids, meteorites, meteors, and meteor showers.
      13. Discuss the possible risk to Earth from collisions with near-Earth asteroids or comets, including evidence of previous collisions.
      14. Discuss and explain recent discoveries within the Solar System.
    6. Explain aspects of stellar evolution (including our Sun) and of galaxies.
      1. Describe stellar evolution.
      2. Restate properties of the Sun.
      3. Describe how our Sun relates to other stars.
      4. Identify the major types of solar activity.
      5. Explain why stars shine.
      6. Explain the difference between absolute and apparent brightness.
      7. Describe how stars are charaterized according to their brightness and surface temperature (Hertzprung-Russell Diagram).
      8. Describe supernova.
      9. Explain how neutron stars and black holes fit into the theory of stellar evolution.
      10. Describe how black holes can trap matter and radiation.
      11. Describe the basic properties of ordinary galaxies.
    7. Demonstrate how to observe the universe both with the unaided eye and also with a telescope.
    1. Record naked eye observations.
    2. Record solar observations using various filters.
    3. Record observations of the Moon, planets, and deep space objects with a telescope.
  
  •  

    AST 111L - Astronomical Investigation

    Credits: 1
    Provides a variety of introductory investigations through laboratory experiments to enhance knowledge of introductory astronomy including celestial coordinates, planetary motion, astronomical laws, telescopes, scale of the solar system, stellar distances, evolution and other astronomical concepts. Identifies many constellations and stars in the current night sky.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 2, and AST 111  (or concurrent enrollment)
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: Natural Science Lab
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the night sky.
      1. Demonstrate the use of scientific notation, angular measure, astronomical measurements and terminology.
      2. Explain how the sun, the moon, and the stars appear to change their positions from night to night and from month to month.
      3. Describe how our time keeping and seasons are tied to the changing sky.
      4. Explain the celestial sphere and the system of celestial coordinates of the sky (horizon and equator systems).
      5. Demonstrate how to read star maps.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of planetary motion and the history of astronomy.
      1. Describe the motion of the planets as seen from the earth and as viewed in the solar system.
      2. Discuss how the observed motion of the planets led to our modern view of a sun-centered solar system (heliocentric model).
      3. Apply Kepler’s laws to explain planetary motion.
      4. Describe the mathematical concept of gravity and how it relates to planetary motion.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of telescopes and radiation.
      1. Describe the basic types and operation of optical telescopes.
      2. Determine the temperature of an object by observing the radiation it emits.
      3. Apply the basic concepts of modern spectroscopy.
      4. Describe how every element produces a distinctive and recognizable pattern of spectral lines.
      5. Identify the different spectra and how they are produced.
      6. Construct and assemble a working telescope.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the solar system.
      1. Describe the similarities and differences among the four terrestrial worlds.
      2. Compare and contrast the basic differences between the terrestrial and the Jovian planets.
      3. Describe the similarities and differences among the four Jovian worlds.
      4. Compute the scale size of the planets and their distances in the solar system by modeling.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of stellar evolution and how the distances to stars are determined.
      1. Use triangulation to compute the distance to objects in space.
      2. Describe the mechanism by which stars shine.
      3. Determine stellar distances by use of stellar luminosity.
      4. Describe the difference between absolute and apparent brightness.
      5. Demonstrate how stars are categorized according to their brightness and surface temperature (Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram).
      6. Describe stellar evolution (formation, life, and death of a star).
  
  •  

    AST 290-299 - Special Projects in Astronomy


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Auto Service Education Program (ASEP)

  
  •  

    AGM 110 - Automotive Electronics Service

    Credits: 4
    Introduces the operation, maintenance, and service of battery, charging, starting systems and GM electrical and electronic systems. Credit may be earned in AGM 110 or ACD 110 or SKGM 110 or AGM 131 but not in more than one.

    Prerequisite(s): Program Coordinator permission.
    Corequisite(s): AGM 112W , AGM 114 , AGM 134  
    Lecture Hours: 40 Lab Hours: 40
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Diagnose and repair of General Electrical Systems.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.
      1. Identify and interpret electrical/electronic system concern; determine necessary action.  P-1
      2. Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as electrical/electronic system operation, vehicle service history, service precautions, and technical service bulletins.  P-1
      3. Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification numbers (VIN, vehicle certification labels, and calibration decals).  P-1
      4. Diagnose electrical/electronic integrity for series, parallel and series-parallel circuits using principles of electricity (Ohm’s Law). P-1
      5. Use wiring diagrams during diagnosis of electrical circuit problems. P-1
      6. Demonstrate the proper use of a digital multimeter (DMM) during diagnosis of electrical circuit problems. P-1
      7. Check electrical circuits with a test light; determine necessary action. P-2
      8. Measure source voltage and perform voltage drop tests in electrical/electronic circuits using a voltmeter; determine necessary action. P-1
      9. Measure current flow in electrical/electronic circuits and components using an ammeter; determine necessary action. P-1
      10. Check continuity and measure resistance in electrical/electronic circuits and components using an ohmmeter; determine necessary action. P-1
      11. Check electrical circuits using fused jumper wires; determine necessary action. P-2
      12. Locate shorts, grounds, opens, and resistance problems in electrical/electronic circuits; determine necessary action. P-1
      13. Measure and diagnose the cause(s) of excessive key-off battery drain (parasitic draw); determine necessary action. P-1
      14. Inspect and test fusible links, circuit breakers, and fuses; determine necessary action. P-1
      15. Inspect and test switches, connectors, relays, solid state devices, and wires of electrical/electronic circuits; perform necessary action. P-1
      16. Repair wiring harnesses and connectors. P-1 1Q. Perform solder repair of electrical wiring. P-1
    2. Diagnose and service battery systems. Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.
      1. Perform battery state-of-charge test; determine needed service. P-1 2B. Perform battery capacity test; confirm proper battery capacity for vehicle application; determine necessary action. P-1
      2. Maintain or restore electronic memory functions. P-1
      3. Perform slow/fast battery charge. P-2
      4. Inspect and clean battery cables, connectors, clamps, and hold-downs; repair or replace as needed. P-1
      5. Start a vehicle using jumper cables and a battery or auxiliary power supply. P-1
    3. Diagnose and repair starting systems. Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.
      1. Perform starter current draw tests; determine necessary action. P-1
      2. Perform starter circuit voltage drop tests; determine necessary action. P-1
      3. Inspect and test starter relays and solenoids; determine necessary action. P-2
      4. Remove and install starter in a vehicle. P-1
    4. Diagnose and repair charging systems. Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.
      1. Perform charging system output test; determine necessary action. P-1
      2. Diagnose charging system for the cause of undercharge, no-charge, and overcharge conditions. P-1
      3. Inspect, adjust, or replace generator (alternator) drive belts, pulleys, and tensioners; check pulley and belt alignment. P-2
      4. Remove, inspect, and install generator (alternator). P-1
      5. Perform charging circuit voltage drop tests; determine necessary action. P-1
  
  •  

    AGM 112W - Engine Service

    Credits: 6


    Introduces the operation, maintenance, and service of GM engines for mechanical performance. Stresses proper repair techniques and diagnosis of engine noises. Credit may be earned in AGM 112 or ACD 112 or SKGM 112 or AGM 141 but not in more than one.

