Aug 08, 2022  
2017-2018 
    
2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Social Science Interdisciplinary

  
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    SSI 290-299 - Special Projects in Social Science Interdisciplinary


    Meets MTA Requirement: None
  
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    SSI 293 - Public Achievement

    Credits: 1
    Introduces and applies a process for making positive-change in communities. Emphasizes the power of citizenship in democracy and that ordinary people can challenge the status quo through collaboration and working toward a common goal. Provides opportunity for "coaching" a team of middle- or high-school students in designing and implementing projects to solve civic problems while learning lifelong skills to engage in politics and public life.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 AND WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the power of citizenship in democracy
      1. Analyze democracy as the rule or work of the people.
      2. Identify interests and what makes a particular person or group connected to an issue.
      3. Practice community change that begins with individual citizens working together toward a common goal.
    2. Analyze, navigate and reflect aupon power relationships between those who are influenced by and have influence over an issue of concern.
      1. Apply a working definition of politics as a process of negotiating situations involving power relations and making public decisions.
      2. Practice power mapping a situation involving a variety of decision makers and stakeholders.
      3. Analyze situations involving power to determine barriers to positive change.
    3. Work collaboratively with others and lead a team toward a common goal.
      1. Understand and practice the values and skills that facilitate productive interaction with others.
      2. Mentor young people to pursue their education as a means of affecting p positive change in t heir lives and com munities.
      3. Practice encouraging others to persevere in the work of citizenship.
      4. Demonstrate critical and creative thinking in developing solutions to problems.
    4. Experience diversity and the benefits/challenges of working with a diverse group of stakeholders to enact positive change.
      1. Demonstrate the importance of listening and appreciating the diverse experience, ideas and perspective others bring to an issue.
      2. Practice the art of questioning to generate reflection and encourage effective problem solving.
      3. Understand how dimensions of diversity affect social institutions and policies, or our expectations of and interactions with others.
    5. Relfect on experience to determine personal development of values.
  
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    SSI 294W - Special Projects: The Great Lakes Indians and European Experience

    Credits: 3
    Examines American Indian history and culture in the Great Lakes from pre-contact to 1934. Considers and explores the approaches of studying Native Americans from a historical and sociological perspective; including the political, cultural, and social consequences of contact with Europeans. Provides a thorough historical and cultural background of the Great Lakes Indians, specifically the "People of the Three Fires," known as the "Anishnaabeg" and "People of the Calumet" of the Great Lakes. Credit may be earned in SSI 294W or IHU 294W  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 or WRITING LEVEL 2.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities, Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Trace the pre-contact period of Great Lakes Indians history and culture.
      1. Explain the origins of the American Indian people
      2. Describe daily and seasonal activities and customs
      3. Examine the belief systems of specific Great Lakes Indian peoples.
      4. Compare the belief systems to Judo-Christian beliefs
      5. Explore the proto and historic contact with Europeans
      6. Explore and compare American Indian Tribes using an anthropological and Native perspective
      7. Compare and contrast geography, religion, economics, politics, language, social organization and history of semi-nomadic vs. sedentary, and horticultural vs. agricultural based societies.
    2. Examine the role and impact of the European peoples on social, political, economic, and military components of native Sovereignty.
      1. Analyze and apply the following political and social concepts as they relate to the Great Lakes Tribes.
        1. Sovereignty (including its political, economic, social and military components)
        2. Changing Spheres of geographic and political influfence
        3. Changing Balance of Power in the Great Lakes among the Tribes and European powers and their causes and impact.
      2. Examine the period of the United States and its influence on Native peoples.
      3. Evaluate the relationships between the United States government and Native peoples regarding specifically: treaties, annuities, removal, reservations, assimilation, and termination.
    3. Critically examine treaties, documents, videos, on-line resources, lectures, discussions to analyze the Tribal Sovereignty of the Saginaw Chippewa Tribe as an in-depth micro-study of concepts presented.
    4. Use writing tasks to promote learning, to analyze course content and to explain course content in a coherent syle for a specific audience and purpose.
  
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    SSI 295W - Special Projects in Interdisciplinary Social Science - The Sixties

    Credits: 3
    Examines, through an interdisciplinary approach, the literature, film, music and other types of media of 1960s America and explores their interrelationships with history, psychology, sociology and philosophy to discover the causes and effects of the upheaval of the era. Discusses the social movements of the era and the changes in the way democracy has been perceived. Credit may be earned in IHU 295W  or SSI 295W but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): A "C" grade or better in a college level composition I course and WRITING LEVEL 2 or permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities, Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the understanding of the historical context of the era.
      1. Describe the complexities of the sixties and the interrelatedness of the various focused studies.
      2. Discuss the perspectives and historical implications of the era.
    2. Analyze the relationships between the various perspectives of the era.
      1. Discuss the various cultural, historical and interdisciplinary perspectives of the era.
      2. Relate specific events to the various cultural and historical elements that comprise the era.
    3. Analyze music, literature and art.
      1. Discuss various art forms of the period.
      2. Critique various art forms as they relate to specific events of the period.
    4. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing and access information by a variety of means for written presentations appropriate to the audience and purpose that includes appropriate academic documentation of sources.
      1. Evaluate information for relevancy to the planned purpose, reliability and credibility.
      2. Categorize and organize the information accessed.
      3. Interpret graphical, numerical and statistical data.
      4. Interpret litarary, philosophical, political and other ideas.
      5. Synthesize information from a variety of sources.
    5. Develop and deliver a formal presentation about the era.
      1. Choose an appropriate topic for the assignment such as: current event, social issue, or personal interest.
      2. Research a variety of materials and choose effective supporting material for topic.
      3. Develop the main points into an effective organizational pattern.
      4. Develop an outline for the presentation that includes an introduction, body, and conclusion.
      5. Develop appropriate visual aids for the presentations.

Sociology

  
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    SOC 158 - Projects in Community Service

    Credits: 2
    Student volunteers will be assigned in groups to assist agency staff in programs in the tri-city area working with populations of need. Students will be assigned on the basis of preferred interests. Supportive seminar will provide structure and supervision for an experience in the field of human services. Students may elect to take SOC 157 and 158 however, only a total of three (3) credit hours can be earned in these courses.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 60
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Apply their knowledge of social work field through continued direct service in the community.
      1. Demonstrate dependability through adhering to attendance standards.
      2. Perform tasks effectively and willing accept assignments.
      3. Demonstrate consideration of others and respect confidentiality.
      4. Accept supervision in a positive and co-operative manner.
      5. Seek out opportunities to learn new skills and abilities.
      6. Identify priorities and display initiative towards duties.
    2. Understand roles performed by human service professionals.
      1. Develop good relations with staff, public, and other volunteers.
      2. Understand the importance of inter-disciplinary teams in the social work field
      3. Effectively communicate thoughts in a clear, logical and concise manner with other team members.
      4. Handle conflicts with others in an objective, mature manner.
  
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    SOC 211HW - Principles of Sociology - Honors

    Credits: 3
    Introduces the scientific study of society and social behavior including the basic concepts, theories, and methods of sociology. Provides opportunities to engage in independent intellectual inquiry to foster deeper learning. Credit may be earned in SOC 211W  or SOC 211HW but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4 and WRITING LEVEL 4 and permission of the Honors Office
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify the scientific method as applied to the study of social behavior and practice critical thinking using a scientific approach.
      1. Apply scientific method to the study of social behavior.
      2. Correctly interpret simple statistical tables, correlations and data.
      3. Differentiate sociology, including its historical development, from other disciplines such as psychology, anthropology and philosophy.
      4. Distinguish among sociology's basic theoretical approaches (such as functional, conflict and symbolic interaction) to the analysis of social behavior and list the main contributions of influential sociologists.
      5. Appreciate the applications of sociological knowledge to the understanding of social life including major social problems.
    2. Employ basic sociological concepts in the analysis of social behavior and society.
      1. Define and apply the concept of culture to the analysis of human behavior including both its cognitive components (such as knowledge, skills, beliefs, myths and language) and its normative components (such as values and norms, including folkways, mores, and taboos).
      2. Analyze basic social interaction and social structure using such concepts as status, role, institution and society.
      3. Locate the principal types of societies and their cultures in the course of human social development.
      4. Identify the structure and dynamics of human groups, including primary and secondary, and the changes which have taken place in human groups as societies have evolved over time.
    3. Identify the basic social institutions and their functions.
      1. Distinguish the functions and processes of socialization and education in human social life.
      2. Explain the functions and techniques of social control, including formal and informal, and analyze the causes and consequences of deviant behavior as well as society’s attempts to cope with it.
      3. Categorize the basic family forms (such as polygamy, monogamy, extended and nuclear) and analyze their functions in different societies both past and present.
      4. Compare the sociological approaches to inequalities of class, race, ethnicity and gender and appreciate the functions of diversity in modern society.
      5. Assess the place of religion in society, using both functional and conflict approaches.
      6. Grasp the significance of major social trends leading to urbanization, modernization, secularization, collective behavior and social movements.
    4. Use writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Practice critical writing skills within the subject.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of the subject matter
    5. Practice intellectual curiosity and apply it in independent ways to deepen understanding of course material.
      1. Complete at least one significant project, either individually or as a group depending on the instructor’s discretion, and work with the instructor to assure that the project demonstrates intellectual curiosity and academic rigor.
      2. Actively engage with peers in conversations, seminars, or in other formats at the instructor’s discretion to enhance the depth of knowledge of the relevant material.
  
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    SOC 211W - Principles of Sociology

    Credits: 3
    Introduces the scientific study of society and social behavior including the basic concepts, theories, and methods of sociology. Credit may be earned in SOC 211W or SOC 211HW  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3 or permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify the scientific method as applied to the study of social behavior and practice critical thinking using a scientific approach.
      1. Apply scientific method to the study of social behavior.
      2. Correctly interpret simple statistical tables, correlations and data.
      3. Differentiate sociology, including its historical development, from other disciplines such as psychology, anthropology and philosophy.
      4. Distinguish among sociology’s basic theoretical approaches (such as functional, conflict and symbolic interaction) to the analysis of social behavior and list the main contributions of influential sociologists.
      5. Appreciate the applications of sociological knowledge to the understanding of social life including major social problems.
    2. Employ basic sociological concepts in the analysis of social behavior and society.
      1. Define and apply the concept of culture to the analysis of human behavior including both its cognitive components (such as knowledge, skills, beliefs, myths and language) and its normative components (such as values and norms, including folkways, mores, and taboos).
      2. Analyze basic social interaction and social structure using such concepts as status, role, institution and society.
      3. Locate the principal types of societies and their cultures in the course of human social development.
      4. Identify the structure and dynamics of human groups, including primary and secondary, and the changes which have taken place in human groups as societies have evolved over time.
    3. Identify the basic social institutions and their functions.
      1. Distinguish the functions and processes of socialization and education in human social life.
      2. Explain the functions and techniques of social control, including formal and informal, and analyze the causes and consequences of deviant behavior as well as society’s attempts to cope with it.
      3. Categorize the basic family forms (such as polygamy, monogamy, extended and nuclear) and analyze their functions in different societies both past and present.
      4. Compare the sociological approaches to inequalities of class, race, ethnicity and gender and appreciate the functions of diversity in modern society.
      5. Assess the place of religion in society, using both functional and conflict approaches.
      6. Grasp the significance of major social trends leading to urbanization, modernization, secularization, collective behavior and social movements.
    4. Use writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Practice critical writing skills within the subject.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of the subject matter
  
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    SOC 212W - Social Problems

    Credits: 3


    Analyzes contemporary social problems within the theoretical framework of social change, value conflicts, and social deviation and examines resulting implications for social policy.

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 211W . READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3 or permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Identify the scientific method as applied to the study of social problems, and practice critical thinking using a scientific approach.

         A.          Apply scientific method to the study of major American social problems.

         B.          Correctly interpret simple statistical tables, correlations, and data as it relates to social problems.

         C.          Identify the major research strategies on social problems including demographic studies, survey research, field observation and, social
                       experiments.

         D.          Define a social problem and be familiar with the key components of the definition.

         E.           Identify the major myths and logical fallacies that relate to specific social problems.

         F.           Demonstrate an understanding of the history of specific social problems, such as poverty, mental illness, violence, and child abuse, in this
                       country.

    2.    Apply both a micro and macro level of analysis to various social problems, demonstrating understanding the specific effects of given
           social problems 
    on the individual, on primary groups such as the family, on institutions such as education, and on society at large.

         A.          Distinguish between a micro and macro analysis of social problems.

         B.          Employ a micro analysis to specific social problems such as mental illness, crime and delinquency, prostitution, etc.

         C.          Employ a macro analysis to specific social problems such as poverty, education, and health care.

         D.         Identify the effects of specific social problems, such as drug abuse, at the individual level of analysis.

         E.          Assess the effects of specific social problems, such as incest and child abuse, on the familiy.

         F.          Demonstrate an understanding of the effects of specific social problems, such as violence, on the American educational system.

         G.         Identify the effects of a specific social problem, such as poverty, at multiple levels of analysis: on individuals, family, the educational system,
                      and on society at large.

    3.    Demonstrate understanding of the major sociological theories that are used to analyze social problems; functionalist theory, value
           conflict theory, social
    disorganization theory, labeling theory, and theories that relate specifically to deviant behavior. Identify the multi-
           casual factors that result in specific
    social problems.

         A.          Distinguish between biological, psychological, and sociological perspectives on the issue of causation.

         B.          Demonstrate an understanding of what multi-casual analysis involves and distinguish between primary and secondary causes.

         C.          Explain functional theory and apply to the analysis of a specific social problem such as poverty.

         D.         Explain value conflict theory and apply to the analysis of a specific social problem such as gender inequality.

         E.          Demonstrate an understanding of labeling theory and apply to the analysis of a specific social problem such as mental illness.

         F.          Demonstrate an understanding of the essential of social disorganization or change theory and apply to a specific social problem such as
                      stress and institutional dysfunction.

         G.         Be able to employ various theories that relate specifically to deviant behavior such as differential association theory, control theory,
                      subculture theory, and means-ends theory.

         H.         Be able to utilize a number of these theories in combination to analyze specific social problems.

    4.    Identify and assess various solutions for given social problems, such as poverty, and propose more effective alternatives.

         A.          Apply sociological knowledge to the solutions of major social problems.

         B.          Identify the complicating factors that make social problems difficult to resolve or solve, such as the visibility of the problem, interrelatedness
                      of social problems, lack of publicity, subjective immersion, and the heterogeneity of American society.

         C.          Assess current solutions to given social problems, such as crime and mental illness.

         D.         Demonstrate an understanding of why various solutions to specific social problems, such as poverty, are not particularly effective.

         E.          Compare a single solution approach with a multiple solution approach to specific social problems.

         F.          Demonstrate an understanding of what ways solutions to specific problems, such as poverty, can directly cause other social problems to
                      emerge.

         G.         Based on a critical assessment of solutions to various social problems, be able to propose

    5.    Using writing tasks to promote learning.

         A.          Practice critical writing skills within the subject.

         B.          Demonstrate knowledge of subject matter.

  
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    SOC 215W - Sociology of Minority Groups

    Credits: 3
    Studies prejudice and discrimination against minority groups, primarily in the United States, using the sociological approach. Emphasizes the analysis of both causes and solutions to the problems of prejudice and discrimination.

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 211W  with a “C” or better. READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3 or permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the concept of “race” as a socially constructed reality.
      1. Demonstrate an appreciation of what is problematic with biological definitions of “race”.
      2. Distinguish between definitions of racial minority groups and ethnic minority groups.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of the role the concept of “race” has played in the historical development of dominant-minority group relations in the United States.
    2. Apply the various theoretical models utilized by sociologists to analyze dominant-minority group relations.
      1. Apply various sociological theories of stratification to the development of minority group status, including emerging concepts of race, class and gender.
      2. Compare various sociological models of assimilation and pluralism.
      3. Define and analyze the relationship among key concepts in the sociology of minority groups, such as prejudice, individual discrimination, ideological racism, and institutional discrimination.
    3. Apply theoretical models to selected historical case studies of dominant-minority group relations.
      1. Compare and contrast the historical development of minority identity in the United States.
      2. Analyze the institutional, cultural, and economic changes in dominant-minority group relations as America has changed from an agricultural to industrial to an advanced industrial society.
      3. Compare and contrast dominant-minority group relations in the United States today with those that existed in the past both in this country and other societies such as Nazi Germany, South Africa, and Ireland among others.
    4. Use writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Practice critical writing skills within the subject.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of subject matter.
  
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    SOC 221W - Marriage and Family

    Credits: 3
    Studies the family as an institution in society. Encompasses aspects of historical and cross societal evidence of this institution as well as contemporary American pairing and child rearing practices with a broad research approach.

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 211W  or SOC 231W  with a “C” or better. READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3 or permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Apply the sociological perspective to the study of the social institution of marriage and the family (kinship).
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the utility of social science methods (such as survey, experiment and ethnography) for understanding marriage and the family.
      2. Apply the basic sociological theories to the study of marriage and the family (for example, functional, conflict, symbolic interaction and exchange theory).
      3. Identify the changes which have taken place in this institution over time, especially since the industrial revolution, including higher divorce rates, lower birth rates and the growth of single-parent families, blended families, step-parenting and “serial monogamy.”
      4. Compare the institution of marriage and the family in our society with other societies both past and present (including such family forms as polygamy, monogamy, extended and nuclear).
      5. Demonstrate an understanding of the social forces that affect the family in today’s society.
      6. Demonstrate an understanding of sexuality and the role of reproduction within the social context.
      7. Demonstrate an understanding of the changes that are likely to occur in one’s primary groups over the life course including the transition from single to married life, becoming a parent and adjusting to advancing age.
    2. Apply the insights gained from the sociological study of marriage and the family to her or his personal life.
      1. Demonstrate a understanding of the impact of social forces on individuals’ decisions such as mate selection, love and emotional fulfillment and reproduction.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of the effects of societal changes on individual families.
      3. Demonstrate an appreciation for the obstacles and problems one is likely to encounter in seeking family stability and emotional fulfillment in primary groups in contemporary society.
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of the challenges of parenting in our society.
    3. Use writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Practice critical writing skills within the subject.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of subject matter.
  
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    SOC 230HW - Physical Anthropology and Archeology - Honors

    Credits: 4
    Introduces the origin and evolution of humankind’s physical and cultural development. Emphasizes the evidence and theories of human evolution and a survey of Old World and New World archeology. Provides opportunities to engage in Independent intellectual inquiry to foster deeper learning. Credit may be earned in only one of SOC 230W , SOC 230HW, BIO 230W , or BIO 230HW .

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4 and WRITING LEVEL 4 or permission of Honors Office
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify the scientific method as applied to the study of humanity’s biological and cultural development and to practice critical thinking using a scientific approach.
      1. Apply the scientific method to the study of human evolution and of archaeology.
      2. Differentiate physical anthropology and archaeology from other academic disciplines.
      3. Appreciate the applications of the knowledge of physical anthropology and of archaeology to the understanding of modern humanity and its origins.
      4. List the main contributions of influential physical anthropologists and archaeologists.
    2. Employ the concepts of physical anthropology to describe and explain the general process of hominization as it is demonstrated by the fossil record.
      1. Identify and describe the major morphological and behavioral components of hominization.
      2. Apply the modern synthetic theory of evolution to explain the process of hominization.
      3. Differentiate between pongids and hominids and describe the uses of primatology in the interpretation of the morphology and behavior of fossil hominids.
      4. Distinguish among the Pliocene hominid genera and paleospecies and place them in the currently accepted hominid phylogeny.
      5. Distinguish among the Pleistocene hominid genera and paleospecies and place them in the currently accepted hominid phylogeny.
      6. Assess the multiregional paradigm and the replacement paradigm for modern human development.
      7. Compare and contrast the race paradigm with the view of modern anthropometry.
    3. Employ the concepts of archaeology to describe and explain the general course of hominid technological and social development and its correlation with hominid biological evolution.
      1. Identify and describe the archaeological evidence of the Pliocene (including Lower Paleolithic).
      2. Describe the correlation of Pliocene archaeological evidence with hominid paleospecies and describe its contribution to our understanding of the hominization process.
      3. Identify and describe the archaeological evidence of the Pleistocene (including Lower, Middle, and Upper Paleolithic; Mesolithic and Neolithic).
      4. Describe the correlation of early and middle Pleistocene archaeological evidence with hominid paleospecies and describe its contribution to our understanding of the hominization process.
      5. Identify and describe the stages of prehistoric technological and social development of modern Homo sapiens and compare and contrast the course of that development for the Old World and the New World.
    4. Use writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Practice critical writing skills within the subject.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of subject matter.
    5. Practice intellectual curiosity and apply it in I ndependent ways to deepen understanding of course material.
      1. Complete at least one significant project, either individually or as a group depending on the instructor’s discretion, and work with the instructor to assure that the project demonstrates intellectual curiosity and academic rigor.
      2. Actively engage with peers in co nversations, seminars, or in other formats at the instructor’s discretion to enhance the depth of knowledge of the relevant material.
  
  •  

    SOC 230W - Physical Anthropology and Archeology

    Credits: 4
    Introduces the origin and evolution of humankind’s physical and cultural development. Emphasizes the evidence and theories of human evolution and a survey of Old World and New World archeology. Credit may be earned in only one of SOC 230W, SOC 230HW , BIO 230W , or BIO 230HW .

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 AND WRITING LEVEL 3, or permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science, Natural Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify the scientific method as applied to the study of humanity’s biological and cultural development and to practice critical thinking using a scientific approach.
      1. Apply the scientific method to the study of human evolution and of archaeology.
      2. Differentiate physical anthropology and archaeology from other academic disciplines.
      3. Appreciate the applications of the knowledge of physical anthropology and of archaeology to the understanding of modern humanity and its origins.
      4. List the main contributions of influential physical anthropologists and archaeologists.
    2. Employ the concepts of physical anthropology to describe and explain the general process of hominization as it is demonstrated by the fossil record.
      1. Identify and describe the major morphological and behavioral components of hominization.
      2. Apply the modern synthetic theory of evolution to explain the process of hominization.
      3. Differentiate between pongids and hominids and describe the uses of primatology in the interpretation of the morphology and behavior of fossil hominids.
      4. Distinguish among the Pliocene hominid genera and paleospecies and place them in the currently accepted hominid phylogeny.
      5. Distinguish among the Pleistocene hominid genera and paleospecies and place them in the currently accepted hominid phylogeny.
      6. Assess the multiregional paradigm and the replacement paradigm for modern human development.
      7. Compare and contrast the race paradigm with the view of modern anthropometry.
    3. Employ the concepts of archaeology to describe and explain the general course of hominid technological and social development and its correlation with hominid biological evolution.
      1. Identify and describe the archaeological evidence of the Pliocene (including Lower Paleolithic).
      2. Describe the correlation of Pliocene archaeological evidence with hominid paleospecies and describe its contribution to our understanding of the hominization process.
      3. Identify and describe the archaeological evidence of the Pleistocene (including Lower, Middle, and Upper Paleolithic; Mesolithic and Neolithic).
      4. Describe the correlation of early and middle Pleistocene archaeological evidence with hominid paleospecies and describe its contribution to our understanding of the hominization process.
      5. Identify and describe the stages of prehistoric technological and social development of modern Homo sapiens and compare and contrast the course of that development for the Old World and the New World.
    4. Use writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Practice critical writing skills within the subject.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of subject matter.
  
  •  

    SOC 231HW - Cultural Anthropology - Honors

    Credits: 3
    Introduces humanity in its cultural setting. Emphasizes the study of diversity of non-industrialized cultures and the implications of that study for understanding our own culture. Provides opportunities to engage in independent intellectual inquiry to foster deeper learning. Credit may be earned in SOC 231W , or SOC 231HW, but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4 and WRITING LEVEL 4 or permission of the Honors Office
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify the scientific method as applied to the study of human cultures and to practice critical thinking using a scientific approach.
      1. Apply the scientific method to the study of human cultures.
      2. Differentiate cultural anthropology from other academic disciplines.
      3. Distinguish among cultural anthropology’s basic theoretical approaches (including cultural neoevolutionism, functionalism and cultural materialism) to the analysis of cultures and list the main contributions of influential cultural anthropologists.
      4. Appreciate the applications of the knowledge of cultural anthropology to the understanding of social life, including cultural diversity.
      5. List the main contributions of influential cultural anthropologists.
    2. Employ basic concepts of cultural anthropology in the analysis of social behavior and society.
      1. Define and apply the concept of culture to the analysis of human behavior including its cognitive components (such as knowledge and beliefs), its symbolic components (such as language), and its normative components (such as values and norms).
      2. Differentiate between cultural relativism and ethnocentrism, appreciating cultural relativism as tool to assure objectivity in social research (not mistaking it for value relativism).
      3. Identify and describe the principal types of societies (including hunting and gathering, horticulture, agriculture, pastoralism, and industry), locating them both in terms of modern geography and in the history of human social development.
      4. Assess the principal types of societies for world view, differentiating between human-centered and nature-centered world views.
      5. Distinguish the functions and processes of enculturation and acculturation for the principal types of societies.
      6. Assess the principal types of societies for egalitarianism and stratification.
      7. Distinguish the functions and processes of gender ideologies, gender hierarchies, and gender roles for each of the principal types of societies.
    3. Identify major social institutions, compare and contrast the cross-societal varieties of each of those institutions, and describe the correlations among those varieties and the principal types of societies.
      1. Distinguish the functions and processes of religion and identify general types of belief systems among the principal types of societies.
      2. Compare and contrast the economic functions and processes of reciprocity, redistribution, and market exchange for the principal types of societies.
      3. Compare and contrast the functions and processes of central and uncentralized political systems (including bands and tribes; chiefdoms and states) and locate them among the principal types of societies.
      4. Identify the variables that shape marriage and family life and distinguish their functions and processes for the principal types of societies (including extended and nuclear families, unilineal and bilateral descent systems, matrilineality and patrilineality, and polygamy and monogamy).
    4. Use writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Practice critical writing skills within the subject.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of subject matter.
    5. Practice intellectual curiosity and apply it in independent ways to deepen undestanding of course material.
      1. Complete at least one significant project, either individually or as a group depending on the instructor’s discretion, and work with the instructor to assure that the project demonstrates intellectual curiosity and academic rigor.
      2. Actively engage with their peers in conversations, seminars, or in other formats at the instructor’s discretion to enhance the depth of knowledge of the relevant material.
  
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    SOC 231W - Cultural Anthropology

    Credits: 3
    Introduces humanity in its cultural setting. Emphasizes the study of diversity of non-industrialized cultures and the implications of that study for understanding our own culture. Credit may be earned in SOC 231W or SOC 231HW  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3, or permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify the scientific method as applied to the study of human cultures and to practice critical thinking using a scientific approach.
      1. Apply the scientific method to the study of human cultures.
      2. Differentiate cultural anthropology from other academic disciplines.
      3. Distinguish among cultural anthropology’s basic theoretical approaches (including cultural neoevolutionism, functionalism and cultural materialism) to the analysis of cultures and list the main contributions of influential cultural anthropologists.
      4. Appreciate the applications of the knowledge of cultural anthropology to the understanding of social life, including cultural diversity.
      5. List the main contributions of influential cultural anthropologists.
    2. Employ basic concepts of cultural anthropology in the analysis of social behavior and society.
      1. Define and apply the concept of culture to the analysis of human behavior including its cognitive components (such as knowledge and beliefs), its symbolic components (such as language), and its normative components (such as values and norms).
      2. Differentiate between cultural relativism and ethnocentrism, appreciating cultural relativism as tool to assure objectivity in social research (not mistaking it for value relativism).
      3. Identify and describe the principal types of societies (including hunting and gathering, horticulture, agriculture, pastoralism, and industry), locating them both in terms of modern geography and in the history of human social development.
      4. Assess the principal types of societies for world view, differentiating between human-centered and nature-centered world views.
      5. Distinguish the functions and processes of enculturation and acculturation for the principal types of societies.
      6. Assess the principal types of societies for egalitarianism and stratification.
      7. Distinguish the functions and processes of gender ideologies, gender hierarchies, and gender roles for each of the principal types of societies.
    3. Identify major social institutions, compare and contrast the cross-societal varieties of each of those institutions, and describe the correlations among those varieties and the principal types of societies.
      1. Distinguish the functions and processes of religion and identify general types of belief systems among the principal types of societies.
      2. Compare and contrast the economic functions and processes of reciprocity, redistribution, and market exchange for the principal types of societies.
      3. Compare and contrast the functions and processes of central and uncentralized political systems (including bands and tribes; chiefdoms and states) and locate them among the principal types of societies.
      4. Identify the variables that shape marriage and family life and distinguish their functions and processes for the principal types of societies (including extended and nuclear families, unilineal and bilateral descent systems, matrilineality and patrilineality, and polygamy and monogamy).
    4. Use writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Practice critical writing skills within the subject.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of subject matter.
  
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    SOC 233W - Archaeology Field Methods

    Credits: 2
    Provides a guided field experience in the basic techniques of land site analysis. Introduces commonly used methods of surveying and mapping; excavation; dating; artifact and ecofact identification and conservation; data recording, including photography and scaled drawing; and site interpretation. Examines criteria for selecting techniques appropriate to specific site conditions. Emphasizes the Michigan prehistoric and historic context.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Have a basic understanding of archaeological theory.
      1. Define and distinguish anthropological anthropology as a unique discipline separate from other disciplines.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of the history of anthropological archaeology theory, i.e. antiquity, cultural history.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of modern advancements in archaeological theory, i.e. processualism, post-processualism.
    2. Have a basic understanding of archaeological field methods.
      1. Apply the scientific method to the study of past human cultures.
      2. Understand archaeological reconnaissance, survey, and site identification, i.e. walk-over, shovel testing.
      3. Understand site assessment, i.e. stratigraphic analysis, deep testing, test units, trenching, provenience, superposition, and strata identified by their contents.
      4. Understand site mitigation, i.e. removal of artifacts from matrix using site assessment procedures for the purpose of historical preservation.
      5. Understand lab analysis, i.e. seriation, relative dating, and absolute dating.
    3. Use writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Practice critical writing skills within the subject.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of subject matter.
  
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    SOC 242W - Nanotechnology: Content and Context

    Credits: 3
    Explores nanotechnology and its impact on society. Discusses the current status of nanotechnology and projected technologies and applications. Focuses on the societal implications of emerging technologies and their impact on social institutions. Includes how technological change in the past has altered societies, and considers how possible future changes predicted with the accomplishment of nanofabrication and other nanotechnologies may impact societies.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 or WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Explain the principles of nanotechnology from the perspective of an informed non-scientist.
      1. Identify the main elements of nanotechnology.
      2. Differentiate between the principles and practices of current macrotechnologies and discuss their applications in society.
      3. Differentiate between the principles and practices of current nanotechnology and discuss its applications in society.
      4. Explore the differences in the physical laws of matter at the nano as opposed to macro level.
      5. Identify measurement obstacles used when working at the nano scale.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the current applications of nanotechnology.
      1. Describe biomedical and other commercial applications of nanotechnology.
      2. List the main issues encountered when moving research at the nanoscale to viable commercial applications.
      3. Identify current manufacturing and production techniques.
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of projected applications of nanotechnology.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of projected applications of nanotechnology.
      1. Identify areas of predicted usage such as nanofabrication, biomedical applications (respirocytes and microbivores), etc.
      2. Identify techniques needed for implementation of current and future research into commercially viable products/processes.
      3. Discuss issues identified when working at the quantum level.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the societal issues surrounding nanotechnology
      1. Identify societal issues raised based on advances in nanotechnology.
      2. Discuss the impact of societal concerns on nanotechnology research and development.
      3. Review current issues of emerging technology such as stem cells and cloning and how societal concerns have impacted research in those areas.
      4. Understand the fears and concerns of the general public regarding nanotechnology and apply that knowledge in an informed, thoughtful, and effective manner to organizations that need to deal with funding and political and social policies.
      5. Compare and contrast the benefit to society with the costs and risks specifically associated with emerging technologies.
      6. Explore how society can evaluate nanotechnology applications.
      7. Research the current status of nanotechnology in other nations.
    5. Access, analyze and use information needed for the implementation of nanotechnology within society.
      1. Identify through written and oral communication key components of the nanotechnology elements and issues.
      2. Differentiate between long and short term activities needed for the implementation of nanotechnology.
      3. Critically analyze information needed to become informed consumers and electorate with regard to emergent technology.
  