    Prerequisite(s): Program Coordinator permission
    Corequisite(s): AGM 110 , AGM 114 , AGM 134  
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 75
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Diagnose General Engine; Removal and Reinstallation (R&R).  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 
            NATEF tasks as listed below.  

        A.        Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification numbers (VIN, vehicle certification labels, and calibration decals).  P-1

        B.        Inspect engine assembly for fuel, oil, coolant, and other leaks; determine necessary action. 

                    P-1

        C.        Diagnose engine noises and vibrations; determine necessary action.  P-2

        D.        Diagnose the cause of excessive oil consumption, unusual engine exhaust color, odor, and

                   sound; determine necessary action.  P-2

        E.        Perform engine vacuum tests; determine necessary action.  P-1

        F.         Perform cylinder power balance tests; determine necessary action.  P-1

        G.        Perform cylinder compression tests; determine necessary action.  P-1

        H.        Perform cylinder leakage tests; determine necessary action.  P-1

        I.          Remove and reinstall engine in a late model front-wheel drive vehicle (OBDI or newer);

                    reconnect all attaching components and restore the vehicle to running condition.  P-1

    2.    Diagnose and repair cylinder head and valve train.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Remove cylinder head(s); visually inspect cylinder head(s) for cracks; check gasket surface areas for warpage and leakage; check passage condition.  P-2

        B.        Install cylinder heads and gaskets; tighten according to manufacturer’s specifications and procedures.  P-1

        C.        Inspect valve springs for squareness and free height comparison; determine necessary action.  P-2

        D.        Replace valve stem seals on an assembled engine; inspect valve spring retainers, locks, and valve grooves; determine necessary action.  P-2

        E.        Inspect valve guides for wear; check valve stem-to-guide clearance; determine necessary action.  P-3

        F.         Inspect valves and valve seats; determine necessary action.  P-3

        G.        Check valve face-to-seat contact and valve seat concentricity (runout); determine necessary action.  P-3

        H.        Check valve spring assembled height and valve stem height; determine necessary action. P-3

        I.          Inspect pushrods, rocker arms, rocker arm pivots and shafts for wear, bending, cracks, looseness, and blocked oil passages (orifices); determine necessary action.  P-2

        J.         Inspect hydraulic or mechanical lifters; determine necessary action.  P-2

        K.        Adjust valves (mechanical or hydraulic lifters).  P-1

        L.         Inspect camshaft drives (including gear wear and backlash, sprocket and chain wear); determine necessary action.  P-2

        M.        Inspect and replace timing belts (chains), overhead camdrive sprockets, and tensioners; check belt/chain tension; adjust as necessary.  P-1

        N.        Inspect camshaft for runout, journal wear and lobe wear.  P-2

        O.        Inspect camshaft bearing surface for wear, damage, out-of-round, and alignment; determine necessary action.  P-3

        P.         Establish camshaft(s) timing and cam sensor indexing according to manufacturer’s specifications and procedures. P-1

    3.    Diagnose and repair engine block assembly.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Disassemble engine block; clean and prepare components for inspection and reassembly. P-2

        B.        Inspect engine block for visible cracks, passage condition, core and gallery plug condition, and surface warpage; determine necessary action.  P-2

        C.        Inspect internal and external threads; restore as needed (includes installing thread inserts). P-2

        D.        Inspect and measure cylinder walls for damage, wear, and ridges; determine necessary action.  P-2

        E.        Deglaze and clean cylinder walls.  P-2

        F.         Inspect and measure camshaft bearings for wear, damage, out-of-round, and alignment; determine necessary action.  P-3

        G.        Inspect crankshaft for end play, straightness, journal damage, keyway damage, thrust flange and sealing surface condition, and visual surface cracks; check oil passage   
                    condition; measure journal wear; check crankshaft sensor reluctor ring (where applicable); determine  necessary action.  P-2

        H.        Inspect and measure main and connecting rod bearings for damage, clearance, and end play; determine necessary action (includes the proper selection of bearings).  P-2

        I.         Identify piston and bearing wear patterns that indicate connecting rod alignment and main bearing bore problems; inspect rod alignment and bearing bore condition.  P-3

        J.        Inspect and measure pistons; determine necessary action.  P-2

        K.       Remove and replace piston pin.  P-3

        L.       Inspect, measure, and install piston rings.  P-1

        M.      Inspect auxiliary (balance, intermediate, idler, counterbalance or silencer) shaft(s); inspect shaft(s) and support bearings for damage and wear; determine necessary    
                  action; reinstall and time.  P-2

        N.      Inspect or replace crankshaft vibration damper (harmonic balancer).  P-3

        O.      Assemble the engine using gaskets, seals, and formed-in-place (tube-applied) sealants, thread sealers, etc. according to manufacturer’s specifications.  P-2

    4.   Diagnose and repair lubrication and cooling systems.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.      Perform oil pressure tests; determine necessary action.  P-1

        B.      Inspect oil pump gears or rotors, housing, pressure relief devices, and pump drive; perform  necessary action.  P-2

        C.      Perform cooling system, cap, and recovery system tests (pressure, combustion leakage, and temperature); determine necessary action.  P-1

        D.      Inspect, test, and replace thermostat and housing.  P-2

        E.      Inspect, test, remove, and replace water pump.  P-1

        F.       Inspect, test, and replace oil temperature and pressure switches and sensors.  P-2

  
  •  

    AGM 114 - Brakes, ABS, TCS Service

    Credits: 5


    Introduces the operation, maintenance, and service of GM base brakes, anti-lock and traction control. Presents general auto lab equipment operation and stresses safety. Credit may be earned in AGM 114 or ACD 114 or SKGM 114 or AGM 132 but not in more than one.