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    SOC 250W - Introduction to Social Work

    Credits: 3
    Introduces social work as a helping profession within the field of human services. Explores social work values, practice strategies, and helping skills in the context of the social welfare institution. Requires 45 hours of internship, which meets the experience requirement necessary for admittance to the social work program at transfer institutions.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3 or permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify the social work mission, defining social work goals and describing practice approaches.
      1. Demonstrate understanding of the social work mission
      2. Describe the values of social work as identified in the N.A.S.W Code of Ethics.
      3. Correctly interpret the goals of social work.
      4. Differentiate the various practice approaches used by the generalist social worker.
    2. Identify significant milestones in the development of the social work profession.
      1. List and elaborate on how major people, events and motivators have influenced the development of the U.S. welfare system.
      2. Trace the history of poverty and articulate on various theories that explain poverty\and populations that are affected by it.
      3. Demonstrate and understanding of the societal arrangements in meeting human needs.
      4. Demonstrate elements to understanding of social systems approach and how change has affected individual’s and family’s ability to meet human needs.
      5. Describe the major social work professional organizations and the roots of these organizations.
    3. Identify social welfare programs created in response to human needs.
      1. Correctly identify and understand programs, organizations, and tangible resources that are available to those in need.
      2. Distinguish among the various categories of social programs and link clients to them.
      3. Correctly identify and interpret political factors which contribute to societies’ desire or refusal to supply needed services.
    4. Define the educational requirements, values, skills and knowledge of the professional social worker.
      1. Distinguish between B.S.W. and M.S. and the education required to obtain these degrees.
      2. Begin to identify the difference in duties performed by B.S.W.’s and M.S.W.’s.
      3. Elaborate on and apply the N.A.S.W. Code of Ethics.
      4. Compare the various skills and knowledge base needed by professional social workers within the various fields of practice.
    5. Identify some of the cultural, ethnic, and special groups in society and some of the psycho-social aspects which affect them.
      1. Identify selected characteristics of special populations (aged, gays, lesbians, minorities, women)
      2. Identify and begin to utilize appropriate social work interventions (family, group, individual therapy) in efforts to enhance or restore functioning.
      3. Distinguish among the various policies that address social concerns and needs of special groups in society.
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of social work role in empowerment and self determination when working with special groups in society.
      5. Demonstrate an understanding of human diversity.
      6. Demonstrate an understanding of how racism, discrimination and prejudice affects individuals and family’s ability to meet their human needs.
    6. Understand how each student’s own values, beliefs, life experiences and education affect their role in the social work profession.
      1. Develop a high level of self-awareness and self-perception through acknowledgement and discussion.
      2. Develop and complete an identity-formation/self-awareness form in order to determine their level of self-awareness.
      3. Develop an awareness about his/own personal values and how these values affect his goals.
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of the values that are dominant in U.S. society.
      5. Develop an understanding and be fully aware of the fundamental values of the social work profession.
      6. Develop a level of objectivity so that complications with clients will not arise.
    7. Understand the various roles and functions of the professional social worker become familiar with the field of social work practice and the settings for the practice.
      1. Describe roles assumed by social workers in social work practice.
      2. Discuss and be aware of social work practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations and the community.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of and describe educational training for social work practice.
      4. Define and be able to demonstrate a knowledge of
  
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    SOC 265W - Third World Development

    Credits: 4
    Using a multidisciplinary approach, describes and analyzes processes and conditions which created and maintain the “third world.” Addresses population, physical environment, historical, political, social and economic factors. Explores and applies current concepts and development theories. Credit may be earned in SOC 265W or GEO 255W , but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify and appreciate the influence of historical factors that were part of the differential development process.
      1. The following historical periods with particular reference to the factors and forces involved in the differential development process: Age of Exploration, the Age of Imperialism, the Cold War Era, the Decade of Development.
      2. The nature of the Industrial Revolution, with reference to the differential development process acting over time.
    2. Use relevant models and theories to explain and suggest cause and effect relationships and make projections.
      1. Explain the CORE - PERIPHERY GLOBAL model in terms of causal factors, descriptive details, validity and changing global realities.
      2. Explain the nature of the Industrial Revolution, with reference to the differential development process acting over time.
    3. Be aware of the significance of the role of the physical environment as a factor of development, of development barriers and opportunities.
      1. The mechanisms responsible for the extremes of precipitation, drought and of unreliability of precipitation in much of the less developed realm and outline the problems and barriers these conditions create.
      2. Examples of endemic climate induced hazards to humans, crops and live- stock experienced over much of the less developed realm.
      3. Natural hazards such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tropical storms experienced by less developed countries that impact on development.
      4. Why much of the soil found in the less developed world is of lower nutritional level and more difficult to utilize over time than is characteristic of the industrialized realm.
    4. Be aware of, and able to discuss a wide range of the more common characteristics and significant variations of the common situation in the less developed realm.
      1. Explanations for the past population explosion and current high birth rates in the less developed countries.
      2. Causal factors for poverty, low quality of life, social deterioration and push factors endemic to rural areas in the less developed world.
      3. The problems, conditions and causal factors of rapid urban growth and accelerating urbanization in the less developed realm.
      4. The nature and results of economic models and projects for economic growth, modernization and diversification applied and exhibited by the less industrialized countries and the Newly Industrializing Nations.
      5. The nature and conditions of politics and government in the post-colonial countries, with particular awareness of the significance of the local elite.
      6. Reasons for the treatment of women as second-class citizens or chattels in less developed places and of their importance in the modernization - development process.
      7. The current and future effects of foreign governments, supranational organizations, N.G.O.s, transnational corporations and global media on further change in the less developed world.
      8. Correct terminology and measures to discuss, explain, compare and contrast conditions and places, e.g., export driven economy, satisfying strategy, infant mortality, dependency ratio.
      9. Locate case study countries, example countries, and additional general geographic information on maps.
    5. Use writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Practice critical writing skills within the subject.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of subject matter.
  
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    SOC 268 - International Studies in Sociology

    Credits: 1-4
    The student will select a major institution of society for the purpose of comparative study. An analysis and comparison of that institution in preselected societies will be the major focus of the course. Includes classroom lectures, individual consultation and international field study. Expenses for field study must be borne by the student. By prior arrangement with appropriate faculty, students may also take International studies in the following discipline: GEO 268

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15-60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

  
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    SOC 279W - Introduction to Social/Behavioral Science Research

    Credits: 3
    Introduces social and behavioral research utilizing a multidisciplinary approach. Shows how to formulate research questions, search the literature, select a research design, collect and analyze data, and draw useful conclusions. Credit may be earned in SOC 279W or SOC 280W , but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): One of the following courses ECN 221W , POL 103W , PSY 211W , SOC 211W , or permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Formulate simple research questions and select an appropriate design for research.
      1. Apply social scientific theory to the development of a research question and the definition of concepts.
      2. Formulate a researchable hypothesis either deduced from theory or induced from empirical observations.
      3. Differentiate between variables and constants.
      4. Explain the criteria of causality (time order, association and control) and distinguish \between independent and dependent variables.
      5. Select an appropriate, systematic, empirical method (such as survey, experiment, ethnography or existing data) to test the hypothesis.
      6. Operationalize - finding valid and reliable indicators for each concept in the hypothesis (or hypotheses) to be tested.
      7. Distinguish between applied research and basic research.
      8. Demonstrate an appreciation for the ethical issues involved in social scientific research.
      9. Distinguish among levels of measurement of variables such as nominal, ordinal, interval and ratio and appreciate the significance for drawing conclusions from the analysis of data.
    2. Conduct a basic review of the literature related to the question being studied.
      1. Use the library to find information on a topic.
      2. Demonstrate an appreciation for the utility of electronic data bases and the Internet.
      3. Demonstrate an awareness of the guides, indexes and information resources available in a modern library.
    3. Collect data effectively which relate to the issue being studied.
      1. Operationalize concepts selecting valid and reliable indicators whether using quantitative or qualitative methods.
        1. Write questions for surveys at various levels of measurement which serve as valid and reliable indicators.
        2. Use ethnographic methods to understand the problems and opportunities of participant observation as well as efficient handling of qualitative data.
        3. If existing data are used, the student will gain an appreciation of the availability of resources, such as the Census, and the particular problems of secondary analysis of data.
      2. Gather data effectively, systematically and ethically.
    4. Analyze the data collected and draw useful conclusions.
      1. Use the basic techniques of data analysis appropriate to the method selected. For example, in survey analysis, the student will able to use simple percentage tables and correlations to discover associations and draw conclusions.
      2. Demonstrate an appreciation for the strengths and limitations of empirical data.
      3. Relate the findings to theory or, in applied research, to the possible solutions of the problem being studied.
      4. Discuss the findings orally in an effective manner.
    5. Use writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Practice critical writing skills within the subject.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of subject matter.
  
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    SOC 280HW - Introduction to Social/Behavioral Science Research/Project - Honors

    Credits: 4
    Introduces social and behavioral research utilizing a multidisciplinary approach. Shows how to formulate research questions, search the literature, select a research design, collect and analyze data, and draw useful conclusions. Requires a research paper. Provides opportunities to engage in independent intellectual inquiry to foster deeper learning. Credit may be earned in only one of SOC 280W , SOC 280HW, or SOC 279W .

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4 and WRITING LEVEL 4 or permission of the Honors Office
    Corequisite(s): SOC 281W  and one of the following courses: ECN 221W , POL 103W , PSY 211W , SOC 211W  or permission of the instructor
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Formulate simple research questions and select an appropriate design for research.
      1. Apply social scientific theory to the development of a research question and the definition of concepts.
      2. Formulate a researchable hypothesis either deduced from theory or induced from empirical observations.
      3. Differentiate between variables and constants.
      4. Explain the criteria of causality (time order, association and control) and distinguish between independent and dependent variables.
      5. Select an appropriate, systematic, empirical method (such as survey, experiment, ethnography or existing data) to test the hypothesis.
      6. Operationalize - finding valid and reliable indicators for each concept in the hypothesis (or hypotheses) to be tested.
      7. Distinguish between applied research and basic research.
      8. Demonstrate an appreciation for the ethical issues involved in social scientific research.
      9. Distinguish among levels of measurement of variables such as nominal, ordinal, interval and ratio and appreciate the significance for drawing conclusions from the analysis of data.
    2. Conduct a basic review of the literature related to the question being studied.
      1. Use the library to find information on a topic.
      2. Demonstrate an appreciation for the utility of electronic data bases and the Internet.
      3. Demonstrate an awareness of the guides, indexes and information resources available in a modern library.
    3. Collect data effectively which relate to the issue being studied.
      1. Operationalize concepts selecting valid and reliable indicators whether using quantitative or qualitative methods.
      2. Write questions at various levels of measurement which serve as valid and reliable indicators when surveys are used.
      3. Understand the problems and opportunities of participant observation as well as efficient handling of qualitative data using ethnographic methods.
      4. Gain an appreciation of the availability of resources, such as the Census, and the particular problems of secondary analysis of data using the ethnographic method.
      5. Gather data effectively, systematically and ethically.
    4. Analyze the data collected and draw useful conclusions.
      1. Use the basic techniques of data analysis appropriate to the method selected. For example, in survey analysis, the student will able to use simple percentage tables and correlations to discover associations and draw conclusions.
      2. Demonstrate an appreciation for the strengths and limitations of empirical data.
      3. Relate the findings to theory or, in applied research, to the possible solutions of the problem being studied.
      4. Discuss the findings orally in an effective manner.
      5. Present the findings of the research effectively in a written research paper using the style and techniques appropriate to the discipline.
    5. Use writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Practice critical writing skills within the subject.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of subject matter.
    6. Practice intellectual curiosity and apply it in independent w ays to deepen understanding of course material.
      1. Complete at least one significant project, either individually or as a group depending on the instructor’s discretion, and work with the instructor to assure that the project demonstrates intellectual curiosity and academic rigor.
      2. Actively engage with their peers in conversations, seminars, or in other formats at the instructor’s discretion to enhance the depth of knowledge of the relevant material.
  
  •  

    SOC 280W - Introduction to Social/Behavioral Science Research/Project

    Credits: 4
    Introduces social and behavioral research utilizing a multidisciplinary approach. Shows how to formulate research questions, search the literature, select a research design, collect and analyze data, and draw useful conclusions. Requires a research paper. Credit may be earned in only one of SOC 280W, SOC 280HW , or SOC 279W .

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): SOC 281W  and one of the following courses: ECN 221W , POL 103W , PSY 211W , SOC 211W , or permission of instructor.
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Formulate simple research questions and select an appropriate design for research.
      1. Apply social scientific theory to the development of a research question and the definition of concepts.
      2. Formulate a researchable hypothesis either deduced from theory or induced from empirical observations.
      3. Differentiate between variables and constants.
      4. Explain the criteria of causality (time order, association and control) and distinguish between independent and dependent variables.
      5. Select an appropriate, systematic, empirical method (such as survey, experiment, ethnography or existing data) to test the hypothesis.
      6. Operationalize - finding valid and reliable indicators for each concept in the hypothesis (or hypotheses) to be tested.
      7. Distinguish between applied research and basic research.
      8. Demonstrate an appreciation for the ethical issues involved in social scientific research.
      9. Distinguish among levels of measurement of variables such as nominal, ordinal, interval and ratio and appreciate the significance for drawing conclusions from the analysis of data.
    2. Conduct a basic review of the literature related to the question being studied.
      1. Use the library to find information on a topic.
      2. Demonstrate an appreciation for the utility of electronic data bases and the Internet.
      3. Demonstrate an awareness of the guides, indexes and information resources available in a modern library.
    3. Collect data effectively which relate to the issue being studied.
      1. Operationalize concepts selecting valid and reliable indicators whether using quantitative or qualitative methods.
      2. Write questions at various levels of measurement which serve as valid and reliable indicators when surveys are used.
      3. Understand the problems and opportunities of participant observation as well as efficient handling of qualitative data using ethnographic methods.
      4. Gain an appreciation of the availability of resources, such as the Census, and the particular problems of secondary analysis of data using the ethnographic method.
      5. Gather data effectively, systematically and ethically.
    4. Analyze the data collected and draw useful conclusions.
      1. Use the basic techniques of data analysis appropriate to the method selected. For example, in survey analysis, the student will able to use simple percentage tables and correlations to discover associations and draw conclusions.
      2. Demonstrate an appreciation for the strengths and limitations of empirical data.
      3. Relate the findings to theory or, in applied research, to the possible solutions of the problem being studied.
      4. Discuss the findings orally in an effective manner.
      5. Present the findings of the research effectively in a written research paper using the style and techniques appropriate to the discipline.
    5. Use writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Practice critical writing skills within the subject.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of subject matter.
  
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    SOC 281W - An Introduction to SPSS

    Credits: 1
    Introduces the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), a comprehensive set of statistical tools for many types of data analysis. Emphasizes the basic procedures, commands, and tools of SPSS. Credit may be earned in SOC 281W or CPS 108 but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): SOC 280W  or permission of the instructor
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use SPSS on a personal computer to perform simple data analysis using one- and two-variable tables and bivariate correlations.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of what a variable is and distinguish among nominal, ordinal, dichotomous, numeric and string variables.
      2. Create and use simple data files including variable and value labels.
      3. Use basic SPSS data transformations such as recode and compute.
      4. Run frequency distributions producing one-variable tables with bar charts, means, medians and modes.
      5. Run cross tabs producing two-variable tables.
      6. Run bivariate correlations.
    2. Grasp the basic elements of interpreting one- and two-variable tables and correlations.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the structure and major uses of percent tables.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of the differences among such measures of central tendency as mean, median and mode.
      3. Discover associations between variables in two-variable tables and correlations.
      4. Distinguish between independent and dependent variables.
      5. Demonstrate comprehension of the major uses and abuses of statistics produced by SPSS.
    3. Use writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Practice critical writing skills within the subject.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of subject matter.
  
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    SOC 282HW - Seminar in Social Issues - Honors

    Credits: 3
    An integrated study involving exploration and development of critical thinking, analysis and problem- solving skills with an interdisciplinary approach focusing on a selected social issue. Provides opportunities to engage in independent intellectual inquiry to foster deeper learning. Same as IHU 282HW  and may be taken for SOC or IHU credit but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4 and WRITING LEVEL 4 or permission of the Honors Office
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities, Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Analyze a specific social issue from both a sociological and an interdisciplinary perspective.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the major aspects of an important contemporary social issue. (The issue may change with each offering of the course. The specific disciplines represented will vary with the issue.)
      2. Apply the sociological perspective to enhance understanding of the issue.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of the utility of social scientific theories and methods to the analysis of a social issue.
      4. Apply the methods and perspectives of other disciplines, depending upon the issue under consideration.
    2. Increase his or her skills in research and the presentation of findings.
      1. Conduct a brief research project (such as a library paper or book report) related to the issue under consideration.
      2. Use acceptable form in the written presentation of the project.
      3. Engage in appropriate oral discourse concerning the social issue in a seminar environment.
    3. Gain an appreciation for a rational and critical study of the specific issue as well as other such issues.
      1. Distinguish between a social scientific analysis of social issues and popular approaches such as those found in the media.
      2. Understand the role of empirical evidence in the analysis of social issues.
      3. Apply rational and critical thinking to the analysis of social issues and problem solving.
      4. Appreciate the utility of studying issues from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.
    4. Use writing tasks to promote learning.
      1. Practice critical writing skills within the subject.
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of subject matter.
    5. Practice intellectual curiosity and apply it in independent ways to deepen understanding of course material.
      1. Complete at least one significant project, either individually or as a group depending on the instsructor’s discretion, and work with the instsructor to assure that the project demonstrates intellectual curiosity and academic rigor.
      2. Actively engage with peers in conversations, seminars, or in other formats at the instructor’s discretion to enhance the depth of knowledge of the relevant material.
  
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    SOC 290-299 - Special Projects in Sociology


    Meets MTA Requirement: None
  
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    SOC 300W - Interviewing, Counseling, and the Helping Relationship

    Credits: 3
    Establishes beginning social work interviewing and relationship skills as well as awareness of the use of self in the helping relationship. Presents specific interviewing strategies for generalist social work practice. Includes student participation in practice sessions using role plays, videotapes and self awareness exercises. Provides opportunities to practice formal and informal writing. Credit may be earned in PSY 300W  or SOC 300W but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 111  with a “C” or better or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Exhibit improved communication skills with individuals and groups.
      1. Develop and improve observation and listening skills in communication and interviewing.
      2. Differentiate the use of particular interviewing strategies with various populations and situations.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of the various skills needed in interviewing different size client systems.
      4. Demonstrate and apply understanding of the influence of ethnicity, culture and gender on communication.
      5. Analyze other student’s ability to demonstrate effective interview skills.
    2. Demonstrate self-observation and awareness in relationship to communication and interviewing.
      1. Evaluate his/her own performance on communication skills.
      2. Identify how his/her values, prejudices and feelings affect communication and interviewing through reading, writing, and class participations.
      3. Aritculate in writing affective responses to reading.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of communication and interviewing within the field of social work.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the development of the helping relationship in social work.
      2. Develop an understanding of the role of social work values and ethics in providing a foundation and framework for practice.
      3. Develop knowledge of verbal and written communication within social work practice.
      4. Differentiate between interviewing, counseling, and psychotherapy.
      5. Interpret client statements and understand the distinction between manifest and latent content.
    4. Conduct client interviews and establish a helping relationship.
      1. Employ interview skills as an assessment tool.
      2. Utilize interview skills to empower clients to change.
      3. Apply various interviewing strategies (questions, responses, leads, etc.)
      4. Begin to develop confrontation, reflective listening, paraphrasing, encouraging and summarizing.
      5. Integrate client information into a bio/social assessment.
      6. Conduct a formal class presentation which demonstrates the integration of interviewing, including use of effective listening skills.
      7. Articulate through progress notes the evaluation of client response to student implementation of interviewing skills.
      8. Evaluate and confront discrepancies in interviews.
      9. Challenge client thoughts and behaviors through empathetic confrontations.

Spanish

  
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    SPA 109 - Spanish for Health Care Professionals I

    Credits: 2
    Introduces basic conversational Spanish for health care personnel. Practices basic conversational skills and vocabulary appropriate to various job-related situations. Practices correct pronunciation patterns by means of oral-aural practice, small group interaction, and role-playing situations. Introduces certain aspects of Hispanic culture. Requires supplemental (outside of class) listening, reading, speaking, and written work using ancillary materials and the textbook’s Internet site.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3 and SPA 112  with a minimum grade of C or a minimum of two years of High School Spanish; or a minimum of two semesters of college-level Spanish; or permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate expressive and receptive skills appropriate to novice level conversational Spanish.
      1. Use the present tense of regular and some irregular verbs in formulaic conversations about topics covered in the text.
      2. Ask and answer simple, formulaic questions to gather information from patients or clients.
      3. Use commands and polite requests to elicit actions from patients or clients.
      4. Conduct a simplified admissions interview.
      5. Explain various common medical procedures to patients or clients.
      6. Develop strategies for understanding native speakers of Spanish.
      7. Recall and use vocabulary that will permit the receptive and expressive skills mentioned above.
    2. Compare and contrast differences between one’s own culture and Hispanic cultures in a sensitive and informed manner.
      1. Use formal and informal register appropriately for the elementary/novice level.
      2. Identify several Spanish speaking countries and regions as well as several Spanish speaking populations in the United States.
      3. Describe the connections between Spanish language and Hispanic culture in the classroom and the surrounding community.
      4. Examine and explain one’s attitudes about Hispanic culture.
      5. Develop the ability to make sensitive cultural comparisons, in particular as related to health care issues.
  
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    SPA 110 - Spanish for Health Care Professionals II

    Credits: 2
    Introduces basic conversational Spanish for health care personnel. Practices basic conversational skills and vocabulary appropriate to various job-related situations. Practices correct pronunciation patterns by means of oral-aural practice, small group interaction, and role-playing situations. Continues introduction to certain aspects of Hispanic culture. Requires supplemental (outside of class) listening, reading, speaking, and written work using ancillary materials and the textbook’s Internet site.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3 and SPA 109  with a minimum grade of C or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Refine the outcomes and objectives of SPA 109  
    2. Demonstrate expressive and receptive skills appropriate to novice level conversational Spanish.
      1. Use the present tense of regular and some irregular verbs in formulaic conversations about topics covered in the text.
      2. Use a variety of past tenses expressions in formulaic conversations to gather information from patients and clients.
      3. Explain various common medical procedures to patients or clients.
      4. Explain hupothetical situations to patients of clients.
      5. Conduct an admissions interview.
      6. Continue to develop strategies for understanding native Speakers of Spanish.
      7. Recall and use vocabulary that will permit the receptive and expressive skills mentioned above.
    3. Compare and contrast differences between one’s own culture and Hispanic cultures in a sensitive and informed manner.
      1. Use formal and informal register appropriately for the elementary / novice level.
      2. Identify several Spanish speaking countries and regions, as well as several Spanish speaking populations in the United States
      3. Describe the connections between Spanish language and Hispanic culture in the classroom and the surrounding community
      4. Describe the diversity of Hispanic cultures, including, but not limited to, cultural practices and beliefs relating to health care.
      5. Examine and explain one’s attitudes about Hispanic culture.
      6. Continue to develop the ability to make sensitive cultural comparisons, in particular as related to health care issues.
  
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    SPA 111 - Spanish One

    Credits: 4
    Introduces basic grammatical structures and vocabulary of modern spoken and written Spanish and correct pronunciation patterns by means of oral-aural practice, small group interaction, reading of simple texts, and written exercises. Introduces certain aspects of Hispanic culture and the differences between the Spanish and the English languages. Requires supplemental (outside of class) listening, reading, speaking, and written work using ancillary materials and the textbook’s Internet site. Intended for students with no previous formal study in Spanish. A diagnostic test will be given to determine proper SPA course placement.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3 or instructor permission
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate expressive and receptive skills appropriate to 1st semester Novice / Elementary Spanish.
      1. Use the present tense of regular and some irregular verbs in formulaic conversations about topics covered in the text.
      2. Describe persons and objects, including possession, demonstrating knowledge of gender and number rules.
      3. Express likes, dislikes, wants, and needs.
      4. Develop strategies for expressing the future tense: Use of the present tense and adverbs of time / use of the ir + a + infinitive construction.
      5. Practice the ability to avoid repetition by using pronouns.
      6. Ask and answer, affirmatively and negatively, simple questions about oneself and others.
      7. Read a passage of text in Spanish to gather information and demonstrate understanding of the passage.
      8. Demonstrate the ability to write a brief paragraph in Spanish, using grammatical concepts, correct syntax, and vocabulary from the text.
      9. Recall and use vocabulary, including idiomatic expressions that will permit the receptive and expressive skills mentioned above.
    2. Compare and contrast differences between one’s own culture and Hispanic cultures in a sensitive and informed manner.
      1. Differentiate between formal and informal speech.
      2. Use formal and informal speech appropriately for the elementary/novice level.
      3. Identify several Spanish speaking countries and regions.
      4. Describe the connections between Spanish language and culture in the classroom and the global community.
      5. Develop the ability to make sensitive cultural comparisons.
      6. Compare some of the differences between the Spanish and the English language, including but not limited to, syntax and grammatical gender differences.
  
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    SPA 112 - Spanish Two

    Credits: 4
    Continues introduction of basic grammatical structures and vocabulary of modern spoken and written Spanish and to correct pronunciation patterns by means of oral-aural practice, small group interaction, reading of simple texts, and written exercises. Continues introduction of certain aspects of Hispanic culture and differences between the Spanish and the English languages. Requires supplemental (outside of class) listening, reading, speaking, and written work using ancillary materials and the textbook’s Internet site. A diagnostic test will be given to determine proper SPA course placement.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3 and SPA 111  or no more than one semester of college-level Spanish; or no more than one year of High School Spanish; any with a minimum grade of C; or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Refine all of the objectives from SPA 111  
    2. Demonstrate expressive and receptive skills appropriate to 2nd semester novice / elementary Spanish.
      1. Express past events and conditions using the preterit and the imperfect tenses of regular and some irregular verbs, including reflexive verbs, in formulaic conversations about topics covered in the text.
      2. Use reflexive verbs to describe routines.
      3. Continue to develop the ability to avoid repetition by using object pronouns, relative pronouns and demonstrative pronouns.
      4. Demonstrate the ability to point out people and things using demonstrative adjectives and pronouns.
      5. Develop the ability to make comparisons.
      6. Develop the ability to express negation using negative and indefinite words.
      7. Read a passage of text in Spanish to gather information and demonstrate understanding of the passage.
      8. Demonstrate the ability to write a brief paragraph in Spanish, using grammatical concepts, correct syntax, and vocabulary from the text.
      9. Recall and use vocabulary, including idiomatic expressions that will permit the receptive and expressive skills mentioned above.
    3. Compare and contrast differences between one’s own culture and Hispanic cultures in a sensitive and informed manner.
      1. Identify several Spanish-speaking countries and regions.
      2. Describe the connections between Spanish language and culture in the classroom and the global community.
      3. Continue to develop the abillity to make sensitive cultural comparisons.
      4. Compare some of the differences between the Spanish and the English language, including but not limited to, syntax and grammatical gender differences.
  
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    SPA 113W - Introduction to Hispanic Cultures

    Credits: 2
    Examines aspects of Hispanic cultures (Europe, the Americas, Africa, and the United States), Studies history, contributions in the areas of art, literature, and music, and the Hispanic presence in the United States. Course is conducted in English.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Compare and contrast differences between one’s own culture and Hispanic cultures in a sensitive and informed manner.
      1. Identify customs and traditions of Hispanic cultures that are both similar and different to the students’ culture.
      2. Compare some of the cultural differences that exist between Hispanic cultures of different regions and the students’ culture.
      3. Examine and explain one’s attitudes about Hispanic culture.
    2. Describe the richness and diversity of Hispanic culture
      1. Identify several Spanish-speaking countries and regions.
      2. Describe various aspects of Hispanic culture as illustrated by the readings or visual media read or presented as part of this class.
      3. Explain the social and historical context of Hispanic customs and traditions from a variety of historical periods.
      4. Make connections between Hispanic culture in the classroom and the surrounding community.
    3. Use writing to learn activities.
      1. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to write grammatically and coherently about the cultural aspects covered in the course.
      3. Use appropriate electronic and print sources to gather information.
      4. Analyze and use that information in written reports.
      5. Formulate written responses to readings.
  
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    SPA 211 - Spanish Three

    Credits: 4
    Introduces the basic grammatical structures and vocabulary of modern spoken and written Spanish and correct pronunciation patterns by means of oral-aural practice, small group interaction, reading of simple texts, and written exercises. Continues introducing certain aspects of Hispanic culture and differences between the Spanish and the English languages. Conducts class in Spanish as much as possible. Requires supplemental (outside of class) listening, reading, speaking, and written work using ancillary materials and the textbook’s Internet site.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3, and SPA 112  or no more than 2 semesters of college-level Spanish; or no more than two years of High School Spanish; any with a minimum grade of C; or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Refine all the objectives from SPA 111  and SPA 112  
    2. Demonstrate expressive and receptive skills appropriate to 3rd semester Elementary / Intermediate Spanish
      1. Demonstrate the ability to give direct formal and informal commands.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to give indirect commands, make recommendations, express doubts, emotional reactions, and contingency and purpose using the present subjunctive and imperfect subjunctive verb forms.
      3. Express future events and conditions using the future tense.
      4. Use the conditional tense to express what the student would do, given a set of circumstances.
      5. Develop the ability to express and narrate past events and conditions using the preterit, the imperfect, and the perfect tenses.
      6. Express possession using stressed possessive adjectives and pronouns
      7. Ask and answer, affirmatively and negatively, more complex questions about oneself and others.
      8. Read a passage of text in Spanish to gather information and demonstrate understanding of the passage.
      9. Demonstrate the ability to write several paragraphs in Spanish in Spanish, using grammatical concepts, correct syntax, and vocabulary from the text.
      10. Use and recall vocabulary, including idiomatic expressions, that permits the expression of more complex thoughts and ideas and that will permit the receptive and expressive skills mentioned above.
    3. Compare and contrast differences between one’s own culture and Hispanic cultures in a sensitive and informed manner.
      1. Differentiate between formal and informal commands
      2. Use formal and informal speech appropriately for this level
      3. Identify several Spanish speaking countries and regions and describe some of the customs, traditions, or foods that are typical of the country or region
      4. Describe the connections between Spanish language and culture in the classroom and the global community
      5. Continue to expand on the ability to make sensitive cultural comparisons
      6. Continue to compare some of the differences between the Spanish and the English languages, including but not limited to, syntax and grammatical gender differences
  
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    SPA 212 - Spanish Four

    Credits: 4
    Instructs at the Intermediate level. Increases and expands vocabulary and written and verbal accuracy and fluency through a review of grammar covered in previous courses. Increases ability to understand written and spoken Spanish. Provides the opportunity to deepen cultural awareness and sensitivity, as well as expand awareness of the cultural richness and diversity that characterizes the Hispanic world. Conducts course in Spanish. Requires supplemental (outside of class) listening, reading, speaking, and written work using ancillary materials and the textbook’s Internet site.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and WRITING LEVEL 3, and SPA 211  or no more than three semesters of college-level Spanish; or no more than three years of High School Spanish; any with a minimum grade of C; or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Refine all of the objectives from SPA 111 , SPA 112 , SPA 211  
    2. Demonstrate expressive and receptive skills appropriate to 4th semester Intermediate Spanish
      1. Continue to develop the ability to give indirect commands, make recommendations, and express doubts, emotional reactions, and contingency and purpose using the present and imperfect subjunctive tenses
      2. Narrate in the past using a variety of past tenses
      3. Hypothesize using the “if” clauses and the correct sequence of tenses
      4. Express likes, dislikes, wants, and needs using a variety of tenses
      5. Continue to develop the ability to describe objects and persons with increased ability to self-correct grammatical and syntactical errors
      6. Practice strategies for using circumlocution or paraphrasing to explain oneself
      7. Practice increased fluency with pronunciation that shows less interference from the student’s first language
      8. Initiate and sustain a conversation or accomplish a task. This includes asking and answering questions affirmatively and negatively, and negotiating meaning
      9. Successfully read an authentic passage of text in Spanish to gather information and demonstrate understanding of the passage. React to the passage using appropriate vocabulary and grammatical structures
      10. Demonstrate the ability to write a brief report in Spanish, using grammatical concepts, correct syntax, and vocabulary from the text as well as high frequency vocabulary from previous levels
      11. Recall and use vocabulary that is beyond the “high frequency” vocabulary typical of the first two or three semesters of Spanish that will permit the receptive and expressive skills mentioned above
    3. Compare and contrast differences between one’s own culture and Hispanic cultures in a sensitive and informed manner.
      1. Use formal and informal speech appropriately for the intermediate level
      2. Identify several Spanish speaking countries or regions and describe some of the customs, traditions, or foods that are typical of the country or region
      3. Describe the connections between Spanish language and culture in the classroom and in the global community
      4. Continue to develop the ability to make sensitive cultural comparisons
      5. Continue to compare some of the differences between the Spanish and the English language, including but not limited to, syntax and grammatical gender differences
  
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    SPA 214 - Intermediate Spanish Conversation

    Credits: 2
    Offers the opportunity to read and discuss short authentic literary and non-literary texts in Spanish and to watch and discuss selected video samples in Spanish. Discusses selected topics such as differences in cultures, educational systems, families, political systems, etc. Conducts course in Spanish.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 3 and SPA 212 ; or four semesters of college-level Spanish; or four years of High School Spanish, any with a minimum grade of C; or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate expressive and receptive skills appropriate to intermediate level Spanish.
      1. Discuss selected Spanish texts and video samples.
      2. Formulate emotional and analytical responses to selected Spanish texts and video samples and to the responses of others.
      3. Use a variety of tenses and vocabulary to discuss the literary and non-literary texts and video samples.
      4. Use strategies for decoding unfamiliar vocabulary and for negotiating meaning.
    2. Compare and contrast differences between one’s own culture and Hispanic cultures in a sensitive and informed manner.
      1. Identify several Spanish speaking countries and regions, as well as several Spanish speaking populations in the United States.
      2. Describe the connections between Spanish language and Hispanic culture in the classroom and the surrounding community.
      3. Describe the diversity of Hispanic cultures, including, but not limited to, cultural products, practices, and attitudes.
      4. Compare and contrast some of the differences that exist between Hispanic cultures of different regions and the students’ culture.
      5. Examine and explain one’s attitudes about Hispanic culture.
      6. Develop the ability to make sensitive cultural comparisons.
  
  •  

    SPA 268W - Studies in Spanish - International Travel

    Credits: 1-4
    Studies ancient, colonial and / or modern civilization(s) in a Spanish-speaking country or countries. Visits archeological and / or historical sites with unassigned time for individual interests. Student must meet all course and travel requirements in addition to paying tuition and travel expenses.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15-60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate expressive and receptive skills appropriate to the level studied. (Note: The expressive and receptive skill level will depend on the student’s prior knowledge of Spanish. This Outcome will not apply to students who have no prior knowledge of Spanish.)
      1. (Receptive skills) Understand and respond to Spanish language written input in the host country/countries: Read signs, menus, maps and other public notices.
      2. (Receptive skills) Understand and respond to Spanish language spoken input in the host country/countries: Understand native speaker speech, recorded broadcasts, and other public announcements.
      3. (Expressive skills) Use Spanish to express one’s needs in the host country/countries: Ask for directions and other information as needed.
    2. Describe the richness and diversity of Hispanic culture
      1. Describe various aspects of the culture of the area visited as illustrated by the historical or archaeological locations visited, and/or by the visual and auditory input experienced during the trip.
      2. Explain the social and historical context of the customs and traditions of the area visited.
    3. Compare and contrast differences between one’s own culture and Hispanic cultures in a sensitive and informed manner.
      1. Identify customs and traditions of Hispanic cultures in the host country/countries that are both similar and different to the students’ culture.
      2. Respond in a culturally sensitive manner to the communication of native speakers in the host country/countries.
      3. Compare some of the cultural differences that exist between the cultures of the places visited and the students’ culture.
      4. Examine and explain one’s attitudes about the culture visited.
    4. Use writing to learn activities.
      1. Demonstrate the learning of concepts through writing.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to write grammatically and coherently about the cultural aspects covered during the trip.
      3. Use appropriate electronic and print sources to gather information.
      4. Analyze and use that information in written reports.
      5. Formulate written responses to the cultural, historical, and linguistic diversity experienced during the trip.
  
  •  

    SPA 275 - Introduction of Hispanic Fiction

    Credits: 3
    Introduces representative literature from the Hispanic world (Europe, the Americas, Africa, and the United States). Reads, discusses, and writes about selected novels, plays, short stories, and poetry. Expands knowledge of Hispanic culture. Conducts course in Spanish.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 4; and SPA 212 , or four semesters of college-level Spanish, or four years of High School Spanish, any with a grade of C or better, or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Humanities
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate expressive and receptive skills appropriate to the intermediate level in Spanish
      1. Read and understand selected literary texts in Spanish.
      2. Respond emotionally and analytically to selected literary texts, and to the emotional and analytical responses of others.
      3. Demonstrate the ability to write in Spanish, using grammatical concepts, correct syntax, and appropriate vocabulary.
      4. Use Spanish vocabulary appropriate to the oral and written discussion and interpretation of literary texts.
      5. Use a variety of tenses and vocabulary to discuss and write about the literary texts.
      6. Develop strategies for decoding unfamiliar Spanish vocabulary.
    2. Compare and contrast differences between one’s own culture and Hispanic cultures in a sensitive and informed manner.
      1. Identify several Spanish speaking countries and regions, as well as several Spanish speaking populations in the United States.
      2. Describe the connections between Spanish language and Hispanic culture in the classroom and the surrounding community.
      3. Compare and contrast some of the differences between the cultural information contained in the selected texts and the students’ culture.
      4. Examine and explain one’s attitudes about Hispanic culture.
      5. Develop the ability to make sensitive cultural comparisons.
  
  •  

    SPA 290-299 - Special Projects in Spanish


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Surgical First Assistant

  
  •  

    SFA 271 - Advanced Surgical Anatomy

    Credits: 6


    Introduces the relationship between anatomy and surgery, relevant physiology, and pathology utilizing the Anatomage 3D Table.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Surgical First Assistant Program. Instructor consent required.
    Corequisite(s): SFA 273  
    Lecture Hours: 90 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Demonstrate understanding of the cardiorespiratory system.

         A.          Describe the layers of muscles of the thoracic wall.

         B.          Identify the anatomical considerations during an intercostal thoracotomy incision and closure (i.e., location of nervous and vascular
                       structure.)

         C.          Compare the sternocostal projections of the pleurae and lungs, and explain the clinical significance of the pleural recesses/sinuses not
                       filled by lung.

         D.          Describe the anatomical structure of the mediastinum.

         E.          Explain where one would expect to find most aspirated foreign bodies and why.

         F.          Compare the size and structure of the right and left lungs, and compare the relationships of vascular, bronchial, and nervous elements at
                      their hila.

         G.         Describe the changes that occur in the lining epithelium from the trachea to the lung alveoli.

         H.         Explain why the arterial element is clamped first during anatomic lung resections.

         I.           Following a lung resection, explain why the pleural cavity is usually flooded with saline before closing the chest and whether the
                      temperature of the saline matters.

         J.          List the different types of bronchogenic carcinomas.

         K.         Discuss metastasis to the lung.

         L.         Describe the anatomical, histological, vascular, and neurological structures of the heart.

         M.        Describe the conduction system of the heart.

         N.         List the risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) and define “unstable” angina.

         O.         Describe the changes that occur in the histologic and gross appearance of the heart after MI, and relate these to common complications of
                      MI.

         P.          Differentiate the signs and symptoms of right and left congestive heart failure.

         Q.         Explain the adult cardiac procedures and the pathologies leading up to them.

         R.         Explain the difference between valvular stenosis and valvular insufficiency/regurgitation.

         S.          Discuss the embryologic origin, location, and potential complications of congenital cardiac anomalies.

         T.          Explain the clinical significance of the esophageal veins during liver disease, such as cirrhosis.

         U.         Describe the Azygos vein system.

         V.          Describe the location and significance of the thoracic duct.

         W.         Describe the location of the openings in the diaphragm and describe the structures and function of those structure passes.

         X.          Describe the procedures associated with pediatric cardiac procedures.

     2.    Relate the anatomical structures of the abdomen to common surgical procedures.

         A.          Describe the gross anatomy, vasculature, embryology, histology, and neurology of the GI system.

         B.          Relate the two layers of the subcutaneous connective tissue below the umbilicus to the placement of sutures.

         C.          Name an incision that may encounter the Pyramidalis muscle.

         D.          Explain how the “peritoneal cavity” differs from the “abdominal cavity.”

         E.          Name the structures that form the median, medial, and lateral umbilical folds and identify the surgical procedure during which they are
                       most apt to be seen.

         F.           Discuss the various types of peptic ulcers, including the risk of undergoing malignant changes.

         G.          Differentiate Billroth I and Billroth II procedures and explain “dumping syndrome.”

         H.          Describe the major manifestations and usual treatment of pyloric stenosis.

         I.            Explain the surgical interest in the duodenal “bulb”/”cap.”

         J.           Discuss the possible results of traumatic injury to the pancreas.

         K.           Define a Whipple procedure.

         L.           Discuss common mechanisms of splenic injury and the possible complications of splenic trauma and surgery.

         M.          Explain why the liver is easily lacerated or ruptured with blunt trauma and what instrumentation should be available during liver trauma
                       surgery.

         N.          Discuss the histologic and gross characteristics and the common clinical manifestations of cirrhosis.

         O.         Discuss the most common cause of malignancy in the liver.

         P.          Diagram the “triangle of Calot” and explain its importance during cholecystectomy.

         Q.         Discuss the various types of gallbladder disease, including their etiology, symptomatology, and major diagnostic tests.

         R.          Explain how the pattern of blood supply to the jejunoileum affects vascular occlusions and surgical resections of the small bowel.

         S.          Discuss intussusception, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, polyps, and diverticulosis.

         T.          Describe how a surgeon usually locates the appendix and explain the clinical significance of the pattern of blood supply to the appendix.

         U.         Differentiate between “external hemorrhoids” and “internal hemorrhoids” and identify which are painful and why.

    3.    Demonstrate understanding of the anatomical features of the post abdominal wall and kidneys in relation to common surgical
           procedures.

         A.          Describe the gross anatomy of the posterior abdominal wall, including the vasculature

         B.          Differentiate a “true” aneurysm, a “false” aneurysm, and a “dissecting” aneurysm or “dissection.”

         C.          Discuss the pre- and post-operative aspects of an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

         D.          Explain why how long the Aorta can be cross-clamped depends on the level at which it is clamped and why the aneurysm is not dissected
                       free from the Inferior Vena Cava.

         E.          List the signs and symptoms of an expanding or ruptured AAA and differentiate the operative mortality.

         F.          Describe the changing relationships between the Inferior Vena Cava and the Aorta in their courses through the abdomen, and how the
                      tributary pattern of the Inferior Vena Cava differs from the arterial pattern of the Aorta.

         G.         Discuss the indications for inserting an intracaval filtering device.

         H.         Describe the gross anatomy, physiology, histology, neurology, embryology, and vasculature of the kidney and ureter.

         I.           Discuss the etiologies of glomerulonephritis and pyelonephritis, and differentiate acute and chronic renal failure.

         J.          Define “shock kidney.”

         K.          Describe the anatomical structures that must be protected during the usual surgical approach for nephrectomy.

         L.          Identify the most common cause of kidney trauma and the most common cause of ureteral injury.

         M.         Compare the various methods of “angio-access.”

         N.          Define Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD) and list its advantages over hemodialysis.

         O.          Explain the usual placement of a transplanted kidney.

     4.    Demonstrate understand of the anatomical features of the male and female pelvis in relation to surgical procedures.

         A.          Describe the relationship between the pelvic inlet and the pelvic outlet.

         B.          List the structures that define the diamond-shaped boundaries and the floor of the perineum.

         C.          Define the internal and external female pelvis: gross anatomy, histology, neurology, vasculature, all organs, and their functions.

         D.          Define the internal and eternal male pelvis: gross anatomy, histology, neurology, vasculature, all organs, and their functions.

         E.          Describe the process of micturition and the autonomic influences.

         F.          Differentiate hypospadias and epispadias and define Chorde

         G.         State the danger inherent in an ascending URI.

         H.         Differentiate the characteristics of testicular and prostatic cancers, and discuss how each is treated.

         I.           Define BPH and discuss theories about its etiology.

         J.          List the indications for the four surgical methods of prostatectomy and discuss possible treatment alternatives.

         K.          Define and describe the dangers of cryptorchidism and testicular torsion.

         L.          Discuss the common causes and treatments of impotency.

         M.         Compare the female perineum with that of the male.

         N.          Discuss the purposes and locations of the performance of an episiotomy.

         O.          Explain the location of referred pain from the ovary and during pregnancy.

         P.           Identify the most common venereal infections and define PID.

         Q.          Explain what a Pap smear is looking for, and define CIN grading.

         R.          Compare cervical and uterine cancers.

         S.          Define endometriosis, compare the theories of its etiology, and describe the sequelae.

         T.           Explain how the character of a fibroid changes with varying estrogen levels.

         U.          Identify what types of ovarian tumors are most common in young women and discuss the usually prognosis for ovarian
                       cystadenocarcinoma.

         V.          List the indications for Cesarean section delivery.

         W.         Compare and contrast the location, character, and predisposing factors of direct and indirect inguinal hernias.

         X.          Compare a laparoscopic hernia repair with an open surgical repair.

         Y.           Discuss where femoral hernias occur and the possible consequences.

         Z.           Define “Richter’s hernia”, “Spigelian hernia”, and “diastasis recti.”

         AA.        Discuss indications for surgical interventions of pathology relating to the abdomen.

    5.    Describe the normal anatomy and function of the structure of the lower extremity, common injuries to the lower extremity, and common
           surgical 
    interventions.

         A.          Describe the normal gross osteology, arthrology, neurology, and vasculature of the anterior, medial, lateral, and posterior thigh.

         B.          Describe the “cruciate anastomosis” of blood vessels on the lateral side of the greater trochanter.

         C.          Describe the common surgical approach for insertion of a hip screw/pin/nail.

         D.          Identify the most common indications for a total hip replacement, and describe the surgical approach when a patient is in lateral position.

         E.          Identify the structures that compensate for the inherent instability of the knee joint.

         F.          Explain why a meniscal tear usually does not heal.

         G.         Describe the mechanism for “locking” the knee in extension and “unlocking” it for flexion.

         H.         Define Baker’s cyst.

         I.           List the indications for a total knee arthroplasty and compare the function of a knee prosthesis with that of a total hip prosthesis.

         J.          Explain why tibial fractures can be problematic.

         K.         Define “intermittent claudication” and explain why it occurs.

         L.          Compare the techniques of AK and BK amputations.

         M.         List the muscles of the anterior/posterior compartment of the leg, their actions, innervation, and blood supply.

         N.         Compare the Greater and Lesser Saphenous veins, including origin, drainage, and companion structures.

         O.         Discuss the causes, possible complications, and indications for surgical treatment of varicosed veins of the leg.

         P.          Explain why the Common Peroneal nerve is easily injured and discuss the possible results of injury.

         Q.         List the structures contained in the four compartments beneath the flexor retinaculum at the medial malleolus.

         R.          Identify the bones and ligaments of the ankle and the foot and their functions; discuss where most ankle sprains occur and why, and
                       explain why surgery may be indicated and what the procedure does.

         S.          Compare the long tendons and intrinsic muscles of the foot to those of the hand.

         T.           Compare the arterial supply and nerve distribution of the foot to that of the hand.

         U.          Define Pott’s fracture, “clubfoot”, Morton’s neuroma, and “flat feet.”

         V.           Differentiate an ankle arthrodesis from a triple arthrodesis.

         W.          Define a bunion and compare the most common types of surgical treatment.

     6.    Discuss the significance of structural components of the skull and brain in intracranial pathologies.

         A.          Name the cranial and facial bones and the main suture lines of the calvarium.

         B.          List and explain different types of congenital cranial deformities.

         C.          Relate a craniotomy approach and closure to the layers of the scalp and the special character of skull bone.

         D.         Describe the brain’s meningeal coverings, dural duplications and cranial venous sinuses.

         E.          Explain the relationship of the ventricular system to diagnostic imaging, hydrocephalus and shunting surgery.

         F.          Locate the major areas and features of the brain and describe the function(s) associated with each.

         G.         List the general principles concerning the organization of cranial nerve nuclei in the brainstem.

         H.         Be able to sketch the major vascular structures that comprise the Circle of Willis and explain why the anastomosing system among the four
                      major contributing arteries is important.

         I.           Discuss the location, most common presenting signs and symptoms, mortality rate, and  principles of surgical management of cerebral
                      aneurysms and AVM’s.

         J.          Explain how the knowledge of brain functions is used to diagnose and locate brain tumors.

         K.         List methods of resection for benign and malignant brain tumors.

         L.          Define types of skull fractures.

         M.         Differentiate the character of the bleeding of an epidural vs. a subdural hematoma, and describe how different types of hemorrhages or
                      hematomas are treated.

         N.         Select the area of injury or pathology that produces various characteristic signs.

         O.         Relate foramina of the skull to the structure(s) passing through them.

         P.          List the functions of cerebrospinal fluid.

         Q.         Describe the pathway of CSF from its production to its drainage

         R.         Differentiate the causes of “communicating’ vs. ‘non-communicating’ hydrocephalus, and discuss types of shunting procedures and their
                      potential long term complications.

         S.          List diagnostic methods for intracranial pathologies

         T.           Describe different approaches and methods for cranial entry.

         U.          Define the Glascow Coma Scale and discuss methods for assessing levels of consciousness.

         V.          Discuss different neurosurgical procedures and their complications.

     7.    Discuss anatomical considerations relevant to surgery of the face, eye, ear, nose, neck and throat.

         A.          Name the components of the bony orbit and identify its anatomical relationships.

         B.          List the innervation and function(s) of each of the extra ocular eye muscles, and explain how eye movements are used to test the integrity |
                      of cranial nerves.

         C.          List the functions of each of the cranial nerves around the eye and explain the significance of the ciliary ganglion to eye surgery performed
                       under Local anesthesia.

         D.          Describe the circulation pathway of aqueous humor and relate it to the treatment options for glaucoma.

         E.          Define a cataract, explain how it can occur, and compare surgical treatment options.

         F.           Describe the features of the retina, define retinal detachment, and explain why a retinal detachment that is approaching the macula
                       requires immediate surgery.

         G.          Define diabetic retinopathy and describe how it is treated.

         H.          Explain how the optic disk can reflect increased intracranial pressure.

         I.           Describe what happens to the distribution of optic nerve fibers at the optic chiasma and explain how various lesions along the optic
                      pathway affect vision.

         J.          Describe the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and its actions.

         K.          Describe the course, functions, and anatomical relationships of the branches of the Trigeminal (facial) Nerve.

         L.          Trace the course of the Facial Artery and explain the significance of the system of anastomoses near the medial canthus/angle of the eye.

         M.         Describe the veins/arteries of the neck.

         N.         Discuss the clinical significance of the carotid sinus during Carotid Endarterectomy.

         O.         List the suprahyoid and infrahyoid muscles, name their innervations, and explain how their functions relate to each other.

         P.          List the nerves responsible for general sensation, taste, and motor function in the tongue.

         Q.         Describe the arterial supply, venous drainage and other anatomic relationships of the thyroid gland.

         R.          Describe the surgical approach for open tracheostomy.

         S.          Identify the major sources of blood supply to the palatine tonsils.

         T.          Describe the muscular coats of the pharynx and the functions of the pharyngeal plexus.

         U.         List the major cartilages of the larynx and the innervations of the muscles of the larynx.

         V.          Explain the clinical significance of the fascial compartments of the neck.

         W.        Describe surgical options for eye pathology.

    8.    Relate structures of the chest wall and superficial back to pathology and surgery of the chest wall, breast and axilla.

         A.          Demonstrate the movements of the humerus and the scapula

         B.          List the superficial back muscles and anterior chest wall muscles, and describe their functions

         C.          Describe the gross and histologic architecture of the normal breast, identify where most breast cancers occur, and explain what alterations
                       occur with benign and malignant changes

         D.         List the major structures contained in the axilla

         E.          Define “radical mastectomy”, “modified radical mastectomy”, and “lumpectomy”

         F.           Name the major nerves and vessels that must be identified and protected during breast and axillary surgery

         G.          Draw and label the components of the Brachial Plexus

         H.          Describe the different surgical options for the pathology of the breast.

    9.    Relate anatomical considerations to orthopedic pathology and surgery of the upper limb.

         A.          Describe the usual incisional approach to the shoulder joint.

         B.          Name the components of the “rotator cuff” and describe their insertions and functions.

         C.          Differentiate between a “shoulder separation” and a shoulder dislocation.

         D.          List intracapsular structures that might be seen during a shoulder arthroscopy.

         E.          List the muscles, nerves, and arteries of the arm and forearm, along with their functions.

         F.           Describe common injuries to nervous and vascular structures in the arm and forearm and their resulting limitations (i.e. clinical
                       manifestations).

         G.          Describe the fascial features of the wrist and how the forearm tendons are organized.

         H.          Describe  osteology, arthology, musculature, vasculature, and neurology of the wrist and hand.

         I.            Discuss the relevance of the extensor “hood”, vincula, and fascial features of a digit to hand injuries.

         J.           Define carpal tunnel syndrome, Dupuytren’s contracture, and DeQuervain’s contracture.

         K.           Describe what happens to the hand with rheumatoid arthritis.

         L.           Explain the order of treatment priorities on an injured hand.

         M.           Discuss the different surgical options for pathology of the upper limb.

     

      Outcome 10: Discuss pathologies of and surgical approaches to the vertebral column and

                               spinal cord.

         Objective

         A.          Define the characteristics that differentiate cervical, thoracic, and lumbar vertebrae.

         B.          Relate the vertebral ligaments to a laminectomy approach.

         C.          Describe the contents of the vertebral canal, including the blood vessels.

         D.         State where a spinal anesthetic is injected and explain why.

         E.          List and describe the various meningeal specializations around the spinal cord.

         F.          Describe the arterial supply to the spinal cord.

         G.         Describe a ruptured lumbar disc.

         H.         Explain the reasons for the usual surgical approach to a herniated cervical disc and describe what complications may be associated with
                      this approach.

         I.           Identify aspects of the spinal cord in cross-section and discuss their functions.

         J.          Describe surgical approaches to correct congenital or acquired pathologies of the spine.

  
  •  

    SFA 273 - Fundamental Techniques

    Credits: 3
    Covers the theory and practice of pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative functions and techniques of a Surgical First Assistant.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Surgical First Assistant program. Instructor consent required.
    Corequisite(s): SFA 271  
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Discuss physiologic monitoring of patients undergoing surgery and the placement of monitoring devices.
      1. List the common types of noninvasive and invasive monitors used intra-operatively and discuss their potential complications.
      2. Discuss the SFA’s responsibilities with regard to intra-operative patient monitoring.
      3. Define “vital signs”, explain why they are important, describe how they can be measured, and list their normal ranges in an adult.
      4. Define terms used to describe abnormalities in vital sign measurements.
      5. Explain the importance of monitoring urine output and body temperature and identify abnormalities that must be reported.
      6. Discuss CVP lines, PA catheters, end-tidal CO2 monitors, pulse oximeters, peripheral nerve stimulators, and special monitors specific to surgical specialties.
      7. Define terms related to hemodynamic monitoring.
    2. Demonstrate the preparation of a patient prior to surgery.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the preoperative assessment of the patient.
      2. Recognize the need for surgical intervention.
      3. Understand patient considerations when preparing the patient for surgery.
      4. Describe the proper attire for a patient entering the O.R. and explain the safety reasons for these rules.
      5. List the indications for bladder catheterization and discuss possible complications and appropriate actions.
      6. Describe the principles of performing urinary catheterization and be able to demonstrate proper technique.
      7. List the essential elements of proper positioning of a patient and discuss the safety precautions to be observed.
      8. Discuss pre-operative preps and indications for hair clipping.
      9. Describe and be able to demonstrate the correct method for various kinds of pre-operative wash preps, including the appropriate choice of antiseptic agent.
      10. List the basic principles of draping and be able to demonstrate standard draping procedures and variations.
      11. Discuss the correct placement, pressure settings, inflation time limits, and possible complications of a pneumatic tourniquet.
    3. Demonstrate understanding of methods of tissue handling and techniques of instrument use.
      1. Identify the indications, advantages and disadvantages for various types of abdominal incisions.
      2. List the general rules of gentle tissue handling and compare different methods of tissue dissection.
      3. Discuss the factors involved in the appropriate selection of instrumentation and the potential hazards from the improper use of instruments.
      4. Describe and demonstrate proper body mechanics when using various kinds of instruments.
      5. Compare various methods of tissue retraction.
      6. List the types of surgical lasers and the characteristics, common uses, and preparation and safe use of each.
      7. Discuss the surgical uses of ultrasound equipment.
    4. Demonstrate methods of providing visualization of the operative site and of hemostasis.
      1. Discuss the various methods of wound visualization.
      2. Discuss the principles of selection and proper use of different kinds of sponging materials.
      3. Describe the proper use of suctioning equipment.
      4. Discuss the purposes and methods of intraoperative irrigation, and list the types, possible side effects and contraindications for various irrigation solutions.
      5. Discuss the different types of bleeding and the SFA’s role in achieving hemostasis.
      6. List and define terms relating to different ligating methods.
      7. Discuss the uses of operating microscopes and the role of the SFA.
    5. Demonstrate appropriate methods of tissue approximation.
      1. List characteristics, common uses, and contraindications different types of suture materials.
      2. Discuss the principles and appropriate uses of the various types of suturing techniques.
      3. Demonstrate a clinically acceptable level of surgical knot-tying techniques.
      4. Discuss the uses of different types of surgical stapling appliances.
      5. Demonstrate a clinically acceptable lev
  
  •  

    SFA 275 - Principles of Surgical Assisting

    Credits: 2


    Explores the interpersonal, legal and ethical aspects of surgical patient care, recognition of surgical complications, and appropriate actions.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Surgical First Assistant program. Instructor consent required.
    Corequisite(s): SFA 277  
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Discuss the importance of appropriate interpersonal skills in the Operating Room.

         A.          Describe the role relationships and interdependencies between the SFA and other team members.

         B.          Explain how the SFA’s scope of practice is determined.

         C.          Discuss what kinds of behaviors and attitudes tend to promote conflict within the surgical team and which behaviors and attitudes tend to
                       promote harmony.

         D.          Discuss effective and productive coping mechanisms used to deal with stress.

         E.          Discuss how the SFA can maintain the expected level of autonomy and initiative without interfering with the activities or professional
                       judgment of the surgeon.

         F.          Explain the SFA’s responsibilities and limitations in resolving a difference of opinion with his/her supervising surgeon.

         G.         Discuss how interpersonal stress can increase during critical situations and what the SFA can do to help.

         H.         Discuss commonly-experienced anxieties and emotional reactions in patients facing surgery.

         I.          Give examples of how the interrelationships between the mind and the body can affect the patient’s response to surgery.

         J.          Discuss how the attitudes and behaviors of the O.R. staff can either heighten or assuage a patient’s fears and anxieties.

         K.         Discuss possible reasons why a patient may be combative and how safety can be provided for both patient and care-givers.

     2.    Take appropriate action during intraoperative emergencies.

         A.          Discuss the appropriate role of the SFA during intraoperative crises/emergencies.

         B.          Describe corrective actions to be taken by the SFA during incidents of massive contamination.

         C.          Discuss the appropriate role of the SFA during failures of critical equipment or a power failure.

         D.          Discuss the appropriate actions to be taken by the SFA if surgical supervision is interrupted.

     3.    Discuss aspects of patient transportation within the health care institution and between facilities.

         A.          Discuss special needs during patient transportation and the SFA’s appropriate role in communications and/or providing care.

         B.          Explain how the SFA might be involved in the inter-agency transfer of a patient.

     4.    Discuss legal considerations in the surgical environment and the legal responsibilities of the Surgical First Assistant.

         A.          Explain “informed consent” and describe the various types of operative and other permits, including appropriate conditions and signatories.

         B.          Describe the proper identification process for a patient entering the O.R. suite.

         C.          Explain the appropriate actions for safeguarding a patient’s personal possessions.

         D.          List the information elements commonly required for various types of operative records, forms and reports.

         E.          Discuss the legal implications of operative record keeping.

         F.           Discuss the SFA’s responsibilities for reporting and documenting.

         G.          List the circumstances that determine a Medical Examiner’s (Coroner’s) case.

         H.          Describe differences in pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative routines for ambulatory surgery patients. Differentiate statutory
                       law and common law.

         J.           Define and identify instances of “dependent” and “independent” functions of an employed health practitioner.

         K.           Define and give examples of various legal concepts and terms that apply to the surgical environment.

         L.           List ways that the Standard of Care may be determined in a court of law and the factors used to establish negligence.

         M.          Give examples of common acts of negligence in an O.R. setting.

         N.           Discuss moral and ethical responsibilities and obligations, as opposed to legal precepts (e.g.confidentiality and legal privilege, patient’s
                        request for a religious counselor vs. request for an attorney, etc.).

         O.           Discuss appropriate actions and behavior for the SFA if he/she is involved in a patient’s lawsuit.

    5.    Demonstrate appropriate ethical decision-making ability.

         A.          Define terminology related to ethical principles and concepts.

         B.          Give examples of O.R. situations that could result in ethical conflicts.

         C.          Describe the decision-making process for resolving ethical conflicts.

         D.          Discuss the application of Advance Directives and DNR orders in the O.R. setting.

         E.          Compare and contrast basic patient’s rights and duties with basic caregiver’s rights and duties.

         F.           Compare the legal with the ethical relationship between the SFA and the surgeon.

  
  •  

    SFA 277 - Bioscience

    Credits: 6


    The course is designed to promote an understanding of microbial physiology which precedes the understanding of disease transmission and or prevention, including standard precautions and infection control. The pharmacology section of the course is designed to promote an understanding of the effects of pre, post and operative drugs. The anesthesia section of the course is designed to promote an understanding of general principles/techniques and drugs used by anesthesia and their effects on the patient. The course will also introduce the student diagnostic testing such as radiology, laboratory and cardiographics. Wound healing, All Hazards, Trauma, nutrition perioperatively, fluid and electrolyte balance and techniques in maintaining homeostasis will be reviewed.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Surgical First Assistant progra. Instructor consent required.
    Corequisite(s): SFA 275  
    Lecture Hours: 90 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Use terminology that is specific to pharmacology.

         A.          Define the differences among a drug’s chemical name, generic name, and registered/trade name.

         B.          Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different routes of administration for drugs.

         C.          Define terms that describe the actions or effects of a pharmacologic agent.

         D.          Analyze perioperative principles of patient assessment and how they relate to anesthesia.

         E.          Consider the goals of anesthesia as it relates to the perioperative patient in the surgical setting.

         F.           Assess the risks and adverse effects of anesthesia, conscious sedation, local anesthetic agents, and pain management in the surgical
                       setting.

         G.          Demonstrate an understanding of anesthesia, conscious sedation, local anesthetic agents, and pain management as it relates to the
                       perioperative patient.

         H.          Understand the principles of local injection techniques.

         I.            Examine the application of topical anesthetic agents.

    2.    Discuss the evaluation and preparation of the preoperative patient by Anesthesia personnel.

         A.          Discuss which aspects of a patient’s medical history would be most relevant in an anesthesiologist’s pre-operative work-up.

         B.          List the ASA patient classifications of anesthesia risk and give two examples of each class.

         C.          List the major categories of pre-operative medications and the most relevant action(s) of each type of drug.

         D.          Discuss why appropriate psychological preparation of a pre-operative patient is important.

     3.    Differentiate surgical considerations of the agents used to achieve surgical anesthesia.

         A.          List and describe the actions of the agents most commonly used for induction of General anesthesia.

         B.          Discuss the purposes, techniques, and possible complications of endotracheal intubation.

         C.          Define a “closed rebreathing system” of administering inhalation anesthesia.

         D.          Compare the physiologic effects of the commonly-used inhalation and neuroleptic anesthetic agents.

         E.          List the advantages, disadvantages and contraindications for each of the above agents.

         F.           Differentiate the mechanism of action and method of reversal for non-depolarizing/antidepolarizing vs. depolarizing neuromuscular
                       blocking agents.

         G.          Discuss the recognition and treatment of complications during General anesthesia.

         H.          Discuss methods, indications/contraindications, and agents used for Regional anesthesia.

         I.            Compare the agents used for Local Infiltration and Topical anesthesia.

         j.            Describe possible untoward effects of Regional, Local and Topical anesthesia.

    4.    Discuss special conditions that can affect and/or be affected by surgical procedures.

         A.          Discuss special considerations regarding open and laparoscopic abdominal surgery.

         B.          Discuss special considerations regarding cranial neurosurgery.

         C.          Discuss special considerations regarding thoracic and cardiac procedures.

         D.          Discuss special considerations regarding obese patients.

         E.          Discuss special considerations regarding pregnant patients.

         F.          Discuss special considerations regarding severely burned patients.

         G.         Discuss special considerations regarding pediatric patients.

         H.         Discuss special considerations regarding geriatric patients.

    5.    Demonstrate knowledge of pharmacologic agents that are commonly used In the Operating Room.

         A.          Describe the uses and effects of pertinent categories of drugs affecting Central Nervous System as they apply to pre-, intra- and
                       post-operative patients.

         B.          Discuss the pre-, intra-, and post-operative uses and effects of drugs acting on the Autonomic Nervous System.

         C.          Relate drugs affecting cardiovascular function and blood coagulability to surgical patients and uses during operative procedures.

         D.          Classify and discuss drugs acting on the Digestive System, including their mechanisms of action, uses and possible adverse effects.

         E.          Relate drugs and solutions affecting fluid balance to surgical patients and uses during operative procedures.

         F.          Discuss the use of obstetrical agents in relation to surgical patients and procedures.

         G.         Classify and discuss the use of endocrine drugs in surgical patients.

         H.         Discuss the uses and effects of steroids and immunosuppressive drugs in relation to surgical patients and procedures.

         I.          Classify antimicrobial agents and discuss their varying mechanisms of action and ranges of  action.

    6.    Describe mechanisms of tissue injury  to wound healing and possible complications.

         A.          Differentiate “disease”, “illness”, and “disability”.

         B.          Define the field of Pathology.

         C.          Define cellular atrophy and hypertrophy and explain how these adaptations are manifested grossly.

         D.          Describe the sequence of changes that occur during sublethal ischemic and hypoxic injury to the cell.

         E.          Describe the various dimensions of necrosis and autolysis.

         F.           Differentiate between acute and chronic inflammation.

         G.          Describe the physiologic processes occurring during the three stages of wound healing and relate these to different suture materials.

         H.          Describe what factors affect wound healing and/or influence the rate of wound healing.

         I.            Differentiate healing by first, second and third intentions and relate those processes to primary closure, secondary union and delayed
                       primary closure.

         J.           Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of hemostasis and coagulation.

         K.          Analyze disorders of hemostasis and coagulation.

         L.          Analyze congenital hemostasis disorders.

         M.         Demonstrate an understanding of disseminated intravascular coagulation.

         N.         Review clinical indications and uses of blood components.

     7.    Discuss types of injuries related to circulatory disturbances.

         A.          List the causes of systemic edema.

         B.          Differentiate hyperemia and congestion.

         C.          Describe the formation and progression of a thrombus and an embolus.

         D.         Differentiate the results of arterial and venous thromboemboli.

         E.          Describe an infarction.

         F.          Define primary and secondary hypertension.

         G.         Relate the possible mechanisms of hypertension with the types of drug therapy that may be employed.

         H.         Describe the three types of arteriosclerosis and the risk factors of each.

         I.           Briefly describe the progression of atherosclerotic changes in a blood vessel.

         J.          Describe the clinical significance of the histologic differences in the walls of the various kinds of blood vessels.

    8.    Discuss nutritional, metabolic, and immunologic disorders relevant to the surgical patient.

         A.          Describe “essential” nutrients.

         B.          List the various causes of malnutrition.

         C.          Describe the health effects of chronic alcoholism.

         D.          Relate the physiologic effects of diabetes mellitus to its signs and symptoms.

         E.          Describe how the immune system works in the body during normal and compromised situations.

         F.           Describe the major causes of acquired immunodeficiencies.

         G.          Describe hypersensitivity reactions.

         H.          Differentiate between rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

         I.           Summarize the physiological composition of body water and solutes.

         J.          Interpret the physiological acid-base balance of the body.

         K.          Analyze the principles of extracellular fluid distribution between plasma and interstitial lymphatic volumes.