    Prerequisite(s): Program Coordinator permission
    Corequisite(s): AGM 110 , AGM 112W , AGM 134  
    Lecture Hours: 40 Lab Hours: 60
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Diagnose general brake systems.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Identify and interpret brake system concern; determine necessary action.  P-1

        B.        Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as brake system operation,

                   vehicle service history, service precautions, and technical service bulletins.  P-1

        C.        Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification numbers (VIN, vehicle certification labels, calibration decals).  P-1

    2.    Diagnose and repair hydraulic system.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Diagnose pressure concerns in the brake system using hydraulic principles (Paschal’s Law).                 P-1

        B.        Measure brake pedal height; determine necessary action.  P-2

        C.        Check master cylinder for internal and external leaks and proper operation; determine necessary action.  P-2

        D.        Remove, bench bleed, and reinstall master cylinder.  P-1

        E.        Inspect brake lines, flexible hoses, and fittings for leaks, dents, kinks, rust, cracks, bulging or wear; tighten loose fittings and supports; determine necessary action.  P-2

        F.        Fabricate and/or install brake lines (double flare and ISO types); replace hoses, fittings, and supports as needed.  P-2

        G.        Select, handle, store, and fill brake fluids to proper level.  P-2

        H.        Bleed (manual, pressure, vacuum or surge) brake system.  P-1

        I.         Flush hydraulic system.  P-3

    3.    Diagnose and repair drum brake systems.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

     

        A.        Remove, clean (using proper safety procedures), inspect, and measure brake drums; determine necessary action.  P-1

        B.        Refinish brake drum.  P-1

        C.        Remove, clean, and inspect brake shoes, springs, pins, clips, levers, adjusters/self-adjusters, other related brake hardware, and backing support plates; lubricate and

                   reassemble.  P-1

        D.        Remove, inspect, and install wheel cylinders.  P-2

        E.        Pre-adjust brake shoes and parking brake before installing brake drums or drum/hub assemblies and wheel bearings.  P-1

        F.        Install wheel, torque lug nuts, and make final checks and adjustments.  P-1

    4.    Diagnose and repair disc brake systems.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Remove caliper assembly from mountings; clean and inspect for leaks and damage to caliper housing; determine necessary action.  P-1

        B.        Clean and inspect caliper mounting and slides for wear and damage; determine necessary action.  P-1

        C.        Remove, clean, and inspect pads and retaining hardware; determine necessary action.  P-1

        D.        Disassemble and clean caliper assembly; inspect parts for wear, rust, scoring, and damage; replace seal, boot, and damaged or worn parts.  P-2

        E.        Reassemble, lubricate, and reinstall caliper, pads, and related hardware; seat pads, and inspect for leaks  P-1

        F.        Clean, inspect, and measure rotor with a dial indicator and a micrometer; follow manufacturer’s recommendations in determining need to machine or replace.  P-1

        G.        Remove and reinstall rotor.   P-1

        H.        Refinish rotor according to manufacturer’s recommendations.  P-1

        I.         Install wheel, torque lug nuts, and make final checks and adjustments.  P-1

    5.    Diagnose and repair power assist units.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Test pedal free travel with and without engine running; check power assist operation.  P-2

        B.        Check vacuum supply (manifold or auxiliary pump) to vacuum-type power booster.  P-2

        C.        Inspect the vacuum-type power booster unit for vacuum leaks; inspect the check valve for proper operation; determine necessary action.  P-2

    6.    Diagnose and repair miscellaneous (wheel bearings, parking brakes, electrical I, etc.)  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3

           NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Remove, clean, inspect, repack, and install wheel bearings and replace seals; install hub and adjust wheel bearings.  P-1

        B.        Check parking brake cables and components for wear, rusting, binding, and corrosion; clean, lubricate, or replace as needed.  P-2

        C.        Check parking brake operation; determine necessary action.  P-1

        D.        Check operation of parking brake indicator light system.  P-3

        E.        Check operation of brake stop light system; determine necessary action.  P-1

        F.         Replace wheel bearing and race.  P-1

        G.        Inspect and replace wheel studs.  P-1

        H.        Remove and reinstall sealed wheel bearing assembly.  P-2

    7.    Diagnose and repair antilock brake and traction control systems.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Identify and inspect antilock brake system (ABS) components; determine necessary action. P-1

        B.        Diagnose antilock brake system (ABS) electronic control(s) and components using self-diagnosis and/or recommended test equipment; determine necessary action.  P-1

        C.        Depressurize high-pressure components of the antilock brake system (ABS).  P-3

        D.        Bleed the antilock brake system’s (ABS) front and rear hydraulic circuits.  P-2

        E.        Remove and install antilock brake system (ABS) electrical/electronic and hydraulic components.  P-3

        F.        Test, diagnose and service ABS speed sensors, toothed ring (tone wheel), and circuits using a graphing multimeter (GMM)/digital storage oscilloscope (DSO) (includes   
                   output signal, resistance, shorts to voltage/ground, and frequency data).  P-1

        G.       Identify traction control system components.  P-3

  
  •  

    AGM 134 - Dealership Work Experience I

    Credits: 2
    Provides work experience in the operation, maintenance, and service of GM base brakes, engine mechanical and electrical systems particularly battery, charging and starting systems. Stresses general auto lab equipment operation and safety. Credit may be earned in AGM 134 or ACD 134 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): AGM 110 , AGM 112W , AGM 114  
    Lecture Hours: 6 Lab Hours: 600
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Diagnose/repair/service engines, brakes, and electrical systems to meet GM factory service information stnadards and NATEF task list requirements.
      1. Perform all necessary tasks on live customer vehicles to the customers satisfaction and industry standards.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge to document completed repairs.
  
  •  

    AGM 142 - Electronic Engine and Emission Controls Service

    Credits: 9


    Introduces the operation, maintenance, and service of GM engines for drivability performance. Stresses proper repair techniques and diagnosis of engine drivability problems. Credit may be earned in AGM 142 or SKGM 142 or ACD 142 but not in more than one.