         L.          Assess the clinical signs of hypovolemic, septic, hemorrhagic and cardiogenic shock.

         M.         Analyze the causes of surgical site infections (SSI).

         N.         Assess the clinical signs of specific SSIs.

         O.         Evaluate the methods for the prevention of SSIs.

         P.          Summarize the specific uses of antibiotics.

    9.    Discuss pathologic and induced alterations of body temperature.

         A.          Describe and differentiate 1st degree, 2nd degree, and 3rd degree burns.

         B.          Describe the major concerns in the initial treatment of a burn patient.

         C.          Compare the three major types of skin cancers.

    10. Discuss disorders of tissue growth related to radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy.

         A.          List the direct and indirect effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on cells.

         B.          List and define the types of purposeful, non-neoplastic, and neoplastic tissue growth and give examples.

         C.          Describe the essential differences benign and malignant tumors.

         D.          Describe the three types/classifications of cancers and the histological and physiological characteristics of each.

         E.          Describe the process if metastasis.

         F.           Explain what ionizing radiation does to both normal and malignant tissue, including the dangers of underdosage and overdosage in
                       therapeutic use.

         G.          Identify the sources, attributes, and uses of external/internal radiation methods.

         H.          Describe how the complications/side effects of radiation therapy relate to the susceptibility of normal cells.

         I.            List the general safety rules for working around radioactive materials.  Describe radiation hazards to personnel and the proper monitoring
                       precautions.

         J.           Identify the characteristics of irradiated tissue and their relevance to subsequent surgical intervention.

         K.          Compare and contrast the mechanisms and side effects of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy.

     11. Discuss routine laboratory tests, diagnostic imaging, and electrocardiogram information in the assessment of the surgical patient.

         A.          List the standard components of a CBC and the normal values of each.

         B.          List the two main mechanisms that can produce anemia.

         C.          Describe in what ways an RBC count, a WBC count, a hemoglobin, and a hematocrit give different and complementary information and
                       how it affects surgical patients.

         D.          Discuss why leukopenia is generally a contraindication for surgery.

         E.          Describe a Differential Count and its clinical relevance.

         F.           Describe what kinds of conditions can elevate or decrease a BUN.

         G.          Describe the difference between HDL’s and LDL’s.

         H.          Describe what information in lab tests can assist with diagnosis and treatment of the most prevalent disorders.

         I.            Describe the differences between hypokalemia and hyperkalemia.

         J.           List the various modalities of diagnostic imaging.

         K.          Compare the various methods of imaging the skull and brain.

         L.          List the kinds of patients that cannot undergo magnetic resonance imaging.

         M.         Describe why most tumors, cysts and edema show up well on MRI.

         N.         Describe when sonography is a preferred method of diagnostic imaging.

         O.         Describe the components of a single EKG configuration and what each represents.

         P.          Describe how an EKG configuration can be used to diagnose cardiac disorders.

         Q.         Differentiate among first degree, second degree, and third degree A-V blocks.

         R.          Describe the danger of Complete Heart Block.

         S.          Describe what kind of drug therapy may be associated with heart block.

         T.          Discuss/describe how diagnostic testing helps in assessing operative mortality and morbidity risks

         U.         Describe how surgical planning differs for a critically ill patient and what the SFA’s role is.

    12. Discuss the various kinds of cardiac pacemakers.

         A.          Describe what the most common indication is for an artificial/mechanical pacemaker.

         B.          Describe the complications associated with a pacemaker.

         C.          Relate the signs and symptoms of shock to the physiologic responses and adaptations occurring.

         D.          Describe the physiological changes of shock and how it is treated.

         E.          Describe the components of external defibrillation on an adult and a child.

    13. Describe pathophysiologic responses in a critically ill surgical patient and identify appropriate therapeutic intervention activities.

         A.          Describe how the SFA can best assist the surgeon (in the larger sense) during the intraoperative care of a critically ill patient.

         B.          Describe the physiological changes that occur in the GI, cardiopulmonary, endocrine and renal neurological systems with the critically ill

                       surgical patient.

         C.          Describe in a diabetic patient, which abnormality of blood sugar level is more hazardous and which is more apt to occur after surgery and
                       why.

         D.          Describe what the role of steroids are in a surgical patient.

         E.          Describe what happens to calorie and protein requirements in a post-operative patient.

         F.          List what vitamins and minerals are especially important for wound healing.

         G.         Differentiate causes of post operative blood pressure abnormalities.

         H.         Describe why vomiting is a serious concern in a post operative patient and what factors may promote vomiting.

         I.           Describe the physiologically importance of pain control in a post-operative patient.

         J.          Define the “4 W’s” of post-op fever etiology.

         K.          Describe the relationship to sterile technique, gentle handling of tissue, and the type of suture material and suturing technique used.

         L.          Describe why the early movement and ambulation is important in post-operative patients.

         M.         Describe why elderly debilitated patients are subject to post-operative complications.

    14. Discuss microbial hazards in the operating room and demonstrate knowledge of standard precautions.    

         A.          Identify the most common organisms of normal flora, their areas of the body, and their morphologic and staining characteristics (gpc, etc.)

         B.          Describe what patient factors predispose to infection.

         C.          Describe what perioperative activities or techniques can help in the prevention of wound infections.

         D.         Describe what kinds of organisms are most apt to be involved in superficial wound infections, deep wound infections, and peritonitis from a
                      perforated bowel.

         E.          Describe what organisms are most commonly involved in pulmonary infections, infections of intravascular lines, and urinary tract infections.

         F.          Discuss the difference between bacteremia and specticemia.

         G.         Discuss why you get called out in the middle of the night for a wound Irrigation and Debridement.

         H.         Describe what gram negative sepsis is.

         I.           Describe what an “opportunistic infection is.

         J.          Discuss how the immune response and susceptibility to sepsis are altered in an immunocompromised patient and what different pathogens
                      may be involved.

         K.          Describe what general rules apply to antibiotic therapy.

         L.          Discuss how the actions of antibiotics compare with the actions of antineoplastic chemotherapeutic agents.

         M.         Discuss whether there are any patterns to the “generations” within a category of antibiotic agents.

         N.         Describe how you can recognize the names of antibiotics belonging to different categories of agents.

         O.         Discuss when a patient is allergic to penicillins, what other category of antibiotics he is apt to have a cross-sensitivity.

         P.          Discuss what the alternatives are to penicillin for patients who are allergic.

         Q.         Identify which antibiotics are usually employed for anaerobic infections.

    15. Discuss the risks of blood transmissible diseases in the surgical

         A.          List and differentiate the types of hepatitis viruses, the diseases they cause, and how they are transmitted.

         B.          Describe the differences among the “c”, “e” and “s” antigens of HBV and comparative risks to Operating Room personnel.

         C.          Discuss the epidemiology of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus and features of HIV infection.

         D.         Describe the risks from an HIV infected patient to Operating Room personnel.

         E.          Describe how the risks of any type of blood-borne infection can be minimized on the O.R.

         F.          Discuss the risks of tuberculosis, the Human Papilloma Virus, and other microbial hazards for Operating Room personnel.

    17. Discuss the role of the surgical assistant in disaster planning.

         A.          Demonstrate an understanding of disaster planning.

         B.          Demonstrate an understanding of putting the plan into action in preparation for a disaster.

         C.          Assess the federal, state and local agencies that are involved in disaster planning and preparation.

         D.          Analyze the legal issues involved in disasters as it relates to surgical assistants.

         E.          Assess the physical and mental stresses that can occur as a caregiver both during disaster and post-disaster.

         F.          Describe the role(s) of the surgical assistant during a disaster.

  
  •  

    SFA 278 - Clinical Practicum I

    Credits: 3


    Practices basic surgical skills and techniques for Surgical First Assistants by individual assignment to a qualified preceptor surgeon who will provide direct supervision during their surgical rotation in a clinical setting.

    Prerequisite(s): SFA 271  , SFA 273  each with a minimum grade of “C” (2.0).
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 270
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1. Complete the requirements for 140 completed cases.

    A. Complete the requirements for the six surgical rotations. A minimum of 20 cases in General Surgery, with thre remaining cases divided between a minimum of two (2) of the specialty areas below.

    1. Cardiovascular surgery
    2. Peripheral vascular
    3. Thoracic
    4. Orthopedic
    5. Neurosurgery
    6. Obstetrical and gynecologic surgery
    7. Genitourinary surgery
    8. Plastic surgery
    9. General surgery
    10. Endosurgery
    11. Ophthalmology
    12. Otorhinolaryngology
    13. Oral/Maxillofacial
    14. Pediatrics
    15. Oncology

    2. Demonstrate entry-level skills in the role of the Surgical First Assistant.

    A. Review selected instruments, supplies and equipment for the operative procedure.
    B. Check the patient’s chart for pertinent information and communicate this to the appropriate persons.
    C. Assist anesthesia personnel as requested.
    D. Assist in applying external monitoring devices.
    E. Assist in moving and positioning the patient for surgery.
    F. Apply tourniquets as required.
    G. Provide or review preparation of the surgical site (shave and wash prep).
    H. Drape the patient without surgeon supervision.
    I. Provide adequate visualization of the operative site.
    J. Assist with temporary and permanent techniques of providing hemostasis.
    K. Participate in volume replacement or autotransfusion techniques as appropriate.
    L. Anticipate the moves of the surgeon and perform any and all tasks delegated and directed by the surgeon.
    M. Recognize surgical hazards and emergency situations and initiate appropriate corrective action.
    N. Verify specimens for laboratory examination.
    O. Identify and approximate tissue planes for closure, selecting appropriate materials (e.g. sutures, staples) and techniques within guidelines directed by the surgeon.
    P. Assist in applying and securing drainage systems.
    Q. Assist in the selection and application of appropriate wound dressings or casting materials.
    R. Transfer and transport the patient from the operating room to the recovery room, if required.
    S. Assist in the development and maintenance of doctor’s preference cards, as needed.

    3. Demonstrate appropriate cognitive, psychomotor and affective skills.

    A. Provide a safe, efficient and supportive environment for the surgical patient.
    B. Respect the patient’s inherent right to privacy, dignity and confidentiality.
    C. Apply legal and ethical principles and appropriate interpersonal skills to all decisions and actions.
    D. Understand the services provided by the surgeon in relation to the patient’s restoration to health and return to the community.
    E. Recognize the importance of teamwork, consideration and cooperation.
    F. Function efficiently and in a professional manner to provide optimum patient care.
    G. Apply knowledge of normal and pathologic anatomy and physiology and of the actions of pharmacologic agents in order to individualize patient care.
    H. Apply the principles of asepsis in a knowledgeable manner to provide optimum patient care.
    I. Prepare and know the specific use of all equipment and supplies used for surgical procedures.
    J. Demonstrate knowledge of the step-by-step progress of specific surgical procedures and display dexterity in the use of the required instrumentation.
    K. Anticipate the needs of the surgeon in order to expedite the procedure, thus minimizing the patient’s exposure to surgical and anesthetic stress.
    L. Develop and improve skills in the organization of work and in assisting the surgeon by using economy in time, motion and materials.
    M. Identify emergency situations and use sound judgment in instituting established procedures to respond to emergencies in a calm and efficient manner.
    N. Demonstrate initiative in expanding his/her knowledge of new surgical procedures and subjects relating to the operating room and to the surgical patient.
    O. Understand that each practitioner is individually responsible for his/her own actions.
    P. Recognize legal and policy limits of individual responsibility and practice.
    Q. Relate operating room services to the total hospital environment.

  
  •  

    SFA 279 - Clinical Practicum II

    Credits: 3


    Practices basic surgical skills and techniques for Surgical First Assistants by individual assignment to a qualified preceptor surgeon who will provide direct supervision during their surgical rotation in a clinical setting.

    Prerequisite(s): SFA 278   with a minimum grade of C (2.0)
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 270
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Complete the requirements for 140 completed cases.

         A.         Complete the requirements for the six surgical rotations. A minimum of 20 cases in General Surgery, with the remaining cases divided
                      between a minimum of two (2) of the specialty areas below.

                      1.    Cardiovascular surgery

                      2.    Peripheral vascular

                      3.    Thoracic

                      4.    Orthopedic

                      5.    Neurosurgery

                      6.    Obstetrical and gynecologic surgery

                      7.    Genitourinary surgery

                      8.    Plastic surgery

                      9.    General surgery

                      10.  Endosurgery

                      11.  Ophthalmology

                      12.  Otorhinolaryngology

                      13.  Oral/Maxillofacial

                      14.  Pediatrics

                      15.  Oncology

    2.    Demonstrate entry-level skills in the role of the Surgical First Assistant.

         A.          Review selected instruments, supplies and equipment for the operative procedure.

         B.          Check the patient’s chart for pertinent information and communicate this to the appropriate persons.

         C.          Assist anesthesia personnel as requested.

         D.          Assist in applying external monitoring devices.

         E.          Assist in moving and positioning the patient for surgery.

         F.          Apply tourniquets as required.

         G.         Provide or review preparation of the surgical site (shave and wash prep).

         H.         Drape the patient without surgeon supervision.

         I.           Provide adequate visualization of the operative site.

         J.          Assist with temporary and permanent techniques of providing hemostasis.

         K.          Participate in volume replacement or autotransfusion techniques as appropriate.

         L.          Anticipate the moves of the surgeon and perform any and all tasks delegated and directed by the surgeon.

         M.         Recognize surgical hazards and emergency situations and initiate appropriate corrective action.

         N.         Verify specimens for laboratory examination.

         O.         Identify and approximate tissue planes for closure, selecting appropriate materials (e.g.sutures, staples) and techniques within guidelines
                      directed by the surgeon.

         P.          Assist in applying and securing drainage systems.

         Q.         Assist in the selection and application of appropriate wound dressings or casting materials.

         R.         Transfer and transport the patient from the operating room to the recovery room, if required.

         S.         Assist in the development and maintenance of doctors’ preference cards, as needed.

     3.    Demonstrate appropriate cognitive, psychomotor and affective skills

         A.          Provide a safe, efficient and supportive environment for the surgical patient.

         B.          Respect the patient’s inherent right to privacy, dignity and confidentiality.

         C.          Apply legal and ethical principles and appropriate interpersonal skills to all decisions and actions.

         D.         Understand the services provided by the surgeon in relation to the patient’s restoration to health and return to the community.

         E.          Recognize the importance of teamwork, consideration and cooperation.

         F.           Function efficiently and in a professional manner to provide optimum patient care.

         G.          Apply knowledge of normal and pathologic anatomy and physiology and of the actions of pharmacologic agents in order to individualize
                       patient care.

         H.          Apply the principles of asepsis in a knowledgeable manner to provide optimum patient care.

         I.           Prepare and know the specific use of all equipment and supplies used for surgical procedures.

         J.          Demonstrate knowledge of the step-by-step progress of specific surgical procedures and display dexterity in the use of the required
                      instrumentation.

         K.          Anticipate the needs of the surgeon in order to expedite the procedure, thus minimizing the patient’s exposure to surgical and anesthetic
                      stress.

         L.          Develop and improve skills in the organization of work and in assisting the surgeon by using economy in time, motion and materials.

         M.         Identify emergency situations and use sound judgment in instituting established procedures to respond to emergencies in a calm and
                      efficient manner.

         N.         Demonstrate initiative in expanding his/her knowledge of new surgical procedures and subjects relating to the operating room and to the
                      surgical patient.

         O.         Understand that each practitioner is individually responsible for his/her own actions.

         P.          Recognize legal and policy limits of individual responsibility and practice.

         Q.         Relate operating room services to the total hospital environment.


Surgical Technology

  
  •  

    ST 100 - Introduction to Health Care Service

    Credits: 3


    Presents the history of medicine, epidemiological methods, and current problems and trends in the health care system. Discusses selected global health care issues. Includes professional, legal, and ethical aspects of a multidisciplinary care system.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 152W  with a grade of “C” or better.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Demonstrate improvement in communication, computation, critical thinking and group interactive skills.

         A.          Paraphrase and synthesize selected readings.

         B.          Evaluate critically what is read.

         C.          Write in a clear, organized, succinct and effective manner.

         D.          Utilize proper spelling, grammar and sentence structure in writing.

         E.          Speak effectively in expressing a reasoned point of view.

         F.           Listen to, respect and critically evaluate the ideas and opinions of others.

         G.          Exhibit development of both inductive and deductive reasoning skills.

         H.          Take a position on an issue and provide evidence/rationale to support that position.

         I.           Given a controversial issue, articulate at least two perspectives (or “sides of the argument”).

         J.           Interpret data presented in the form of tables, graphs and charts.

         K.          Perform accurate computations on data.

         L.          Recognize patterns and trends in data and justify those conclusions.

         M.         Analyze errors in logic in examples of inferences drawn from data.

         N.         Work constructively in a group, contributing to the product(s) of the group and accepting responsibility for one’s own level of work.

         O.         Identify and analyze one’s own values, especially regarding health and health care.

         P.          Respect the perspectives, values and choices of others.

    2.    Summarize the history and evolution of Western medicine and the health care system, with particular emphasis on surgical practice.

         A.          Trace Man’s concept of disease from its beginning until the present day.

         B.          List practices or elements of modern medicine that can be traced back to ancient cultures (Egyptian, Babylonian or Greek).

         C.          Describe what happened to the development of European medicine between the time of the fall of the Roman Empire and the
                       Renaissance.

         D.          Discuss the advances made in medical knowledge during the 16th through 19th centuries.

         E.          Identify three “problems” that had to be resolved before the modern era of safe invasive surgery could begin and give the approximate
                       dates of those solutions.

         F.          List at least six developments during the last approximately 150 years that are now considered “essential” parts of modern medical
                      practice.

         G.         Identify current trends in the practice of surgery.

         H.         Identify trends or themes that recur throughout the history of Western medicine.

         I.          Compare the education and preparation of doctors today with those of approximately 150 years ago.

         J.          Describe the history of Operating Room staffing and the profession of Surgical Technology.

    3.    Discuss the numerous interacting factors that influence health worldwide and the changing patterns of disease in this country.

         A.          Define “health” and “disease”.

         B.          Explain what is meant by the “multifactorial nature” of disease etiology.

         C.          Discuss the importance of infectious agents throughout history and the impact these still have on non-Western societies.

         D.          Discuss the negative consequences of the overuse of antibiotics.

         E.          Discuss current trends in sexually transmitted diseases, including contributing factors and consequences.

         F.          Explain the recent emergence of previously-unknown human pathogens.

         G.         Define genetically-adaptive traits and explain how they may be advantageous or deleterious as the physical or social environment changes.

         H.         Discuss the causes of the increase in genetic disorders in this country and the possible consequences of medical intervention as well as
                      non-intervention.

         I.           Discuss the ethical issues associated with “treating” genetic predisposition toward various diseases.

         J.          Define terminology related to under- or over-activity of the immune system.

         K.          Explain the “hygiene hypothesis” as an explanation for the increasing prevalence of allergies

                      and asthma in the U.S.

         L.          List the most prevalent nutritional disorders in the U.S. and in the world today.

         M.         Discuss the consequences of improved general nutrition in this country.

         N.         Discuss the health problems and health care costs associated with obesity.

         O.         List influences on health that arise from the physical environment.

         P.          Discuss the impact of work-related disease and injury, including those associated with the Operating Room.

         Q.         Explain how personality traits can be related to susceptibility to physical diseases.

         R.         List economic and political factors that can influence the availability of health care services to individuals or communities.

         S.          List influences on health that arise from the social environment, including unemployment and socio-economic-educational conditions.

         T.          Discuss the consequences of social stress in terms of violence, suicide, and substance  abuse.

         U.         Discuss the impact of trauma on the American health care system.

         V.          Discuss the interactions of biological factors, environmental factors, and social factors in the determination of health and disease.

         W.         State the impact of the health care industry on American business and economics.

         X.          Trace historical changes in the patterns of disease in the U.S.

         Y.           Discuss how the health status of a population usually is measured and how the U.S. compares with other countries.

         Z.          List the three leading causes of death in the U.S. today.

         AA.       Compare the leading causes of death with the major chronic health problems in this country.

         BB.       Discuss the impact that the aging of the American population will have on the health care system.

         CC.       Identify other current demographic trends in the U.S. and explain the effects these are expected to have on the health care system.

         DD.       Define and give examples of the six levels of health care.

    4.    Demonstrate an introductory level of knowledge of epidemiology, including interpretation of various types of presentation of data,
           analysis of 
    conclusions and awareness of the methods of conduct of interventional studies.

         A.          Define “public health” and differentiate its characteristics from those of medical care.

         B.          Define “epidemiology.”

         C.          Define “incidence”, “prevalence”, “morbidity” and “mortality.”

         D.          Identify the sources of public health data and discuss the dependability of that data.

         E.          Define population dynamics, including the terminology associated with mortality, natality, rate of natural change and migration.

         F.          Calculate standard epidemiologic rates from tables of data.

         G.         Describe the purposes of “adjusting” rates when comparing data from diverse populations.

         H.         Define “infant mortality”, “maternal mortality”, and “life expectancy”; discuss factors that can affect each of them, and explain why these are
                      the most commonly used parameters to compare the general health of different populations.

         I.           Explain the “J-shaped curve” depicting death rates related to age.

         J.          Discuss factors affecting natality.

         K.         Define Completed/Total fertility rate (CFR/TFR).

         L.          Differentiate “replacement fertility” from “zero population growth.”

         M.         Define and discuss the “Neolithic Revolution.”

         N.         Define and discuss “Demographic Transition.”

         O.         Discuss the differences in health-related demographics (including major causes of death) between pre-Transition vs. post-Transition
                      societies.

         P.          Inperpret depictions of age disbribution in a population and compare population pyramids of “Western” vs. “Third World” countries.

         Q.         Describe trends in population growth and age distribution in the U.S. and in the world and discuss the possible consequences of these
                      trends.

         R.         List and explain the elements of descriptive epidemiology.

         S.         Explain how the leading causes of death and disease can vary among sub-populations.

         T.          Define analytic epidemiology.

         U.         Explain hwo epidemiologic studies identify risk factors.

         V.         Construct and interpret a 2 x 2 table and calculate rates and risk factors from it.

         W.        Compare and contrast prospective/cohort studies, petrospective/case-control studies, and cross-sectional studies, including the appropriate
                     type of risk estimate obtained from each.

         X.         List the criteria for the epidemiologic determination of causality.

         Y.         Explain what is meant by saying that risk factors generally are “neither necessary nor sufficient” for the incidence of a disease.

         Z.          Discuss the interpretation of data and identify examples of random error, confounding, and various types of bias.

         AA.       Analyze the validity of conclusions drawn from situational examples.

         BB.       Define Population Attributable Risk (PAR) and identify the major uses of such studies.

         CC.       State the purpose of screening surviellance.

         DD.       Contrast sensitivity and specificity in assessing screening tests.

         EE.        Describe the ways that a clinical/therapeutic trial can be conducted.

         FF.         Define the various stages (“phases”) of clinical/therapeutic trials.

         GG.       Define a “randomized controlled trial (RCT)” and a “triple blind” study.

         HH.       Discuss the “placebo effect.”

     5.    Explain the concept of the continuum between health behaviors and illness behaviors.

         A.          Define “health behaviors” and give examples.

         B.          Provide examples of circumstances that can influence a person’s motivation to engage in health behaviors.

         C.          Differentiate “disease” from “illness.”

         D.          Explain the differences in society’s expectations of a person when s/he is sick (referred to as “the sick role”).

         E.          Describe typical patient reactions to sickness.

         F.           List the stages of grief.

         G.         Give examples of patient expressions of egocentricity and dependency.

         H.         Discuss how a health care worker can respond to illness behavior.

         I.          Interpret the balance between “professional closeness” and “professional distance.”

         J.          List and explain the elements of The Patient’s Bill of Rights.

    6.    In the process of theorizing the individualizing of patient care, exhibit sensitivity to patients as unique persons.

         A.          Relate perceptions and anxieties about sickness and health care to different developmental stages in children and teenagers.

         B.          Discuss the general physiologic changes of aging and the social concerns of elderly patients, and explain how these may affect the care
                       needed.

         C.          Discuss the influence of family or social unit on a patient’s health care experiences and recuperation.

         D.          Explain how factors of race and ethnicity affect the predisposition to disease.

         E.          Exhibit sensitivity to cultural differences in a patient’s perceptions of health and his/her receptivity to health care.

         F.          Discuss how religious beliefs can affect a patient’s perceptions of disease and responses to it.

         G.         Demonstrate awareness of how language and dialect differences can affect a patient’s

         H.         Relate health care system “traditions” to other aspects (e.g. dietary customs) of a culturally diverse society.

         I.          Relate socio-economic-educational factors to differences in patients’ perceptions, expectations and acceptance of the health care system.

         J.          Identify any gender differences in the factors mentioned above.

         K.          Given a patient description, identify relevant factors in terms of individualizing patient care.

    7.  Demonstrate familiarity with the organization of the U.S. health care system, including its goals, regulatory agencies, facilities, financing,
         current 
    issues and trends toward the future.

         A.          Identify and trace the historic evolution of the four current goals of the health care system.

         B.          Discuss whether the U.S. has a “sickness care system” or a “health care system.”

         C.          Compare and contrast the roles and influences of the various types of health care regulatory agencies.

         D.          Discuss the historical development of hospitals.

         E.          Explain how hospitals can be classified and give examples for each.

         F.           Define the process of hospital accreditation and discuss its importance.

         G.          Describe the typical administrative structure of a hospital and how the various elements interact.

         H.          Identify other types of health care facilities.

         I.           Analyze historical changes in the financing of health care.

         J.          Define Medicare and Medicaid.

         K.          Analyze trends in economic aspects within the health care system.

         L.          Debate the idea of health care as a “right” or a “privilege.”

         M.         Identify and discuss the major problems facing the health care delivery system.

         N.         List factors contributing to the increasingly high cost of health care.

         O.         Discuss the effects that the prospective payment system has had and is expected to have on health care facilities and practitioners.

         P.          Identify current attempts to address the problems in the health care delivery system.

         Q.         Describe current changes/trends in medical practice.

         R.         Define “managed care” and “capitation” and explain their intended purposes.

         S.         Discuss elements of the debate concerning HMO’s.

         T.          List advantages and disadvantages of the current trend toward Managed Care.

         U.         Discuss the evolutionary changes that are occurring within hospitals and with other types of health care facilities.

     8.    As a future practitioner, demonstrate understanding of the elements of professional health care service.

         A.          Differentiate a profession from an occupation.

         B.          Discuss generally-held public expectations of a professional.

         C.          Identify aspects of quality control on a profession.

         D.          Define the process of accreditation of an educational program.

         E.          Differentiate licensure, certification, and registry; and list advantages and disadvantages of each.

         F.          Explain the “implicit contract” between a patient and a health care professional.

         G.          Identify various disciplinary measures used in quality control of practitioners.

         H.          Describe the job function and working conditions of a Surgical Technologist.

         I.            Discuss the credentialing mechanism and continuing education requirements for a Surgical Technologist.

    9.    Discuss the evolution, roles and interrelationships of members of the health care team.

         A.          Relate various health care team members to the six levels of health care and the goals of the health care system.

         B.          Identify the three “clients” of a health care professional.

         C.          Discuss role ambiguities and “turf battles” among members of the team.

         D.          List the elements that promote positive team interaction

         E.          Give examples of negative stereotypes that interfere with team functioning.

  
  •  

    ST 207 - Pharmacology in the Operating Room

    Credits: 2


    Introduces anesthetic agents and other drugs commonly used in the perioperative setting: their uses, methods of administration, physiologic effects, and hazards or untoward effects.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Surgical Technology program
    Corequisite(s): ST 210 , ST 220 , ST 230 , and ST 240  
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives  1.    Demonstrate progress in communication and language skills, critical thinking, interpersonal/collaborative skills, and information
            literacy.

         A.          Communicate in acceptable English and use medical terminology accurately and appropriately.

         B.          Analyze data and discipline-based knowledge to formulate logical conclusions.

                      1.    Integrate and correlate concepts from different courses.

                      2.    Organize and integrate information into a format that illustrates patterns, clusters, and

                             hierarchies of information.

                      3.    Utilize graphs, tables, and charts to summarize, analyze, and interpret information.

                      4.    Apply the scientific method of inquiry and research.

         C.         Demonstrate the ability to perform basic mathematical calculations.

         D.         Work constructively within a group, demonstrating respect and consideration for others.

         E.         Demonstrate the ability to access, analyze, and use information appropriate to the discipline.

                      1.    Identify and access appropriate print, media, and electronic resources to expand

                            his/her understanding of the subject matter.

                      2.    Evaluate the quality of information gathered from ptin and electronic sources with

                            reference to reliability of the source, currency, and applicability.

                      3.    Paraphrase, synthesize, and summarize information gathered from multiple sources.

     2.    Demonstrate knowledge of general concepts of medication administration.

         A.          Define the three names of any drug and discuss how each is used.

         B.          Compare and contrast the various routes of drug administration.

         C.          Define specific terminology used in the study of pharmacology.

     3.    Demonstrate an understanding of the methods and agents used to achieve surgical anesthesia.

         A.          Define the ASA system of patient classification regarding anesthesia risk and give examples of each level of classification.

         B.          Describe the pain pathways from peripheral receptors to interpretive cortex and where those may be interrupted to achieve “anesthesia”.

         C.          List the basic methods of providing surgical anesthesia, comparing the advantages and disadvantages of each.

         D.          Describe the methods of induction of general anesthesia and of endotracheal intubation.

         E.           Identify indications for emergency induction procedures.

         F.            List the most commonly used inhalation anesthetic agents and describe their effects on various physiologic systems.

         G.           Compare the categories, agents and uses of neuromuscular blocking agents.

         H.           Discuss the purposes and agents used for neuroleptic analgesia and anesthesia.

         I.             Discuss the major hazards and complications attendant with general anesthesia.

         J.            Compare the methods, agents and usage of spinal and epidural anesthesia.

         K.           Describe alternative methods used to provide regional anesthesia.

         L.           List the agents used for local infiltration and topical anesthesia, their uses and potential adverse reactions.

         M.          Demonstrate knowledge of how to observe for untoward reactions.

     4.    Demonstrate knowledge of other pharmacologic agents that are commonly used in the operating room or that are specifically related to perioperative care.

         A.          Classify and discuss the various types of analgesic and antipyretic agents, including their mechanisms of action, uses and adverse effects.

         B.          Identify and discuss sedative-hypnotic agents and tranquilizers, including their mechanisms of action, uses and adverse effects.

         C.          Classify and discuss the uses of other drugs acting on the Central Nervous System, including anticonvulsants, anti-Parkinsonism drugs,                    CNS stimulants, antiemetics, antihistamines, and centrally-acting skeletal muscle relaxants.

         D.          Classify and discuss Autonomic Nervous System drugs, including their actions and uses during surgery.

         E.          Classify and discuss antihypertensive agents and miscellaneous vascular drugs.

         F.           Classify and discuss cardiac inotropic agents, anti-arrhythmic drugs and coronary dilators, including their mechanisms of action.

         G.          Discuss drugs used to lower serum cholesterol levels.

         H.          Classify and discuss drugs affecting the gastrointestinal tract and biliary system.

         I.            Discuss the effects and uses of different types of insulin and insulin antagonists.

         J.           Classify and discuss coagulants, local hemostatic agents, anticoagulants, and thrombolytic agents, including their mechanisms of action.

         K.          Differentiate the perioperative uses of intravenous fluids (both crystalloid and colloid), hyperalimentation fluids, blood transfusion and blood
                      component therapy.

         L.          Discuss the potential adverse effects associated with blood transfusion and how they can be recognized, and compare those risks with the
                      use of autologous blood.

         M.         Classify and discuss diuretics, including their uses and potential adverse effects.

         N.         Classify and discuss the uses and effects of obstetrical agents.

         O.         Classify and discuss the uses and effects of hormones associated with the reproductive systems.

         P.          Discuss the uses, actions and side effects of adrenocorticosteroids.

         Q.          Discuss the uses of other hormones.

         R.          Discuss methods and agents of antineoplastic chemotherapy.

         S.          Discuss the current status of other types of antineoplastic therapy.

         T.          Classify and discuss agents used for antimicrobial therapy.

    5.    Demonstrate the ability to accurately perform mathematical calculations regarding dosages for back-table medications or solutions.

         A.          Given a medication strength, calculate the dilution necessary to achieve a different concentration.

         B.          Given a medication, calculate a requested irrigation solution.

  
  •  

    ST 210 - The Surgical Patient

    Credits: 2


    Introduces basic concepts of operative patient care, such as preparation of a patient for surgery, patient transportation, surgical incisions, wound healing, operative records, special procedures in the operating room, and the legal, moral and ethical responsibilities of surgical care.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Surgical Technology program
    Corequisite(s): ST 207 , ST 220 , ST 230 , and ST 240  
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives  1.    Demonstrate progress in communication and language skills, critical thinking, interpersonal/collaborative skills, basic mathematical
            calculations, 
    and information literacy.

         A.          Communicate in acceptable English and in terminology appropriate to the discipline.

                      1.    Understand and critically evaluate what is read.

                      2.    Write in a clear, organized, succinct, and effective manner.

                      3.    Demonstrate proper spelling, grammar, and sentence structure in formal writing.

                      4.    Use medical terminology accurately and appropriately.

         B.          Analyze data and discipline-based knowledge to formulate logical conclusions.

                      1.    Integrate and correlate concepts from different courses.

                      2.    Exhibit development of both inductive and deductive reasoning skills.

                      3.    Take a position on an issues and provide evidence or adequate rationale to support that position.

         C.          Work constructively within a group, demonstrating respect and consideration for others.

                      1.    Listen to, respect, and critically evaluate the ideas and opinions of others.

                      2.    Contribute to the product(s) of a study or work group, function within the guidelines established by the group, and accept responsibility
                              for one’s own level of participation.