    Prerequisite(s): AGM 112W  
    Corequisite(s): AGM 212W , AGM 143  
    Lecture Hours: 81 Lab Hours: 144
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Diagnose engine performance.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Identify and interpret engine performance concern; determine necessary action.  P-1

        B.        Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as engine management system operation, vehicle service history, service precautions, and technical service     
                   bulletins.  P-1

        C.        Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification numbers (VIN, vehicle certification labels, and calibration decals).  P-1

        D.        Diagnose abnormal exhaust color, odor, and sound; determine necessary action.  P-2

        E.        Perform engine absolute (vacuum/boost) manifold pressure tests; determine necessary action. P-1

        F.        Perform cylinder power balance test; determine necessary action.  P-1

        G.        Perform cylinder compression tests; determine necessary action.  P-1

        H.        Perform cylinder leakage test; determine necessary action.  P-1

        I.         Diagnose engine mechanical, electrical, electronic, fuel, and ignition concerns with an oscilloscope and/or engine diagnostic equipment; determine necessary action.  P-1

        J.         Verify engine operating temperature; determine necessary action.  P-1

        K.        Perform cooling system pressure tests; check coolant condition; inspect and test radiator, pressure cap, coolant recovery tank, and hoses; perform necessary action.  P-1

        L.         Verify correct camshaft timing.  P-2

    2.    Diagnose and repair computerized engine controls.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Retrieve and record stored OBD I diagnostic trouble codes; clear codes.  P-2

        B.        Retrieve and record stored OBD II diagnostic trouble codes; clear codes.  P-1

        C.        Diagnose the causes of emissions or driveability concerns resulting from malfunctions in the computerized engine control system with stored diagnostic trouble codes.  P-1

        D.        Diagnose the causes of emissions or driveability concerns resulting from malfunctions in the computerized engine control system with stored diagnostic trouble codes.  P-1

        E.        Check for module communication errors using a scan tool.  P-2

        F.        Inspect and test computerized engine control system sensors, powertrain control module (PCM), actuators, and circuits using a graphing multimeter (GMM)/digital storage

                   oscilloscope (DSO); perform necessary action.  P-1

        G.        Obtain and interpret scan tool data.  P-1

        H.        Access and use service information to perform step-by-step diagnosis.  P-1

    3.    Diagnose and repair ignition system.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Diagnose ignition system related problems such as no-starting, hard starting, engine misfire, poor driveability, spark knock, power loss, poor mileage, and emissions 
                   concerns on vehicles with electronic ignition (distributorless) systems; determine necessary action.  P-1

        B.        Diagnose ignition system related problems such as no-starting, hard starting, engine misfire, poor driveability, spark knock, power loss, poor mileage, and emissions
                   concerns on vehicles with distributor ignition (DI) systems; determine necessary action.  P-1

        C.        Inspect and test ignition primary circuit wiring and solid state components; perform necessary action.  P-2

        D.        Inspect, test and service distributor.  P-3

        E.        Inspect and test ignition system secondary circuit wiring and components; perform necessary action.  P-2

        F.        Inspect and test ignition coil(s); perform necessary action.  P-1

        G.       Check and adjust ignition system timing and timing advance/retard (where applicable).  P-3

        H.        Inspect and test ignition system pick-up sensor or triggering devices; perform necessary action.  P-1

    4.    Diagnose and repair fuel, air induction, and exhaust systems.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Check fuel for contaminants and quality; determine necessary action.  P-3

        B.        Inspect and test mechanical and electrical fuel pumps and pump control systems for pressure, regulation and volume; perform necessary action.  P-1

        C.        Inspect throttle body, air induction system, intake manifold and gaskets for vacuum leaks and/or unmetered air  P-2

        D.        Inspect and test fuel injectors.  P-2

        E.        Check idle speed and fuel mixture.  P-2

        F.        Adjust idle speed and fuel mixture.  P-3

        G.        Inspect the integrity of the exhaust manifold, exhaust pipes, muffler(s), catalytic converter(s), resonator(s), tail pipe(s), and heat shield(s); perform necessary action.  P-2

        H.        Perform exhaust system back-pressure test; determine necessary action.  P-1

    5.    Diagnose and repair emissions control systems–positive crankcase ventilation. Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF

           tasks as listed below.

        A.        Diagnose oil leaks, emissions, and driveability problems resulting from malfunctions in the positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) system; determine necessary action.  P-2

        B.        Inspect, test and service positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) filter/breather cap, valve, tubes, orifices, and hoses; perform necessary action.  P-2

    6.    Diagnose and repair emissions control systems–exhaust gas recirculation. Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as
           listed  below.

        A.        Diagnose emissions and driveability problems caused by malfunctions in the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system; determine necessary action.  P-1

        B.        Inspect, test, service and replace components of the EGR system, including EGR tubing, exhaust passages, vacuum/pressure controls, filters and hoses; perform
                    necessary action. P-2

        C.        Inspect and test electrical/electronic sensors, controls, and wiring of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) systems; perform necessary action.  P-2

    7.    Diagnose and repair emissions control systems–exhaust gas treatment.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed
           below.

        A.        Inspect and test catalytic converter performance.  P-1

    8.    Diagnose and repair emissions control systems–intake air temperature controls.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as
           listed below.

        A.        Diagnose emissions and driveability problems resulting from malfunctions in the intake air temperature control system; determine necessary action.  P-3

        B.        Inspect and test components of intake air temperature control system; perform necessary action.  P-3

    9.    Diagnose and repair emissions control systems–early fuel evaporation (intake manifold temperature) controls.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority                
           2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Diagnose emissions and driveability problems resulting from malfunctions in the early fuel evaporation control system; determine necessary action.  P-3

    10.  Diagnose and repair emissions control systems–evaporative emissions controls.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks
           as listed below.

        A.        Inspect and test components and hoses of evaporative emissions control system; perform necessary action.  P-1

        B.        Inspect and test components and hoses of evaporative emissions control system; perform  necessary action.  P-1

    11.  Diagnose and repair engine related service.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Adjust valves on engines with mechanical or hydraulic lifters.  P-1

        B.        Remove and replace timing belt; verify correct camshaft timing.  P-1

        C.        Remove and replace thermostat.  P-2

        D.        Inspect and test mechanical/electrical fans, fan clutch, fan shroud/ducting, air dams, and

                    fan control devices; perform necessary action.  P-1

  
  •  

    AGM 143 - Dealership Work Experience II

    Credits: 2
    Provides work experience in the operation, maintenance, and service of GM steering/suspension and drivability performance. Stresses basic spark, fuel, and emission control systems.

    Prerequisite(s): AGM 134  
    Corequisite(s): AGM 142 , AGM 212W  
    Lecture Hours: 6 Lab Hours: 600
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Diagnose/repair/service suspension/steering, engine performance/drivability, and electrical systems to meet factory service information standards and NATEF task list requirements.
      1. Perform all necessary tasks on live customer vehicles to the customer’s satisfaction and industry standards.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge to document completed repairs.
  
  •  

    AGM 210 - Body Electronics Service

    Credits: 3


    Stresses the operation, diagnosis, and service of GM body electrical and electronics systems. Credit may be earned in AGM 210 or SKGM 210 or ACD 210 or AGM 241, but not in more than one.

    Prerequisite(s): AGM 110  
    Corequisite(s): AGM 214  
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Diagnose, repair, and service general electrical systems.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Identify and interpret electrical/electronic system concern; determine necessary action.  P-1

        B.        Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as electrical/electronic system operation, vehicle service history, service precautions, and technical service
                    bulletins.  P-1

        C.        Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification numbers (VIN, vehicle certification labels, and calibration decals).  P-1

        D.        Diagnose electrical/electronic integrity for series, parallel and series-parallel circuits using principles of electricity (Ohm’s Law).  P-1

        E.        Use wiring diagrams during diagnosis of electrical circuit problems.  P-1

        F.         Demonstrate the proper use of a digital multimeter (DMM) during diagnosis of electrical circuit problems.  P-1

        G.        Check electrical circuits with a test light; determine necessary action.  P-2

        H.        Measure source voltage and perform voltage drop tests in electrical/electronic circuits using a voltmeter; determine necessary action.  P-1

        I.         Measure current flow in electrical/electronic circuits and components using an ammeter; determine necessary action.  P-1

        J.         Check continuity and measure resistance in electrical/electronic circuits and components using an ohmmeter; determine necessary action.  P-1

        K.        Check electrical circuits using fused jumper wires; determine necessary action.  P-2

        L.         Locate shorts, grounds, opens, and resistance problems in electrical/electronic circuits; determine necessary action.  P-1

        M.        Measure and diagnose the cause(s) of excessive key-off battery drain (parasitic draw); determine necessary action.  P-1

        N.        Inspect and test fusible links, circuit breakers, and fuses; determine necessary action.  P-1

        O.        Inspect and test switches, connectors, relays, solid state devices, and wires of electrical/electronic circuits; perform necessary action.  P-1

        P.        Repair wiring harnesses and connectors.  P-1

        Q.        Perform solder repair of electrical wiring  P-1

    2.    Diagnose, repair, and service lighting systems.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Diagnose the cause of brighter than normal, intermittent, dim, or no light operation; determine necessary action.  P-1

        B.        Inspect, replace, and aim headlights and bulbs.  P-2

        C.        Inspect and diagnose incorrect turn signal or hazard light operation; perform necessary action P-2

    3.    Diagnose, repair, and service gauges, warning devices and driver information systems.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3
           NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Inspect and test gauges and gauge sending units for cause of intermittent, high, low, or no gauge readings; determine necessary action.  P-1

        B.        Inspect and test connectors, wires, and printed circuit boards of gauge circuits; determine necessary action.  P-3

        C.        Diagnose the cause of incorrect operation of warning devices and other driver information systems; determine necessary action.  P-1

        D.        Inspect and test sensors, connectors, and wires of electronic instrument circuits; determine necessary action.  P-2

    4.    Diagnose, repair, and service horn, wiper/washer systems.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Diagnose incorrect horn operation; perform necessary action.  P-2

        B.        Diagnose incorrect wiper operation; diagnose wiper speed control and park problems. Perform necessary action.  P-2

        C.        Diagnose incorrect washer operation; perform necessary action.  P-2

    5.    Diagnose, repair, and service accessories.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Diagnose incorrect operation of motor-driven accessory circuits; determine necessary action. P-2

        B.        Diagnose incorrect heated glass operation; determine necessary action.  P-3

        C.        Diagnose incorrect electric lock operation; determine necessary action.  P-2

        D.        Diagnose incorrect operation of cruise control systems; determine necessary action.  P-3

        E.        Diagnose supplemental restraint system (SRS) concerns; determine necessary action. (Note: Follow manufacturer’s safety procedures to prevent accidental deployment.)  
                    P-2

        F.        Disarm and enable the airbag system for vehicle service.  P-1

        G.       Diagnose radio static and weak, intermittent, or no radio reception; determine necessary action.  P-3

        H.        Remove and reinstall door panel.  P-1

        I.         Diagnose body electronic system circuits using a scan tool; determine necessary action.  P-

        J.        Check for module communication errors using a scan tool.  P3

        K.        Diagnose the cause of false, intermittent, or no operation of anti-theft system.  P-2

  
  •  

    AGM 212W - Suspension System Service

    Credits: 7


    Introduces the operation, maintenance, and service of GM steering and suspension systems. Credit may be earned in AGM 212 or SKGM 212 or ACD 212 or AGM 133 but not in more than one.

    Prerequisite(s): Program Coordinator Permission
    Corequisite(s): AGM 110 , AGM 112W , AGM 134  
    Lecture Hours: 56 Lab Hours: 84
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Diagnose general suspension and steering systems.  Complete 95% of Priority1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Identify and interpret suspension and steering concern; determine necessary action.  P-1

        B.        Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as suspension and steering system operation, vehicle service history, service precautions, and technical service

                   bulletins.  P-1

        C.        Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification numbers (VIN, vehicle certification labels, calibration decals).  P-1

    2.    Diagnose and repair steering systems.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Diagnose steering column noises, looseness, and binding concerns (including tilt mechanisms); determine necessary action.  P-2

        B.        Diagnose power steering gear (non-rack and pinion) binding, uneven turning effort, looseness, hard steering, and fluid leakage concerns; determine necessary action.  P-3

        C.        Diagnose power steering gear (rack and pinion) binding, uneven turning effort, looseness, hard steering, and fluid leakage concerns; determine necessary action.  P-3

        D.        Inspect steering shaft universal-joint(s), flexible coupling(s), collapsible column, lock cylinder mechanism, and steering wheel; perform necessary action.  P-2