                      3.    Respect the perspectives, values, and choices of others.

         D.         Demonstrate the ability to apply conversion formulas and perform basic mathematical calculations.

     2.    Demonstrate understanding of the concepts of the continuity of care of the surgical patient and what is happening to the patient
            before, during, and
    after the operation, including the administrative or record-keeping aspects of surgical patient care.

         A.          Identify the components of a pre-operative check list for preparation of a surgical patient.

         B.          Explain the meaning, purpose and limitations of “informed consent.”

         C.          Differentiate various types of operative permits in terms of appropriate conditions and signatories.

         D.          Explain the use of other types of consents or records.

         E.          Define the two purposes of a shave prep.

         F.          Identify the areas to be shaved for various kinds of operations.

         G.         Discuss different authority’s opinions regarding the appropriate time, location and method for performing a “shave” prep or whether such a
                      prep is indicated at all.

         H.         Describe the proper attire for a patient entering the O.R. and explain the safety reasons for these rules.

         I.          Discuss the appropriate safeguarding of a patient’s personal possessions.

         J.          Explain the reasons for establishing baseline pre-operative vital signs.

         K.         Describe the purposes of pre-operative medications.

         L.          List the categories of drugs most commonly used as pre-operative medications.

         M.         Describe the proper safety measures to be taken while transporting a patient to the O.R., including special situations.

         N.         Describe the identification process of a patient entering the O.R. suite.

         O.         Identify the safety precautions involved in transferring a patient onto the O.R. table before surgery and onto a stretcher/gurney after
                      surgery.

         P.          Discuss the legal implications of operative record keeping.

         Q.         List the information elements commonly required for various kinds of O.R. records and forms.

         R.         Explain the purposes and uses of Incident Reports.

         S.          Define the circumstances that determine a Medical Examiner’s (Coroner’s) case, and recognize indications for such a case.

         T.          Describe the proper procedures for measuring intraoperative blood loss and urine output.

         U.         Discuss the proper methods for monitoring a patient receiving local anesthesia (in the absence of anesthesia personnel).

         V.          Describe the special procedural elements involved in intraoperative X-ray technique, bowel technique, cancer technique, and multiple
                      set-up technique.

     3.    Demonstrate knowledge of  incisional approaches for General Surgery procedures and the process of wound healing.

          A.          List the factors affecting the choice of the type of surgical incision.

         B.           For General Surgery incisions, describe the indications, uses, advantages and disadvantages for each.

         C.           Name the three stages of wound healing and describe the physiologic processes occurring during each one.

         D.           List factors that influence the rate of wound healing.

         E.           Differentiate healing by First, Second and Third Intentions and relate those to primary closure,  secondary union and delayed primary
                       closure.

         F.           List and define complications that may occur during wound healing.

    4.    Demonstrate knowledge of different kinds of surgical specimens.

         A.          Define “Frozen Section” and explain why such a specimen may be requested.

         B.          Describe the proper methods for handling various types of surgical specimens:

                      1.    Frozen sections

                      2.    Permanent (paraffin) sections

                      3.    Cultures

                      4.    Bronchial washings or other fluids

                      5.    Cytology specimens

                      6.    Stones

                      7.    Foreign bodies

                      8.    Amputated limbs

                      9.    Legal evidence

                      10.  Tissue for banking/preservation

     5.    Demonstrate competence in preparing medications and solutions on the sterile field.

         A.          Describe the proper method for dispensing, identifying, and handling back-table medications and solutions.

         B.          Identify various types of syringes and their uses.

         C.          Explain the sizing (gauge) of hypodermic needles.

         D.          Calculate simple conversions for weights, measurements, and temperature.

     6.    Demonstrate knowledge of environmental risks to Operating Room personnel.

         A.          Compare Septic Case Technique with the use of Standard Precautions.

         B.          List and differentiate the types of hepatitis viruses and know how they are transmitted.

         C.          Discuss Hepatitis B and C viruses and the risks to Operating Room personnel.

         D.          Discuss the Human Immunodeficiency Virus and the risks to Operating Room personnel.

         E.          Discuss the risks of other microbial hazards for Operating Room personnel.

    7.    Demonstrate familiarity with current theories concerning neoplastic growth, and with the uses of ionizing radiation as an alternative
           therapeutic 
    modality or as an adjunct to surgery.

         A.          Differentiate neoplastic (tumor) growth from hypertrophy, hyperplasia and metaplasia.

         B.          List the essential differences between benign and malignant tumors.

         C.          Explain how neoplastic growths are named and classified.

         D.          Discuss the intrinsic factors and extrinsic factors that may contribute to the etiology of cancers.

         E.          Compare and contrast the three types of cancers: sarcomas, carcinomas and mixed tumors.

         F.           Define “grading” vs. the TNM method of “staging” malignancies.

         G.          Differentiate between “curative” and “palliative” therapy.

         H.          Compare surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy as modalities for treating cancers.

         I.           Explain what ionizing radiation does to both normal and malignant tissue, including the dangers of underdosage and overdosage in
                      therapeutic use.

         J.          Review the electromagnetic spectrum, the elements of radioactive disintegration, and the concept of half-life.

         K.          Define and characterize radionuclides (radioisotopes) and discuss their uses.

         L.          Identify the sources, attributes, and uses of external radiation methods.

         M.         Identify the uses and methods of administration of internal radiation sources.

         N.          Compare the half-lives of commonly used radioactive elements and relate those to therapeutic dosages.

         O.         List the general safety rules for handling radioactive materials; describe radiation hazards to personnel and proper monitoring precautions.

         P.          Discuss the concept of stereotactic radiosurgery (“gamma knife”).

         Q.         Identify the characteristics of irradiated tissue and their relevance to subsequent surgical intervention.

     8.    Be conversant in the concepts and terminology of legal, moral and ethical responsibilities toward patients.    

         A.          Define various legal concepts as they apply to the O.R. situation.

         B.          List ways that the Standard of Care may be determined in a court of law.

         C.          Discuss how the principles of legal responsibility apply to a student.

         D.          Give examples of common acts of negligence in an O.R. setting.

         E.          Discuss moral and ethical responsibilities and obligations, as opposed to legal precepts.

      9.    Recognize the special needs of pediatric and geriatric patients.

         A.          Discuss psychological concerns in different age groups of Pediatric patients facing surgery.

         B.          List and describe the special needs of infants and young children undergoing surgery, in terms of both anatomical and physiological
                       considerations.

         C.          Discuss the physiologic changes associated with aging and identify the special needs of a geriatric patient undergoing surgery.


    10.    Be familiar with the different conditions involved in ambulatory surgery.

         A.          Discuss the advantages of Ambulatory/Out-Patient surgery and the types of procedures for which it may be indicated or desirable.

         B.          List the four major types of settings for ambulatory surgery and their relative merits and disadvantages.

         C.          Describe the differences in pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative routines for ambulatory surgery patients.

     11. Demonstrate knowledge of the concepts of operative care of orthopedic patients.

         A.          Define terminology associated with bone fractures and their treatment, and with bone healing.

         B.          Define the various uses of casts, including types of cylinder casts, spica casts, and splints.

         C.          Define different types of traction and differentiate traction from an external fixation device.

         D.          Discuss the specific indications for internal fixation and list the various general methods, giving examples of each.

         E.          List factors affecting the healing of fractures.

         F.           Discuss the problem of non-union and the use of bone grafts, electrical stimulation, and other treatment methodologies.

         G.          Describe the proper method of preparing plaster for cast application.

         H.          Compare fiberglass casting materials with plaster casts.

  
  •  

    ST 220 - Fundamentals of Surgical Technology

    Credits: 6


    Demonstrates fundamental principles of operating room function: roles of surgical team members, sterilization and disinfection methods, aseptic technique, surgical instruments, sutures and equipment, electrical safety, patient positioning and preparation, draping the sterile field, and care of supplies. Develops beginning technical skills through laboratory practice; later, operating room observational experiences are provided.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Surgical Technology program
    Corequisite(s): ST 207 , ST 210 , ST 230 , and ST 240  
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 120
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Demonstrate progress incommunication and language skills, critical thinking, interpersonal/collaborative skills, and information
           literacy.

         A.          Communicate in acceptable English and in medical terminology appropriate to the discipline.

                      1.    Understand and critically evaluate what is read.

                      2.    Organize and integrate information into a format that illustrates patterns, clusters, and  hierarchies of information.

                      3.    Write in a clear, organized, succinct, and effective manner.

                      4.    Demonstrate proper spelling, grammar, and sentence structure in formal writing.

                      5.    Use medical terminology accurately and appropriately.

                      6.    Speak effectively when participating in class discussions and when expressing a reasoned point of view.

         B.          Analyze data and discipline-based knowledge to formulate logical conclusions.

                      1.    Integrate and correlate concepts from different courses.

                      2.    Exhibit development of both inductive and deductive reasoning skills.

                      3.    Demonstrate problem-solving skills in both hypothetical and mock-clinical situations.

                      4.    Recognize patterns and trends in data and be able to justify any conclusions drawn.

                      5.    Make predictions based on evidence.

                      6.    Differentiate coincidental and causal relationships.

                      7.    Utilize graphs, tables, and charts to summarize, analyze, and interpret information.

                      8.    Apply the scientific method of inquiry and research.

                      9.    Take a position on an issue and provide evidence or adequate rationale to support that position.

         C.          Work constructively within a group.

                      1.    Demonstrate respect and consideration for others.

                      2.    Listen to, respect, and critically evaluate the ideas and opinions of others.

                      3.    Respond appropriately to other’s communications.

                      4.    Value differences and diversity within a group.

                      5.    Contribute to the product(s) of a study or work group and accept responsibility for one’s own level of participation.

                      6.    Function within the guidelines established by the group.

                      7.    Identify and analyze one’s own values and responses.

                      8.    Respect the perspectives, values, and choices of others.

         D.         Demonstrate the ability to access, analyze, and use information appropriate to the discipline.

                      1.    Identify and access appropriate print and media resources to expand his/he understanding of subject matter.

                      2.    Access web sites using URL’s and hyperlinks.

                      3.    Conduct an Internet search pertinent to course subject matter.

                      4.    Evaluate the quality of information gathered from print and electronic sources with reference to reliability of the source, currency, and
                             applicability.

                      5.    Paraphrase, synthesize, and summarize information gathered from multiple sources.

                      6.    Demonstrate word processing skills for the preparation of written assignments.

     2.    Demonstrate awareness of the physical environment and staffing of an Operating Room Department.

         A.          Summarize the history and evolution of the field of Surgical Technology.

         B.          Discuss variations in the administrative organization of the Operating Room Department.

         C.          Discuss variations in the physical organization of the O.R. suite.

         D.         List the major pieces of furniture in an operating room.

         E.          Define the purpose and contents of a Job Description.

         F.          Identify the members of the surgical team and describe their primary roles.

      3.    Demonstrate knowledge and proper application of aseptic and sterile techniques.

         A.          Define terminology related to medical and surgical asepsis.

         B.          List the categories of chemical agents and physical agents or methods that can be used to remove, inhibit, or destroy microorganisms.

         C.          List the factors that affect the destruction of microorganisms.

         D.          List the various methods of sterilization and discuss the principles of action of each method.

         E.          List and compare the various types of steam sterilizers.

         F.           Identify the correlations between pressure and temperature in an autoclave.

         G.          Identify the time required for steam sterilization at different temperature settings for different kinds of items and for different wrapping
                       materials.

         H.         Define the general rule for when gas sterilization is required and when ETO is contraindicated.

         I.           Discuss the hazards of and the precautions to be taken when using an ethylene oxide sterilizer.

         J.          List the various monitoring methods for sterilizers, including both biological monitors and process monitors.

         K.          Discuss the principles and precautions of sterilization or disinfection using activated glutaraldehyde, including timing, and correct soaking
                       and rinsing methods.

         L.          Discuss the indications and use of paracetic acid sterilization.

         M.         Discuss the indications and use of gas plasma sterilization.

         N.          Discuss other methods of sterilization and their uses.

         O.         Categorize and describe the action and uses of various chemical disinfectants:

         P.          Categorize and describe the actions and uses of various antiseptic agents:

         Q.          Identify factors that influence the choice of a specific disinfectant or antiseptic agent.

         R.          Describe the vectors of transmission of microorganisms and indentify and explain the major principles of aseptic technique as they relate
                       to sources of contamination.

         S.          Discuss and demonstrate proper attire for operating room personnel.

         T.          Discuss the properties, advantages and disadvantages of the various types of wrapping  materials.

         U.         Explain and demonstrate correct methods of packaging items for steam sterilization.

         V.          Describe the proper method of loading an autoclave.

         W.         Define “event-related sterility” and identify its conditions regarding packaging.

         X.          Demonstrate correct methods of dispensing supplies onto a sterile field.

         Y.          Describe and demonstrate the principles of establishing and maintaining a sterile field.

         Z.          Demonstrate the proper method of removing gown and gloves after a case.

         AA.       Describe and demonstrate post-operative clean-up techniques.

         BB.       Define “terminal sterilization” and “terminal disinfection.”

         CC.       Correlate disinfection procedures with the resistance of different types of microorganisms.

      Outcome 4:    Demonstrate knowledge of the use of basic surgical instruments and supplies.

         A.          Define the seven categories of surgical instruments and give examples of each.

         B.          Identify by name(s) the most commonly used basic General surgical instruments and give examples of their use.

         C.          List the types of absorbable suture materials and discuss the characteristics, uses, and contra-indications for each.

         D.         State the absorption times for each of the above, and relate those absorption times to the stages of wound healing.

         E.          Compare the characteristics of braided or twisted suture materials with monofilament materials and relate these to their uses.

         F.          List the types of non-absorbable suture materials and the characteristics, uses, and contra-indications for each.

         G.         Identify the color coding used for each type of suture material.

         H.         Describe the uses of accessory suture materials.

         I.           Discuss the factors influencing the choice of suture material, and list the attributes of the “ideal” suture material.

         J.          List and define terms relating to different ligating methods and common suturing techniques.

         K.          Define “tensile strength” and discuss how this is different than “gauge.”

         L.          Describe and demonstrate the proper techniques for handling various types of suture materials.

         M.         Discuss the uses of different types of surgical stapling appliances.

         N.          List and define terms pertaining to the point, the shaft, and the eye of a surgeon’s needle, and how each is related to usage.

         O.         Compare the advantages and disadvantages of eyed needles and swaged needles.

         P.          Discuss the packaging of swaged sutures, including multiple-needle packs and control release needles.

         Q.          Describe and demonstrate the correct placement of a needle in a needleholder.

         R.          Describe and demonstrate the proper handling of surgeon’s needles, including their safe disposal.

         S.          Relate needle types and sizes and suture material types and sizes to appropriate tissue usage.

         T.          Identify the various types of surgical sponges (including alternative names) and give examples of appropriate usage.

         U.         List and demonstrate the materials needed for different types of draping procedures.

         V.          Describe the purpose and potential complications of wound drainage.

         W.         List the various types of capillary/wick drains and tubular drains, including reservoir systems.

         X.          Discuss the principles of chest drainage.

         Y.          List the purposes of a post-operative dressing, the types of materials used for dressings, and the probable usage of each type.

         Z.          Identify selected specialty instruments used during simulated surgical procedures in the laboratory and know when and how they are used.

    5.    Demonstrate understanding of safety practices in the O.R.

         A.          List the rules for prevention of explosions and fire with regard to personnel and patients, equipment and flooring, and the environment.

         B.          Explain the functioning and safety devices of an electrosurgical unit.

         C.          List the precautions to be taken when grounding a patient to prevent injury from an electrosurgical unit.

         D.          Discuss other electrical hazards and the precautions to be taken to prevent patient burns or electrocution.

         E.          Discuss the problem of latex allergy.

         F.           Discuss and demonstrate the principles of proper sponge, needle, and instrument counts.

         H.          Demonstrate safe handling of knife blades, needles, and other sharps.

     6.    Demonstrate competence in the scrub role during laboratory simulation.

         A.          Describe and demonstrate the principles involved in the performance of a surgical scrub.

         B.          Compare and demonstrate different drying techniques.

         C.          Describe and demonstrate the principles of gowning and gloving oneself and others.

         D.          Discuss and demonstrate variations in Mayo stand and back-table arrangements of instruments and supplies, indicating an understanding
                       of priorities during case setup.

         E.          Discuss and demonstrate the basic principles of draping.

         F.          Describe and demonstrate the role of the Scrub Person in preparing to begin surgery.

         G.         Demonstrate during laboratory simulated procedures the correct intraoperative handling of

                      sterile supplies and equipment in the scrub role:

                      1.    Passing and isolating the skin knife

                      2.    Passing the deep knife

                      3.    Passing instruments, including retractors

                      4.    Passing ties

                      5.    Maintaining the supply of sponges

                      6.    Exchanging instruments between the Mayo stand and the back-table

                      7.    Using suction and electrocautery

                      8.    Receiving sterile items from the Circulator

                      9.    Anticipating patterns of instrument use

                      10.  Recognizing and responding to hand signals

                      11.  Identifying medications and solutions on the sterile field in an acceptable manner

                      12.  Handling syringes and hypodermic needles

                      13.  Preparing irrigation

                      14.  Caring for specimens

                      15.  Selecting appropriate suture materials and sizes

                      16.  Threading needles and passing sutures

                      17.  Performing appropriate counts with the circulator

                      18.  Preparing drainage mechanisms

                      19.  Preparing dressings

    7.    Demonstrate competence in the circulating role during laboratory

         A.          Safely transport a patient on a stretcher.

         B.          Transfer and secure a patient onto the operating table.

         C.          List the essential elements of proper positioning of a patient, and discuss the safety precautions to be observed during patient positioning.

        D.           Identify the principles, usage, precautions, and necessary equipment for positioning a patient, and demonstrate various positionings.

         E.          Demonstrate the proper preparation of a wash prep set, and proper techniques in open gloving.

         F.           Describe the extent of the area to be prepped for various typical procedures.

         G.          Describe and demonstrate the correct methods of performing various kinds of wash preps.

         H.          Discuss and demonstrate the principles of performing urinary catheterization

         I.            Describe and demonstrate the role of the Circulator in preparing to begin surgery.

         J.           Demonstrate during laboratory simulations the intraoperative role of the circulator:

                      1.    Anticipating the needs of the scrub person

                      2.    Dispensing sterile supplies onto the field

                      3.    Transferring medications onto the sterile field using various methods

                      4.    Arranging discarded sponges for blood-loss estimate and for count

                      5.    Caring for specimens

                      6.    Filling out operative records and forms

                      7.    Performing appropriate counts with the scrub person

                      8.    Taping dressings after wound closure

    8.    Demonstrate competence in the intraoperative role of an assistant (“Second Assistant”) to the surgeon during laboratory simulations.

         A.          Appropriately use sponges, suction, and electrocautery.

         B.          Correctly hold retractors and provide adequate exposure for the surgeon.

         C.          Cut sutures correctly.

         D.         Place skin staples with the surgeon.

    9.    Demonstrate development of a level of behavioral and technical practices acceptable for continuation into clinical externship.

         A.          Demonstrate acceptable skills in the cognitive domain.

         B.          Demonstrate acceptable skills in the psychomotor domain.

         C.          Demonstrate acceptable skills in the affective domain.

  
  •  

    ST 230 - Surgical Anatomy

    Credits: 4
    Presents comprehensive regional study of human anatomy as encountered during surgery. Provides the basis for studies of surgical pathology, operative procedures and practical skills of surgical patient care.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Surgical Technology program
    Corequisite(s): ST 207 , ST 210 , ST 220 , and ST 240  
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate progress in communication and language skills, critical thinking, interpersonal/collaborative skills, and information literacy.
      1. Communicate in acceptable English and use medical terminology accurately and appropriately.
      2. Analyze data and discipline-based knowledge to formulate logical conclusions.
        1. Integrate and correlate concepts from different courses.
        2. Exhibit development of both inductive and deductive reasoning skills.
      3. Work constructively within a group, demonstrating respect and consideration for others.
      4. Demonstrate the ability to access, analyze, and use information appropriate to the discipline.
        1. Identify and access appropriate print, media, and electronic resources to expand his/her understanding of subject matter.
        2. Access web sites using URL’s and hyperlinks.
        3. Paraphrase, synthesize, and summarize information gathered from multiple sources
    2. Define and appropriately use anatomical terminology.
      1. Utilize correct spelling, pronunciation, and formation of plurals.
      2. Define anatomical planes of the body or an organ.
      3. Define and demonstrate action terms and terms pertaining to anatomical relationships.
    3. Relate events in embryological development to normal and anomalous post-birth anatomy.
      1. Compare and contrast spermatogenesis and oogenesis.
      2. Describe ovarian and endometrial events during the menstrual cycle.
      3. Describe the process of fertilization and list the events that happen when fertilization occurs.
      4. Define: zygote, cleavage, morula, blastula/blastocyst and gastrulation.
      5. Describe implantation and the development of the placenta.
      6. Summarize the major events that occur during the second, third and fourth embryonic weeks.
      7. List adult organs and tissues derived from each of the three embryonic germ layers, and identify embryonic cells that persist in adult organs.
      8. Describe the development of the brain and spinal cord (including motor and sensory nerve cells) and of the ventricular system.
      9. Describe the formation of the eye, ear, face and palate.
      10. Discuss the major events in the development of the heart and major blood vessels.
      11. Trace the course of fetal circulation and explain the changes that occur at birth.
      12. Discuss the major events in the development of the respiratory system and the diaphragm.
      13. Describe the formation of pharyngeal/bronchial arches, pouches and clefts, and identify the associated nerve and/or derivatives of each.
      14. Explain the development of the abdominopelvic cavity, the fate of the yolk sac and vitelline duct, the formation of the regions of the gut tube (including vascular supply), and the derivatives of dorsal and ventral mesenteries.
      15. Describe the formation and development of the gastrointestinal tract and accessory organs.
      16. Explain the difference between primarily and secondarily retroperitoneal structures.
      17. Discuss the formation of the genitourinary system and compare the migrations of the kidney, testis, and ovary from the urogenital ridge.
      18. Trace the differentiation of the male and female reproductive tracts and genitalia and identify homologous structures.
      19. Describe the development of a limb bud, including the derivatives of dermatomes, myotomes, and lateral plate mesoderm.
      20. Differentiate the terms “embryo” and “fetus.”
      21. Discuss teratogenesis.
      22. Define the “age of viability” and differentiate it from “prematurity.”
      23. Explain the three major categories of stem cells and differentiate embryonic vs. adult stem cells.
      24. Discuss the medical applications of stem cell research, and differentiate therapeutic vs. reproductive cloning.
    4. Demonstrate knowledge about the anatomy of the scalp, skull and brain.
      1. List the layers of the scalp and discuss the clinical significance of the special characteristics of each layer.
      2. Name and locate the muscles and aponeurosis of the scalp.
      3. Explain the character of skull bone and its clinical significance.
      4. Name and locate
  
  •  

    ST 240 - Operative Procedures

    Credits: 4


    Studies selected commonly-performed types of surgical procedures. Discusses the pathology leading to surgical invention, the purposes of the surgery, problems which may arise, and the consequences of the surgery for the patient, in addition to the basic techniques utilized during the procedure and any special instrumentation and supplies.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Surgical Technology program
    Corequisite(s): ST 207 , ST 210 , ST 220  and ST 230  
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    Demonstrate progress in communication and language skills, critical thinking, interpersonal/collaborative skills, and information
           literacy.

         A.          Communicate in acceptable English and use medical terminology accurately and appropriately.

         B.          Analyze data and discipline-based knowledge to formulate logical conclusions.

                      1.    Integrate and correlate concepts from different courses.

                      2.    Exhibit development of both inductive and deductive reasoning skills.

                      3.    Recognize patterns and trends in data and be able to justify any conclusions drawn.

                      4.    Make predictions based on evidence.

                      5.    Differentiate coincidental and causal relationships.

                      6.    Utilize graphs, tables, and charts to summarize, analyze, and interpret information.

                      7.    Apply the scientific method of inquiry and research.

         C          Work constructively within a group.

         D.         Demonstrate the ability to access, analyze, and use information from personal, print, media and electronic resources to expand his/her
                      understanding of subject matter.

                      1.    Identify and access appropriate print, media, and electronic resources to expand his/her understanding of subject matter.

                      2.    Evaluate the quality of information gathered from print and electronic sources with

                            reference to reliability of the source, currency, and applicability.

                      3.    Paraphrase, synthesize, and summarize information gathered from multiple sources.

    2.  Demonstrate knowledge of the use of various types of surgical lasers and the safety measures required.

         A.          Locate visible light on the electromagnetic spectrum and compare its activity with longer and shorter wavelengths.

         B.          Translate the acronym “laser”.

         C.          Discuss the generation and characteristics of laser energy, and explain what occurs on contact with tissue.

         D.          List advantages of laser surgery.

         E.          For each kind of surgical laser, identify its special attributes (including the color of its beam) and list its major uses.

         F.          List other medical uses of laser.

         G.         Discuss hazards and safety considerations during laser surgery.

      Outcome 3:    Demonstrate knowledge of selected pathologies and operative procedures in General Surgery.

         A.          Describe methods of classifying the extent and depth of thermal burns.

         B.          Discuss the initial treatment priorities and post-operative  and long-term care of a severely burned patient.

         C.          List and define the terms used to describe different sources of skin grafts.

         D.         Compare electrical and chemical burns with thermal burns.

         E.          Discuss different types of mammoplasty and breast reconstruction.

         F.          List and compare common benign and malignant breast lesions/conditions.

         G.         Discuss the pathophysiology of breast cancer, including its progression, relevant anatomic relationships, and common sites of metastasis.

         H.         List diagnostic methods that may be used for breast masses.

         I.           Define the various types of mastectomy and discuss possible complications.

         J.          Discuss comparative results of various treatment options for breast cancer, per current medical literature.

         K.          Discuss other types of breast surgery.

         L.          Discuss pathologies and surgery of the thyroid and parathyroid glands.

         M.         Describe the specific steps and the instrumentation and supplies needed for the performance of a surgical/open tracheostomy.

         N.         List alternative methods for securing a patient airway.

         O.         Discuss potential complications and postoperative concerns for patients undergoing thyroid, parathyroid, or tracheal surgery.

         P.          Discuss the pathology and treatment options for conditions of the esophagus.

         Q.         Compare various treatments for diaphragmatic hernias.

         R.          Discuss peptic ulcer disease and therapies.

         S.          Discuss malignancies of the stomach, including treatment and prognosis.

         T.          Discuss various surgical options for treating morbid obesity.

         U.         Discuss other types of stomach surgery.

         V.          Discuss liver pathologies and treatment options.

         W.         Discuss surgical conditions and diseases of the pancreas.

         X.          List possible indications for surgery on the spleen.

         Y.          Discuss the etiology, diagnosis, and possible complications of gallbladder disease.

         Z.          Define terminology related to gallbladder surgery.

         AA.       Compare non-surgical and both open and laparoscopic surgical treatment of gallbladder disease, including possible complications.

         BB.       Identify instrumentation and different dissection techniques for gallbladder surgery.

         CC.       Discuss the pathology and treatment options for conditions of the small intestine.

         DD.       Discuss special instrumentation, surgical techniques, and suture use during small bowel resection.

         EE.        Discuss acute appendicitis and the open and laparoscopic surgical options.

         FF.        Define terminology related to benign and malignant conditions of the large intestine.

         GG.       Discuss the diagnosis and treatment options of colon pathology.

         HH.       Compare different methods of colon resection, including instrumentation.

         II.          Differentiate types of hemorrhoids and discuss their treatment options.

         JJ.         Define terminology related to hernias.

         KK.       Differentiate direct vs. indirect inguinal hernias.

         LL.        Describe open and laparoscopic methods of hernia repair.

         MM.      Discuss femoral, umbilical, and ventral hernias, and their surgical treatments.

         NN.       Discuss the etiology, possible complications, and treatment options for varicosed veins of the leg.

     4.    Demonstrate knowledge of selected pathologies and operative procedures in Orthopedic Surgery.

         A.          Identify the types of orthopedic hardware commonly used during surgery of the upper limb.

         B.          Discuss the injuries and conditions that require surgery on the shoulder.

         C.          Describe the usual incisional approach for open surgery on the shoulder, and compare open and arthroscopic shoulder procedures.

         D.          Discuss characteristics, hazards, and treatment options for fractures of the clavicle, arm, and forearm.

         E.          Describe common injuries to nervous and vascular structures in the arm and forearm and their clinical manifestations.

         F.          Discuss the procedures for examination and evaluation of an injured hand, and explain the treatment priorities.

         G.         List the general principles of hand surgery, and identify special instrumentation used during hand surgery.

         H.         Define terminology related to common wrist and hand conditions and discuss treatment options.

         I.           Discuss the post-operative care and rehabilitation of hand surgery patients.

         J.          Describe the pathology and major principles of surgical correction of spinal curvature, and list

         K.          List the methods and types of orthopedic hardware that may be used for spinal fusion.

         L.          Discuss the demographics, etiology, and treatment of congenital hip problems.

         M.         Compare extracapsular vs. intracapsular hip fractures, including the demographics, causes, and treatment options of the various types.

         N.         Discuss the pathophysiology of different types of arthritis and identify medical therapies.

         O.         Describe the surgical positioning, type of incision, special instrumentation, and general surgical techniques for various types of hip surgery.

         P.          List possible complications of total joint replacement, and discuss typical pre-operative and post-operative care of a patient undergoing
                      total joint replacement.

         Q.         Relate the anatomy of the knee to common types of injuries and joint diseases.

         R.          List and describe types of arthroscopic procedures on the knee.

         S.          Discuss the most common causes, potential complications, and treatment options for fractures of the femur, tibia, fibula, and ankle.

         T.          Discuss medical and surgical treatments for injuries and pathologies of the ankle and foot.

    5.    Demonstrate knowledge of selected pathologies and operative procedures in Plastic Surgery.

         A.          Discuss various methods of providing skin coverage.

         B.          Define terminology related to skin grafts and skin flaps.

         C.          Discuss other types of flaps, tissues transfers, and the use of tissue expanders.

         D.          Identify specialty instruments for Plastic Surgery.

         E.          Discuss common causes of and the evaluation of soft tissue trauma of the face.

         F.           Discuss the surgical principles involved in the treatment of facial soft tissue trauma.

         G.          Define terminology related to esthetic and reconstructive facial surgery.

         H.          Discuss the indications, techniques, and surgical hazards for surgery on the parotid gland.

         I.           Describe the surgical techniques and special instrumentation for cosmetic or reconstructive rhinoplasty.

         J.          Discuss the demographics, etiology, goals, surgical techniques, possible results, and longterm follow-up care of repair of a cleft lip or a cleft
                      palate.

     6.    Demonstrate knowledge of selected pathologies and operative procedures in Maxillofacial and Ear, Nose and Throat Surgery.

         A.          Discuss the mechanisms of injury, classifications, diagnostic methods, general treatment  priorities, and potential complications of facial
                       fractures.

         B.          Discuss the indications, special considerations, incisional approaches, and instrumentation for facial fracture and orthograthic surgery,
                       including various methods of providing stabilization.

         C.          Define terminology related to nasal surgery.

         D.          Describe the surgical techniques and specialty instrumentation used in nasal surgery.

         E.          Discuss pathologies of the periorbital air sinuses and list potential complications of sinus infection.

         F.          Compare open sinus surgery vs. sinusoscopy.

         G.         Define terminology related to hearing loss and middle ear pathologies and surgeries.

         H.         Discuss the surgical approaches, anatomical considerations, and potential hazards of various kinds of middle ear surgery.

         I.           Discuss pathologies and surgeries of the inner ear.

         J.          Discuss the indications, surgical techniques, instrumentation, methods for providing hemostasis, surgical and post-operative positioning, 
                      and possible complications associated  with tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy.

         K.          List the purposes and identify the instrumentation of laryngoscopy, bronchoscopy, and esophagoscopy.

         L.          Discuss the etiologies and surgical treatments for pathologies of the larynx and upper airway.

         M.         Discuss the etiology, pathophysiology, treatment options, and potential surgical and post-operative complications of primary cancers of the
                      lip, oral cavity, and throat.

     7.    Demonstrate knowledge of selected pathologies and operative procedures in Ophthalmic Surgery.

         A.          List and state the purpose of pharmacologic agents commonly associated with ophthalmic surgery.

         B.          Discuss the pre-operative preparation, positioning and anesthesia options for a patient undergoing ophthalmic surgery.

         C.          Identify supplies, sutures and selected instruments used in ophthalmic surgery.

         D.          Discuss the causes of cataract formation, and describe the surgical techniques and potential complications of various types of cataract
                       extraction and intraocular lens insertion.

         E.          Discuss the pathophysiology and progression of the two types of glaucoma, and discuss medical and surgical treatment options.

         F.          Define terminology related to eye muscle imbalances, and discuss the various types of eye muscle surgery and potential complications.

         G.         Discuss the causes, signs and symptoms, hazards, and treatment options associated with a retinal hole or detachment.

         H.         Discuss the indications for and various techniques of vitrectomy.

         I.           Define and describe other types of ophthalmic conditions and surgeries, including possible complications.

    8.    Demonstrate knowledge of selected pathologies and operative procedures in Urologic Surgery.

         A.          Discuss the indications, incisional approaches, patient positioning, surgical techniques, special instrumentation, and possible complications
                       of open and endoscopic kidney and adrenal surgery.

         B.          Differentiate the various methods of angio-access for hemodialysis.

         C.          Compare hemodialysis, Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis, and other methods of hemofiltration.

         D.         Discuss kidney transplantation, including the criteria for recipient and donor selection,  surgical technique, and post-operative and long-term
                      care of the patient.

         E.          Identify the most common cause of ureteral injury.

         F.          Discuss various methods of ureteral and bladder lithotripsy.

         G.         Discuss the indications for and techniques of permanent urinary diversion surgery.

         H.         List the most common signs and symptoms of lower G-U pathologies.

         I.          Discuss the uses of various types of urethral and suprapubic catheters.

         J.          Identify the instruments and supplies used during endoscopic ureteral, bladder, prostate, and urethral surgeries.

         K.          List the kinds of solutions that may be used for distention and irrigation during endoscopic bladder or prostate surgery and explain the
                      indications and potential hazards for each.

         L.          Discuss the indications for and techniques of suprapubic cystostomy.

         M.         Discuss the demographics, pathophysiology, progression, diagnosis, and non-surgical treatment alternatives for benign prostatic
                      hyperplasia (BPH) and for prostatic cancer.

         N.         Differentiate the indications, techniques, and possible complications of the various methods of open prostatectomy.

         O.         Discuss the advantages of robotic surgery for prostatectomy.

         P.          List possible indications for orchiectomy.

         Q.         Discuss the etiology, hazards, and surgical treatment of cryptorchidism and testicular torsion.

         R.         Discuss non-surgical and surgical treatments for impotency.

         S.         Define terminology related to congenital anomalies of the genitourinary system, and describe the surgical treatments for each.

         T.          List other types of urologic surgeries.

     9.    Demonstrate knowledge of selected pathologies and operative procedures in Gynecology and Obstetrics.

         A.          Identify specialty instruments and common suture use associated with gynecologic surgery.

         B.          List possible uses for gynecologic laparoscopy, and describe the equipment and instrumentation, surgical technique, and potential
                       complications.

         C.          Define a “total” abdominal hysterectomy, list the indications, and describe the surgical steps of a TAH.

         D.         Discuss the possible etiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment options for endometriosis.

         E.          Discuss benign and malignant diseases of the ovary, uterus, and cervix, including their  diagnosis and treatment options.

         F.          Compare various techniques for tubal ligation.

         G.          List other types of adnexal surgery.

         H.          Discuss the causes, symptoms, and treatment options for stress urinary incontinence.

         I.           Discuss the component procedures of gender reassignment (transsexual) surgery.

         J.          List possible reasons for the performance of a Dilatation and Curettage (D&C), the proper order of instrumentation, and potential
                      complications.

         K.          List the common indications for vaginal hysterectomy.

         L.          Contrast the surgical techniques for vaginal vs. abdominal hysterectomy and compare those with a laparoscopic-assisted vaginal
                      hysterectomy.

         M.         Define anterior and/or posterior colporrhaphy (A&P repair).

         N.         Discuss the indications for and techniques of hysteroscopy, including cavity distention methods.

         O.         Define various types of vaginal fistulae and congenital anomalies of the uterus and vagina and explain their origins.

         P.          Discuss the indications for and technique of vaginoplasty, vulvar surgery, and surgical treatments for lesions of Bartholin’s glands.

         Q.         List other types of abdominal and vaginal gynecologic surgery.

         R.         Define terminology related to obstetrics and neonatology.

         S.         Compare and contrast various methods of assisted reproductive technologies.

         T.          Identify the equipment needed for suction curettage and differentiate its use for interruption of pregnancy vs. therapeutic procedures.

         U.         Discuss the causes, signs and symptoms, hazards, and possible surgical interventions for an ectopic tubal pregnancy.

         V.          Define “incompetent cervical os” and explain the surgical treatment options.

         W.         List and explain the most common indications for Cesarean Section delivery.

         X.          Describe the pre-operative positioning and care of a patient undergoing Cesarean Section delivery.

         Y.          List the special instruments and supplies needed for a Cesarean Section and describe the surgical steps of the procedure.

         Z.          Discuss vaginal delivery after a Section (VBAC).

         AA.       Explain Apgar scoring of a newborn.

     10. Demonstrate knowledge of selected pathologies and operative procedures in Thoracic, Cardiovascular and Peripheral Vascular
           Surgery.

         A.          Identify instrumentation and closure methods used for intercostal thoracotomy and for median sternotomy thoracotomy.

         B.          Compare and contrast the techniques of pneumonectomy, lobectomy, segmentectomy and wedge resection.

         C.          List the types of primary lung cancers and discuss the etiology, prevalence, diagnostic methods, treatment options, staging methods and 
                       prognosis of each.

         D.          Explain why the lung is a frequent site of metastasis from cancers elsewhere in the body.

         E.          List surgical procedures that can be performed through a thoracoscope.

         F.           Discuss surgical procedures associated with emphysema.

         G.          List other reasons for performing thoracic and chest wall surgery.

         H.          Differentiate open heart vs. closed heart surgery.

         I.           Discuss the capabilities and side effects of cardiopulmonary bypass, and the special types of patient monitoring that are routine during
                      open-heart surgery.

         J.          Describe special instrumentation, sutures and pharmacologic agents used in cardiovascular  and peripheral vascular surgery.

         K.          Discuss the demographics, risk factors, signs and symptoms, methods of evaluating, treatment alternatives, and the usual indications for
                      surgery for myocardial ischemia.

         L.          Describe the surgical techniques (including possible bypass sources) for open and minimally- invasive Coronary Artery bypass surgery.

         M.         Discuss the etiology of various types of valvular heart disease, and compare and contrast artificial/mechanical vs. tissues heart valve
                      replacements.

         N.         List other types of surgery that may be performed for acquired heart disease, and discuss possible surgical and post-operative
                      complications associated with open-heart surgery.

         O.         Identify the most common indications for a temporary or permanent cardiac pacemaker.

         P.          Trace the historical development of pacemaker capabilities, discuss the component parts, interpret the international pacing “code”,
                      differentiate the placement techniques of a transvenous vs. transthoracic pacemaker, and discuss potential complications of cardiac
                      pacemakers.

         Q.         Differentiate an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) from a cardiac pacemaker.

         R.          Discuss safety precautions when performing any kind of surgery on a patient who has a cardiac pacemaker or an ICD.

         S.          List the common signs and symptoms of congenital heart disease, and distinguish “cyanotic” vs. “acyanotic” congenital heart diseases,
                      giving examples of each.

         T.          Describe Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA), Coarctation of the Aorta, atrial septal defects, and ventricular septal defects, and discuss the
                      etiology, symptomatology, diagnosis, treatment options, and possible surgical complications for each.

         U.         Define Tetrology of Fallot, Truncus Arteriosus, and Transposition of the Great Vessels, and discuss possible surgical repair techniques.

         V.          List possible causes of aneurysms of the thoracic and abdominal Aorta, and differentiate a “true” aneurysm, a “false” aneurysm, and a
                      “dissection”.

         W.        Identify the most common location for an aneurysm on the Aorta, and discuss how an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm is usually discovered,
                     when surgery is indicated and why, and the routine pre-operative preparations of a patient scheduled for AAA repair.

         X.          Describe the incisional approach, surgical techniques, and possible intraoperative and postoperative complications for open AAA repair.

         Y.          Compare types of synthetic materials used for vascular prostheses.

         Z.          Discuss angioscopic methods of teating occulsive and aneurysmal vascular disease.

         AA.       Discuss pulmonary emboli and explain the purpose, placement, and mechanics of intracaval filtering devices.

         BB.       Discuss femoral-popliteal occlusive disease, including etiology, clinical progression, and diagnosis.

         CC.       Compare traditional vs. in-situ Femoral-Popliteal bypass surgery, including instrumentation, supplies, and sutures.

         DD.       Differentiate a “thrombus” vs. an “embolus”, list the signs and symptoms of acute arterial obstruction in a leg, and discuss the technique of
                      arterial embolectomy.

         EE.        List other types of surgery for vascular disease in the lower limb.

         FF.        Compare the techniques for various levels of amputation of the lower limb.

    11: Demonstrate knowledge of selected pathologies and operative procedures in Neurosurgery.

        A.          Describe congenital cranial and spinal neurological anomalies, relate the etiology of these defects to embryological development, and
                     discuss the treatment options and long-term implications.

         B.        Discuss various types of congenital and acquired cranial and craniofacial deformities, and list different methods of skull reconstruction or
                     cranioplasty.

         C.        Differentiate the causes of the two main types of hydrocephalus, compare the pathophysiology of hydrocephalus in an infant vs. in an adult,
                     and discuss the types of shunting procedures and their potential long-term complications.

         D.         Discuss different types of skull fractures and closed head injuries, including characteristics, diagnosis, usual treatments, and potential
                      complications.

         E.          List and define various diagnostic methods for intracranial pathologies.

         F.          Discuss patient positioning for cranial neurosurgery, differentiate various incisional  approaches, describe the steps, list intra-operative
                      monitoring devices used during craniotomy, and discuss possible surgical and post-operative complications.

         G.         Identify instrumentation and discuss special supplies, equipment, and pharmacologic agents commonly used during intracranial surgery.

         H.         Define and list possible uses for skull trephination and stereotaxis.

         I.           Identify bening vs. malignant types of primary intracranial tumors, and discuss the characteristics, clinical manifestations, and general
                      prognosis of each.

         J.          Discuss the etiology and demographics, most common locations, signs and symptoms, and  general prognosis of cerebral aneurysm.

         K.         Discuss the initial treatment of a patient following an episode of subarachnoid hemorrhage and the surgical management of cerebral
                      aneurysm.

         L.          Define arteriovenous malformation (AVM) and discuss treatment alternatives.

         M.         List other types of cranial neurosurgical procedures, and discuss the use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy for intracranial pathologies.

         N.         Discuss the demographics, risk factors, pathophysiology, signs and symptoms, and diagnostic tests for Carotid occlusive disease.

         O.         Explain the purpose of Cartoid Endarterectomy, and describe the incision, anatomical considerations, surgical techniques, special
                      instrumentation, and potential intra-operative and post-operative complications.

         P.          List conditions for which a laminectomy may be performed, identify various methods of positioning the patient, and describe the procedure,
                      including special instrumentation, precautions, and possible complications.

         Q.         Define a herniated nucleus pulposus and explain how it occurs, identify the most common locations for HNP, describe the usual signs and
                      symptoms, list common diagnostic methods, and discuss treatment alternatives.

         R.          Compare anterior and posterior approaches to the cervical spine.

         S.          Discuss surgical treatments for intractable pain.

    12. Demonstrate knowledge of selected pathologies and operative procedures in Pediatric Surgery.

         A.          Discuss special considerations for an infant or young child undergoing surgery, and explain differences in instruments and sutures used
                      during Pediatric surgery.

         B.          Identify congenital anomalies that require surgical correction in utero or immediately after birth.

         C.          Define terminology related to congenital anomalies of the head and neck.

         D.          Discuss types of esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal fistula and the usual method of surgical repair.

         E.          Compare Omphalocele, Gastroschisis, and other types of congenital defects of the abdominal  wall, including their origins during
                      embryological development, and describe the surgical treatments.

         F.          Compare the type and repair of inguinal hernias in an infant or child with those in an adult.

         G.         Define terminology related to congenital anomalies of the gastrointestinal tract, and discuss the signs and symptoms and surgical
                      correction for each.

         H.         List other types of General surgical procedures that may be performed on infants or young children.

  
  •  

    ST 250 - Clinical Externship

    Credits: 12


    Gains supervised clinical experience in hospital operating room suites. Evaluates each student’s progress in the theoretical, behavioral, and practical application of concepts of surgical technology.

    Prerequisite(s): ST 207 , ST 210 , ST 220 , ST 230  and ST 240 , each with a minimum “C” (2.0) grade, and the consent of the Program Coordinator
    Corequisite(s): ST 251W  
    Lecture Hours: 0 Lab Hours: 540
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Demonstrate acceptable communication and language skills, critical thinking skills, interpersonal/collaborative skills, and information
            literacy

         A.          Communicate in acceptable English and use medical terminology accurately and appropriately.

         B.          Integrate and correlate concepts from different courses, utilize both inductive and deductive reasoning skills, and demonstrate problem-
                       solving skills in both hypothetical and clinical situations.

         C.          Work constructively within a group.

                      1.    Demonstrate respect and consideration for others.

                      2.    Listen to, respect, and critically evaluate the ideas and opinions of others.

                      3.    Respond appropriately to other’s communications.

                      4.    Value differences and diversity within a group.

                      5.    Identify and analyze one’s own values and responses.

                      6.    Respect the perspectives, values, and choices of others.

         D.         Demonstrate the ability to access, analyze, and use information from personal, print, media, and electronic resources to expand his/her
                      understanding of subject matter.

    2.    Adhere to standard principles of aseptic technique, to the departmental policies of the affiliating institution, and to acceptable standards of behavior and interpersonal interactions.

         A.          Demonstrate appropriate employment behaviors, including acceptable attendance and punctuality and adherence to all hospital and
                      departmental policies.

         B.          Display adherence to correct O.R. attire at all times.

         C.          Demonstrate adherence to principles of Standard Precautions and other measures for protection of self and others at all times.

         D.         Demonstrate correct and safe processing, wrapping and/or sterilization of supplies and equipment as appropriate to the department.

         E.          Demonstrate recognition of any breaks in sterile technique and the ability to take proper steps to correct them.

         F.          Demonstrate proper and safe disposition of all surgical supplies and equipment upon completion of the procedure and assist in room clean
                      up as appropriate to departmental policies and practices.

         G.         Assist with stocking rooms and/or preparation for cases as appropriate to the department.

         H.         Demonstrate positive interpersonal skills, courtesy and consideration with patients, staff and physicians.

         I.          Communicate effectively and appropriately with staff and physicians.

         J.          Exhibit strict adherence to confidentiality of patient information at all times and in all situations.

         K.          Demonstrate a positive attitude regarding duties and responsibilities.

         L.          Demonstrate initiative, resourcefulness, and enthusiasm for new experiences.

         M.         Exhibit mature attitude, self-control, and adaptability in unfamiliar or stressful situations.

         N.         Demonstrate the ability to organize and complete work assignments within appropriate time frames.

         O.         Demonstrate cost consciousness and awareness of efficient utilization of supplies.

         P.          Exhibit a positive attitude toward evaluation of his/her performance, and toward any suggestions or corrections.

         Q.         Show the ability to evaluate oneself, recognize one’s own limitations, and seek appropriate assistance if needed.

         R.          Demonstrate appropriate selection and utilization of resources for enhancement of knowledge and skills.

     3.   Demonstrate competence in the Scrub role and, upon completion of this clinical experience course, the ability to scrub minor cases
           without 
    assistance, and commonly performed major cases with minimal assistance.

         A.          Demonstrate correct scrubbing, gowning and gloving procedures.

         B.          Correctly gown and glove others.

         C.          Demonstrate proper set-up procedures, as appropriate to departmental practices and within acceptable time limits.

         D.          Assist in draping the patient without contamination.

         E.          Properly prepare the field for the commencement of surgery.

         F.          Demonstrate correct and safe passing of knives and other sharps, and their appropriate disposition after use.

         G.         Demonstrate proper passing of instruments, in position of use.

         H.         Demonstrate proper passing of ties, use of electrosurgical apparatus, and handling of chemical and mechanical hemostatic devices.

         I.           Maintain the supply of sponges on an exchange basis, appropriately discarding used sponges.

         J.          Demonstrate appropriate exchange of instruments between the Mayo stand and the back- table.

         K.          Maintain organization, efficiency and conservation of movements throughout the case.

         L.          Anticipate sequential patterns of instrument use.

         M.         Anticipate the needs of the surgeon, as appropriate to experience level.

         N.         Recognize and respond to hand signals.

         O.         Anticipate the need for additional supplies and properly receive sterile items from the circulator.

         P.          Demonstrate proper handling and operation of special equipment, including stapling devices.

         Q.         Identify medications and solutions on the sterile field in an acceptable manner.

         R.          Demonstrate correct and safe handling of syringes and hypodermic needles.

         S.          Anticipate and properly prepare irrigation solutions.

         T.          Demonstrate accurate identification and appropriate care of specimens.

         U.         Select appropriate suture materials and sizes.

         V.          Demonstrate correct and safe handling, passing, and disposition of suture needles.

         W.        Properly prepare wound drains and dressings.

    4.    Demonstrate correct and safe Circulating duties as an assistant to staff Circulating personnel, as appropriate to the departmental
           policies and
    practices of the affiliating institution.

         A.          Correctly dispense sterile supplies onto a sterile field.

         B.          Assist with transportation of patients.

         C.          Assist with transfer of a patient on and off the operating table.

         D.          Assist with patient positioning for anesthesia and surgery.

         E.          Correctly perform a preoperative wash prep.

         F.          Correctly perform a bladder catheterization.

         G.         Anticipate the need for additional supplies during surgery.

         H.         Arrange discarded sponges for blood-loss estimate and for count.

         I.           Assist with filling out operative records and forms.

         J.          Demonstrate appropriate care of specimens, including culture media.

         K.          Perform appropriate counts in accordance with departmental policy.

         L.          Tape dressings after wound closure.

    5.    Demonstrate competence in performing the intraoperative functions of Second Assistant to the Surgeon

         A.          Demonstrate proper sponging and suctioning techniques.

         B.          Hold retractors correctly and assist in providing wound exposure.

         C.          Cut sutures correctly.

         D.          Place skin staples with the surgeon.

         E.          Assist in the application of wound drains and dressings.

  
  •  

    ST 251W - Operating Room Seminar

    Credits: 3


    Discusses patient-monitoring devices and diagnostic tests, abnormalities and correlations with surgical patient conditions, and surgery for traumatic injuries. Includes discussion of students’ clinical experiences, the professional role of the Surgical Technologist, general review, and assigned research studies.

    Prerequisite(s): ST 207 , ST 210 , ST 220 , ST 230 , and ST 240 , each with a minimum ” C” (2.0) grade, and consent of the Program Coordinator
    Corequisite(s): ST 250  
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Demonstrate acceptable communication and language skills, critical thinking skills, interpersonal/collaborative skills, and information
            literacy.

         A.          Communicate in acceptable English and in medical terminology appropriate to the discipline.

                      1.    Understand and critically evaluate what is read.

                      2.    Write in a clear, organized, succinct, and effective manner.

                      3.    Demonstrate proper spelling, grammar, and sentence structure in formal writing.

                      4.    Use medical terminology accurately and appropriately.

                      5.    Speak effectively when participating in class discussion and when expressing a reasoned point of view.

         B.          Analyze data and discipline-based knowledge to formulate logical conclusions.

                      1.    Integrate and correlate concepts from different courses.

                      2.    Exhibit development of both inductive and deductive reasoning skills.

                      3.    Demonstrate problem-solving skills in both hypothetical and clinical situations.

                      4.    Recognize patterns and trends in data and be able to justify any conclusions drawn.

                      5.    Make predictions based on evidence.

                      6.    Differentiate coincidental and causal relationships.

                      7.    Take a position on an issue and provide evidence or adequate rationale to support that position.

         C.          Work constructively within a group.

                      1.    Demonstrate respect and consideration for others.

                      2.    Listen to, respect, and critically evaluate the ideas and opinions of others.

                      3.    Respond appropriately to other’s communications.

                      4.    Value differences and diversity within a group.

                      5.    Contribute to the product(s) of a study or work group and accept responsibility for one’s own level of participation.

                      6.    Function within the guidelines established by the group.

                      7.    Identify and analyze one’s own values and responses.

                      8.    Respect the perspectives, values, and choices of others.

         D.         Demonstrate the ability to access, analyze, and use information appropriate to the discipline.

                      1.    Identify and access appropriate print and media resources to expand his/her understanding of subject matter.

                      2.    Access web sites using URL’s and hyperlinks.

                      3.    Conduct an Internet search pertinent to course subject matter.

                      4.    Evaluate the quality of information gathered from print and electronic sources with reference to reliability of the source, currency, and
                             applicability.

                      5.    Paraphrase, synthesize, and summarize information gathered from multiple sources.

                      6.    Demonstrate word processing skills for the preparation of written assignments.

                      7.    Use appropriate style to cite and document sources.

     2.    Locate and interpret information contained in a patient’s chart.

         A.          Describe the organization of a patient’s chart.

         B.          Given examples, translate commonly used charting abbreviations and symbols.

         C.          Correctly use charting abbreviations and symbols.

     3.    Be aware of common monitoring and diagnostic methods, recognize deviations from normal results and, when appropriate, participate
            in 
    interventional activities.

         A.          Describe and demonstrate the proper methods for measuring Vital Signs, and discuss the importance in patient monitoring.

         B.          Differentiate a “sign” vs. a “symptom” and give examples of each.

         C.          Identify the normal adult respiratory rate and factors that may affect the quality, rate and rhythm of respirations.

         D.          Define Cheyne-Stokes and Kussmaul breathing patterns and explain their significance.

         E.          Identify the normal adult pulse rate and factors that may affect the rate, strength and rhythm of the pulse.

         F.          List and locate the pulse (and pressure) points on the human body.

         G.         Identify the normal adult blood pressure and factors that may affect it, and explain indirect and direct methods of blood pressure
                      measurement.

         H.         Explain the significance of systolic and diastolic pressures in hemodynamic physiology.

         I.           Define Central Venous Pressure and identify factors that may affect it.

         J.          Explain the methods, importance and uses of CVP determination.

         K.          Discuss normal rates of urine output and the significance of its measurement during surgery.

         L.          Identify various methods of measuring body temperature, the normal values for each method, and possible causes for above-normal and
                      subnormal temperature readings.

         M.         Discuss methods of regulating body temperature during surgery.

         N.         Differentiate what happens to blood pressure, pulse, respirations, body temperature, urine output, skin color and skin texture in cases of
                      infection, hemorrhage, shock, anaphylaxis,hypoxia and hemolytic transfusion reaction.

         O.         Discuss the use of a pulse oximeter, end-tidal CO2 monitor, and peripheral nerve stimulator during surgery.

         P.          Define shock in physiologic terms, and discuss the mechanisms responsible for the signs and symptoms of shock.

         Q.         List eight categories of shock and give examples of causes for each.

         R.         State the normal blood volume of an adult, and list the signs and symptoms that are related to progressive blood loss (hypovolemia).

         S.          List the components of the general treatment measures for shock.

         T.           List the categories of pharmacologic agents used in the definitive treatment of shock, in their proper order of use, and give examples of
                       specific agents used.

         U.          List possible causes of respiratory and cardiac arrest.

         V.          Discuss the effects of serum potassium levels on the myocardium.

         W.         List the reversible causes of cardiac arrest using the “5H’s and 5 T’s”.

         X.          Describe the treatment of cardiac arrest, including proper methods of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, indications for open cardiac
                      massage, appropriate emergency drugs, and the use of defibrillation.

         Y.          Identify how the onset of severe shock or sudden cardiac arrest during surgery may be recognized by the Scrub Person.

         Z.          Discuss the appropriate roles of the various members of the surgical team during cardiac resuscitation, and explain the importance of
                      record-keeping during “Code” procedures.

         AA.       Explain how an electrocardiogram reading is derived and identify the proper placement of EKG lead electrodes on a patient in the O.R.

         BB.       Using a typical (Lead II) EKG tracing, define what cardiac events are indicated by the P wave, QRS complex, and T wave.

         CC.       Discuss how an individual EKG configuration can indicate abnormal conditions of the heart.

         DD.       Define Normal Sinus Rhythm (NSR).

         EE.       Differentiate an escape beat/rhythm from a premature beat.

         FF.        Define and discuss the causes, typical EKG pattern, and treatment of various cardiac dysrhythmias.

         GG.       Identify the kinds of cardiac dysrhythmias that may require a permanent pacemaker.

         HH.       Differentiate the appearance of dysrhythmias from that of a pacemaker malfunction or 60-cycle interference.

         II.          Describe the electrophysiologic classification of anti-arrhythmic drugs.

         JJ.        Differentiate cardioversion from defibrillation, and explain the physiologic action and purpose of a defibrillating shock.

         KK.       Discuss the uses of a Holter monitor and an Implantable Cardiovertor Defibrillator.

         LL.        List the departments of the Clinical Pathology section of a hospital.

         MM.      List the components of a Complete Blood Count, their normal values, and examples of causes of abnormal findings.

         NN.       Explain which lab tests are referred to as “cardiac markers”.

         OO.      List various types of blood chemistry tests and examples of causes of abnormal findings.

         PP.       List other common blood tests and their significance to diagnosis.

         QQ.      List the components of a Urinalysis, their normal values, and examples of causes of abnormal findings.

         RR.       Give examples of special biochemical, toxicologic, serologic, histologic, and cytologic diagnostic tests.

         SS.        List the components of an Arterial Blood Gases study, their normal values, and examples of causes of abnormal findings.

         TT.        Analyze the meaning of given examples of ABG results.

         UU.       Describe the proper method for collecting and transporting a blood specimen for ABG analysis.

     4.    Demonstrate familiarity  with common types of traumatic injuries and their treatments.    

         A.          Discuss the extent and impact of traumatic injury in American society.

         B.          Define “the Golden Hour”.

         C.          Describe the ACS rating of Trauma Centers and the types of services involved.

         D.          Define “triage” as it applies to multiple patients and to multiple injuries on the same patient.

         E.          Discuss the proper handling of the clothing and any legal evidence from a trauma patient.

         F.          In the treatment of trauma victims, differentiate the preliminary evaluation and resuscitation from the definitive evaluation.

         G.         List examples of injuries that are immediately life-threatening.

         H.         Define the Glasgow Coma Scale and discuss methods for assessing levels of consciousness.

         I.           List possible causes of unconsciousness.

         J.          List grades of blood loss status and the indicative signs and symptoms of each; relate this to volume replacement therapy.

         K.          Discuss the causes and treatments of various kinds of chest injuries, abdominal injuries, and orthopedic injuries.

         L.          Discuss special considerations with injuries to children and to pregnant patients.

                      1.    Epidural hemorrhage or hematoma

                      2.    Subdural hematomas (acute, subacute, and chronic)

                      3.    Subarachnoid hemorrhage

         M.         Explain special O.R. rules for dealing with trauma patients.

         N.         Describe a complete neurologic examination.

         O.         Discuss the types of direct/primary head injuries and the methods of diagnosis and treatment

                      for each.

         P.          Discuss the types of secondary head injuries and the methods of diagnosis and treatment for

         Q.         Define terminology related to head injuries, explain the clinical correlates of increasing intracranial pressure, and discuss the monitoring of
                      head injury patients.

         R.          Discuss types of vertebral and spinal cord injuries and their methods of diagnosis and treatment.

         S.          Discuss emerging new therapies for spinal cord injuries.

    5.    Demonstrate understanding of the terms related to physics.

         A.          Define terms related to mechanics:

                      1.    Study of Motion

                      2.    Projectile and satellite motion

                      3.    Newton’s Law of Motion

                      4.    Newton’s Law of Gravity

                      5.    Momentum

                      6.    Energy and work

         B.          Define terms related to properties of matter:

                      1.    Atomic nature of matter

                      2.    Solids

                      3.    Liquids

                      4.    Gases and plasmas

         C.          Define terms related to heat:

                      1.    Temperature, heat and expansion

                      2.    Heat transfer

                      3.    Change of state

         D.         Define terms related to sound, vibrations and waves:

                      1.    Simple harmonic motion

                      2.    Vibrating Strings

         E.          Define terms related to light:

                      1.    Reflection and refraction

                      2.    Color

                      3.    Light waves

                      4.    Light emission

         F.          Define terms related to modern physics:

                      1.    Atomic and nuclear physics

                      2.    Relativity

         G.         Apply the principles of physics to safe patient care practices in the O.R.

     6.    Deal positively with the emotional reactions engendered by the surgical setting in patients, co-workers and him/herself.

         A.          Participate in a weekly discussion of events and feelings experienced during the hospital Clinical Externship.

         B.          Keep a daily journal of experiences in the hospitals, to be turned in weekly.

         C.          Exhibit sensitivity and appropriate responses to emotional stresses in others.

         D.          Recognize and initiate efforts to resolve problems in interpersonal relationships in the clinical setting.

         E.          Act as a resource to classmates and others having interpersonal difficulties.

     7.    Prepare a researched Patient Case Study, selected from any procedure on which s/he participated.

         A.          Find and cite the appropriate information on the patient’s hospital chart.

         B.          Effectively use a medical library for research.

         C.          Identify other appropriate resources, including persons.

         D.          Present a written discussion of the disease process or abnormality (anatomy, physiology and pathology), pre-operative diagnostic tests
                       and pharmacologic therapy, pre-operative preparation, the surgical procedure performed, any life-style changes that may result, and the
                       prognosis.

         E.          Write in a clear, organized and effective manner, using proper terminology, spelling, and grammar and sentence structure.

         F.          Utilize appropriate citations to resource literature, including a proper form of bibliography.

    8.    Pass a comprehensive examination covering all the subject matter presented throughout the entire program.

         A.          Demonstrate understanding of various theories and perspectives embodied in the discipline and its basic science foundations.

         B.          Demonstrate understanding of aseptic and safety practices in the perioperative setting.

         C.          Demonstrate entry-level knowledge of surgical procedures and techniques.

         D.          Demonstrate entry-level knowledge of instruments, supplies and equipment used in surgery.

         E.          Demonstrate entry-level knowledge of surgical anatomy, pharmacology and microbiology

  
  •  

    ST 290-299 - Special Projects in Surgical Technology


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Technical Trades Interdisciplinary

  
  •  

    TTI 100W - Introduction to Sustainability

    Credits: 3
    Explores the many facets of sustainability. Investigates how social, economic, and environmental activities shape all aspects of our planet. Develops sustainability literacy by studying, in a multidisciplinary framework, the interdependence of humans and the environment within historical and current contexts. Explores the working definition of sustainability and relationships among social, economic and environmental factors.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 or WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: Social Science
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Student will define sustainability and describe sustainablity theory.
      1. Describe sustainability as a confluence of social, economic, and environmental systems.
      2. Demonstrate an increase in sustainability literacy.
      3. Articulate the topics of sustainability and possible solutions to problems.
      4. Create a personal definition of sustainability.
    2. Student will identify and analyze the relative influence of sustainability factors within historical and current contexts.
      1. Demonstrate the ability to derive meaning from historical context.
      2. Demonstrate the ability to derive meaning from a current context.
      3. Distinguish between the causes and effects concerning the sustainability of an interconnected world.
    3. Student will apply sustainability through an interdisciplinary perspective.
      1. Develop skills to assess and to implement practical solutions to real-world sustainability challenges.
      2. Propose diverse solutions to common sustainability problems.
      3. Illustrate various perspectives on the role of community.
      4. Prepare to be an active participant with sustainable solutions.
      5. Articulate the ways in which sustainable thinking and decision-making contributes to the process of creating solutions for current and emerging social, environmental, and economic crisis.
  
  •  

    TTI 101 - Exploring Careers in Technology, Trades and Manufacturing

    Credits: 2
    Emphasizes career education in the Technical, Trades and Manufacturing disciplines including opportunities, wages, working conditions, and curriculum. Includes hands-on projects in each of the disciplines.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): N/A
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Explore the careers offered in the Technical, Trades and Manufacturing Division disciplines.
      1. Discuss the wages, hours and working conditions of the various disciplines.
      2. Explore the opportunities these fields offer.
      3. Discuss the training and education necessary to be successful in these fields.
      4. Explore the health and safety issues confronting employees.
    2. Demonstrate a hands-on skill required for each discipline.
      1. Perform a hands-on skill required of each discipline.
      2. Discuss why this skill is necessary.
  
  •  

    TTI 110 - Sustainable Building Principles

    Credits: 2
    Discusses sustainable (green) building concepts including rating systems such as LEED for Homes and NAHB Model GREEN Home Building. Follows green building from design and site selection to the finishes used, with special emphasis on current case studies, the economics of green building, benefits and barriers, and sources of information.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Integrate concepts of high performance green buildings and sustainability into daily living.
      1. Demonstrate confidence using industry-appropriate terminology.
      2. Explain what makes a building “green.”
      3. Discern the proper selection of green building materials.
      4. Explain the benefits and costs of green building.
    2. Discover green building features including sustainable site aspects, energy and water efficiency, indoor air quality, day-lighting, and “green” materials.
      1. Distinguish the difference in the selection of mechanical and electrical systems.
      2. Assess indoor environmental quality factors.
      3. Analyze green building water supply and waste water strategies.
      4. Explain the concepts of sustainable landscapes.
      5. Explore means to reduce the ecological footprint of construction operations.
    3. Research green building resources and information.
      1. Analyze industry standards and information sources.
      2. Identify and utilize aspects of common green building rating systems.
  
  •  

    TTI 120 - Energy Auditing and Weatherization

    Credits: 3
    Provides training in the principles of energy auditing and weatherization inspection. Covers the principles of energy, energy and the building shell, energy auditing, air leakage, insulation, windows and doors, heating and cooling systems, indoor air quality, lighting and appliances, and water heating. Provides training to conduct energy audits and use this data to form a cost effective weatherization plan. Begins steps in acquiring knowledge for those considering energy auditing certification.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 35 Lab Hours: 10
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand home energy past and present.
      1. Recognize opportunities to develop efficient strategies for efficient energy use.
      2. Understand energy efficient rating systems and how to use them to evaluate a structure.
      3. Develop cost effective methods to reduce energy use.
    2. Understand the fundamental principles of energy.
      1. Understand the basic laws of thermodynamics.
      2. Understand human comfort conditions and how this impacts energy conservation.
      3. Understand how energy is converted for home use.
    3. Understand the building shell and its impact on energy consumption and conservation.
      1. Become familiar with basic home construction techniques.
      2. Recognize how energy moves through residential structure.
      3. Understand different insulation materials and their characteristics.
      4. Evaluate different window and door qualities based on standard rating data.
      5. Understand the basics of heating and cooling systems.
      6. Investigate lighting and appliances and their impact on energy consumption.
    4. Understand energy management and its impact on health and safety.
      1. Recognize how energy conservation techniques can affect the indoor air quality.
      2. Develop strategies to control moisture in a residential structure.
      3. Utilize whole house mechanical systems to control energy loss and effectively deal with indoor air quality issues.
    5. Understand the use of energy loss test equipment.
      1. Utilize energy test equipment to identify and target energy loss in the building envelope.
      2. Utilize test data to evaluate energy loss and how this should drive the weatherization process.
  