        E.        Adjust manual or power non-rack and pinion worm bearing preload and sector lash.  P-3

        F.        Remove and replace manual or power rack and pinion steering gear; inspect mounting bushings and brackets.  P-1

        G.        Inspect power steering fluid levels and condition.  P-1

        H.        Diagnose power steering fluid leakage; determine necessary action.  P-2

        I.         Remove, inspect, replace, and adjust power steering pump belt.

        J.         Remove and reinstall power steering pump.

        K.        Remove and reinstall power steering pump pulley; check pulley and belt alignment.  P-3

        L.         Inspect and replace power steering hoses and fittings.  P-2

        M.        Inspect and replace pitman arm, relay (centerlink/intermediate) rod, idler arm and mountings, and steering linkaage damper.  P-2

        N.        Inspect, replace, and adjust tie rod ends (sockets), tie rod sleeves, and clamps.  P-1

        O.        Test and diagnose components of electronically controlled steering systems using a scan tool; determine necessary action.  P-3

    3.    Diagnose and repair front suspension systems.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Diagnose short and long arm suspension system noises, body sway, and uneven riding height concerns; determine necessary action.  P-1

        B.        Diagnose strut suspension system noises, body sway, and uneven riding height concerns; determine necessary action.  P-1

        C.        Remove, inspect, and install upper and lower control arms, bushings, shafts, and rebound bumpers.  P-3

        D.        Remove, inspect, and install short and long arm suspension system coil springs and spring insulators.  P-2

        E.        Remove, inspect, install, and adjust suspension system torsion bars; inspect mounts.  P-3

        F.        Remove, inspect, and install stabilizer bar bushings, brackets, and links.  P-2

        G.        Remove, inspect, and install strut cartridge or assembly, strut coil spring, insulators

                   (silencers), and upper strut bearing mount.  P-1

        H.        Lubricate suspension and steering systems.  P-2

    4.    Diagnose and repair rear suspension systems.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Remove, inspect, and install coil springs and spring insulators.  P-2

        B.        Remove, inspect, and install leaf springs, leaf spring insulators (silencers), shackles, brackets, bushings, and mounts.  P-3

        C.        Remove, inspect, and install strut cartridge or assembly, strut coil spring, and insulators (silencers).  P-2

    5.    Diagnose and repair miscellaneous service.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Inspect, remove, and replace shock absorbers.  P-1

        B.        Remove, inspect, and service or replace front and rear wheel bearings.  P-1

    6.    Diagnose, adjust, and repair wheel alignment.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Differentiate between steering and suspension concerns using principles of steering  geometry (caster, camber, toe, etc).  P-1

        B.        Diagnose vehicle wander, drift, pull, hard steering, bump steer, memory steer, torque steer, and steering return concerns; determine necessary action.  P-1

        C.        Perform prealignment inspection; perform necessary action.  P-1

        D.        Measure vehicle riding height; determine necessary action  P-1

        E.        Check and adjust front and rear wheel camber; perform necessary action.  P-1

        F.        Check and adjust caster; perform necessary action.  P-1

        G.        Check and adjust front wheel toe; adjust as needed.  P-1

        H.        Center steering wheel.  P-1

        I.         Check toe-out-on-turns (turning radius); determine necessary action.  P-2

        J.         Check SAI (steering axis inclination) and included angle; determine necessary action.  P-2

        K.        Check and adjust rear wheel toe.  P-2

        L.         Check rear wheel thrust angle; determine necessary action.  P-2

        M.        Check for front wheel setback; determine necessary action.  P-2

        N.        Check front cradle (subframe) alignment; determine necessary action.  P-3

    7.    Diagnose and repair wheel and tire.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Diagnose tire wear patterns; determine necessary action.  P-1

        B.        Inspect tires; check and adjust air pressure.  P-1

        C.        Diagnose wheel/tire vibration, shimmy, and noise; determine necessary action.  P-2

        D.        Rotate tires according to manufacturer’s recommendations.  P-1

        E.        Measure wheel, tire, axle, and hub runout; determine necessary action.  P-2

        F.        Diagnose tire pull (lead) problem; determine necessary action.  P-2

        G.        Balance wheel and tire assembly (static and dynamic).  P-1

        H.        Dismount, inspect, repair, and remount tire on wheel.  P-2

        I.         Reinstall wheel; torque lug nuts.  P-1

        J.         Inspect and repair tire.  P-2

  
  •  

    AGM 214 - Heating/Air Conditioning

    Credits: 5


    Introduces the operation, maintenance, and service of GM Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning systems and their controls. Credit may be earned in AGM 214 or SKGM 214 or ACD 214 or AGM 233, but not in more than one.

    Prerequisite(s): AGM 143  
    Corequisite(s): AGM 210  
    Lecture Hours: 50 Lab Hours: 50
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Diagnose and repair A/C System.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Identify and interpret heating and air conditioning concern; determine necessary action.  P-1

        B.        Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as heating and air conditioning system operation, vehicle service history, service precautions, and technical
                   service bulletins.  P-1

        C.        Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification numbers (VIN, vehicle certification labels, calibration decals).  P-1

        D.        Performance test A/C system; diagnose A/C system malfunctions using principles of refrigeration.  P-1

        E.        Identify refrigerant type; conduct a performance test of the A/C system; determine necessary action.  P-1

        F.        Leak test A/C system; determine necessary action.  P-1

        G.        Inspect the condition of discharged oil; determine necessary action.  P-2

        H.        Determine recommended oil for system application.  P-1

    2.    Diagnose and repair refrigeration system compressor and clutch.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Inspect, test, and/or replace A/C compressor clutch components and/or assembly.  P-2

        B.        Remove and reinstall A/C compressor and mountings; measure oil quantity; determine necessary action.  P-1

    3.    Diagnose and repair refrigeration system evaporator, condenser, and related components.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 
           NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Determine need for an additional A/C system filter; perform necessary action.  P-3

        B.        Remove and inspect A/C system mufflers, hoses, lines, fittings, O-rings, seals, and service valves; perform necessary action.  P-2

        C.        Inspect A/C condenser for airflow restrictions; perform necessary action.  P-1

        D.        Remove and reinstall receiver/drier or accumulator/drier; measure oil quantity; determine necessary action.  P-1

        E.        Remove and install expansion valve or orifice (expansion) tube.  P-2

        F.        Inspect evaporator housing water drain; perform necessary action.  P-3

        G.        Remove and reinstall evaporator; measure oil quantity; determine necessary action.  P-3

        H.        Remove and reinstall condenser; measure oil quantity; determine necessary action.  P-3

    Outcome 4:    Diagnose and repair heating, ventilation, and engine cooling systems. Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF

                           tasks as listed below.