  •  

    TTI 200 - Academic Sustainability Travel

    Credits: 2
    Includes 12 hours of on-campus instruction and 18 hours of academic travel at the determined location. Gains knowledge of the location prior to departure with the objective of developing a sustainability project. Presents final project to an applicable professional body after completion of travel. An honors option may be possible.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 12 Lab Hours: 18
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Discuss the history and culture of an academic location.
      1. Identify literary and artistic works.
      2. Describe the agriculture.
      3. Explain the economic situation.
      4. Describe community health and development aspects.
    2. Summarize the architecture and geography of an academic travel location.
      1. Identify historical architecture.
      2. Detail existing sustainable projects and structures.
      3. Describe geographical features of the location.
    3. Prepare a Sustainability Assessment.
      1. Identify the needs of the people being affected or served.
      2. Identify available local materials.
      3. Compare available transportation methods.
      4. Analyze local construction methods.
      5. Propose a Sustainable Project.
    4. Complete academic travel to the location.
      1. Develop a new sustainable project for the location.
      2. Propose a plan to improve an in-place sustainable practice.
      3. Provide a plan for adapting a sustainable practice that is in-place at the travel location for use in the student’s community.
      4. Work on an ongoing sustainable project at the travel location.
    5. Assess and present results.
      1. Rate success or feasibility of the project.
      2. Prepare presentation using presentation software and/or digital media.
      3. Relate the presentation to an applicable professional body.
  
  •  

    TTI 290-299 - Special Projects in Technical Trades Interdisciplinary


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Water Environment Technology

  
  •  

    WET 110 - Water Treatment Technologies

    Credits: 3
    Studies conventional water treatment processes. Includes preliminary treatment, coagulation and flocculation, sedimentation and clarification, filtration, and disinfection. Includes tours of municipal water treatment facilities and related field discussions. Credit may be earned in WWT 110 or WET 110, but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Describe the basic components and applications of preliminary treatment devices.
      1. Explain pre-oxidation, screening, pre-sedimentation, and micro-screening.
      2. Describe various pre-oxidation processes such as iron and manganese removal.
    2. Describe the mechanisms of coagulation and flocculation.
      1. Identify non-settleable solids as suspended, colloidal and dissolved.
      2. Explain a water particle’s electrical charges including; naturally repelling and attracting forces.
      3. Describe particle destabilization mechanisms including; charge neutralization and enmeshment.
      4. Discuss and perform various calculations regarding chemical coagulants including; aluminum sulfate, ferric chloride and polymers.
      5. Describe water characteristics affecting chemical selection including; water temperature, pH, alkalinity, turbidity, and color.
      6. Describe operating factors affecting floc development including; flash mixing, flocculation mixing and flocculation detention time.
      7. Summarize federal regulations including; the Intrerim Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule, the Information Collection Rule, and the disinfectants/Disinfection-Byproducts Rule.
    3. Describe the sedimentation process, also called clarification.
      1. Describe various basin (settling) types including; rectilinear flow, center feed/radial flow, peripheral feed/radial flow, peripheral feed/spiral flow, and square/radial flow.
      2. Describe sedimentation enhancement devices including; tube settlers and plate settlers.
      3. Describe other clarification processes such as: solids-contact clarifiers, dissolved air flotation units, and adsorption clarifiers.
      4. Perform sludge production calculations.
    4. Describe the suspended solids removal process of filtration.
      1. Define various approaches of filtration such as: slow sand filtration, rapid sand filtration, dual media sand/anthracite filtration, mixed media (garnet) filtration, deep-bed granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration, and diatomaceous earth filtration.
      2. Describe the components of a basic filtration system including; underdrain, filter box, wash troughs, piping and valving, controls, media, and surface wash.
      3. Perform calculations regarding effective size, uniformity coefficient, bed expansion and mixing
    5. Describe various processes associated with inactivating pathogenic organisms.
      1. Describe various methods of disinfection including; heat treatment, radiation treatment and chemical treatment.
      2. Describe various advantages and disadvantages of water treatment disinfectant chemicals including; chlorine, chloramines, ozone, and chorine dioxide.
      3. Illustrate chemical equations respective of mono, di, and tri chloroamine formation.
      4. Diagram the breakpoint chlorination schematic.
      5. Explain the Surface Water Treatment Rule and its relationship to contact time calculations.
      6. Explain various forms of disinfection equipment systems.
      7. Describe various disinfection byproducts including; trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids.
  
  •  

    WET 112 - Wastewater Treatment Technology

    Credits: 3
    Provides an introduction to the causes of water pollution, the reasons for treating polluted waters and the fundamentals of wastewater treatment. Studies the basic principles of treatment plant operation and the processes commonly used in pollution control facilities. Investigates terms, mathematics and problem solving techniques commonly used by wastewater treatment personnel. Credit may be earned in WWT 112 or WET 112, but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand terms commonly used in wastewater technology.
      1. Define common “wastewater” terms.
      2. Explain terms and phrases commonly used by wastewater treatment professionals and be able to appropriately use those terms and phrases in verbal and written communication.
    2. State the major causes of water pollution and the importance (reasons for) of identifying, reducing and eliminating sources of water pollution.
      1. Distinguish between “point” versus “no-point” source pollution discharges.
      2. Explain the importance of and differences between “municipal” and “industrial” wastewater discharges.
      3. Identify, define and explain the pollutant character, effects and impacts of oxygen demanding substances, solid materials, nutrients, organic and inorganic substances, temperature, p.H., disease causing organisms and toxic materials.
      4. Discuss the water-cycle and its importance.
    3. Discuss wastewater operations techniques, concerns, requirements and operator traits, skills, qualifications and opportunities.
      1. Describe the basic monitoring and reporting functions of a “wastewater operator”.
      2. Discuss typical versus non-typical wastewater treatment plant operating conditions and common response actions to problems that operators have at their disposal.
      3. Safety and Health issues relative to wastewater collection and treatment will be investigated.
      4. Identify the desirable traits, skills and qualifications of a wastewater treatment plant operator.
      5. Explore opportunities for employment and continuing education.
    4. Define, differentiate and discuss various wastewater treatment process options and alternatives.
      1. List and describe the most common wastewater treatment plant types: attached growth, activated sludge and physical/chemical.
      2. List and describe the stages of wastewater treatment.
    5. Evaluate treatment plant operations by application of a logical problem-solving process.
      1. Identify a problem, determine alternatives to solving the problem and provide a solution to the problem.
      2. Manipulate waste water mathematical formulas in order to evaluate treatment pant performance.
      3. Complete a sample “monthly operations report”; of form and content typically required for submittal to a regulatory agency.
  
  •  

    WET 210 - Advanced Wastewater Treatment Technologies

    Credits: 3
    Discusses wastewater treatment technologies beyond conventional processes. Includes the processes and techniques commonly used for advanced wastewater treatment, disinfection, solids stabilization and disposal, nutrient reduction and toxics removal. Includes field tours and discussion of safety and health, sampling procedures, record keeping, data preparation and report writing, and analytical procedures used to determine optimal plant operation and compliance with regulatory requirements.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 6 and WET 112  or permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand terms commonly used in wastewater technology.
      1. Define and use more advanced “wastewater” terms.
      2. Explain terms and phrases commonly used by wastewater treatment professionals and be able to appropriately use those terms and phrases in verbal and written communication.
    2. Discuss the processes, equipment and safe, efficient operation and maintenance of advanced wastewater systems.
      1. Describe and Demonstrate the basic operation and maintenance practices, policies and skills involved in an advanced wastewater facility.
      2. Further identify, define and explain the pollutant character, effects and impacts of oxygen demanding substances, solid materials, nutrients, organic and inorganic substances, temperature, p.H., disease causing organisms and toxic materials.
      3. Discuss the nitrogen cycle and its importance.
    3. Discuss the processes of chemical addition to enhance and improve the removal of pollutants from in-plant wastewater streams.
      1. Explain the concepts of chemical addition to wastewater processes and the anticipated impacts of those treatment aids.
      2. Understand the principles of simple “bench-top” jar-tests which can determine target chemical addition dosages.
      3. Use correct mathematical formulas to calculate chemical feed rates and usage.
      4. Discuss the processes of coagulation and flocculation as aids to sedimentation.
    4. Describe specific advanced wastewater treatment processes.
      1. Discuss the processes of reverse osmosis, air flotation, ozonation and other such “advanced” methods of further and better removing pollutants from wastewater.
      2. Describe the various filtration processes used to separate solids from water.
      3. Discuss “breakpoint chlorination” as an advanced treatment practice.
    5. Evaluate treatment plant operations by application of a logical problem-solving process and review of elated monitoring and analytical data.
      1. Identify a problem, determine alternatives to solving the problem and provide a solution to the problem.
      2. Develop an annual budget for a specified size and type of wastewater plant.
      3. Complete a sample “monthly operations report”; of form and content typically required for submittal to a regulatory agency.
      4. Write a sample annual report to a City administration, summarizing the state of the treatment facility and recommendations for improving treatment and cost effectiveness.
    6. Describe and differentiate between the various job descriptions found in atypical wastewater treatment plant and the role that each of those jobs plays in thesuccessful operation of the collection systems and treatment facility.
      1. Study job descriptions and talk to working professionals concerning the education,skills, experience and personal traits earned and exhibited by wastewater plant staff.
  
  •  

    WET 212 - Advanced Water Treatment Technologies

    Credits: 3


    Considers drinking water treatment technologies beyond conventional processes. Includes softening, ion exchange, activated carbon absorption, aeration, air stripping, and membrane processes. Includes participation in field tours and discussions on safety and health, sampling procedures, record keeping, data preparation, report writing and the analytical procedures used to determine and measure drinking water quality.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 6 WET 110  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.    The student can describe the process “softening” typical source waters

         A.          Describe the effects of hard and soft water and the types of water hardness.

         B.          Describe drinking water softening processes.

         C.          Describe conventional softening equipment found in water treatment facilities.

         D.         Explain the impacts softening may have on other treatment processes.

         E.          Perform softening dosage and chemical solids production calculations.

     2.    The student can describe corrosion and scaling in drinking water systems.

         A.          Explain the purpose of corrosion and scaling control.

         B.          Describe the chemical reactions that occur during the corrosion of metals.

         C.          Describe the factors affecting corrosion including: dissolved oxygen, total dissolved solids, pH, temperature, flow velocity, types of metal,
                       electrical current, and bacteria.

         D.          Explain the chemistry of scale formation including calcium carbonate precipitate.

         E.          Explain the use of corrosion inhibitors and sequestering agents.

         F.           Discuss federal SDWA regulations including the Lead & Copper Rule.

     3.    The student can discuss impacts of ion exchange on drinking waters and on industrial users.

         A.          Summarize the advantages and disadvantages of operating ion exchange processes.

         B.          Describe health concerns that may be associated with the ion exchange process.

         C.          Describe the ion exchange softening process basic components.

         D.          Define cycles of the ion exchange process: softening, backwash, regeneration, and rinse.

         E.          Perform ion exchange calculations including: removal capacities and run times.

     4.    The student understands the impacts of organic compounds in raw water supplies and can explain various techniques of the
             absorption process used 
    to remove such contaminants.

         A.          Distinguish Synthetic (SOCs) and Volatile Organic Chemicals (VOCs) found in water.

         B.          Define various forms of disinfection by-products including THMs and HAAs.

         C.          Differentiate between carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic substances.

         D.          Describe the steps in Gas Chromatography.

         E.          Describe the details of adsorption.

         F.           Explain the applications of powdered and granular activated carbon.

         G.          Illustrate a typical breakthrough pattern for a granular activated carbon bed.

         H.          Discuss the factors influencing adsorption.

         I.            Perform adsorption calculations using the Langmuir and Fruendlich Isotherms.

         J.           Describe National Primary Drinking Water Regulations regarding treatment chemicals.

         K.           Describe typical carbon adsorption feeding equipment used in a water treatment plant.

         L.           Describe the properties of activated carbon.

         M.          Discuss the analytical process of mass spectroscopy.

    5.    The student can describe aeration and air stripping processes that can remove dissolved gasses, introduce oxygen to oxidize
           dissolved materials 
    and release volatile chemicals.

         A.          Summarize the constituents affected by aeration including: carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, methane, VOCs, radon, iron and manganese,
                      and taste and odors.

         B.          Define the types of aerators including: water-into-air types, air-into-water types and combination types.

         C.          Describe the advantages and disadvantages of fine-bubble and course bubble diffused aeration.

         D.          Describe how iron is removed via aeration by illustrating iron oxidation reaction.

         E.          Calculate various air stripper design parameters including: Henry’s constant, Gas Transfer Coefficient, and air-to-water ratio.

         F.           Describe the impact of solubility, surface area, and relative volatility to the aeration/air  stripping processes.

         P.          age 3 WET 212 - O & O

     6.    The student can describe various membrane filtration processes

         A.          Describe the forces used in membrane processes including pressure and electrical energy.

         B.          Describe membrane processes: micro, ultra, & nano-filtration, and reverse osmosis.

         C.          Discuss the removal efficiency of various membrane processes.

         D.          Discuss the differences between the most common membrane materials.

         E.          Describe the four (4) membrane configurations currently available including: spiral wound, hollow fiber, tubular, and plate and frame.

         F.          Discuss various reverse osmosis conditions: salt rejection, salt passage, and recovery rate.

    7.    The student can discuss standard process monitoring and water quality compliance reporting tests and the methods and procedures
            used during the
    daily operation of water treatment plants.

         A.          Explain standard water treatment analytical procedures, including but not limited to alkalinity, hardness, chloride, fluoride, turbidity,
                       conductivity and residual chlorine.

    8.    The student can describe and differentiate between the various job descriptions found in a typical drinking water plant and the role that
            each of those jobs plays in the successful operation of the distribution systems and treatment facility.

         A.          Study job descriptions and talk with working professionals concerning the education,skills, experience and personal traits earned and
                       exhibited by drinking water plant staff.

  
  •  

    WET 215 - Water Quality Analysis And Wet Instrumentation

    Credits: 3
    Investigates conventional water and wastewater laboratory test procedures, with particular emphasis on those analytical techniques that require an understanding and practical use of laboratory instrumentation. Water Quality Lab tests include BOD, TSS, temperature, DO, pH, conductivity, TDS, total and volatile solids, alkalinity, TRC, and others common to the daily operation of both drinking water and wastewater plants; includes discussions of basic stream ecology and applied environmental science principles. Instrumentation Lab includes the use of pH, millivolt and specific ion meters and probes and an introduction to Spectrophotometry, atomic absorption (AA), and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Includes field tours of municipal water and wastewater treatment facility labs and related field study discussions.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 6 and WET 110  and WET 112  and CHM 105W  or CHM 111  or permission of the instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate a working knowledge and hands on experience with water and wastewater bacteriological methods, analytical procedure and concentration determination
      1. Conduct BOD, TSS, pH, TRC, DO, TDS, alkalinity and other test procedures
      2. Identify the equipment and apparatus used in the procedures studied.
      3. Discuss the health implications of coliform found in waters humans are exposed to.
      4. Explain the importance of “conventional pollutants” discharged to surface waters.
      5. Explain the importance of “conventional pollutants” found in untreated drinking water
      6. Discuss health and safety concerns commonly found in water and wastewater labs.
    2. Demonstrate a working proficiency with the basic test procedures.
      1. Explain the purpose and function of phosphorus, nitrogen, carbon, chlorine and other tests
      2. Describe the analytical test procedures, good lab technique and the waste disposal concerns related to the analytical procedures presented. concerns related to the analytical procedures presented.
      3. Describe the additional and unique health and safety issues related to these tests.
    3. Demonstrate practical proficiency with the basic analytical instruments.
      1. Explain the principles of spectrophotometry.
      2. Identify the working parts of a typical spectrophotometer.
      3. Properly prepare and arrange the instruments prior to conducting a test.
      4. Prepare calibration standards and establish a standard curve.
      5. Determine am unknown concentration using good analytical technique and a standard curve prepared for that purpose.
      6. Calibrate a pH meter using three buffered dilutions.
      7. Using pH or millivolt meter and specific ion probe, properly calibrate the equipment.
      8. Conduct a dissolved oxygen analysis on either an incubated or grab water sample.
    4. Demonstrate a working knowledge of basic water - laboratory equipment.
      1. Describe the process and set up requirements for a BOD incubator.
      2. Describe the purpose and set up requirements for a drying oven and muffle furnace.
      3. Describe the purpose and set up requirements for dessicator equipment.
      4. Demonstrate a working understanding of an Atomic Absorption (AA) unit.
      5. Demonstrate a working knowledge of Gas Chrome/Mass Spec (GC/MS) unit.
      6. Properly set up and use typical manual and automatic titration equipment.
      7. Describe the importance of quality “lab water” and the equipment used to produce it.
    5. Relate the significance of various findings from typical water and wastewater laboratories, by means of written report.
      1. Make verbal and/or written report to interested stakeholders (City Council).
      2. Correctly describe, using professional verbiage, the importance of analytical findings.
      3. Evaluate the treatment process, draw conclusions and make valid recommendations based on the knowledge of water/wastewater treatment and the analytical findings described.
  
  •  

    WET 220 - Water Microbiology

    Credits: 3


    Investigates more advanced water quality analytical techniques and the microbiology of water, including microscopic examination and identification of microorganisms commonly found in water supplies, water and wastewater treatment processes and polluted bodies of water. Water Quality Analysis lab work involves more advanced analytical procedures to determine nutrients, heavy metals and toxic materials. Focuses on lab safety and health, proper lab technique, representative sampling procedures, record keeping, data preparation and handling, and report writing. Continues field studies and analysis using Atomic Absorption and/or Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometer instruments. Includes lab work involving organisms commonly found in water and wastewater samples and with specific bacteriological analytical techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 6 and WET 210  and WET 212  and WET 215  or permission from instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1:    Demonstrate a working knowledge and hands on experience with water and wastewater bacteriological methods, analytical procedure and concentration determination.

         A.          Describe and demonstrate the basic aseptic technique.

         B.          Perform both Total and Fecal coliform analysis using standard membrane techniques.

         C.          Perform “confirmed” bacteriological techniques for Total, Fecal and E-Coli organisms.

         D.          Have a working knowledge of the “multiple tube fermentation” analytical method.

         E.          Demonstrate good aseptic technique

         F.          Discuss the concept of concentration in terms of test accuracy and units of expression.

     2.    Can evaluate water samples and identify existing and predominant  microorganisms.

         A.          By use of a practical and logical procedure, evaluate water samples for the presence of various types of microorganisms and/or other |
                       pollutants of concern.

         B.          Be able to identify indicator organism that are or may be either beneficial or detrimental to the treatment process purpose, the incoming or
                       raw water supply, drinking or potable waters and surface or groundwaters.

         C.          Be able to explain why an organism is present at all, why it may be in predominance and either its beneficial or detrimental impacts on the
                       water environment in which it is found.

         D.         Be able to discuss the impacts of pathogenic organisms on employee and public health.

     3:    Can set up and use a variety of inspection tools; including but not limited to microscopes, viewing scopes, magnifying glass,
            projection equipment to 
    evaluate and identify microorganisms.

         A.          Be proficient at the technique of preparing microscopic slides

         B.          Be competent at the set up of microscope and accessory equipment for microscopic determination of organisms in water samples.

         C.          Shall have a working knowledge of the sample enhancement techniques, including staining, used to better inspect and quantify
                       microscopic samples.

         D.          Be able to identify, by either scientific or common name, the microorganisms present in a sample.

     4.    Has hands on experience with the various analytical equipment used by water and wastewater laboratory personnel.

        A.          Have a working knowledge of the use and limitations of an analytical balance.

         B.          Be familiar with the various analytical “probes” available to today’s lab staff.

         C.          Has used some of the more advanced equipment such as atomic absorption (AA) and/or Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrophotometer
                       (GC/MS) to determine presence and concentration of a known material.

         D.          Understand concept of wet chemistry analytical “colorimetry” and spectrophotometry.

         E.          Be familiar with operation and maintenance of p.H., conductivity and specific ion meters.

         F.          Be familiar with the operation of water baths, drying ovens, muffle furnaces, incubators and the other “common” types of equipment found
                      in water and wastewater laboratories.

         G.         Understand the importanace of having on hand and properly using the appropriate accessory items: timers, glassware, cleaning
                      equipment, reagents, lab water, etc.

         H.         Is proficient at making determinations using the correct mathematical formula, in the correct terms of expression and in the right context to
                      professionally present findings.

    5.    Show proficiency at analyzing certain non-conventional pollutants: nutrients, metals, toxics.

         A.          Properly collect, preserve and store samples for analysis.

         B.          Conduct sample preparations, such as digestion, dechlorinations, acidification as may  berequired per accepted analytical method.

         C.          Have hands on experience with “test kits”, “spot tests” and quick use field test gear.

         D.          Conduct a Total phosphorus test using the ascorbic acid method.

         E.          Conduct an Ammonia Nitrogen test

         F.          Conduct two metals tests from a list of those commonly found in water samples.

         G.         Conduct two toxics tests from a list of those commonly found in water samples.

         H.         Understand the health hazards that environmental lab personnel are commonlyexposed to and the steps that can be taken to minimize
                      exposure, disease, illness and injury.

  
  •  

    WET 230 - Water/Wastewater Utility Management

    Credits: 3
    Investigates, in depth, the management elements of planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling as they relate to the management, supervision and administration of Water and Wastewater facilities. Presents management styles, problem recognition and problem solving techniques, budget and report preparation activities, federal and state regulatory issues, employee/employer (labor/management) relations and leadership topics.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 2 and WET 110  and WET 112  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. List and describe the five basic management elements.
      1. List the five management elements and the sub-elements of each.
      2. Describe the activities of planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling as management responsibilities and the management duties of a “real” management position.
    2. Understand the variety of management styles and attempt to determine his/her own “probable” style.
      1. Distinguish between McGregor’s “Theory X-Theory Y” manager
      2. List and define the five basic (Blake/Mouton) managerial styles
    3. By applying a logical process and techniques, recognize problems and determine their origin, then provide solutions and/or alternatives of action to deal with the problem/s at hand.
      1. Define the steps of a basic problem solving procedure.
      2. Apply the problem solving procedure to a typical management situation, determine the problem and identify problem solution alternatives.
    4. Establish a working budget for a typical “publicly owned water or wastewater” utility.
      1. Define the primary budgeting areas and the items included there in.
      2. Assemble the budget into a “typical” format for submittal and presentation.
      3. Be able to verbally present the budget in summary form.
    5. List and discuss the major regulatory issues surrounding the production and distribution of potable water supplies (Safe Drinking Water Act), and the required practices (mandated by the Clean Water Act) related to pollution control programs.
      1. List the major Environmental (such as: SDWA, CWA, ICR, RCRA, TOSCA, GLI, IPP) laws relating theWater/Wastewater fields.
      2. Discuss the major laws; their intent and impact on the regulated community and end users.
      3. Draw conclusions as to the merits and benefits these laws relative to the Health Safety and Welfare of today’s society.
    6. Discuss the aspects, dynamics impacts of both positive and negative employee/management relations.
      1. Read and interpret a “real life” job description.
      2. Understand and implement the method of employee goal setting process of Management By Objective (MBO)
      3. Conduct an employee “Job Performance Review”
      4. Understand the roles of participants in quality improvement activities (quality circles, TQM, TQT, etc.).
      5. Initiate and conduct an employee disciplinary action, from a management perspective. This role playing exercise is intended to expose the student to the most difficult relationship between employee and employer. The class will investigate the dynamics of this process and the attitudes of both parties.
      6. Explain the impacts of substance abuse, tardiness, general and sexual harassment of co-workers, theft from work, falsification of documents.
    7. List and discuss the traits and skills of “successful” leaders.
      1. List and discuss the traits and skills of successful leaders.
      2. Determine which of the successful leadership traits/skills he/she may already have.
      3. Know how to acquire those “leadership” traits/skills he/she may not have.
      4. Inspire and build leaders of employees who are yet to come under the influence our student/”leaders-in-training”.
  
  •  

    WET 240 - Applied Hydraulics

    Credits: 3


    Studies applied hydraulic principles utilized in water distribution and wastewater collection systems. Includes pumpage, headloss, piping, valving, metering, cross connection control, storage, corrosion, and an introduction to hydraulic modeling. Discusses the principles of force, pressure, hydraulic grade line, and pump curves. Includes tours of municipal/industrial water pump stations and storage reservoirs and related field discussions. Credit may be earned in WWT 240 or WET 240, but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 6 or permission of instructor.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Describe basic hydraulic principles.

         A.          Define such terminology as: density, specific gravity, pressure, force, piezometric surface, hydraulic grade line, and energy grade line.

         B.          Define terms such as: pressure head, elevation head, and velocity head.

         C.          Calculate friction head loss in piping systems, utilizing both the Hazen Williams formula, as well as the Daracy-Weisbach formula.

         D.          Explain the significance of minor losses as they relate to piping systems.

         E.          Define Bernoulli’s Theorem as that of the total energy possessed by a fluid being the sum of its pressure, kinetic and potential energies.

         F.          Describe the graphical representation relating fraction factor, Reynbolds number, and relative roughness as the Moody Diagram.

     2.   Solve various pumping problems.

         A.          Describe factors affecting suction and discharge of a pumping system, including head and lift.

         B.          Define the components of total dynamic head.

         C.          Perform horsepower and efficiency calculations including: motor efficiencies, pumping efficiencies, and wire-to-water efficiencies.

         D.          Perform pumping cost calculations.

         E.          Interpret standard pump curves including, the relationships of flow, total head, break horsepower, and efficiency.

         F.           Perform calculations associated with the Affinity Laws.

         G.          Perform calculations regarding the Rule of Continuity.

         H.          Compare parallel piping arrangements with series pumping arrangements.

         I.            Describe the differences between radial-flow, axial-flow, and mixed-flow pumps.

     3.    Describe various flow metering devices and their typical applications.

         A.          Explain flow measuring devices such as: Weirs, Parshall Flumes, venturis, orifice meters, piston meters, nutating disc meters, turbine
                       meters, compound meters, and current meters.
    4.    Explain differences in piping materials and their appropriate applications.

         A.          Define four (4) general types of piping systems used by water utilities including: transmission lines, in-plant piping, distribution mains, and
                      service lines.

         B.          List advantages and disadvantages of various pipe materials including: grey cast iron, ductile iron, steel, asbestos-cement, PVC, and
                       pre-stressed concrete cylinder pipe.

         C.          Describe various pipe joints including: flange joints, mechanical joints, ball-and-socket joints, push-on joints, restrained joints, and grooved-
                       and-shouldered joints.

    5.    Define the numerous applications for valving in typical water distribution systems.

         A.          Describe the principle used for valving including: to start and stop flow, to regulate pressure and throttle flow, to prevent backflow, and
                       to relieve pressure.

         B.          Describe the classifications of water utility valves including: gate valves, globe valves, needle valves, pressure relief valves, air-and-
                       vacuum relief valves, diaphragm valves, pinch valves, rotary valves, butterfly valves, and check valves.

         C.          Describe the principle methods of operating water system valves including: manually, electrically, hydraulically, and pneumatically.

     6.    Describe a Cross-connection and the various means of protection.

         A.          Describe the means of backflow including back pressure and back siphonage.

         B.          Describe the preventative measures, depending on the degree of hazard involved, including: air gaps, reduced pressure zone backflow
                       preventers, double-check valve assemblies, atmospheric and pressure vacuum breakers, and abarometric loops.

     7.    Describe various functions and purposes of water storage.

         A.          Define the primary types of water storage including: hydro-pneumatic tanks, ground-level reservoirs, and elevated tanks

         B.          Explain the daily variation of system demands known as the Diurnal Cycle.

         C.          Explain the need for various reservoir system components including: overflow piping, altitude valves, air vents, access hatches, cathodic
                       protection systems, paint coatings, and rechlorination systems.

     8.    Describe how both internal and external corrosion impact piping systems.
        A.           Describe the various external coating protection mechanism such as: concrete, coal tar, and poly-wrap.

         B.          Describe various means of internal pipe protection including: cement, calcium carbonate precipitate, and polyphosphate film formation.

         C.          Summarize the Lead and Copper Rule including: action levels, health risks, sampling requirements, and notification requirements.

     9.    Explain the basics of computerized hydraulic modeling.

         A.          Calculate basic water system flows by means of the Hardy-cross Method.

         B.          Describe field calibration of a computerized hydraulic model by comparing hydrant flow tests  to model results.

  
  •  

    WET 244 - Water/Wastewater Utility Equipment Maintenance

    Credits: 3
    Provides the student with basic knowledge of mechanical equipment and repair techniques used in both water and wastewater facilities. Uses shop drawings and blueprints during disassembly and reassembly of a variety of mechanical devices. Studies pumps, valves, piping systems, and chlorination equipment. Credit may be earned in WWT 244 or WET 244. but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 2 and WET 110  or WET 112  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate his or her ability to follow proper maintenance procedures and guidelines necessary to perform as a competent maintenance person in this field.
      1. Diagnose failed, malfunctioning and inefficient pump conditions.
      2. Comprehend the factors involved in pumping various fluids.
      3. Measure (pumping equipment’s) amperage levels and ascertain the equipment’s efficiency based on these measurements.
      4. Interpret mechanical prints and cut sheets.
  
  •  

    WET 246 - Water/Wastewater Utility Electrical Maintenance

    Credits: 2
    Studies basic electricity and instrumentation utilized in water and wastewater treatment facilities. Emphasizes the use of testing equipment to troubleshoot electrical and instrumental failures, maintenance problems, and evaluation of equipment performance. Includes discussion of energy conservation methods. Credit may be earned in WWT 246 or WET 246, but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 2 and WET 110  or WET 112  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate an ability to report, diagnose, maintain, and take a calculated safe approach to the reparations of a failed electrical circuit or device.
      1. Describe the fundamentals of electrical components in both A.C. and D.C. environments.
      2. Utilize test equipment to ascertain equipment/circuit failures.
      3. Make cost/efficiency determinations based on test equipment measured values.
      4. Interpret ladder diagram logic and read electrical prints
  
  •  

    WET 265 - Practicum In Water/Wastewater Treatment

    Credits: 4
    Provides opportunities to perform technical procedures through structured field experience in water and wastewater treatment plants. Emphasizes gaining experience under plant managers and operating personnel with goal of developing organizational skills and responsibility necessary for entry-level employment. Uses rotation through assigned areas of experience in water treatment for 160 hours and continuous experience in wastewater treatment for 160 hours of in-plant services for total of 320 hours minimum required. Credit may be earned in WWT 265 or WET 265, but not in both.

    Prerequisite(s): READING LEVEL 2 and WRITING LEVEL 2 and MATH LEVEL 6 and WET 210 , WET 212 , WET 215 , WET 244 , WET 246 , each with a minimum “C” (2.0) grade and must be taken during final semester with permission of program director
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 3 Lab Hours: 320
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Demonstrate the Performance Skills approved by the State of Michigan for Water Environment Technology.
      1. Demonstrate proficiency in monitoring filter performance, calculating filter rate, adjusting filter rates, and backwashing filters.
      2. In the area of Chemical Treatment:
        1. Determine Chemical Dosage
        2. Adjust Treatment Rates
        3. Collect Water Samples
        4. Prepare Chemical Solutions
        5. Biological Treatment
        6. Monitor Performance
        7. Identify Organisms
        8. Calculate Wasting/Return Rate
        9. Calculate Mean Cell Retention Time
      3. In the area of Pump Operations:
        1. Operate Pumps
        2. Operate Plant Valves
        3. Operate Standby Power Equipment
      4. In the area of Plant Maintenance:
        1. Maintain Chemical Feeder
        2. Maintain Pumps
        3. Maintain Electrical Equipment
        4. Maintain Basins and Piping
        5. Maintain Filters
        6. Maintain Instrumentation
      5. In the Laboratory:
        1. Comprehend the OSHA Chemical Hygiene Plan
        2. Perform Daily Chemical Tested
        3. Perform Coliform Test
        4. Prepare Reagents
        5. Work with GC/MS Chromatography/Atomic Absorption
        6. Perform Other Bacteriology Tests
      6. In the area of Administration:
        1. Demonstrate Computer Skills
        2. Explain EPA and MDPH Regulations
        3. Complete MDPH/MDNR Operation Reports
        4. Respond to Consumer Problems
        5. Schedule Maintenance
        6. Supervise Work Force
        7. Maintain Inventory
        8. Prepare Budgets
        9. Train and Manage Personnel
        10. Prepare Emergency Plans
        11. Communicate Effectively
        12. Promote Safety/Understand MIOSHA Regulations
      7. Complete the following:
        1. Carry Out Cross-Connections
        2. Demonstrate Solids Handling
  
  •  

    WET 290-299 - Special Projects in Water Environment Technology


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Welding Engineering Technology

  
  •  

    WELD 101 - Exploratory Oxy-Fuel Welding and Cutting

    Credits: 1
    Addresses safety in the use of oxy-fuel gas equipment and equipment set-up. Explores oxy-fuel welding and brazing of flat strips 1/8” or less in thickness, and cutting plate in laboratory experience. Intended for non-welding majors.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 10 Lab Hours: 5
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand the theory of the Oxy-fuel processes.
      1. Realize the significance of this process in manufacturing and industry.
      2. Discuss relationships with other welding and/or cutting processes.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate safety practices and procedures.
      1. Realize the value of the use of safety equipment.
      2. Identify proper protective equipment.
      3. Apply safety procedures in all laboratory activities.
    3. Demonstrate appropriate equipment operation.
      1. Realize the importance of proper equipment set-up.
      2. Apply proper procedures when setting up equipment.
    4. Develop, read, and follow a welding specification/procedure document.
      1. Realize the importance of following the procedure.
      2. Define and explain appropriate welding terms.
      3. Apply the procedure when making a specific cut or weld.
    5. Demonstrate proper techniques to complete cuts and welds on carbon steel material.
      1. Realize the value of proper body positioning, visual factors, material prep and positioning, and tacking.
  