        A.        Diagnose temperature control problems in the heater/ventilation system; determine necessary action.  P-2

        B.        Perform cooling system, cap, and recovery system tests (pressure, combustion leakage, and temperature); determine necessary action.  P-1

        C.        Inspect engine cooling and heater system hoses and belts; perform necessary action.  P-1

        D.        Inspect, test, and replace thermostat and housing.  P-1

        E.        Inspect and test cooling fan, fan clutch, fan shroud, and air dams; perform necessary action.  P-1

        F.        Inspect and test electric cooling fan, fan control system and circuits; determine necessary  action  P-2

        G.        Inspect and test heater control valve(s); perform necessary action.  P-2

    Outcome 5:    Diagnose and repair operating systems and related controls.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed
                            below.

        A.        Diagnose malfunctions in the electrical controls of heating, ventilation, and A/C (HVAC) systems; determine necessary action.  P-2

        B.        Inspect and test A/C-heater blower, motors, resistors, switches, relays, wiring, and protection devices; perform necessary action.  P-1

        C.        Test and diagnose A/C compressor clutch control systems; determine necessary action.  P-1

        D.        Diagnose malfunctions in the vacuum and mechanical components and controls of the heating, ventilation, and A/C (HVAC) system; determine necessary action.  P-2

        E.        Inspect and test A/C-heater control panel assembly; determine necessary action.  P-3

        F.        Inspect and test A/C-heater control cables and linkages; perform necessary action.  P-3

        G.        Inspect A/C-heater ducts, doors, hoses, cabin filters and outlets; perform necessary action. P-3

        H.        Check operation of automatic and semi-automatic heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) control systems; determine necessary action.  P-3

    Outcome 6:    Recover, recycle, and handle refrigerant.  Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.

        A.        Perform correct use and maintenance of refrigerant handling equipment.  P-1

        B.        Identify (by label application or use of a refrigerant identifier) and recover A/C system refrigerant.  P-1

        C.        Recycle refrigerant.  P-1

        D.        Label and store refrigerant.  P-1

        E.        Test recycled refrigerant for non-condensable gases.  P-1

        F.        Evacuate and charge A/C system.  P-1

  
  •  

    AGM 218W - Automatic Electronic Transmission Service

    Credits: 8
    Introduces the operation, maintenance, and service of GM electronically controlled transmissions. Credit may be earned in AGM 218W or SKGM 218W or ACD 218W or AGM 232, but not in more than one.

    Prerequisite(s): AGM 143  
    Corequisite(s): Asep 106 , AGM 234  
    Lecture Hours: 80 Lab Hours: 100
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Diagnose general transmission and transaxle. Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.
      1. Identify and interpret transmission/transaxle concern; assure proper engine operation; determine necessary action. P-1
      2. Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as transmission/transaxle system operation, vehicle service history, service precautions, and technical service bulletins. P-1
      3. Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification numbers (VIN, vehicle certification labels, and calibration decals). P-1
      4. Diagnose fluid usage, level, and condition concerns; determine necessary action. P-1
      5. Perform pressure tests; determine necessary action. P-1
      6. Perform stall test; determine necessary action. P-2
      7. Perform lock-up converter system tests; determine necessary action. P-1
      8. Diagnose electronic, mechanical, hydraulic, vacuum control system concerns; determine necessary action. P-1
      9. Diagnose noise and vibration concerns; determine necessary action. P-2
      10. Diagnose transmission/transaxle gear reduction/multiplication concerns using driving, driven, and held member (power flow) principles. P-1
    2. Adjust and perform maintenance on transmission and transaxle. Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.
      1. Inspect, adjust or replace throttle valve (TV) linkages or cables; manual shift linkages or cables; transmission range sensor; check gear select indicator (as applicable). P-1
    3. Repair in-vehicle transmission and transaxle. Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.
      1. Inspect and replace external seals and gaskets. P-2
      2. Inspect extension housing, bushings and seals; perform necessary action. P-3
      3. Inspect, leak test, flush, and replace cooler, lines, and fittings. P-2
      4. Diagnose electronic transmission control systems using a scan tool; determine necessary action. P-1
    4. Repair of off-vehicle transmission and transaxle (removal, disassembly, and reinstallation). Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.
      1. Remove and reinstall transmission and torque converter (rear-wheel drive). P-2
      2. Remove and reinstall transaxle and torque converter assembly. P-1
      3. Disassemble, clean, and inspect transmission/transaxle. P-1
      4. Inspect, measure, clean, and replace valve body (includes surfaces and bores, springs, valves, sleeves, retainers, brackets, check-balls, screens, spacers, and gaskets). P-2
      5. Inspect servo bore, piston, seals, pin, spring, and retainers; determine necessary action. P-3
      6. Inspect accumulator bore, piston, seals, spring, and retainer; determine necessary action. P-3
      7. Assemble transmission/transaxle. P-1
    5. Repair of off-vehicle transmission and transaxle (oil pump and converter). Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.
      1. Inspect converter flex plate, attaching parts, pilot, pump drive, and seal areas. P-2
      2. Measure torque converter endplay and check for interference; check stator clutch. P-2
      3. Inspect, measure, and reseal oil pump assembly and components. P-1
    6. Repair of off-vehicle transmission and transaxle (gear train, shafts, bushings and case). Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.
      1. Measure endplay or preload; determine necessary action. P-1
      2. Inspect, measure, and replace thrust washers and bearings. P-2
      3. Inspect oil delivery seal rings, ring grooves, and sealing surface areas. P-2
      4. Inspect bushings; determine necessary action. P-2
      5. Inspect and measure planetary gear assembly (includes sun, ring gear, thrust washers, planetary gears, and carrier assembly); determine necessary action. P-2
      6. Inspect case bores, passages, bushings, vents, and mating surfaces;
  
  •  

    AGM 226 - Advance Engine Electronics & Fuel System Service (GM)

    Credits: 7
    Studies electronic inputs to the computerized engine controls; units of instruction necessary to develop a thorough understanding of induction systems and injection systems. Develops skills through controlled learning experiences with sensors, fuel delivery, and fuel injection systems.

    Prerequisite(s): AGM 112W  with a minimum grade of “C” (2.0)
    Corequisite(s): AGM 228W  
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Diagnose general engine. Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.
      1. Identify and interpret engine performance concern; determine necessary action. P-1
      2. Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as engine management system operation, vehicle service history, service precautions, and technical service bulletins. P-1
      3. Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification numbers (VIN, vehicle certification labels, and calibration decals). P-1
      4. Inspect engine assembly for fuel, oil, coolant, and other leaks; determine necessary action. P-2
      5. Diagnose abnormal engine noise or vibration concerns; determine necessary action. P-2
      6. Diagnose abnormal exhaust color, odor, and sound; determine necessary action. P-2
      7. Perform engine absolute (vacuum/boost) manifold pressure tests; determine necessary action. P-1
      8. Perform cylinder power balance test; determine necessary action. P-1
      9. Perform cylinder compression tests; determine necessary action. P-1
      10. Perform cylinder leakage test; determine necessary action. P-1
      11. Diagnose engine mechanical, electrical, electronic, fuel, and ignition concerns with an oscilloscope and/or engine diagnostic equipment; determine necessary action. P-1
      12. Prepare 4 or 5 gas analyzer; inspect and prepare vehicle for test, and obtain exhaust readings; interpret readings, and determine necessary action. P-1
      13. Verify engine operating temperature; determine necessary action. P-1
      14. Perform cooling system pressure tests; check coolant condition; inspect and test radiator, pressure cap, coolant recovery tank, and hoses; perform necessary action. P-1
      15. Verify correct camshaft timing. P-2
    2. Diagnose and repair computerized engine controls. Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.
      1. Retrieve and record stored OBD I diagnostic trouble codes; clear codes. P-2
      2. Retrieve and record stored OBD II diagnostic trouble codes; clear codes. P-1
      3. Diagnose the causes of emissions or driveability concerns resulting from malfunctions in the computerized engine control system with stored diagnostic trouble codes. P-1
      4. Diagnose emissions or driveability concerns resulting from malfunctions in the computerized engine control system with no stored diagnostic trouble codes; determine necessary action. P-1
      5. Check for module communication errors using a scan tool. P-2
      6. Inspect and test computerized engine control system sensors, powertrain control module (PCM), actuators, and circuits using a graphing multimeter (GMM)/digital storage oscilloscope (DSO); perform necessary action. P-1
      7. Obtain and interpret scan tool data. P-1
      8. Access and use service information to perform step-by-step diagnosis. P-1
      9. Diagnose driveability and emissions problems resulting from malfunctions of interrelated systems (cruise control, security alarms, suspension controls, traction controls, A/C, automatic transmissions, non-OEM-installed accessories, or similar systems); determine necessary action. P-3
    3. Diagnose and repair fuel, air induction, and exhaust system. Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.
      1. Diagnose hot or cold no-starting, hard starting, poor driveability, incorrect idle speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine misfire, power loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions problems on vehicles with carburetor-type fuel systems; determine necessary action. P-3
      2. Diagnose hot or cold no-starting, hard starting, poor driveability, incorrect idle speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine misfire, power loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions problems on vehicles with injection-type fuel systems; determine necessary action. P-1
      3. Check fuel for contaminants and quality; determine necessary action. P-3
      4. Inspect
  
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    AGM 228W - Electronic Engine Performance & Emission Control

    Credits: 7
    Studies units of instruction necessary for a thorough understanding of ignition systems, emission control systems, and driveability diagnosis. Develops skills through controlled learning experiences with ignition systems, emission control systems, and driveability diagnosis.

    Prerequisite(s): AGM 112W  with a minimum grade of “C” (2.0)
    Corequisite(s): AGM 226  
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 90
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Diagnose and repair ignition system. Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.
      1. Diagnose ignition system related problems such as no-starting, hard starting, engine misfire, poor driveability, spark knock, power loss, poor mileage, and emissions concerns on vehicles with electronic ignition (distributorless) systems; determine necessary action. P-1
      2. Diagnose ignition system related problems such as no-starting, hard starting, engine misfire, poor driveability, spark knock, power loss, poor mileage, and emissions concerns on vehicles with distributor ignition (DI) systems; determine necessary action. P-1
      3. Inspect and test ignition primary circuit wiring and solid state components; perform necessary action. P-2
      4. Inspect, test and service distributor. P-3
      5. Inspect and test ignition system secondary circuit wiring and components; perform necessary action. P-2
      6. Inspect and test ignition coil(s); perform necessary action. P-1
      7. Check and adjust ignition system timing and timing advance/retard (where applicable). P-3
      8. Inspect and test ignition system pick-up sensor or triggering devices; perform necessary action. P-1
    2. Diagnose and repair early fuel evaporation (intake manifold temperature) controls. Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.
      1. Diagnose emissions and driveability problems resulting from malfunctions in the early fuel evaporation control system; determine necessary action. P-3
      2. Inspect and test components of early fuel evaporation control system; perform necessary action. P-3
    3. Diagnose and repair evaporative emissions controls. Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.
      1. Diagnose emissions and driveability problems resulting from malfunctions in the evaporative emissions control system; determine necessary action. P-1
      2. Inspect and test components and hoses of evaporative emissions control system; perform necessary action. P-2
      3. Interpret evaporative emission related diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs); determine necessary action. P-1
    4. Perform engine related service. Complete 95% of Priority 1, 80% of Priority 2, and 50% of Priority 3 NATEF tasks as listed below.
      1. Remove and replace thermostat. P-2
      2. Inspect and test mechanical/electrical fans, fan clutch, fan shroud/ducting, air dams, and fan control devices; perform necessary action. P-1
    5. Write effectively.
      1. Practice writing essay unit tests, quizzes.
      2. Practice writing service repair orders (concern, cause, correction).
      3. Practice writing daily assignments.
      4. Practice writing weekly feedback to instructor.
  
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    AGM 234 - Dealership Work Experience III

    Credits: 2
    Provides work experience in the operation, maintenance, and service of GM manual and automatic heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems, automatic transmissions, and drivelines. Stresses proper handling of refrigerant and safety.

    Prerequisite(s): AGM 143  
    Corequisite(s): ASEP 106  , AGM 218W  
    Lecture Hours: 6 Lab Hours: 600
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Diagnose/repair/service drivelines, automatic transmissions and light repair systems to meet factory service information standards and NATEF task list requirements.
      1. Perform all necessary tasks on live customer vehicles to the customer’s satisfaction and industry standards.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge to document completed repairs.
 

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