  •  

    WELD 102 - Exploratory Shielded Metal Arc Welding

    Credits: 1
    Addresses safety in arc welding, welding terms and definitions and electrode selection. Includes striking an arc and running boards.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 10 Lab Hours: 5
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand the theory of Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW).
      1. Discuss the significance of this welding process in manufacturing and industry.
      2. Discuss relationships with other welding processes.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate safety practices and procedures.
      1. Discuss the value of the use of safety equipment.
      2. Identify proper protective equipment.
      3. Apply safety procedures in all laboratory activities.
    3. Demonstrate appropriate equipment operation.
      1. Discuss the importance of proper equipment set-up.
      2. Apply proper procedures when setting up equipment.
    4. Demonstrate proper techniques to complete tack welds.
      1. Discuss the value of proper body positioning, visual factors, material prep and positioning, and tacking.
      2. Strike an arc, and apply tack welds.
  
  •  

    WELD 103 - Introduction to Plasma, Carbon Arc, and Fuel Gas Cutting

    Credits: 3
    Addresses safety in use of equipment for oxy-fuel gas welding and cutting, and equipment set-up. Include oxy-fuel welding of flat strips 1/8” or less in thickness, and cutting, beveling, and piercing plate and pipe in laboratory experience. Credit may be earned in one of the following courses WELD 103, SKWL 103 , or SKWL 101 but not in more than one.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand the theory of Plasma, Carbon Arc, and Oxy-fuel processes.
      1. Realize the significance of these processes in manufacturing and industry.
      2. Discuss relationships with other welding and/or cutting processes.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate safety practices and procedures.
      1. Realize the significance of these processes in manufacturing and industry.
      2. Discuss relationships with other welding and/or cutting processes.
      3. Apply safety procedures in all laboratory activities.
    3. Demonstrate appropriate equipment operation.
      1. Realize the importance of proper equipment set-up.
      2. Apply proper procedures when setting up equipment.
    4. Develop, read, and follow a welding specification/procedure document.
      1. Realize the importance of following the procedure
      2. Define and explain appropriate welding terms.
      3. Apply the procedure when making a specific cut or weld.
    5. Demonstrate proper techniques to complete cuts and welds on carbon steel material.
      1. Realize the value of proper body positioning, visual factors, material prep and positioning, and tacking.
  
  •  

    WELD 104 - Introduction to Shielded Metal Arc Welding

    Credits: 3
    Addresses safety in arc welding, welding terms and definitions, electrode selection, and welding joints. Includes striking an arc, running beads, pad welding, and fillet welds in lab. Credit may be earned in either WELD 104 or SKWL 104  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand the theory of Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW).
      1. Realize the significance of this welding process in manufacturing and industry.
      2. Discuss relationships with other welding processes.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate safety practices and procedures.
      1. Realize the value of the use of safety equipment.
      2. Identify proper protective equipment.
      3. Apply safety procedures in all laboratory activities.
    3. Demonstrate appropriate equipment operation.
      1. Realize the importance of proper equipment set-up.
      2. Apply proper procedures when setting up equipment.
    4. Develop, read, and follow a welding specification/procedure document.
      1. Realize the importance of following the procedure.
      2. Define and explain appropriate welding terms.
      3. Apply the procedure when making a specific weld.
    5. Demonstrate proper techniques to complete 2F, 3F, and 4F welds on 1/4” carbon steel plate.
      1. Realize the value of proper body positioning, visual factors, material prep and positioning, and tacking.
      2. Apply tack welds, root passes, filler passes, and cover passes in accordance with AWS D1.1 standards.
  
  •  

    WELD 106 - Exploratory Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Credits: 1
    Discuss general safety, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) safety, welding terms and definitions, filler metal, electrode and gas selection. Includes laboratory exercises in starting an arc and running bead on plate.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 10 Lab Hours: 5
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand the theory of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW).
      1. Describe the significance of this welding process in manufacturing and industry
      2. Discuss relationships with other welding processes.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate safety practices and procedures.
      1. Describe the value of the use of safety equipment.
      2. Identify proper protective equipment.
      3. Apply safety procedures in all laboratory activities.
    3. Demonstrate appropriate equipment operation.
      1. Describe the importance of proper equipment set-up.
      2. Apply proper procedures when setting up equipment.
    4. Demonstrate proper techniques to complete a tack weld.
      1. Describe the value of proper body positioning, visual factors, material prep and positioning and tacking.
      2. Apply tack welds.
  
  •  

    WELD 108 - Exploratory Gas Metal Arc Welding

    Credits: 1
    Discusses general safety, Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) safety, welding terms and definitions, electrode and gas selection. Includes laboratory exercises in starting an arc and running beads.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 10 Lab Hours: 5
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand the theory of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW).
      1. Describe the significance of this welding process in manufacturing and industry.
      2. Discuss relationships with other welding processes.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate safety practices and procedures.
      1. Describe the value of the use of safety equipment.
      2. Identify proper protective equipment.
      3. Apply safety procedures in all laboratory activities.
    3. Demonstrate appropriate equipment operation.
      1. Describe the importance of proper equipment set-up.
      2. Apply proper procedures when setting up equipment.
    4. Demonstrate proper techniques to complete a tack weld on carbon steel.
      1. Descri be the value of proper body positioning, and tacking.
      2. Apply tac k welds.
  
  •  

    WELD 114W - Intermediate Shielded Metal Arc Welding

    Credits: 8
    Discusses Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) safety, welding terms and definitions, welding electronics, and welding joints. Includes laboratory exercises in groove welds in fixed positions.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 60
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand the theory of Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW)
      1. Realize the significance of this welding process in manufacturing and industry
      2. Identify the primary considerations in the use of this welding process.
        1. Chemical, metallurgical, electrical, and physical properties.
      3. Discuss relationships with other welding processes.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate safety practices and procedures.
      1. Realize the value of the use of safety equipment.
      2. Identify proper protective equipment.
      3. Apply safety procedures in all laboratory activities.
    3. Demonstrate appropriate equipment operation.
      1. Realize the importance of proper equipment set-up.
      2. Apply proper procedures when setting up equipment.
    4. Develop, read, and follow a welding specification/procedure document.
      1. Realize the importance of following the procedure
      2. Define and explain appropriate welding terms.
      3. Apply the procedure when making a specific weld.
    5. Demonstrate proper techniques to complete a 3G and 4G weld on 3/8” carbon steel plate.
      1. Realize the value of proper body positioning, visual factors, material prep and positioning, and tacking.
      2. Apply tack welds, root passes, filler passes, and cover passes in accordance with AWS D1.1 standards.
  
  •  

    WELD 120 - Beginning Industrial Blueprint Reading

    Credits: 2


    Includes manipulation of basic fractions and decimals as applied to the reading of blueprints, reading measuring instruments, basic geometric figures, drafting and blueprinting procedures, basic orthographic projection auxiliary and sectional views, detail and assembly drawings, dimensioning and tolerances, title block, change block, list of materials, and notes. Credit may be earned in WELD 120 or DRF 120 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives 1.     Describe the several kinds of industrial prints and explain their organization.

         A.          Read and use correct terms to distinguish between the various kinds of industrial print making methods including: blueprint, blue-line,
                      diazo, photocopy, and computer methods.

         B.          Identify and properly fold standard print sizes.

         C.          Define and explain: dimension, tolerance, print zone, title block, revision block, parts list, specified tolerance

         D.          Identify, read and use print scales.

         E.          Read prints to find specific title block information.

     2.    Use paper and pencil to clearly record and communicate specified information using sketched figures and hand lettered text.

         A.          Recognize, name, and sketch representations of points, lines, squares, rectangles, circles, arcs, and other specified plane geometric
                       figures.

         B.          View and sketch objects in two dimensions to correct proportions.

         C.          Make isometric and similar pictorial sketches of specified objects.

         D.          Prepare standard format orthographic multiview sketches of specified three dimensional objects.

    3.    Read and make measurements to specifications using scales and precision instruments.

         A.          Identify and read standard metric and inch engineering scales.

         B.          Demonstrate correct handling, use, and care of scales and precision measuring instruments.

         C.          Make measurements and read:

                      1.    vernier calipers and micrometers

                      2.    dial calipers and dial indicators.

    4.    Explain text information and conventional annotation practices of prints.

         A.          Identify ANSI standard line conventions, letter forms, and note conventions.

         B.          Locate, read, and explain print note and symbolic information.

     5.    Read standard multiview, sectional view, and auxiliary view prints.

         A.          Correlate objects and object features with corresponding ANSI standard multiview, sectional,

                       partial, enlarged feature, and auxiliary view print representations.

         B.          List and explain how orthographic views are selected, organized, and placed.

         C.          Recognize and distinguish between third-angle projection.

     6.    Read industrial prints to determine materials and manufacturing processes.

         A.          Identify manufacturing materials from written and symbolic information.

         B.          Interpret industrial prints to identify manufacturing methods and processes.

         C.          Read print data to interpret surface finish specifications.

         D.          Distinguish between computer-integrated manufacturing, computer-aided design and drafting,computer-aided manufacturing, and
                       computer-aided engineering.

         E.          Explain the information displayed in a quality control chart.

     7.    Read industrial prints to determine size, location, and tolerance dimensions.

         A.          Identify the ANSI tolerance standard for dimensions.

         B.          Read the value of specified dimension.

         C.          Calculate specified dimension tolerances.

         D.          Determine specified maximum material and least material conditions.

         E.          Distinguish between shaft basis and hole basis tolerance systems.

         F.           Calculate to determine clearance, allowance, or interference, fit conditions between specified features.

         G.         Read and explain information given in specified surface finish symbols.

    8.    Demonstrate ability to read and explain print data related to fasteners, springs, and other standard parts and features.

         A.          Identify ANSI standard screw thread representations.

         B.          Define screw thread feature terms.

         C.          Explain specified metric and Unified, and American National thread notes.

         D.          Explain information given in specifications for springs, pins, rivets, washers, retaining rings, keys, keyways, keyseats, and other standard
                       parts and features.

    9.    Demonstrate understanding of welding processes and welding process print symbols.

         A.          Explain common groups of welding processes including: Oxygen Gas, Shielded Metal Arc, Gas Metal Arc, and Gas Tungsten Arc.

         B.          Name the major parts of AWS welding symbols.

         C.          Identify the major types of welds.

         D.          Explain specified destructive and nondestructive weld tests.

         E.          Read and explain weld specifications.

     10. Demonstrate ability to read orthographic and pictorial section view.

         A.          Explain the purpose of sections and section views as used on industrial prints.

         B.          Identify ANSI standard section view practices including full, half, offset, aligned, broken-out, auxiliary, revolved, and removed.

         C.          Identify ANSI conventional practices including aligned sections, unsectioned features, and conventional revolutions and breaks.

     11. Demonstrate ability to read, interpret, and explain ANSI standard geometric dimensioning and tolerancing practices.

         A.          Distinguish between general and geometric tolerancing practices.

         B.          Explain the datum reference frame system for dimension and tolerance practices.

         C.          Correctly read prints with selected geometrically dimensioned and tolerance features.

         D.         Name and explain selected geometric characteristic symbols.

     12. Demonstrate ability to read working drawings for specified manufacturing, assembly, and installation information.

         A.          Distinguish between assembly, detail, and installation prints.

         B.          List typical information presented with detail prints.

         C.          List typical information presented with assembly and installation prints.

         D.          Distinguish between the various kinds of assembly drawings.

         E.          Read detail working drawings for specified information.

         F.          Read assembly working drawings for specified information.

         G.         Read working drawing parts lists for specified information.

  
  •  

    WELD 122 - Blueprint Reading for Welders and Fabricators

    Credits: 2
    Applies principles specifically designed for welders and fabricators working with welding drawings. Interprets basic blueprint information, orthographic projection, assembly drawings, and geometric tolerancing. Places emphasis on welding symbols and welding drawings. Credit may be earned in WELD 122 or DRF 122  but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): WELD 120  or DRF 120 or DRF 121  or SKDR 101  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identifies and applies general blueprint information.
      1. Reads and interprets textural information on engineering design drawings of single components.
      2. Reads and interprets textural information on engineering design drawings of an assembly of components.
    2. Reads orthographic engineering drawings.
      1. Applies the principles of orthographic projection to interpret a multi-view drawing of single components.
      2. Applies the principles of orthographic projection to interpret a multi-view drawing of an assembly of components.
      3. Interprets the usage of line types used in the design of components and assemblies.
    3. Reads fillet weld symbols
      1. Identifies fillet weld symbols.
      2. Interprets the meaning of fillet weld symbols
      3. Constructs and applies fillet weld symbols.
    4. Reads groove and plug weld symbols.
      1. Identifies groove and plug weld symbols.
      2. Interprets the meaning of groove and plug weld symbols.
      3. Constructs and applies groove and plug weld symbols.
    5. Reads spot and seam weld symbols.
      1. Identifies spot and seam weld symbols.
      2. Interprets the meaning of spot and seam weld symbols.
      3. Constructs and applies spot and seam weld symbols.
    6. Reads welding assembly drawings.
      1. Applies the principles of welding assembly to interpret a multi-view drawing of an assembly of components.
      2. Interprets the usage of line types used in the design of components and assemblies.
    7. Reads geometric tolerancing symbols.
      1. Identifies geometric tolerancing symbols.
      2. Interprets the meaning of geometric tolerancing symbols.
  
  •  

    WELD 220 - Weld Qualification-Plate

    Credits: 4
    Teaches welding safety, welding terms and definitions, welding electronics, and AWS welder performance testing procedures. Includes qualification tests in the 3G and 4G positions as laboratory exercises.

    Prerequisite(s): WELD 114W  and WELD 235W  each with a minimum grade of “C” (2.0)
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 45
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand the American Welding Society criteria for the structural welding code.
      1. Realize the significance of this welding code in manufacturing and industry.
      2. Identify the primary considerations in the use of this welding code.
      3. Discuss relationships with other welding codes.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate safety practices and procedures.
      1. Realize the value of the use of safety equipment.
      2. Identify proper protective equipment.
      3. Apply safety procedurres in all laboratory activities.
    3. Demonstrate appropriate equipment operation.
      1. Realize the importance of proper equipment set-up.
      2. Apply proper procedures when setting up equipment.
    4. Develop, read, and follow a welding specification/procedure document.
      1. Realize the importance of following the procedure.
      2. Define and explain appropriate welding terms.
      3. Apply the procedure when making a specific weld.
    5. Demonstrate proper techniques to complete a 3G and 4G weld on carbon steel plate.
      1. Realize the value of proper body positioning, visual factors, material prep and positioning, and tacking.
      2. Apply tack welds, root passes, filler passes, and cover passes in accordance with AWS D1.1 standards.
  
  •  

    WELD 224W - Advanced Shielded Metal Arc Welding

    Credits: 8
    Discusses Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) safety, nominal pipe size and thickness standards, and welding joints. Includes laboratory exercises in groove welds on pipe in fixed positions.

    Prerequisite(s): WELD 114W  with a minimum grade of “C”
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 60
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand the theory of Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW).
      1. Realize the significance of this welding process in manufacturing and industry.
      2. Identify the primary considerations in the use of this welding process.
        1. Chemical, metallurgical, electrical, and physical properties.
      3. Discuss relationships with other welding processes.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate safety practices and procedures.
      1. Realize the value of the use of safety equipment.
      2. Identify proper protective equipment.
      3. Apply safety procedures in all laboratory activities.
    3. Demonstrate appropriate equipment operation.
      1. Realize the importance of proper equipment set-up.
      2. Apply proper procedures when setting up equipment.
    4. Develop, read, and follow a welding specification/procedure document.
      1. Realize the importance of following the procedure.
      2. Define and explain appropriate welding terms.
      3. Apply the procedure when making a specific weld.
    5. Demonstrate proper techniques to complete a 2G-5G weld on carbon steel 2” schedule #80 pipe.
      1. Realize the value of proper body positioning, visual factors, material prep and positioning.
      2. Apply tack welds, root passes, and cover passes in accordance with AWS D1.1 standards.
  
  •  

    WELD 226W - Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Credits: 8
    Discusses general safety, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) safety, welding terms and definitions, filler metal, electrode and gas selection, nominal pipe size and thickness standards, and welding joints. Includes laboratory exercises in starting an arc, running beads, pad welding, and groove welds on plate and pipe in fixed positions.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 60
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand the theory of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW).
      1. Realize the significance of this welding process in manufacturing and industry
      2. Identify the primary considerations in the use of this welding process.
        1. Chemical, metallurgical, electrical, and physical properties.
      3. Discuss relationships with other welding processes.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate safety practices and procedures.
      1. Realize the value of the use of safety equipment.
      2. Identify proper protective equipment.
      3. Apply safety procedures in all laboratory activities.
    3. Demonstrate appropriate equipment operation.
      1. Realize the importance of proper equipment set-up.
      2. Apply proper procedures when setting up equipment.
    4. Develop, read, and follow a welding specification/procedure document.
      1. Realize the importance of following the procedure.
      2. Define and explain appropriate welding terms.
      3. Apply the procedure when making a specific weld.
    5. Demonstrate proper techniques to complete a 2G-5G weld on carbon steel 2” schedule #80 pipe.
      1. Realize the value of proper body positioning, visual factors, material prep and positioning and tacking.
      2. Apply tack welds, root passes, filler passes, and cover passes in accordance with AWS D1.1.
  
  •  

    WELD 235W - Gas Metal Arc Welding

    Credits: 8
    Discusses general safety, Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) safety, welding terms and definitions, electrode and gas selection, nominal pipe size and thickness standards, and welding joints. Includes laboratory exercises in starting an arc, running beads, pad welding, and groove welds on plate and pipe in fixed positions.

    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 60
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Understand the theory of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW).
      1. Realize the significance of this welding process in manufacturing and industry.
      2. Identify the primary considerations in the use of this welding process.
        1. Chemical, metallurgical, electrical, and physical properties.
      3. Discuss relationships with other welding processes.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate safety practices and procedures.
      1. Realize the value of the use of safety equipment.
      2. Identify proper protective equipment.
      3. Apply safety procedures in all laboratory activities.
    3. Demonstrate appropriate equipment operation.
      1. Realize the importance of proper equipment set-up.
      2. Apply proper procedures when setting up equipment.
    4. Develop, read, and follow a welding specification/procedure document.
      1. Realize the importance of following the procedure.
      2. Define and explain appropriate welding terms.
      3. Apply the procedure when making a specific weld.
    5. Demonstrate proper techniques to complete a 2G-5G weld on carbon steel 2” schedule #80 pipe.
      1. Realize the value of proper body positioning, and tacking.
      2. Apply tack welds, root passes, filler passes, and cover passes in accordance with AWS D1.1 standards.
  
  •  

    WELD 290-299 - Special Projects in Welding


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Wind Turbine Technology

  
  •  

    WTT 100 - Introduction to Wind Energy

    Credits: 3
    Introduces students to the fundamental concepts of turning energy from the wind into electricity. Explores the history and projected future of producing energy from the wind. Identifies the various scales of wind turbines, design types and requirements, and their major subcomponents. Performs a general analysis of sites where wind turbine installations are developing, along with analyzing Federal and State policies regarding the production of power from large-and small- scale wind turbines.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 6
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Define general wind turbine terminology.
      1. Define general wind terminology including wind speed, power, and density.
      2. Describe the components of wind turbine.
      3. Describe components of wind measurement devices: anemometer.
      4. Discuss aspects of wind turbine control.
      5. Discuss the future of the wind industry and other topics that are appropriate.
    2. Describe evolution of wind turbine technology
      1. Define different types and applications of various wind turbines
      2. Describe environmental and economic issues of the wind industry.
      3. Define key elements of wind energy systems and quality and longevity requirements for sustainability.
    3. Explain air flow as related to wind turbine.
      1. Analyze blade efficiencies.
      2. Analyze blade environmental impacts on wind resources and blade efficiencies.
    4. Examine site construction, foundation, roads, and substation development.
      1. Compare differences in tower foundations.
      2. Analyze substation development.
      3. Describe and examine wind park site construction and roadways.
    5. Discuss environmental, ethical, and legal obligations of the wind farm.
      1. Define environmental and ethical aspects on locations of wind farms.
      2. Describe legal obligations of wind farms.
    6. Understand wind measurement and perform appropriate calculations.
      1. Use a regional wind database and understnd the relationship between elevations and wind speed.
      2. Calculate the annual power from the wind turbine.
      3. Use basic principles of wind energy conversion.
      4. Know the operational characteristics of a wind generator.
      5. Understand source of the wind, wind charateristics, wind speed gradient.
      6. Analyze wind statistics, basic elements of wind power, and power density of the wind.
      7. Understand the economics of the power produced.
  
  •  

    WTT 110 - Climb Safety and Rescue Safety Training

    Credits: 2
    Identifies industry safety standards and regulatory requirements for fall hazards associated with wind turbine maintenance activities. Identifies the function and use of basic fall protection equipment and also selects, inspects, assembles, and uses fall protection and rescue equipment. Upon completion of this course, participants will be capable of using a planned approach to tower climbing and rescues using state-of-the art techniques and equipment.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH LEVEL 6 and LW 223W  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify industry safety equipment and regulatory requirements for personal protection equipment and practices (lock-out/tag-out) and fall hazards associated with wind turbine maintenance activities.
      1. Identify safety regulations that apply to technicians.
      2. Identify proper industry safety equipment: climbing gear, hard hat, gloves, safety glasses, and steel-toed shoes.
      3. Identify the function and use of basic fall protection equipment and also select, inspect, assemble, and use fall protection and rescue equipment.
      4. Explain the use of lock-out/tag-out practices and devices used by technicians.
    2. Complete a tower climb test.
      1. Demonstrate the use of personal protective equipment used by technicians.
      2. Identify safety hazards associated with wind turbines.
      3. Perform supervised climb test in wind turbine.
      4. Use climbing gear, hard hat, gloves, safety glasses, and steel-toed shoes.
    3. Perform Safety Training.
      1. Perform training related to OSHA, Electrical Safety, Walking and Working Surfaces, Exit Routes, Emergency Action and Fire Prevention Plans, Fire Protection, Materials Handling/Back Injury Prevention, Flammable and Combustible Liquids, Personal Protective Equipment, Machine Guarding, and Hazard communication.
    4. Demonstrate skill and knowledge to use a planned approach to tower climbing and rescue.
      1. Explain fundamental theories and principles of fall protection.
      2. Practice donning a full-body harness.
      3. Identify anchorage points (engineered and non-engineered).
      4. Explain hardware compatibility.
      5. Identify connecting means (new standards and designs).
      6. Identify energy absorbing lanyards.
      7. Identify commercially available fall arrest systems.
      8. Practice using ladder climbing devices.
      9. Perform rescue demonstration.
      10. Practice packaging and lowering the patient.
      11. Demonstrate the use of pre-climb checklists and rescue plans.
      12. Explain rescue system components.
      13. Demonstrate anchoring the rescue system.
      14. Demonstrate descent control.
  
  •  

    WTT 120W - Wind Turbine Mechanical Systems

    Credits: 3
    Identifies and explains the operation and construction of wind turbine mechanical systems. Explains preventative maintenance activities and lubrication requirements while emphasizing potential mechanical failures that are associated with the maintenance activities. Provides opportunities to inspect, disassemble, and reassemble wind turbine mechanical systems. Demonstrates proper lubrication and preventative maintenance techniques along with applicable mechanical repair procedures.

    Prerequisite(s): MT 151  and MT 161  each with a grade of “C” or better
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify wind turbine gearboxes and other mechanical systems.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the operation of various gearboxes (helical, spur, and worm-wheel) and state typical faults and their symptoms.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of the operation of variable speed drives.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of preventative maintenance activities of wind turbine mechanical systems.
      1. Explain preventative maintenance.
      2. Explain mechanical repair procedures.
      3. Explain lubrication requirements.
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of potential mechanical failures associated with maintenance activities.
    3. Demonstrate proper techniques to inspect, disassemble, and reassemble wind turbine mechanical systems.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the function of lubricants and how to select correct lubricants for specific applications.
      2. Identify various bearing types (roller, ball, etc.), remove and refit them correctly, understand their typical applications, and recognize common defects.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of how to correctly remove and replace seals, gaskets, and gland packing.
      4. Use measuring equipment to correctly identify different types of screw threads by means of outside diameter, inside diameter, thread form, and pitch.
      5. Demonstrate proper lubrication and preventative maintenance techniques along with applicable mechanical repair procedures.
    4. Use common terminology of wind turbine maintenance and demonstrate practical measuring/mathematical skills.
      1. Use measuring equipment to correctly identify different types of screw threads by means of outside diameter, insidse diameter, thread form, and pitch.
      2. Identify, select, and use standard threaded fasteners.
      3. Perform threaded fastener torque calculations.
      4. Assemble and repair damaged threaded fasteners properly.
      5. Demonstrate an understanding of the types of energy and perform energy, work, and torque calculations.
    5. Demonstrate proper safety techniques and proper use of personal protective equipment.
      1. Apply safe working practices and understand the principles of preventative and first-line maintenance.
      2. Apply knowledge of safety techniques in isolating mechanical systems when necessary to prevent danger.
  
  •  

    WTT 230 - Wind Turbine Schematics

    Credits: 1
    Identifies National and European schematic symbols, analyzes operating characteristics, and explains the operation of interrelated wind turbine systems. Covers applied schematics as well as the overall operation of a wind turbine.

    Prerequisite(s): WTT 120W  with a grade of “C” or better
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Identify National and European schematic symbols, analyze operating characteristics, and explain the operation of interrelated wind turbine systems.
      1. Explain generation systems used by large wind turbines to convert rotational force to electrical energy.
      2. Analyze a typical operating curve for a commercial wind turbine.
      3. Discuss trends in the size of commercial wind turbine designs.
    2. Identify and explain wind turbine systems.
      1. Classify large wind turbines by generating capacity, generating method, and size.
      2. Explain how the speed of large wind turbines is controlled.
      3. Discuss yaw control systems in wind turbines.
      4. Discuss wind protection methods typically employed by commercial wind turbines.
      5. Explain the purpose of the controller in a wind turbine.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the application of schematics as well as the overall operation of a wind turbine.
      1. Define terms used in large wind turbine design.
      2. Assess a turbine’s generating capacity based on swept rotor area.
      3. Identify parts of wind turbines.
  
  •  

    WTT 240 - Power Generation, Transmission, and Distribution

    Credits: 2
    Identifies and explains the regulatory requirements as well as the risks and hazards associated with working on high voltage systems. Applies three-phase electrical power generation characteristics to utility scale transformers, relays, capacitors, switchgear, and related components for both common Delta and Wye configurations.

    Prerequisite(s): ET 120  with a grade of “C” or better
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 30 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Explain the generation of electrical power with a wind turbine generator from the local transmission system to a substation where a customer will purchase the generated power.
      1. Explain all aspects of working with components of a high voltage transmission system.
      2. Explain basic electricity, related math, and transformer theory with hands-on experience with single-phase transformers and various three-phase transformer banks.
      3. Introduce transformer over-voltage and over-current protection, equipment grounding, cutout and lightning arrestor use and installation, current and potential transformer applications, use of the VOM, and principles of troubleshooting.
      4. Demonstrate an understanding of substations, capacitors, voltage regulators, auto-boosters; practical experience in substation grounding, inspections, substation maintenance; operation and installation of high side fuses, power transformers, substation buswork, and transfer switches; methods of voltage regulation; and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA).
    2. Explain electrical power systems.
      1. Define electrical power.
      2. Explain basic concepts, three-phase review, and per unit.
    3. Explain electrical power distribution.
      1. Discuss basic considerations and distribution system layout.
      2. Discuss distribution transformers.
      3. Discuss distribution equipment.
      4. Discuss distribution substations.
      5. Discuss distribution line construction.
    4. Explain electrical power transmission.
      1. Discuss transmission system overview.
      2. Discuss transmission line parameters.
      3. Discuss transmission line fault current calculation, protection, and bulk power substations.
      4. Discuss transmission line construction.
  
  •  

    WTT 280 - Fundamentals of Data Acquisition

    Credits: 3
    Examines how wind resource data is collected and analyzed for use in the development of wind powered generation of electricity. Identifies and explains the function and operation of sensors and transducers. Develops skills of selecting, connecting, and operating sensors and transducers in an industrial environment in order to perform maintenance actions.

    Prerequisite(s): ET 122  with a grade of “C” or better.
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 15 Lab Hours: 30
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: Yes

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use terminology related to test and measurement and verify the functionality of the training hardware.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of company introduction
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of expected background
      3. Use related terminology
      4. Practice setting up and testing hardware
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of operation of commonly used sensors, transducers, and instruments.
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of operation and limitations of common measuring instruments
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of fundamental programming logic transferable to other programming languages
      3. Write programs based on an industry-standard graphical programming language
      4. Practice interpreting technical specifications and selecting sensors and transducers for a given application
      5. Demonstrate an understanding of terminologies associated with instrumentation systems (e.g., range, sensitivity, dynamic response, calibration, hysteresis, error, accuracy, precision, data uncertainty, mean and standard deviation)
      6. Practice    developing computerized instrumentation systems for industrial processes using multiple sensors, interface electronics, data acquisition card, and GPIB and serial instruments
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of instrument controls and how they can be used for communicating and controlling hardware instruments.
      1. De   scribe instrument control applications
      2. Explain instrument control components
      3. Create a GPIB object
      4. Dem   onstrate an understanding of communicating with the instruments
    4. Demonstrate the ability to collect and analyze data.
      1. Us   e data    acquisition software and hardware to collect and analyze data from a physical system
  
  •  

    WTT 290-299 - Special Projects in Wind Turbine Technology


    Meets MTA Requirement: None

Writing

  
  •  

    WRT 090 - Introduction to Academic Writing

    Credits: 4
    Provides those who are not yet prepared for academic work in the regular composition sequence (ENG 111A , ENG 111 , ENG 112 , or OAT 150, OAT 151 , OAT 152 ) with opportunity to improve their writing skills in an interactive and collaborative setting. Includes practice of personal and academic writing with special attention given to individual needs, which may include organization, sentence structure and variety, correct usage, and vocabulary development. Practices active reading strategies to understand, interpret, and apply information from reading. Does not earn credit towards graduation. Must earn a grade of “C” or better in WRT 090 for progression to the next level. Credit may be earned in ENG 090 or WRT 090 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): WRITING LEVEL 1
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 60 Lab Hours: 15
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use a writing process for pre-college and college essays at the basic level
      1. Plan and brainstorm ideas for an essay before beginning to write.
      2. Produce drafts of an essay and show an understanding of revision.
      3. Participate effectively in writing groups and conferences.
      4. Demonstrate an ability to work with written comments.
      5. Produce edited, properly formatted essays.
    2. Write basic college level essays.
      1. Use introductions, conclusions, and paragraphs.
      2. Write essays that demonstrate a sense of organization.
      3. Use topic sentences.
      4. Use transitions between sentences and paragraphs.
      5. Write at least two essays with a clear thesis.
    3. Develop abilities with the more complex aspects of an essay.
      1. Demonstrate ability to develop significant ideas and use supportive, specific examples.
      2. Write essays that lack confusion.
      3. Write essays that demonstrate an awareness of audience.
      4. Reduce number of errors in grammar, usage, and punctuation.
    4. Produce written responses to and understand texts at the basic level.
      1. Demonstrate ability, both orally and in writing, to make personal connections to the ideas in a piece of reading.
      2. Demonstrate an ability to negotiate unfamiliar vocabulary, as well as make new words a part of one’s own vocabulary.
      3. Demonstrate basic skills for information literacy, including accessing, analyzing, and using resources such as dictionaries, encyclopedias, handbooks, and the Internet.
  
  •  

    WRT 098 - Preparation for College Writing

    Credits: 3
    Provides those who are not yet prepared for academic work in the regular composition sequence (ENG 111A , ENG 111 , ENG 112  or OAT 150, OAT 151 , OAT 152 ) with opportunity to improve their writing skills in an interactive and collaborative setting. Includes practice with personal and academic writing. Does not earn credit for graduation. Credit may be earned in ENG 098 or WRT 098 but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): WRITING LEVEL 2
    Corequisite(s): None
    Lecture Hours: 45 Lab Hours: 0
    Meets MTA Requirement: None
    Pass/NoCredit: No

    Outcomes and Objectives
    1. Use a writing process for pre-college and college essays at the intermediate level.
      1. Plan and brainstorm ideas for an essay before beginning to write.
      2. Produce drafts of an essay and show an understanding of revision.
      3. Participate effectively in writing groups and conferences.
      4. Demonstrate an ability to work with written comments.
      5. Produce edited, properly formatted essays.
    2. Write intermediate college-level essays.
      1. Use introductions, conclusions, and paragraphs.
      2. Write essays that demonstrate a sense of organization.
      3. Use topic sentences.
      4. Use transitions between sentences and paragraphs.
      5. Write at least two essays with a clear thesis.
    3. Develop abilities with the more complex aspects of an essay.
      1. Demonstrate ability to develop significant ideas and use supportive, specific examples.
      2. Write essays that lack confusion.
      3. Write essays that demonstrate an awareness of audience.
      4. Reduce number of errors in grammar and punctuation.
    4. Produce written responses to and understand texts at the intermediate level.
      1. Demonstrate ability, both orally and in writing, to make personal connections to the ideas in a piece of reading.
      2. Demonstrate an ability to negotiate unfamiliar vocabulary, as well as make new words a part of one’s own vocabulary.
      3. Demonstrate intermediate skills for information literacy, including accessing, analyzing, and using resources such as dictionaries, encyclopedias, handbooks, and the Internet.
 

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